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Here is a Staffordshire white ironstone sugarbowl dating to 1867.  This shape has two names, Laurel Wreath and Victory Shape.  This particular item's backstamp bears the latter name.


It measures 8 inches tall by 6 1/2 inches wide.  The shape is memorable because of its many unique elements.  Note the tightly knotted design on the finial, the wreath design which appears on both side, the ribbing on both lid and base, and the thumbprints, also on both pieces.  There is no shape quite like this one!


It is in fine condition, free of flaws.  It bears the pottery's backstamp.  The Staffordshire vegetable server presented once was paired with a domed lid; however, I only can offer the octagonal base which measures 10 inches measured angle-to-angle across the top by 5 inches tall.


It bears the  T&R Boote backstamp and English Registry Mark.  The year letter is difficult to read, but I think it is a P, making the year of production 1851.


I believe this is 1851 Octagon Shape, a classic design with panels on the sides.


It is in great shape, free of chips and cracks.  The antique oval Staffordshire white ironstone platter presented has the Sydenham type ogee shapes on the surround.  This is Columbia Shape, one of several designs using shapes similar to Sydenham and dating to the same period. The English Registry Mark dates it to 1855.


It measures 15 1/2 by 12 1/2 inches and is in fine shape, free of chips and cracks.  It bears the backstamp of the pottery with the words, Wooliscroft and "Opaque China"  This attractive old three section fife measures 20 Ĺ inches in length with good age, originality and evidence of  period use and carrying yet remains in eye appealing condition.  This nice period musical instrument will display nicely with any Civil War era musical grouping without spending a lot of money.

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

Elsmore & Forster White Ironstone Sugar $125.00

 

T&R Boote Pedestalled Vegetable Server, $50.00

 

Wooliscroft White Ironstone Oval Platter $125.00

 

mid 19th century ROSEWOOD KEYED FIFE $85.00

Whether a Civil War era collector or just a fancier of antique lighting devices or the work of early country tinsmiths, this wonderful all original lamp oil can will fit the bill.  Entirely original and as found with pleasing evidence of age and period use, this classic old <I>oiler</I> remains in pleasing condition with no repairs or condition issues and is ready for your collection.  Its classic construction style will be appreciated by the experienced collector. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I> All direct sales are backed by </I> <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased !</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item is being returned per these previsions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  A classic style iron ball mold best described by our photos except to advise the viewer that it measures about 5 inches in overall length and offers an especially desirable cavity size suitable for and most often related to, use with a heavy flintlock or percussion pistol rather than the more common and much smaller ball mold of the period hunter.  The mold is marked with the <B>#18</B> which, consistent with the early smooth-bore ball sizing system, indicates that the mold casts balls at eighteen to the pound.  (Approximately 5/8 inch in diameter.)  A nice companion piece with an antique powder horn, with a period musket or with a nice hunting bag.  ( Illustrated here with a vintage quarter for size comparison. )  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !


 The reflections of five years of life on a New England farm, are left to the reader of <B>Alfonso L. Andersonís</B> (see period U. S. Census Records)  pocket journals of <B>1867, 1868, 1871, 1872, 1874</B>.  The simplicity of Andersonís carefully penned record of just post-Civil War life on a Massachusetts farm, leaves the reader with a clear impression of the Spartan lifestyle of the time. Little is recorded of leisure in Andersonís life save the reading of the paper on Sundays, a picnic, or <I>Sabbath School celebration</I> on July 4th are out classed only by a single notation on the occasion of going to see Barnumís Col. Tom Thumb.  It seems that with the possible exception of a visiting neighbor, even Christmas was a day of labor as Anderson records <I>fixed the horse stable floor</I> and <I>chopped in the woods</I> as his only comment except that the weather was fair, Christmas day 1874.   Besides the usual published material, (calendar, interest tables, foreign gold and silver coin values, postal rates, astrological tables &c ) these little pocket journals offer a simple insight as Anderson dutifully records the bare activities of each and every day.  Simple notation such as <I> cut wood, bought cloth for a shirt, killed hog, put hams in smoke, cleared stone from wheat field, planted peas, early potatoes & sweet corn</I> are combined with a number of references to <I>hired work</I> especially in winter.  Anderson had a talent for filing saws and repairing looms that carried him about the countryside.  The country farmer closed most of his yearly journals with a summary of the success or failure of his crops for that year.  Such notations <I> With regard to my own crops; corn good, wheat a failure, potatoes half a crop</I>, in his 1867 year end synopsis leaves one to wonder how they survived in such times.  Such concern becomes even more acute in light accounting notations in the back of each yearís journal.

     All complete and quite easy to read in Andersonís careful brown ink hand, these journals will offer interesting reading and will lay in well with a variety of period antiques.  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !


 An exceptionally nice looking import leather shako complete with  original die struck brass American eagle over infantry horn plate as illustrated in Stanley Philipís, <I> Excavated Artifacts from Battlefields & Campsites of the Civil War</I>.  All original and complete, this example even retains the chin strap with original strap retainer in the crown.  Both original features are generally long since gone.  This one even sports its period dress wool pompom.  Known to have been imported early in the Civil War the use of this handsome shako has been well established by virtue of camp site and battle field excavations with records of use by Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and New York regiments.   Offers good evidence of age and originality yet all in excellent condition with nice original finish and solid construction even to its original 2 ĺ inch wide sweat band.  An attractive piece of Civil War head gear at a reasonable price!  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

Earlier to mid 1800s tinned sheet iron L $100.00

 

American Revolutionary War through Civil $65.00

 

5 years of late 1860s early to mid 1870s $95.00

 

Civil War IMPORT INFANTRY SHAKO $1250.00

<b> 16th Mississippi Regiment, who was paroled at Appomattox Court House, Va.


Also includes doctor's letter</b>


8 1/2 x 14, two sided imprinted form, filled out in ink. Plus 1 page letter written by J.B. Thigpen, M.D.


Form No. 3. Application for Indigent Blind Widow of Soldier or Sailor of the late Confederacy, Under Chapter 73, Acts of 1900. This is for the widow of B.F. Everett who enlisted in the service of the Confederate States in  May 1861, and served in Company F, 16th Mississippi Volunteers. States that he served until the close of the war and was paroled at Appomattox. The document has been signed and witnessed and is dated August 3, 1901. 


Included with this form is a doctor's letter, 6 x 6 3/4, written in ink: 


Lake Como, Miss., Sept. 5, 1914 


To the Hon. Pension Board of Jasper County, [Miss.]


Greetings:


This certifies to you that Mrs. Bettie Everett who is applying for an increase in her pension is under treatment a good deal of the time and not at any time able to do any work. 


Very truly yours, 

J.B. Thigpen, M.D. 


Light age toning and wear with some slight paper loss at the edges. Small archival tape repairs.


Benjamin F. Everett, served in Co. F, 16th Mississippi Infantry Volunteers, 1861-65. 


