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Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of American flags and a spread winged eagle in top of a shield with the slogan, "Liberty & Union- Now and Forver- One and Inseparable." 41st Reg't O.V., U.S.A. is printed at upper right. Light staining. 5 1/2 x 3 1/8. Rare.  


T-46. Richmond, September 2, 1862. Vignettes of Ceres reclining on cotton bales at center, and Confederate Secretary of State, R.M.T. Hunter at right. Fine.  


T-18. Richmond, Va., September 2, 1861. Large sailing vessel at center, sailor at capstan at left. Very fine.  A Blue + White sponge decorated Umbrella Stand. Beautiful colors, sponging and stripes. Mint condition with no chips or hairlines. 21 inches H., 9 1/2 inches D. American. Ca. 1900.

41st Regiment Ohio Volunteers, Liberty & $25.00

 

1862 Confederate $10 Note $85.00

 

1861 Confederate $20 Note $60.00

 

BLUE + WHITE SPONGE DECORATED UMBRELLA S $500.00

A white ironstone Brush Vase in the Wheat shape. Unmarked. Ca. 1860. It is 5 inches H., 2 3/4 inches D. Mint condition  


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"Pap thought he would write you a few lines to tell you how he was getting along out here among the little Secesh boys.  Well bub, they call us blue bellied Yankees and say a heap of hard things of us, but that donít hurt us."</b>


2 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his son.


<b><u>Moorefield, [Va.], Jan. 9th, 1863</b></u> 


To Wm. O. Lupton,


My Dear son,


Pap thought he would write you a few lines to tell you how he was getting along out here among the little Secesh boys.  Well bub, they call us blue bellied Yankees and say a heap of hard things of us, but that donít hurt us.  We get plenty to eat here.  Our wagons go out and get what hay and corn they want and drive in cattle and hogs and sheep so that we have all kinds of meat and plenty of this is a very plentiful country.  There is a heap of wheat, hay and corn but there is no store goods to be had and no salt but what we have. A heap of people could not kill their hogs because they could not get salt to salt the meat, even the richest of them cannot get it and if they do they say it costs about one dollar a pound and that is mighty high for salt. Well Willy, I must quit this scribbling.  I want him to write me a letter and tell me how fast you are learning and whether he is a good boy or not.  I want him to be good and mind his Mother and do all for her that he can for the good Lord loves little boys that mind their Mothers.  So good by my Dear boy and may the good Lord bless you and keep you safe until I return to you is the prayer of your ever loving Father.


Lieut. L. Lupton


To William O. Lupton


Staining and light wear. Paper chips at left edge. Small archival tape repair on one fold.

    

Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  A white ironstone Brush Vase in the Fuchsia with Band shape. Potted by Mellor Taylor + Co. Ca. 1880s. Mint condition. 5 inches H., 2 1/2 inches square.  A 2 pc. white ironstone Soup Tureen in the Challinor Pear shape. Made by E. Challinor + Co. Ca. mid 1800s. It is 15 inches lg. handle to handle. 11 inches H. to the finial. Excellent color and crisp detail. The bowl is in excellent shape but the lid has a repaired finial that has been broken off and some roughness in one area of the lid rim. As is.

IRONSTONE BRUSH VASE, WHEAT $50.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

IRONSTONE BRUSH VASE, FUCHSIA WITH BAND $60.00

 

IRONSTONE SOUP TUREEN, CHALLINOR PEAR $60.00




Selma, Ala., August 8th, 1862. Bank of Selma. $966 paid on the account of the Shelby Iron & Mfg. Co. Signed by H.T. Jones, Prest. Endorsed on the reverse. 


Shelby Iron & Mfg. Co. manufactured Confederate ordnance during the Civil War.  


T-30. Richmond, September 2, 1861. General Francis Marion's sweet potato dinner, R.M.T. Hunter at left, and Minerva at right. Very fine.  


Memphis, Tennessee, May 1, 1852. Indian, Cherubs, Hunter with rifle, 5 gold dollars, Maiden in oval at right, steamboat at bottom, red FIVE overprint. Very fine.  


Charleston, May 20, 1855. Vignette of Fort Moultrie at center, Robert Y. Hayne at left and Langdon Cheves at right. FOUR in red over print. Cut cancelled. Very fine. Uncommon denomination. Scarce.