<u>16th Mississippi Infantry Regiment</u>


Organized in June 1861, about 950 officers and men were mustered into the Confederate service. Sent to Virginia, the regiment was brigaded under Generals Trimble, Featherston, Posey and Harris. After fighting in General Stonewall Jackson's Shenandoah Valley campaign, they participated in the campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days Battles to Cold Harbor, then shared in the Petersburg siege and the Appomattox campaign. The 16th Mississippi lost 6 killed and 28 wounded at Cross Keys; had 15 killed, 51 wounded, and 19 missing at Gaines' Mill and Malvern Hill; 63 per cent of the 288 engaged at Sharpsburg were disabled; they reported 23 wounded at Fredericksburg; and sustained 76 casualties at Chancellorsville. The regiment took 385 men into the battle of Gettysburg. On April 9, 1865, it surrendered at Appomattox Court House with 4 officers and 68 men. [Source: Units of the Confederate States Army].

 


8 pages. Important From Washington. New Points of Policy in the Conduct of the War. Executive Order Regarding the Seizure of Property in Rebellious States. Order in Regard to Aliens and the Oath of Allegiance. Arrival of General Halleck. Explanation of the Law Making Postage Stamps Currency. News From The Peninsula. The Rebels Quiet on the James River. Our Transports and Mail Boats Not Interfered With. How the Rebels Suffered in the Late Battles. Gen. Burnside Gone to Washington. The Retreat to the James River. Absurd Rumors of Changes in the Cabinet at Washington. The Cotton Supply Question. The Battles Before Richmond. List of Wounded in the Different Encounters. Names of the Prisoners in Richmond. Military Power of the Rebels Exhausted. The War on the Mississippi. Unsuccessful Attempt to Destroy the Rebel Ram Arkansas. Farragut's Fleet Again Below the Vicksburg Batteries. The Guerrilla's in Kentucky. Morgan Overtaken and Defeated. His Band Scattered. Cannon, Horses and Other Property Recovered. The New Call For Troops. Recruiting in the City. Military Matters in Brooklyn. The Battle of Seven Pines and more. Very fine issue.  


7 1/2 x 3 3/4, manuscript in ink.


Assessor and Collector's Office

Liberty, June 15th, 1864


$57.86. Received of John Brown the sum of fifty seven dollars and eighty six cents in full of his State and county tax for the year 1863. Includes two signatures. Light age toning and wear. Texas Civil War material is considered to be uncommon.


John Brown, served as a corporal, in Co. E, 11th Spaight's Texas Cavalry and Infantry Battalion during the War Between The States.  


Unused, patriotic envelope, with vignette of two negroes in conversation, one is a well dressed gentleman wearing a top hat, the other a laborer wearing a felt hat. Imprint at right: The Result of Secession. Julius- "Is your massa Union or Session? Sam- "Why he's Session." Julius- "Den I pitys yer- you was as good a leben hundred dollar nigga as eber I see- an now yer aint wuf wun cent!" Published by D. Murphy's Son, Printer, 65 Fulton & 572 Pearl Sts., N.Y. Small mounting trace spots on the four corners of the reverse. Scarce and very desirable black related cover.

Application of Widow of Private Benjamin

 

The New York Times, July 23, 1862

 

1864 Confederate Texas Tax Receipt $35.00

 

Patriotic Cover, The Result of Secession

<b>From Armies of the Potomac, Tennessee and Georgia</b>


5 x 8, imprint.


War Department

Paymaster General's Office

Washington, D.C., June 22, 1865


Memorandum


All Veteran Volunteers in Batteries of Volunteer Artillery mustered out as organizations, from Armies of the Potomac, Tennessee and Georgia, under recent orders, are mustered out "on account of their services being no longer required," and are entitled to balance of Veteran Bounty. 


Heavy Artillery follows the general rule, not that for Field Artillery.


Official


Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning and staining with two very tiny holes at the left edge which do not affect any of the content.  


<b>For a private wounded in the battles of Fair Oaks, and Salem Heights, Virginia</b>


10 x 15 1/2, two sided imprinted form, filled out in ink. The United States In Account with Jacob Shay, of C Company, Ninety Third Regiment of Penna. Infantry on Account of Clothing during his enlistment; the money value of each issue being hereby acknowledged. Enlisted at Lebanon, Pa., on the Twenty fourth day of September 1861. Individual entries are dated from October 1861 to September 1862, with the appropriate money values. The document has been signed 4 times by Jacob Shay, and has been witnessed 4 times by William W. Murray. Murray also signs the document one more time at the bottom as Captain Commanding Company.


The reverse side is filled out for Cyrus Shay, probably the brother of Jacob, who enlisted at Lebanon, on the thirteenth of September 1861. It includes entries from October 1861 to August 1862. It has been signed 6 times by Cyrus Shay and witnessed 6 times by Captain William W. Murray, and signed one more time at the bottom by Murray as Captain Commanding Company. An interesting notation on the document states that that this account was not settled and placed in the October 1862 rolls listing Cyrus Shay as a deserter. 


Light age toning and edge wear.


Jacob Shay was wounded in action on May 31, 1862, at the battle of Fair Oaks, Va., and he was also wounded on May 3, 1863, at Salem Heights, Va., during the Chancellorsville campaign. He was promoted to corporal on September 1, 1862. The date of his muster out of the service is unknown.


Cyrus Shay was listed as a deserter, the exact date is unknown.


The 93rd Pennsylvania Infantry saw action in the Virginia peninsular campaign, the 7 Days battles, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg and Appomattox, to name but a few of their battle honors.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with illustration of Colonel Elisha B. Harvey with Head-Quarters Seventh Regiment, P.R.V.C., Gen. McCall's Division printed at upper right. 5 1/2 x 3.


WBTS Trivia: The 7th Pennsylvania Reserves, were also known as the 36th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment, and they were commanded by Colonel Elisha B. Harvey. Organized at West Chester, they were ordered to Washington, D.C., on July 21, 1861, where they were mustered into the U.S. service for a term of three years. The regiment fought gallantly at Gaines' Mill, where it was in the thick of the fighting and its losses were heavy. They saw action at Glendale, and Antietam where they again suffered heavy losses. The regiment made a gallant charge at the battle of Fredericksburg where they captured the battle flag of the 19th Georgia Infantry. In the Wilderness campaign, a large portion of the regiment was cut off and captured. Of the 272 men taken prisoner, many of them never returned home from their Rebel prisons.    


<b>U.S. Civil War Congressman from Pennsylvania</b>


(1822-96) Born in Town Hill, Luzerne Co., Pa., studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1844, and commenced a practice in Allentown, Pa. Served as district attorney of Lehigh County, 1853-56. Was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1856, 1864 and 1868; and a delegate to the Union National Convention in 1866. Served as U.S. Congressman, 1862-65, and 1869-71. 


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 2 1/2, in ink, John D. Stiles, Allentown, Pennsylvania.

War Department Memorandum Regarding Arti $10.00

 

1861-62 Clothing Account, 93rd Pennsylva $25.00

 

Colonel Elisha B. Harvey, 7th Pennsylvan $25.00

 

Autograph, John D. Stiles $15.00




<b>Colonel of the 57th Ohio Infantry during the Civil War


United States Congressman from Ohio</b>


(1821-87) He was a school teacher and editor and publisher of the Findlay (Ohio) Democratic Courier. Member of the Ohio State Senate, 1851-52. Studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1853, and commenced practice in Findlay. Delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1856. At the age of 40, he enlisted in the Union army, on September 27, 1861, and was commissioned lieutenant colonel, 57th Ohio Infantry. He was promoted to colonel on December 16, 1861, and was discharged for disability on April 24, 1863, at Young's Point, La. Served as U.S. Congressman, 1867-71, including the 40th U.S. Congress, which was the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress. 


<u>Signature with Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 2 1/2, in ink, W. Mungen, Findlay, Ohio.  


<b>U.S. Civil War Congressman from Massachusetts</b>


(1808-75) Born in Marblehead, Mass., he was engaged in the importing business in Boston, and later in the iron business. Member of the Massachusetts State House of Representatives, 1851-53; and the State Senate in 1858. Served as U.S. Congressman, 1861-75. Was Chairman of the powerful Ways and Means Committee. Also served on the Committee on Banking and Currency, and Committee on Coinage, Weights and Measures.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 3/8 x 2 1/2, in ink, S. Hooper, Boston, Mass.  


<b>Colonel of the 11th Michigan Infantry during the Civil War


Severely wounded during the 1864 Atlanta campaign resulting in the amputation of his leg


United States Congressman from Michigan</b>


(1827-88) He studied law, was admitted to the bar, and commenced practice in Sturgis, Michigan in 1851. Served as prosecuting attorney, 1855-59; was a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1860; and was appointed U.S. District Attorney for Michigan by President Abraham Lincoln in March of 1861. During the first summer of the Civil War, Stoughton, stirred by patriotic emotions determined that his place was with the army so he enlisted on August 24, 1861, and was commissioned lieutenant colonel of the 11th Michigan Infantry. Promoted to Colonel April 1, 1862, he was wounded in action on July 4, 1864, at Roughs Station, Ga., resulting in the amputation of his right leg. He was promoted to brevet brigadier and major general, March 13, 1865. He was a member of the Michigan State Constitutional Convention in 1867; served as Michigan Attorney General, 1867-68; and U.S. Congressman, 1869-73.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 4, in ink, Wm. L. Stoughton, Sturgis, Mich.    


8 1/2 x 11, imprinted form, filled out in ink, with vignette of spread winged eagle on shield.


To all whom it may Concern: Know ye, That Walter S. Waggner, Sergeant of late Captain Edward M. Koch's Company (I) Fifth Regiment of Maryland Volunteers who was enrolled on the Eight day of October one thousand eight hundred and Sixty one to serve three years or during the war, is hereby Discharged from the service of the United States this ninth day of October 1864, at Bermuda Hundred, Va., by reason of Expiration of term of Service.


Said Walter S. Waggner was born in Baltimore City in the State of Maryland, is twenty three years of age, five feet, nine inches high, light complexion, blue eyes, dark hair, and by occupation when enrolled, a Farmer. 


Given at Bermuda Hundred, Va., this Ninth day of October 1864. L.H. Bowen, Lt. & A.C.M.  John W. Worth, 2nd Lieut. Comdg. Co. I, Fifth Regt. Md. Vols. 


Light age toning and wear. Scarce. Very desirable Maryland Civil War regiment.


Walter S. Waggner, served in the 5th Maryland Infantry, from October 8, 1861, to October 7, 1864.


John W. Worth, enlisted on September 24, 1861, as a private, and was mustered into Co. A, 5th Maryland Infantry. He was promoted to corporal, sergeant, and 1st sergeant, exact dates unknown. Promoted to 2nd lieutenant, February 28, 1863; captured on June 15, 1863, at Winchester, Va., and confined in a Confederate prison at Macon, Ga.; promoted to 1st lieutenant, April 10, 1865; mustered out of the service, September 1, 1865.


Lewis H. Bowen, enlisted on June 5, 1861, and was commissioned 2nd lieutenant, 2nd Rhode Island Infantry. He was discharged for disability on July 18, 1862. He re-enlisted on August 4, 1863, and was commissioned 1st lieutenant, 5th Rhode Island Heavy Artillery. He was on detached service 1864-65, as Commissary of Musters; and was mustered out of the service, June 26, 1865.


<u>5th Maryland Infantry Regiment</u>


Attached to the main body of the Army of the Potomac as part of the 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 2nd Army Corps, the 5th Maryland Infantry fought with that command in the battle of Antietam, being on that part of the field known as the "Bloody Lane," where the regiment lost 39 killed and 109 wounded. Some idea of the severity of this part of the battle may be gained from the fact that the commanding officers were all wounded and carried from the field. The battle honors of the regiment include Antietam, Charlestown, Winchester, the siege of Petersburg, the assault on the Confederate works at Petersburg during the mine explosion which became known as the "Battle of the Crater," the Second Battle of Fair Oaks, and the occupation of Richmond. The 5th Maryland Infantry were the equal of any regiment in the Union army for bravery and devotion to duty. During their service they lost 64 killed, while 97 died of wounds and disease. [Source: The Union Army, Vol. 2].

Autograph, William Mungen $20.00

 

Autograph, Samuel Hooper $15.00

 

Autograph, General William L. Stoughton $35.00

 

5th Maryland Infantry Discharge Certific $125.00




<b>Signed by the colonel and adjutant of the regiment</b>


14 1/2 x 9 3/4, on vellum, filled out in ink, with vignette of a spread winged eagle with American shield.


The Commanding Officer Of The Fifth Regiment Of Maryland Vol. Infty. To all who shall see these presents, greeting: Know Ye, That reposing special trust and confidence in the patriotism, valor, fidelity and abilities of Walter Waggner, I do hereby appoint him Sergeant in Company "I" of the Fifth Regiment of Md. Vols. Infty. in the service of the United States to rank as such from the 23 day of April one thousand eight hundred and 63. He is therefore carefully and diligently to discharge the duty of Sergeant by doing and performing all manner of things thereunto belonging, And I do strictly charge and require all Non Commissioned Officers and Soldier under his command to be obedient to his orders as Sergeant. And he is to observe and follow such orders and directions from  time to time as he shall receive from me or the future Commanding Officer of the Regiment or other Superior Officers and Non Commissioned Officers set over him according to the rules and discipline of War. This Warrant to continue in force during the pleasure of the Commanding Officer of the Regiment for the time being.


Given under my hand at the Head Quarters of the Regiment at Point of Rocks, Md., this Twenty Third day of April in the Year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and Sixty Three.


By the Commanding Officer, Col. Wm. Louis Schley, Commanding the Regiment


John B. Wilson, Adjutant of the Regiment


Light age toning and wear. Scarce. Very desirable Maryland Civil War regiment.


Walter S. Waggner, served in the 5th Maryland Infantry, from October 8, 1861, to October 7, 1864.


William Louis Schley, was commissioned colonel of the 5th Maryland Infantry on September 4, 1861, and was mustered out of the service on October 6, 1864.


John B. Wilson, was mustered into Co. A, 5th Maryland Infantry, with rank of sergeant, on September 12, 1861. He was promoted to 2nd lieutenant, January 28, 1863; 1st lieutenant, April 20, 1863; was captured on June 15, 1863, at the battle of Winchester, Va., and confined in a Confederate prison at Macon, Ga.; mustered out of the service, on September 18, 1864. 