Fort Moultrie, located on Sullivan's Island, was one of the forts that was built to protect the city of Charleston. On the evening of December 26, 1860, Major Robert Anderson moved his garrison from Fort Moultrie, to the stronger Fort Sumter, situated out in Charleston harbor. Fort Sumter was attacked by Confederate forces in the early morning hours of April 12, 1861, and thus commenced the War Between The States.

1862 Bank of Selma, Alabama Check $35.00

 

1861 Confederate $10 Note $75.00

 

1852 Farmers and Merchants Bank of Memph $95.00

 

1855 Bank of the State of South Carolina $125.00

<b>Tried Before a Military Commission


One man was charged with kidnapping a negro contraband who was working for the U.S. Q.M. Department and selling him into slavery in Kentucky!</b>


13 pages, string bound imprint, 4 3/4 x 7 1/8.


Extremely interesting document regarding five separate cases brought before a U.S. Military Commission. The document gives the charges, specifications, findings and sentences for each case.


Joseph R. Hammill, was charged with larceny and misapplication and embezzlement of public money. It specifies that Hammill entered the home of Elijah Boswell, of Charles County, Maryland, and did feloniously take and carry away a large sum of money, the property of the said Boswell. It further states that Hammill, at the time was in the service of the U.S. military authorities as an engineer and employed under Colonel Lafayette C. Baker, Provost Marshal of the War Department, and did take in the name of the U.S. from the said Elijah Boswell, a large sum of money, and then converted it to his own use, misapply, and embezzle the said money.


William Yokum, was charged with aiding and kidnapping and abstracting an employee of the U.S. from the military service, to the prejudice of good order and military discipline. It specifies that Yokum, being an employee of the U.S. in charge of contrabands at the military post at Cairo, Illinois, and serving with the Army of the U.S. in the field, did induce one Morris McComb, a negro contraband under his charge, and an employee of the U.S. in the Q.M. Dept. at said post, to accompany him, under a false pretense, to a point on the Ohio River, and did there deliver him to one Joseph K. Gant, who then and there by force of arms, <b><i>the said Yokum, seized and confined with ropes the said McComb, and conveyed him from said post and service, with the view of having McComb conveyed to the state of Kentucky and reduced to slavery.</b></i> It further states that Yokum did accept and receive from said Gant, as a compensation for his services of delivering McComb into slavery, the sum of $50.


John H. Germon, was charged with embezzling and misapplying military subsistence stores belonging to the U.S. that was entrusted to him, which he wrongfully appropriated for his own private use and that of his family. 


Henry W. Scott, a contractor acting on behalf of the U.S., was charged with willful neglect of duty. He had agreed to furnish the U.S. Army certain articles of clothing which he did not deliver. 


Captain John S. Davis, 90th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, was charged with conduct prejudicial to good order and military discipline, and conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman. It states that Captain Davis, after being relieved from duty as Commandant of Camp of Distribution, and ordered to join his regiment, did go to the city of Washington, D.C., in an ambulance from the camp, and purchased rockets and other fireworks, and returned to camp and caused the rockets and fireworks to be discharged by enlisted men belonging to the camp on a hill inside the lines and overlooking the camp, after the hour designated for taps, when all lights are to be extinguished and quiet to reign in camp, without the knowledge or consent of his superior officers, and with the apparent intention of offering insult to his commanding officer, causing the men of the camp to cheer and indulge in boisterous language in willful disobedience to orders, rules and regulations.


Much more content. Very desirable 1864 imprint.  


Signed in print by E.D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant General.


Excellent condition.          A gorgeous Pedestal Panelled Compote. Probably the nicest compote we have ever offered. Anthony Shaw. Ca. 1860-82. It is 8 1/2 inches D., 5 inches H. Mint condition with excellent color and detail. Very slight fine crazing.  White ironstone Leaf Compote or Tazza. Wm Brunt, E. Liverpool Oh. Ca. 1865-75. It is 9 inches D., 4 1/4 inches H. Excellent color and detail. There is a tiny chigger on one end of the handle and a tight hairline on the rim that goes thru(both pictured).  A white ironstone covered Vegetable in the early Square Open Flower shape. Potted by James Edwards. Ca. 1848. It is 8 1/2 inches square, 6 1/2 inches H. Beautiful color, detail and form. Used condition with chips and stains around the inside rim and base. Lid and bowl are marked. As is.