<u>5th Maryland Infantry Regiment</u>


Attached to the main body of the Army of the Potomac as part of the 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 2nd Army Corps, the 5th Maryland Infantry fought with that command in the battle of Antietam, being on that part of the field known as the "Bloody Lane," where the regiment lost 39 killed and 109 wounded. Some idea of the severity of this part of the battle may be gained from the fact that the commanding officers were all wounded and carried from the field. The battle honors of the regiment include Antietam, Charlestown, Winchester, the siege of Petersburg, the assault on the Confederate works at Petersburg during the mine explosion which became known as the "Battle of the Crater," the Second Battle of Fair Oaks, and the occupation of Richmond. The 5th Maryland Infantry were the equal of any regiment in the Union army for bravery and devotion to duty. During their service they lost 64 killed, while 97 died of wounds and disease. [Source: The Union Army, Vol. 2].


 


<b>Document Signed


Pension Certificate for Civil War Veteran who fought in the 5th Maryland Infantry</b>


(1829-1909) Born in Golconda, Illinois, he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1853 and practiced in his hometown until 1856, when he moved to Kansas and became identified with the Free State Party. He returned to Illinois in 1857, practiced in Harrisburg until the Civil War, and after the firing upon Fort Sumter made the first war speech in southern Illinois, at Metropolis. 


He entered the Union army as major of the 56th Illinois Infantry, Sept. 28, 1861, was promoted lieutenant colonel in June, 1862, and colonel on Aug. 31. He served with General William S. Rosecrans in the Army of the Mississippi, led a successful bayonet charge at Corinth on Oct. 4, 1862, and afterwards commanded a brigade in the Vicksburg campaign and also in the Chattanooga campaign being several wounded at Missionary Ridge, Nov. 25, 1863. During the Atlanta campaign he held the line of communications from Dalton to Acworth and from Kingston to Rome, and in Oct., 1864, reinforced Resaca and held it against Confederate General John Bell Hood. He was brevetted brigadier general of volunteers, on Sept. 19, 1864, received promotion to the full rank of brigadier general on Feb. 15, 1865, and was with General William T. Sherman on his march to the sea and in the assembling of his army in South Carolina, his final service being as commander of a brigade in the veteran corps at Winchester, Va. 


He resigned in May, 1865, was builder and first president of the Cairo & Vincennes Railroad in 1866, and from 1867-69 was a Republican U.S. Congressman from Illinois. He was president of the Illinois Republican Convention in 1866, and in 1876 was a delegate to the Republican National Convention. He was Commissioner of the Internal Revenue from 1876 to 1883; practiced law in Washington, D.C., until 1889; was Commissioner of Pensions, 1889-93, and was then engaged in the practice of law in Chicago. 


[Source: The Union Army, Vol. 8]


<u>Document Signed</u>: 7 3/4 x 10 1/2, imprinted form, filled out in ink, with vignette of a female figure with an American flag, stacked muskets, cannon balls, cannon and shield with Invalid Pension printed on it.


UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENT of the INTERIOR. Bureau Of Pensions. It is hereby certified That in conformity with the laws of the United States Walter S. Waggner who was a Private, Co. I, 5 Regiment Maryland Volunteer Infantry, is entitled to a pension under the provisions of the Act of June 27, 1890, at the rate of Eight dollars per month to commence on the Twenty ninth day of April one thousand eight hundred and ninety one. This pension being for "Disease of eyes and piles." Given at the Department of the Interior this Twelfth day of April one thousand eight hundred and ninety two and of Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and sixteenth. John W. Noble, Secretary of the Interior. [Noble's signature is stamped]. Counter signed, [hand signed in ink] Green B. Raum, Commissioner of Pensions. Light age toning and wear. Scarce Maryland Civil War unit.


Walter S. Waggner, served in the 5th Maryland Infantry, from October 8, 1861, to October 7, 1864.


<u>5th Maryland Infantry Regiment</u>


Attached to the main body of the Army of the Potomac as part of the 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 2nd Army Corps, the 5th Maryland Infantry fought with that command in the battle of Antietam, being on that part of the field known as the "Bloody Lane," where the regiment lost 39 killed and 109 wounded. Some idea of the severity of this part of the battle may be gained from the fact that the commanding officers were all wounded and carried from the field. The battle honors of the regiment include Antietam, Charlestown, Winchester, the siege of Petersburg, the assault on the Confederate works at Petersburg during the mine explosion which became known as the "Battle of the Crater," the Second Battle of Fair Oaks, and the occupation of Richmond. The 5th Maryland Infantry were the equal of any regiment in the Union army for bravery and devotion to duty. During their service they lost 64 killed, while 97 died of wounds and disease. [Source: The Union Army, Vol. 2].  


8 1/2 x 5 1/2, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


Certificate of Marks and Brands- Class 1. THE STATE OF TEXAS, County of Hardin. Be It Remembered, That on this 8th day of June 1885, Jane S. Brown of Liberty County had her Brand recorded in the Clerk's Office of said County, as follows, to wit: (shows an illustration of the Mark and Brand and states that the location of the brand is to be on the hip). To Certify Which, I hereunto sign my name and affix my official seal, (embossed seal at lower left of the document) this 8th day of June 1885. E.H. Callins, County Clerk, Hardin County. Imprint at upper right, Sold by Clarke & Courts, Stationers, Printers, Lithographers, Galveston. Light age toning and wear. Scarce. Desirable Texas imprint.   


7 1/4 x 2 3/4, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


Assessor And Collector's Office, Liberty County, Texas, April 5th, 1862. Received of John Brown, forty dollars and eighty five cents, in full of his State and Country Tax for the year 1860 & 1861 in and out of the County. Signed by the Assessor and Collector. Light age toning and wear. Uncommon war date Texas imprint.


John Brown, served as a corporal, in Co. E, 11th Spaight's Texas Cavalry and Infantry Battalion during the War Between The States.

5th Maryland Infantry Appointment For Se $150.00

 

Autograph, General Green B. Raum $75.00

 

State of Texas Certificate of Marks and $50.00

 

1862 Confederate Texas Tax Receipt $39.00

A nice item for the medical collector this period invalid feeder remains in  excellent condition with no chips or cracks.  Will go well with medical, nursing or hospital items of the Civil War period. see: Dammannís <I>Collectors Encyclopedia of Civil War Medical Instruments & Equipment</I>. (An example of this desirable  <I>boat</I> shaped feeder is included in the Gettysburg Visitors Center museum collection.  please note:   ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  Illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison is a nice original antique pocket note book with leaves marked for the days of the week with space for pencil notations which could be wiped away for re-use.  All intact with no splits or chips, the outer cover is marked <I>No.3</I> which denotes the size.  The piece retains its original clasp and patriotic shield escutcheon.  A nice item for the Civil War era <I>smalls</I>and personal item collector.  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 Leather bound, measuring approximately 6 Ĺ X 4 ľ X Ĺ inch thick, this all original and period record book bears the title <I>Detail Book <B> 2nd Mass. Infy. </B> Adjts. Office</I> penned in the front. The book contains a daily hand written record of the officers detailed as <I>Officer of the day</I> and <I>Officer of the guard</I> (<I>Officer of the picket</I>) with notation where appropriate of <I>field, camp</I> and <I>company</I> officer detail.  The book is <U>complete</U> beginning February 22, 1864 through the end of the Civil War and mustering out in late July 1865.  In the back are hand written rosters of Captain grade officers of the 2nd Massachusetts Infantry.   The record is in a very legible hand, is easily read  and the book remains in pleasing condition with good evidence of age and originality but remains solid at the binding with no tears, repairs or loose pages.  