1864 War Department Imprint Regarding Ca $45.00

 

WHITE IRONSTONE PANELLED COMPOTE

 

IRONSTONE LEAF COMPOTE / TAZZA $80.00

 

IRONSTONE VEGETABLE, SQUARE OPEN FLOWER




Civil War patriotic imprint with illustration of General Grant. Titled, "Major General Grant, The Hero Of Fort Donelson." Quote at upper right, "General Grant's reply to Buckner on the terms of surrender: I will accept no terms but unconditional immediate surrender; I propose to move immediately on your works." Light staining. Published by Jas. Gates, Cincinnati. 5 1/4 x 3. Rare.  A 3 piece white ironstone Sauce Tureen in the Wheat + Clover shape. Ford, Challinor + Co. Ca. 1860s. Underplate is 9 1/4 inches lg. and has minor pitting and roughness on one area. Lid has one area of pitting. Bowl is mint. Exc. color and crisp detail. 7 1/2 inches H.  A white ironstone Teapot in the Corn + Oats shape. J Wedgwood. Ca. 1863. 9 1/2 inches H. Excellent condition with no chips or hairlines. There is minor stains that I have tried to picture. Minor wear on spout(pictured).  Cobalt blue 2 gal. stoneware jug. Haxstun + Co. Fort Edward NY. Ca. 1875-82. Exc. condition. 13 inches H. Floral or stylized design.

General U. S. Grant, The Hero of Fort Don

 

IRONSTONE 3 pc. SAUCE TUREEN, WHEAT + C $150.00

 

WHITE IRONSTONE TEAPOT, CORN + OATS $90.00

 

COBALT BLUE DEC. 2 GAL. STONEWARE JUG $200.00

Cobalt Blue Decorated Stoneware 2 gal. Jug. Cowden + Wilcox, Harrisburg Pa. Ca. 1870. 14 inches H. Floral design. Exc. condition but with a repair on the back(pictured).As is.  


Raleigh, Jan. 1, 1864. Vignette of large sailing ship at center. 50 Cts in red over print. Crisp uncirculated condition.  


Raleigh, Sept. 1, 1862. Crisp uncirculated condition.  


By Garry Wills. Published by Simon & Schuster, New York, 1992. Hard cover, dust jacket, 315 pages, index. Excellent.


Winner of the Pulitzer prize in 1993, this is an account of the making of Lincoln's revolutionary masterpiece. 


The power of words has rarely been given a more compelling demonstration than in the Gettysburg Address. Lincoln was asked to memorialize the gruesome battle. Instead he gave the whole nation a "new birth of freedom."

COBALT BLUE DECORATED STONEWARE JUG 2 Ga $125.00

 

1864 State of North Carolina 50 Cents No $59.00

 

1862 State of North Carolina $1 Note $59.00

 

Lincoln at Gettysburg, The Words That Re




<b>Negro with basket of cotton</b>


State of Georgia, Savannah, July 4, 1860. Vignette of negro with basket of cotton at left, and sailing ship at center. ONE in red overprint. Very fine.  


G.B. Lamar, who signed this note as President of the Bank of Commerce, was an investor and banker who became involved in securing supplies and funds to aid the Confederate cause in the Civil War. Prior to the outbreak of hostilities, he resided in New York as president of the Bank of the Republic. In 1861, he returned to Savannah to become head of the Bank of Commerce. He served as paymaster for Georgia troops, financial adviser to the Confederate government, and as head of the Importing and Exporting Company of Georgia, which was involved in blockade running. He was arrested and thrown in the Old Capitol Prison in Washington as a suspect in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. After his release three months later, he tried to claim his cotton, which was stored at warehouses in Georgia and Florida, but was arrested for stealing government property and trying to bribe a government official. A military commission convicted him and he returned to prison for a short time. President Andrew Johnson finally commuted his sentence a few days before his term expired.  


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"I try and bear it with that resignation becoming a Christian.  I tried to commence this year anew to serve my Heavenly master and intend to try and live in that way that when I have to leave this world I may meet those Dear ones where Jesus is.  I want you to pray for me that I may be found walking in that straight and narrow pathway that leads to a better world beyond the tomb.  "</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife.