     A hard fought Regiment, the 2nd Mass. Volunteers saw action at such as the Battle of Winchester, Cedar Mountain and participated in the infamous <I>Mud March</I>.  They were engaged at the Battles of Chancellorsville, Brandy Station, Beverly Ford and at <B>Gettysburg</B>.  In the time covered by this Detail Record, the 2nd Mass. Volunteers participated in the Atlanta Campaign which included such as the Battle of Resaca and New Hope Church; operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek and the Siege of Atlanta.  The period in which this record was kept includes the time of the 2nd Mass. participation in <B>Sherman's March to the Sea</B>, the <B>Siege of Savannah</B> then the <B>Campaign of the Carolinas</B> and on through the <B>Battle of Bentonville</B> and the <B>Occupation of Raleigh</B>.  The period of this Officers Detail Record includes the daily assignments from the time of the <B>Surrender of Johnston and his army</B> participation in the final  March to Washington, D. C., via Richmond and the <B>Grand Review</B>.  The final entry is dated July 21, 1865 covering the a period of Provost duty in Washington, mustering out of the 2nd Regiment July, 11 and return to Boston where the Regiment would be discharged.  A desirable find!  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

 A neat little item for the lighting collector, this "IMPROVED WAX NIGHT LIGHT" retains its original paper label boasting a PATENT WICK SUSTAINER  which is said to  enable this little traveling size candle to <I>give steady light and BURN EIGHT HOURS</I>.   T. W. Houchin is given as the patentee with Houchin Mfg. Co., New York the maker.  An attractive little personal item for the lighting device collector and a neat night light for medical surroundings. (illustrated here with a U.S. quarter for size comparison)  Another one of those period items of every day 19th century life that seldom survived to reach the modern day historian. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

19th Century INVALID FEEDER $65.00

 

Civil War vintage traveling Ė IVORY NOTE $125.00

 

original Civil War 2nd Mass. Infantry - $235.00

 

19th century IMPROVED 8 HOUR CANDLE $75.00

Offered here for the first time since we acquired it years ago in a lot of old coins, is this classic <I>MAJOR GENERAL  G. B. Mc CLELLAN  - WAR OF 1861</I> Civil War identification disk marked <B> CHESTER  S. FURMAN Ė COLUMBIA Ė CO.A  35TH REGt. P.V. </B>    (Note that on the original, the B in COLUMBIA is inversed as is the t in 35th .  We have seen such inversions on these disks before, frequently in combination with some misalignment of individual letters.   Our speculation is that such characteristics are attributed to disks acquired from camp sutlers who struck the identification with individual letter dies rather than utilizing die guides available to mail order or established vendor sources. )  A quick <I>Google</I> of <I>Chester S. Furman</I> will offer much more information on Corp. Furman than provided here but suffice it to say that our man enlisted and was mustered in on July 13, 1861 as a Corporal  of Co. A (recruited in Columbia, PA) of the 35th Pennsylvania Infantry (a.k.a. 6th Penn. Reserves).  He transferred out of the 35th Vols. On October 28, 1863 and was mustered into the <B>US Army Signal Corps</B> .  He was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor  for action on July 2, 1863 at the battle of Gettysburg where he was<B><I> one of six volunteers who charged upon a log house near Devilís Den.</B></I>  (see: <I>Deeds of Valor</I> p.244)

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!




 Antique 19th century fifteen-piece Italian walnut Mannerist style figural carved dining set with twelve leather upholstered chairs (two arms and ten sides) circa 1890. This magnificently carved Italian set consists of a sideboard with green marble insert with bronze lattice details on two inside upper cabinets doors, flanked by two carved doors. Lower cabinets have elaborate carvings, with central drawer below shelf. Cresting piece with central putti surrounded by fruit and foliate. Serving cabinet has marble inlay and central mirror flanked by two cabinets. Grand figural carved table has fully skirted leaves to accommodate twelve chairs.


Dimensions

Table: 31"H x 59"W x 49"D (112" with leaves)

Chair: 41"H x 20"W x 19"D

Server: 88"H x 76"W x 26"D

Sideboard: 98"Hx 84"W x 26"D  


<b>Signed by 18 Vermont soldiers some of whom were wounded and captured during the Civil War</b>


8 x 24, manuscript in ink.  


State of Vermont


We, whose names are hereunto affixed, do severally consent, and by our signatures hereunto made, do agree, to be enrolled into the Cavendish Light Infantry, a Company of Volunteer Militia now raised in the said town of Cavendish and vicinity, subject to the orders of the Commander in Chief; and in consideration of arms and equipments to be furnished us by the State of Vermont, we do hereby agree to serve for the period of one year, unless sooner discharged agreeably to law; and this enlistment we enter into with the full understanding that we are liable at any moment to be ordered into active service under the Government of the United States. Cavendish, Vt., April 18, 1861. Bears the signatures of 18 men who listed in this unit. Light age toning and wear. Desirable early war Vermont document.


<u>Record of Soldiers Who Signed This Document</u>:


William Scheller: unknown


William Henry Ingleston: Served in the 6th Vermont Infantry; wounded in action, May 5, 1864, at the battle of the Wilderness; captured August 21, 1864, at Charles Town, WV.


William W. Carey: Served in the 6th Vermont Infantry; wounded in action, April 16, 1862, Lee's Mill, Va. Promoted to 1st Lieutenant, May 15, 1864


Alick Stearns: Served in 1st Vermont Infantry


Martin Chapman: Served in the 1st and 6th Vermont Infantry regiments


Samuel Fitch: Served in the 1st Vrmont Infantry


A.H. Moore: unknown


Isaac Thornton: unknown


eligible signature 


George T. Spaulding: Served in the 1st Vermont Infantry


George S. Orr: Served in the 1st Vermont Infantry


Moses E. Orr: unknown


William F. Williams: Served in the 4th Vermont Infantry


C.A. Shephard: Served in the 1st Vermont Infantry


Xenophen E. Lockwood: Served in the 4th Vermont Infantry


Thomas J. Olney: unknown


Edwin M. Carlisle: Served in the 1st and 6th Vermont Infantry regiments; wounded in action, June 29, 1862, at Savage's Station, Va.


Ira E. Chase: Served in the 3rd Vermont Infantry; wounded in action May 5, 1864, at the Wilderness, Va.  