<b><u>Moorefield, [Va.], Jan. 2nd, 1863</b></u> 


My Dear wife,


After my love to you and the children I will inform you that I am in very good health at present although I have not been on duty since I got to camp.  My boils trouble me a good deal and I have had a touch of the jaundice which made me feel kind of mean for several days, but I expect to go on duty in two or three days.  Well Dear, I recd. your letter of the 28th and was very glad to hear from you but was sorry to hear that your breast was worse.  If it does not get better I wish you would consult some Doctor about it or send to the Dutchman.  It might be that he could help you.  Well Dear, you talk of your troubles about poor little Irena.  It has just been the same with me while I was at home.  It did not seem so hard but when I got to be all alone and got to studying about it, it almost set me crazy, but I try and bear it with that resignation becoming a Christian.  I tried to commence this year anew to serve my Heavenly master and intend to try and live in that way that when I have to leave this world I may meet those Dear ones where Jesus is.  I want you to pray for me that I may be found walking in that straight and narrow pathway that leads to a better world beyond the tomb.  Well dear, in regard to my getting released I donít think it could be done at this time as so many of our officers are unfit for duty at this time.  Lieut. Okey * has applied for a discharge but he donít know whether he will get it or not, and he is so crippled that he is unfit for duty.  Dear I want to know whether you have been telling anybody that I was going to resign or was about to so in which I was set forth as a coward and a traitor for the reason that I had used my influence to get men to volunteer and then when I got them here would shamefully desert them.  It is not my intention to do anything that I would be ashamed of in after life and I think under the circumstances in which I have been placed in regard to my family that there would be nothing disgraceful in my resigning my office.  It would not be the fear of danger that would make me do it for I donít think we will have any fighting to do.  We are to be kept back as a guard for the provisions.  Well in regard to Jehuís proceedings I am not much set up with it.  Ben told me about it as we went to Barnesville, but the information didnít gratify me much but let them alone.  A new broom sweeps clean.  Please donít let this be seen by others.  Well I must conclude.  With my love to you all, I remain your ever loving husband and Father.


Levi Lupton


May God bless you.


Direct to Moorefield, Hardee Co., Va.       

 

Staining and light wear. Fine letter.


* Henry Okey, was 46 years old, when he enlisted on August 11, 1862, as a private, and was mustered into the 116th Ohio Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant, on September 12, 1862, and resigned on January 2, 1863. 

    

Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  A Rare white ironstone Footbath. Nice bulbous shape with beautiful shell shaped handles. Near mint condition with only some chips/roughness on the handles. No other chips or hairlines. Great color. It is 16 1/2 x 13 1/2 inches, 8 1/2 inches H. There is an illegible mark on the bottom that includes a triangle. Probably American. Ca. late 1800s -1910.  A white ironstone Pedestal Cakestand. Made by J. Furnival. Ca. 1850s. Beautiful scalloped rim, fluted base with ring. Mint condition and great color and detail. 12 1/4 inches D., 5 1/4 inches H.

1860 Bank of Commerce, Savannah, Georgia $45.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $95.00

 

WHITE IRONSTONE FOOTBATH

 

WHITE IRONSTONE PEDESTAL CAKESTAND




Milledgeville, Ga., February 1st, 1863. Vignette of state arms within snake at center, Minerva at left, Ceres at right. Red seal at center. Extra fine.  <b>to Soldiers</b>


5 x 8, imprint.


War Department,

Adjutant General's Office,

Washington, September 26, 1865


MEMORANDUM:


Second Comptroller's Office,

Washington, September 15, 1865


It has been decided by this office that accidents, alike incident to civil and military life, do not entitle the soldier, when discharged thereof, to the bounties of March 3, 1863. There must be some extra danger incurred by reason of the military service. It is thought that the case enclosed fully answers this requirement. The handling of shells is a work purely military, and a soldier discharged for wounds occasioned by their explosion, under the circumstances stated within, has a legal claim to the bounty if otherwise entitled. 


JOHN BROADHEAD,

Comptroller


Official


Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning and edge wear. There are two tiny punch holes at the left edge which do not affect any of the content. Interesting document.  


<b>The Story of General Philip Kearny, 1815-1862


Autographed by the author</b>


By Irving Werstein. Published by The John Day Company, New York, 1963. Hard cover with dust jacket, 248 pages, index, illustrated. Autographed and presented by the author, "5/2/63. To Dick Berkey, With all best wishes, Irving Werstein." Very fine.