 


By Adele Kenny. Schiffer Publishing Ltd., 2001, hard cover with dust jacket, 176 pages, index, illustrated. New condition. This new and beautiful book traces the development of pioneer photographs and the miniature art cases that were manufactured to protect and display them. Icons of their time, photographic cases are rich in history and design. Not limited to the cases themselves, this book explores various aspects of the Daguerreian era (1840-1870) and includes information on one-of-a-kind photographic forms, artists and casemakers, die-engraving, and all components of wood-framed, thermoplastic, and novelty cases. Emphasis is placed on Victorian-era design and its impact on the American case art industry. Included are over 460 illustrations, informative captions with values, and a comprehensive index. Written for novice and experienced collectors and designers alike, this book is a must-have resource for photographica enthusiasts, dealers, historians, and artists. Original price: $59.95.

35th Penn. Vols. ID DISK Ė Gettysburg Me $1200.00

 

6484 19th C. Italian Walnut Carved Dinin $85000.00

 

1861 Enrollment of Men Into The Cavendis $75.00

 

Photographic Cases, Victorian Design Sou




<b>8th Mississippi Regiment


Also includes doctor's letter</b>


8 1/2 x 14, two sided imprinted form, filled out in ink.


Form No. 3. Application for Indigent Blind Widow of Soldier or Sailor of the late Confederacy, Under Chapter 102, Code of 1906, for $75.00. This is for the widow of James A. Bishop who enlisted in the service of the Confederate States in Jasper County, Mississippi in February 1862, and served in Company A, Eighth Mississippi. States that he was discharged April 1, 1864, at Enterprise, Mississippi. The document has been signed and witnessed and is dated August 6, 1914. Included with this form is a doctor's letter, 5 1/2 x 9, written in ink: Jasper Co., Miss., Aug. 3rd, 1914. To whom it may concern, This is to certify Mrs. Melissa Bishop on account of age and being affected with Rheumatism is unable to earn a living. Respectfully, W.C. Lamb, M.D. Light age toning and wear.    


 Victorian heavily carved dining table with winged griffins on plinth, resting on massive claw feet. Beautiful quarter sawn oak top and substantial apron.  A complete American Renaissance Revival carved oak dining room suite, late 19th C., American, comprised of an extension dining table, sideboard, server, china cabinet and eight side chairs. The circular table with molded edge and scalloped carving, figural supports below the skirt, massive anthemion carved pedestal opening to receive two leaves, on an incurvate plinth ending in massive paw feet; the sideboard with broken arch putti crest, griffin support shelf, massive base with extensive decoration of fruit clusters, figural supports and carved moldings, rounded sides, acanthus molded base, ball feet, conforming server with shelf, the 8 chairs (6 sides and 2 arms) with putti crests, barley twist stiles, trapezoidal seats and barley twist legs connected by incurvate stretcher. This suite is $55,000 as is.  Price restored for entire suite, including the addition of fully skirted leaves, and COM upholstery $75,000. 


Table: 30"H x 62" Diameter, opens to 96" wide (with four 18" leaves)

China Cabinet: 94"H x 21"D x 56"W

Sideboard: 87"H x 92"W x 30"D

Server: 54"H x 57.5"W x 22"D

Chair: 50"H 


Note: The strapwork crests with cabochons and flanked by cherubs on the sideboard, server, and chairs are similar to those on a carved oak sideboard, server and chairs in a suite descended in a New Orleans family and attributed to R.J. Horner of New York.  Grandly scaled incredibly carved Rococo "Throne Chair" executed in walnut. This massive chair is a statement piece.

Application of Widow of Deceased Confede

 

7247 19th C. Oak Carved Winged Griffin D $12500.00

 

7157 RJ Horner 12-Piece Renaissance Revi $55000.00

 

7711 Massive Over The Top French Rococo $25000.00

<b>Their Backmarks & Dates</b>


By William F. McGuinn and Bruce A. Bazelon. Hard cover, 144 pages, illustrated. Newly Revised Edition published in 1990. New, choice condition. A comprehensive listing and discussion of the makers and suppliers of American military and related uniform buttons covering the period from 1790 to 1920. It includes listings for hundreds of back marks with numerous photographs of button backs, dies, and button related memorabilia. This book is an indispensable reference work.  


Measures 29 x 18 1/2. Features numerous different illustrations with descriptions. Includes cannons, rifles, pistols, swords, gun carriages, and much more. This print was part of the series that was issued with the Atlas to Accompany The Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, 1861-1865. Light age toning. A previous owner had this print laminated which protects it and gives it firmness for easier handling or display.   The antique sauce boat presented measures 8 1/2 inches wide by 5 inches tall.  The floral design involves groups of three hanging flowers on a vine that winds its way around the sides of the vessel.  Under the handle are nicely embossed foliates.  It once belonged to a large dinnerware set, each item of which would have a variation of this pretty design.


Two potteries made this shape, W Baker and W.E Corn.  The latter called this design Lily Shape.  Since not backstamp appears on the underside of this gravy tureen, I cannot tell you which pottery produced it.


It's in fine shape, free of chips and cracks with the exception of a tiny chiplet on the underside of the base.  <b>The Aftermath of a Battle</b>


By Gregory A. Coco. 1995, Thomas Publications, Gettysburg, Pa. Soft cover, 433 pages, index, illustrations, maps. This outstanding book traces the cleanup and restoration of the battlefield from the initial stages of removing the wounded and burying the dead, to the development of hospitals, gathering of prisoners, and memorializing the fields. Using numerous first hand accounts, written by people who were present to witness these scenes, the descriptions herein illustrate in a very powerful way the grim realities of warfare. Brand new.

American Military Button Makers And Deal

 

Diagrams of Weapons of the Civil War

 

White Ironstsone Sauce Boat, Bordered Hy $55.00

 

A Strange and Blighted Land, Gettysburg

Magnificent French rosewood bureau plat desk with fancy bronze ormulu mounts and a black, gold-tooled leather top circa 1890.  


<b>For Corporal of the Jeff Davis Light Artillery</b>


8 1/2 x 14, two sided imprinted form, filled out in type and ink.


APPLICATION FOR PENSION

Form 4- Widows


Application of Widow of Soldier or Sailor of the Late Confederacy. For Mrs. P. Blankinship, the widow of Corporal Joseph Blankinship, of Akenville, Wilcox Country, Alabama, who enlisted in 1861, and served as a corporal and gunman under Capt. Bondurant. Further states that he was with Robert E. Lee at Appomattox Court House. Dated June 19, 1924, and signed multiple times by the pensioner, P. Blankinship, and T.Q. Brame, the Chancery Clerk. Also signed by E.A. White, President of the Board of Inquiry of Jasper County, Mississippi, and other members of the board, and witnesses. The document has an embossed Jasper County, Miss. seal. 


Also included is a typed letter signed, 8 1/2 x 14. 


State of Mississippi

Jasper County


I, Mrs. P. Blankinship, do hereby certify that I was married to Joseph Blankinship, a Confederate Veteran, at Lake Como, Mississippi, on 22 day of Oct. 1865. 


I further certify that I have no income whatever of any kind of description.


This April 11, 1928.


Mrs. P. Blankinship


Sworn to and subscribed before me this the 11th day of April, A.D., 1928.


T.Q. Brame

Clerk of Chancery Court

Jasper County, Miss.


Light age toning and wear. Confederate pension documents are scarce to find, this application filed by the State of Mississippi. 


Joseph Blankinship served as a corporal in the Jeff Davis Light Artillery Battery of Alabama during the War Between The States.


The Jeff Davis battery, organized at Selma, Ala., in May, 1861, was soon sent to Virginia, where it fought in Early's brigade at Manassas and at the battle of Seven Pines, losing 3 men at the latter place.


In Hill's division, during the Seven Days' battles, it lost 3 killed and 14 wounded; at Cold Harbor, 3 killed and 10 wounded; at Gaines' Mill, 3 killed and 14 wounded.


It also fought at Mechanicsville and many other points in Virginia, and was at South Mountain, Fredericksburg and Orange Court House.  It took part in the terrible battle of Gettysburg.


Serving, consecutively, in Long's and Page's brigades, it was in northern Virginia during the spring and summer of 1864, at Cedar Creek in October, 1864, and at Fort Clifton in March, 

1865.  It was almost continuously engaged.


Its first captain was J.T. Montgomery, who was succeeded by J.W. Bondurant, and later it was commanded by W.J. Reese. The latter was in command during and after the battle of Gettysburg.  These officers were all distinguished for their skill and gallantry.


Source:  Confederate Military History, Vol. VIII


 


<b>Bicentennial Edition</b>


By Alphaeus H. Albert. Boyertown Publishing Company, 1976. Blue cloth, hard cover, with gold embossed lettering on the front cover and spine, 511 pages, profusely illustrated. Bicentennial Edition. Very fine. This famous reference work is considered the "bible" or standard reference work on the subject of buttons from 1775 onward.


A definitive listing of the buttons depicting the insignia of the armed forces and famous regiments, governmental, service and veteran organizations, educational and military training institutions, the State seals, the Republic of Texas, the Confederate armed forces, the caricatures and slogans of political campaigns, including those of Washington's Inauguration, with illustrations and relative value.  


Elizabeth Brown Pryor. Published by Viking Penguin Group, N.Y., 2007. Hard cover with dust jacket, 658 pages, index, illustrations, brand new. 


A legendary but elusive hero; a wonderful trove of overlooked family letters; and one of America's most dramatic sagas all come together in this new study of Robert E. Lee.


Over the past several years historian Elizabeth Brown Pryor has uncovered important documents in both private and public collections that give a stunning personal account of Lee's military ability, his beliefs, and his time. "Reading the Man" presents dozens of these previously unpublished letters in their entirety, using them as departure points for a series of surprising "historical excursions" that shed new light on every aspect of Lee, telling his life story with an innovative blend of analysis, historiography, and rich period detail. Through them we are able to look across time at Lee's troubled childhood, the hardening of his anti-abolitionist views, his celebrated but controversial battlefield performance, and his final wrenching years.


Part of the intrigue of "Reading the Man" is that it delves into lesser-known aspects of Lee's character, such as his pioneering role in engineering science, the fluctuation in his religious beliefs, and the way he shaped his leadership style. The relationships that influenced Lee's decisions are also examined, including the deep love he held for his seven children and the often tense interactions he had with his fellow generals and the Confederate government. And for the first time his actions are explained in the context of the tumultous societal developments taking place in the young United States, which changed the expectations of men like Lee, making them leading actors in the formation of the nation, frequently at the cost of their private happiness. 


As Pryor's exhaustive research shows, Robert E. Lee had no premonition of fame. He never saw himself as a tragic, heroic figure, and as a result his letters are remarkably open. Lee's guileless pen reveals a person who is frequently as confused, passive, and vulnerable as he is conscientious and brave; a witty storyteller and merry companion who suffers from loneliness and deep depressions; and an intrepid commander whose very boldness may have lost him the war. The Robert E. Lee who emerges is more complex and contradictory and far more fascinating than the familiar stone icon. "Reading the Man" gives a tantalizing glimpse of a guarded soul while it prods us to question our own assumptions about the meaning of loyalty and patriotism.

7718 Antique French Rosewood Bureau Plat $15000.00

 

Application of Widow of Deceased Confede $25.00

 

Record of American Uniform and Historica $45.00

 

Reading The Man; A Portrait of Robert E.




<b>United States Congressman from Missouri</b>


(1823-93) He established the first omnibus line in St. Louis, Missouri and subsequently inaugurated the first street railroad company.  He served as a member of the Board of Alderman of St. Louis, 1853-67.  Was President of the Missouri Railroad Company, 1859-83.  Served as United States Congressman, 1869-77 and 1879-81. 

 

<u>Signature with Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 2 3/8, in ink, Erastus Wells, St. Louis, Mo.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a Union Zouave with musket saying goodbye to his sweetheart who is wearing an American flag dress. Verse at top: "The Girl I left Behind Me," "He turn'd and left the spot- O! do not deem him weak- For doubtless was the soldier's heart, though tears were on his cheek; Go, watch the foremost rank, in danger's dark career; Be sure the hand most daring then has wiped away a tear." Light staining. 5 1/2 x 3 1/8.


***Please read the history about these Union patriotic imprints recently discovered in their individual category section on the website. CIVIL WAR MEMORABILIA/Patriotic Imprints.  


<b>The famous 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry</b>


Civil War patriotic imprint with illustration of Colonel DeWitt Clinton Baxter, commander of the 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry, "Baxter's Zouaves." Imprint at top center, Head-Quarters Baxter's Fire Zouaves, Third Regiment, Baxter's Brigade. 5 1/2 x 3 1/8.


The 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry, Baxter's Fire Zouaves, were organized in Philadelphia, Pa., on August 10, 1861, and were commanded by Colonel DeWitt Clinton Baxter, who was wounded in action on July 3, 1863, at the battle of Gettysburg. The monument with statue of a Zouave with clubbed musket marks the area near the famous stonewall and copse of trees where the regiment was in action during Pickett's Charge on July 3rd. It was here that the brave Pennsylvanians were deadlocked in heroic hand to hand combat with their Rebel rivals. The regiment went into the fight 485 strong and when the smoke cleared only 266 were left.


WBTS Trivia: The hard fighting 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry lost 11 officers and 182 enlisted men killed and mortally wounded, and 2 officers and 69 enlisted men who died from disease during the Civil War for a total of 264 men lost.


***Please read the history about these Union patriotic imprints recently discovered in their individual category section on the website. CIVIL WAR MEMORABILIA/Patriotic Imprints.    


<b>Written by Clark S. Edwards, Colonel of the regiment


He commanded the 5th Maine during the battle of Gettysburg!


Promoted to Brevet Brigadier General


War Date Letter With Cover that has been franked by Edwards as Major of the 5th Maine Infantry


"We are still here in camp but have orders to move...report says to Harpers Ferry or across into Va...I presume we shall have another fight within a day or two as everything is looking that way."</b>


(1824-1903) Edwards was 37 years old when the news of the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter reached the small town of Bethel, Maine.  He was high on a ladder shingling his roof and he immediately climbed down, obtained permission from the appropriate authorities to form a company of volunteers, and set out to gather recruits from Bethel and the surrounding towns.  This group of men became Company I, of the 5th Maine Volunteer Infantry, with Edwards commissioned as their captain on June 24, 1861.  He rose through the ranks and was appointed colonel of the regiment, on January 8, 1863, commanding the 5th Maine Infantry from that date forward. He was promoted to brevet brigadier general, on March 13, 1865, for his gallant and meritorious Civil War service record.