In all American military history there has not been another career like that of flamboyant, daring General Philip Kearny. This fearless and wealthy soldier of fortune, idolized by his troops, fought in five wars- on the western frontier of the United States, with the French Foreign Legion in Africa, the Mexican War, at Solferino in the conflict between France and Austria, and in the American Civil War.


Kearny had inherited more than a million dollars before he was twenty one, but instead of a life of ease and luxury, he chose to make the army his profession. Selected by President James Polk as one of three young officers to study tactics at the famous cavalry school in Saumur, France, Kearny joined the Chasseurs d'Afrique and helped them to put down an uprising in Algiers.


In 1847 he led a daring cavalry charge against the Mexicans at Churubusco. The charge failed, and Kearny lost his left arm. Later in combat he rode at the head of his troops brandishing a sword with his remaining arm and holding the reins in his teeth.


Abraham Lincoln, who appointed Kearny to command the 1st New Jersey Brigade in the Army of the Potomac, spoke of him as "my general." When Kearny was killed at Chantilly, in Virginia, on September 1, 1862, General Winfield Scott called him "the bravest soldier I ever knew."


In "Kearny the Magnificent," Irving Werstein presents more than a story of a hero; he probes into the many facets and motives of an unusual and complex personality, one whose motto was "Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori- it is fitting and proper to die for one's country."  


<b>The Irish Brigade</b>


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of Colonel Michael Corcoran within a Union shield with eagle above and the banner with motto, "True To The Union." Col. Michael Corcoran, 69th Regt. N.Y.S.M. is printed below. 3 1/4 x 2 1/2. Anything associated with the Irish Brigade is highly desirable.


***Please read the history about these Union patriotic imprints recently discovered in their individual category section on the website. CIVIL WAR MEMORABILIA/Patriotic Imprints. 


<u>Colonel Michael Corcoran</u>(1827-63) Born in Ireland, he emigrated to America in 1849 and in 1859 became colonel of the famed 69th New York Militia. He was a hero at 1st Bull Run where he was wounded and captured. Corcoran then became a pawn in a controversial chess game played by the Union and Confederate authorities where he was held hostage for reprisal in the event of the execution of the crews of captured privateers by the U.S. Navy. After being shuttled back and forth between a number of Confederate prison camps, he was exchanged in August 1862 and promoted to brigadier general. After an invitation to dine with President Lincoln, Corcoran was as enthusiastic as ever and continued to rally Irish support for the Union by raising the "Corcoran Irish Legion" which he led in the Suffolk, Va. campaign. He later held divisional command in the 22nd Corps. On Dec. 22, 1863, near Fairfax Court House, Va., Corcoran suffered a fall while riding and was crushed to death beneath his horse.

1863 State of Georgia $10 Note $50.00

 

War Department Memorandum Regarding Acci $10.00

 

Kearny The Magnificent

 

Colonel Michael Corcoran, 69th New York $35.00




Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, 1862. Vignette of deer. Crisp uncirculated condition.  A white ironstone Vegetable in the President shape. John Edwards. Ca. 1855. it is 11 inches lg. to handles. Excellent color and detail. Good condition except of the end of one handle has been poorly repaired(pictured)with no glaze.  White ironstone Relish in the President shape. Potted by John Edwards. Ca. 1855. Nice detail and color. Good condition with 2 small chips or rim. 9 1/4 inches lg.  A stunning 3 piece white ironstone Soup Tureen in the Sydenham shape. T + R Boote. Ca. 1852. Absolute mint condition with excellent color and crisp detail. Tiny chigger on inside rim of bowl(pictured). Underplate is 16 1/4 inches lg. 16 inches H. to the finial.

1862 Summit County, Ohio 25 Cents Note $35.00

 

WHITE IRONSTONE VEGETABLE, PRESIDENT $40.00

 

WHITE IRONSTONE RELISH, PRESIDENT $30.00

 

3 Pc. IRONSTONE SOUP TUREEN, SYDENHAM $500.00




Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of spread winged eagle in flight with American flags, shield, sailing ship, cannon stacked muskets and drum. The motto "Onward To Victory" is in a stars and stripes design to the right. 81st Regiment P.[ennsylvania] V.[olunteers], Col. Jas. Miller, Howard's Brigade is printed below. Light staining. 5 1/2 x 3.  


THE STATE OF FLORIDA. Fifty Cents. Tallahassee, Feb'y 2nd, 1863. FIFTY in blue overprint. Crisp uncirculated condition.  A white ironstone Coffee Pot in the Wheat + Clover shape. Turner + Tomkinson. Ca. 1862. Excellent detail and color. Chip under lid rim, wear on spout and glaze imperfection on side(all pictured). 10 inches H.  A white ironstone Vegetable in the Prize Bloom shape. Unmarked but made by TJ J Mayer. Ca. 1853. Excellent condition with no chips or hairlines. There is slight staining and wear(pictured). Clay separation t finial which is occurred during firing. 8 1/2 inches D., 7 inches H.

Onward To Victory, 81st Regiment Pennsyl

 

1863 State of Florida 50 Cents Note $85.00

 

WHITE IRONSTONE COFFEE, WHEAT + CLOVER $90.00

 

WHITE IRONSTONE VEGETABLE, PRIZE BLOOM $90.00

A white ironstone Punch Bowl in the Wheat shape. Turner + Goddard. Ca. 1860s. Excellent detail and color. Slight wear and staining on the rim. 8 1/2 inches D., 5 1/2 inches H.  White ironstone pedestal Compote. Potted by Edward Clarke. Ca. 1860s. Nice plain lines and form. 9 1/2 inches D., 4 1/2 inches H. Mint condition with nice color.  Six (6) white ironstone bread + butter plates in the Corn + Oats shape. 6 3/8 inches D. All marked J Wedgwood. Ca. 1863. Excellent condition with minor wear. One plate has a discolored spot(pictured). Price is for all 6.  A two piece white ironstone Sauce Tureen in the Sydenham shape. Unmarked but made by T + R Boote. Ca. 1853. Mint condition and excellent color and detail. 8 inches H.

WHITE IRONSTONE PUNCH BOWL, WHEAT $250.00

 

WHITE IRONSTONE COMPOTE $80.00

 

6 IRONSTONE PLATES, CORN + OATS $120.00

 

WHITE IRONSTONE SAUCE TUREEN, SYDENHAM $90.00




<b>Regarding soldiers arrested and tried as deserters</b>


5 x 7 3/4, imprint.


War Department,

Adjutant General's Office,

Washington, April 21, 1865


MEMORANDUM:


In case a soldier is arrested and tried as a deserter, but found guilty only of absence without leave, can he be subjected to a stoppage against his pay for the amount of the expenses, (including reward) of his apprehension as a deserter?


OPINION:


In my opinion such stoppage would be wholly without legal sanction.  The accused having been judicially determined not to have been guilty of a desertion, can properly be made liable to none of the consequences resulting by operation of law upon a commission or conviction of a specific crime. That the Government has once, upon imperfect evidence in regard to the facts in the case, allowed and paid the expense in question to the officer making the arrest, constitutes no good reason why these should be required of the soldier, after the only tribunal competent to pass upon his offense has pronounced him guiltless of the charge upon which he was apprehended.


J. HOLT,

Judge Advocate General


Official


Light age toning. There are two tiny punch holes at the left edge which do not affect any of the content.


<u>General Joseph Holt</u>: (1807-94) A renowned lawyer and Democratic orator in Kentucky, he was President Buchanan's Commissioner of Patents (1857), Postmaster General (1859), and Secretary of War (1861). When President Lincoln was inaugurated, he returned to Kentucky to try to turn that state from a policy of neutrality. He then was named colonel and the first Judge Advocate General on September 3, 1862, holding the prerogative of certain civil powers of arrest and of holding persons in arrest without writ of habeas corpus. Promoted Brigadier General U.S.V., Judge Advocate General, June 22, 1864 upon the establishment of the Bureau of Military Justice, he tried General Fitz John Porter as well as the Lincoln assassination conspirators, and Andersonville commandant, Captain Henry Wirz. He was severely criticized for obtaining Mrs. Suratt's death warrant by keeping the military commissioners plea of clemency for her from President Andrew Johnson.     


Augusta, Georgia. Maid holding a wand with liberty cap seated by shield with the number "5" within, and a ship in the background. Maids at left and right. Cut cancelled. G-VG. Circa 1849.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of a seated gentleman wearing a top hat and holding a large proclamation that reads, "A collection of Union envelopes in a few years from now will form a most valuable and pleasing curiosity, and will be sold at double the original cost." A carpet bag sits on the floor beside his chair and U.S.A. is in large stars and stripes letters to his right. Published by Car Bell, Hartford, Conn. 5 7/8 x 3 1/4. Very desirable and quite scarce. 


** What a neat and appropriate Civil War patriotic advertising imprint this is. I wonder what the publisher or original collector would think about how much we cherish these collectibles today, and how valuable they have become some 150 years later!   Until quite recently these Model 1858 style smooth side canteens with tin spout rather than the standard pewter spout were generally accepted by knowledgeable collectors to be of Confederate origin.  If you were fortunate enough to find one with the original course <I>butternut</I> cover (see: <I>Civil War Canteens</I> by Sylvia & OíDonnell 1st edition p.89) Confederate issue was assured.  A good example of how much has been learned with time and dedication to accuracy in the Civil War collecting field, the tin spout version of the Mod. 1858 type canteen is now known to be of Cincinnati Depot origin.  Turns out, that desirable twilled jean cloth cover is as distinctive of these Cincinnati contract canteens as the tin spout. (see OíDonnellís current publication: <I>U. S. Army & Militia Canteens 1775 Ė 1910</I>)  The example offered here remains in exceptionally nice condition and sports a painted <I>í62-Ď92</I> date.  Likely from a GAR hall display, this canteen will do well in any quality Civil War grouping.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

Memorandum & Opinion of Joseph Holt, Jud $25.00

 

The Mechanics Bank of Augusta, Georgia $ $20.00

 

U. S. A. , Advertising Imprint $45.00

 

especially nice - Civil War issue TIN SP $475.00




Augusta, Georgia, July 1, 1849, with vignettes. Cut cancelled. Very good.  


Milledgeville, April 6th, 1864. Vignette of Moneta seated by chest with States Arms in the background. Fine.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of a group of Union soldiers in front of a tent. The wounded soldier at far left has his arm in a sling and is leaning on a cane, the sergeant at center stands leaning on his musket, with canteen on his belt, and the zouave at far right sits on a drum while playing the fiddle. Tent scene with flag is visible in the background. Titled, "Home, Sweet Home." Published by Frank Beard. 5 3/8 x 3 1/8. Rare.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with ornately designed full color vignette with stars and stripes background, and an American patriot, Revolutionary War soldier, at the left holding his musket and the Constitution, with the motto "Secured" and the date 1776 above, and a Zouave at the right holding his musket with the motto "Defended" and the date 1861 above. The central slogan is "The Union Forever" and there is an American shield, flags and cannons at the bottom. Published by James Cates, Cincinnati. 5 3/4 x 3 1/8. Rare.


***Please read the history about these Union patriotic imprints recently discovered in their individual category section on the website. CIVIL WAR MEMORABILIA/Patriotic Imprints.

1849 Mechanics Bank of Augusta, Georgia $25.00

 

1864 State of Georgia $5 Note $30.00

 

Home Sweet Home

 

The Union Forever




Spectacular Civil War patriotic imprint with vignettes of the three most famous Irish commanders who served during the war. From left to right are Colonel Michael Corcoran, Colonel James A. Mulligan and Colonel Thomas Francis Meagher. Titled, "Sons Of Erin" this green colored imprint is complete with Irish harps and sprigs of boxwood. 5 3/8 x 3 1/4. Very rare and desirable!  


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"We heard last night that our men had taken Vicksburg on the Mississippi, and that they had whipped the enemy at Murfreesboro, Tennessee.  If this is true I think the war will be over before long and I do hope that it will for I am tired of being away from home for I would like to be at home with my little family."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry.


<b><u>Moorefield, [Va.], Jan. 9th, 1863</b></u> 


My ever dear and loving wife,


After my love to you and the children I will inform you that I recd. your letter of Sunday the 4th last night and was glad to hear from you and that you were all in tolerable health for if you all could keep well I could feel better contented with my lot.  Well I am in the enjoyment of excellent health at present.  I have got entirely over my boils and the jaundice and am fit for duty again.  Well dear, I should like to have been with you on last Sunday for it would seem good to have a quiet Sabbath again.  Here we are awakened by the sound of the drum or the shrill notes of the bugle and then it is hurry and bustle all day.  I would be glad to have the privilege of going to class and spending the balance of the day at home.  It seems like I never knew the worth of the privilege of Sabbath enjoyments so much as I have since I have been in the army.  Well I donít want you to fret yourself about me for I do not think there is much danger of getting into a fight.  It is true they came around here on last Saturday but they did not come near enough to do any harm and they have gone clear off.  Our company went out on Wednesday to see if they could find where they had been encamped but they could not find anything.  It appears that they were only some cavalry with two or three cannon.  I expect we will leave here before long.  I donít know where we will go but likely to go to New Creek.  We have had very pleasant weather here most of the time.  It rained a little on last Sunday and Tuesday night it snowed a little, but it is not so cold here as it is with you, but we may have it cold enough yet.  We heard last night that our men had taken Vicksburg on the Mississippi, and that they had whipped the enemy at Murfreesboro, Tennessee.  If this is true I think the war will be over before long and I do hope that it will for I am tired of being away from home for I would like to be at home with my little family.  It seems like the people are going wild about getting married out there.  Well, all I have to say is that they had better wait until the war is over.  I think that our folks had better not be too much set up with their new daughters for fear it wonít hold out, but just let them have their way.  Well dear, I must bring this to a close.  I donít know whether you can read it or not for I have a very poor pen, but maybe you can spell it out, so good by my dear from your loving husband.  May God bless you and keep you safe is my daily prayer.  The Capt. and men all got back safe.


Lieut. Levi Lupton

 

Light staining and wear. Very fine letter. 

    

Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  A white ironstone Sugar in the Sydenham shape. T + R Boote. Ca. 1850s. Mint condition, excellent color and detail. 7 1/2 inches H.  White ironstone Relish in the Ceres shape. It is marked Olympic but it is Ceres with cable. Elsmore + Forster. Ca. 1850s. It is 8 1/4 inches lg. Exc. detail and color. Good condition with one chip under rim(pictured).

Sons of Erin, Colonels Corcoran, Mulliga

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $125.00

 

WHITE IRONSTONE SUGAR, SYDENHAM $95.00

 

WHITE IRONSTONE RELISH, CERES $25.00

A white ironstone relish dish in the Lily of the Valley shape. Potted by Anthony Shaw. Ca. 1856. Good condition with 2 small rim chips on the underside(pictured). 8 3/4 inches lg. Great color and detail.  


By Louis A. Warren. Published by the Indiana Historical Society, Indianapolis, Indiana, 1991. Hard cover with dust jacket, 298 pages, index, illustrated, maps. Excellent condition.


First published in 1959 to mark the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's birth, Louis A. Warren's classic study of Lincoln's formative years in Indiana tracks his growth from awkward boy to serious young man poised on the brink of a brilliant career. Here are fascinating glimpses of Lincoln's family life, the people he knew, the places he visited, his physical development, and the tragedies he suffered. Perhaps most revealing is Warren's treatment of Lincoln's education, both in the schools he briefly attended and in the books he read, and the influence of Thomas Lincoln in forming the character of his son.   


<b>87th Illinois Infantry


United States Congressman from Illinois</b>


(1830-90) Born in Loudoun County, Va., he moved with his parents to Illinois where he later studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1852, and commenced practice in White County, Illinois. He enlisted on October 3, 1862, and was commissioned lieutenant colonel, of the 87th Illinois Infantry, taking part in the Mississippi, Vicksburg and Arkansas campaigns. He was mustered out of the service on June 16, 1865, at Helena, Arkansas. He served as U.S. Congressman, 1869-73.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 4 1/4, in ink, John M. Crebs, Carmi, Illinois.   


By Lee A. Wallace, Jr. Published by H.E. Howard, Inc., Lynchburg, Va., 1986, Revised Second Edition. 372 pages, index, illustrated. Gray cloth hardback with gold embossed title and Virginia State Seal on the front cover. Excellent to like new condition. Indispensable reference book for researching Virginia soldiers and units that fought in the War Between The States.

IRONSTONE RELISH, LILY OF THE VALLEY $35.00

 

Lincoln's Youth, Indiana Years, 1816-183

 

Autograph, Lieutenant Colonel John M. Cr $10.00

 

A Guide to Virginia Military Organizatio $95.00




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