The 5th Regiment Maine Volunteer Infantry was one of the first Maine regiments to be mustered into the Union Army.  They fought in many battles from 1st Bull Run to Petersburg.  During the battle of Rappahannock Station the regiment is credited with capturing 4 Confederate battle flags and 1,200 prisoners.  Known as one of Maine's best fighting regiments, it captured more prisoners than the entire number of men who served in the regiment, and three times the number of battle flags than any other Maine regiment.  After three long years of hard fought service only 193 men were mustered out of the regiment when their term of service expired.  Among their battle honors are written the names of 1st Bull Run, Gaines' Mill, 2nd Bull Run, Crampton's Gap, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Rappahannock Station, Rapidan Crossing, Mine Run, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor and Petersburg.


4 pages, 5 x 7 3/4, in ink. Comes with envelope addressed in the hand of Edwards to his wife, Mrs. C.S. Edwards, [thus his full signature] Bethel, Maine, C.D.S., Washington, D.C., Nov. 4, 1862, stamped Due 3. Franked (signed) at the top right, Soldier's Letter, Maj. C.S. Edwards, 5th Me. Vol.  


<b><u>Tuesday Afternoon, In camp near Bakersville, Md., Oct. 28th/62</b></u>


My Dear wife,


We are still here in camp but have orders to move or be ready to move at once, but I hardly know which way we go, but report says to Harpers Ferry or across into Va.  I presume we shall have another fight within a day or two as everything is looking that way.  I have not received any letters from you since I wrote my last as we only get one mail a week.  The health of the Regt. is good at the present time.  Bryce* is quite smart again.  David is well.  All the Bethel boys are well that is with us.  The clever fella is still in the Hospital but I hear he is quite smart.  Dan Stearns** is the same as ever.  I am as fat as a hog.  I weigh 160 lbs. that is ten lbs. more than I weighed last winter.  If I keep on I will be obliged to go home.  When I sit down I have to unbutton my pants and find by my clothes are all too small for me.  I never was near as plucky as now.  A clear conscience is everything to make a man pluck up.  I get along quite easy now, have but very little to do as we have good horses to ride, or at least I have.  I have been out to a little vill.[age] or three of them.  One is Bakersville, one Fair Play and the other is Tillman Town.  There is one store in each place but few goods in them at the present time.  My horse is a beautiful one to ride and I like riding very much.  I think you & Kate will not laugh when you see me ride now as they call me a very good rider, but I think it is in having a good horse.  You write me that Lee is still at Augustine.  If he had been here a few days ago I could [have] got him a good place in the Comm. Department, but the place is now taken up.  I hope his wife is feeling better than she was a while ago.  Give my regards to her and tell her I will call & see her when I go home.  I shall write the boys as soon as I find out about the matters that is the sutlerís.  I think they could do well here in it and well could make more money in one month here than he can in a year at the North.  I know of some of the privates making a hundred dollars per month in selling little things they buy outside the Regt.  I have no doubt but he could make money in buying pelts here as the farmers are selling nice pelts from twenty to forty cts. a piece (20 to 40 cts.) and he could send them to N. York or Boston & make a profit.  I think if I should resign I would go with something of the kind here and in western Va. & Penna.  I must now go on dress parade so good bye.  


There is no formal signature, but the letter is definitely complete, and has two of his signatures on the envelope, in the address line and the free frank at top.


Light age toning and wear. Very fine.


* Bryce M. Edwards, was a 41 year old private, of Co. I, 5th Maine Infantry, who hailed from Otisfield, Me.


** Daniel M. Stearns, was a 22 year old private, of Co. I, 5th Maine Infantry, and a resident of Bethel, Me. He was wounded in action on May 3, 1863 at the battle of Chancellorsville, Va.

Autographm Erastus Wells $6.00

 

The Girl I Left Behind Me

 

Head Quarters Baxter's Fire Zouaves

 

5th Maine Infantry Letter $125.00




2 pages, 4 1/8 x 6 1/2, written in ink by Charles V. Bogart, to his mother.


<b><u>Nashville, Tennessee, Hospital No. 1, July 21, 1863</b></u>


Dear Mother,


I will once more sit down to write a few lines to let you know that I am not dead nor a going to be. I have...written several letters but can't get any since. I just received a letter from Charley. Charley is the only one I can get any letters from any more. I have written to all the rest of you two or 3 times a piece and I have not heard a word from any of you since I came here. Have you wrote or not. I should like very well to know how you all are getting along. I think I am pretty near well. I am going to the Regiment before long, I expect in a few days. I should like to hear how you are before I go, and write. No more at present so good by. My love to you all.

 

C.V. Bogart


Light age toning and wear. The ink is faded in some places.


Charles V. Bogart served in Co. G, 18th U.S. Infantry during the Civil War. After the war he was a member of G.A.R. Post #780, General Willich Post, in Des Plaines, Illinois. He died on November 26, 1909.


The 18th U.S. Infantry fought in the battles of Shiloh, Perryville, Stones River, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and in the Atlanta campaign.   


2 pages, 4 7/8 x 8, written in ink by Charles V. Bogart, to his mother.


<b><u>General Field Hospital, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, June the 3, 1863</b></u>


Dear Mother,


I have just written you a letter enclosed in a letter I sent to Hud Swick and put it in the office and got back to the tent and Tune was here. Had a letter wrote to send he had wrote the eve you sent to me, and so I thought I would write a few lines and send with his. I have not got much to write at present for I am wrote almost out. I have written 4 letters today and this makes 5. I believe that is all at present so good by. O yes, I forgot to ask [how] you get along this spring work and who do you have to help you. Things look nice down here. We have just had some rain and it makes things look green. No more. Write soon.

  

C.V. Bogart


Light age toning and fold wear. 


Charles V. Bogart served in Co. G, 18th U.S. Infantry during the Civil War. After the war he was a member of G.A.R. Post #780, General Willich Post, in Des Plaines, Illinois. He died on November 26, 1909.


The 18th U.S. Infantry fought in the battles of Shiloh, Perryville, Stones River, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and in the Atlanta campaign.   


2 1/2 pages, 5 x 7 3/4, written in ink by Charles V. Bogart, to his mother.


<b><u>Head Qrs. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 14th A.[rmy] C.[orps], Camp with[in] 1 1/2 miles from Atlanta, In line of Battle, July 24th, 1864</b></u>


Dear Mother,


After so long a time I sit down to inform you that I am still alive and well. I expect you thought I was never a going to write again, but as old saying is better late than never. We are with[in] one mile and a half of Atlanta. We have to move 3 or 4 times a day some days. I am still at Hd. Qrs. I am now cooking. I expect you would like to know what I am a going to have for supper tonight. Well blackberry or cherry pie, warm biscuits, tea and coffee. We have a cow. She gives about 4 quarts of milk. I have 3 officers to cook for. They are all from the 18th [U.S. Infantry]. Oh yes, we have lots of dried fruit too, dried apples, dried peaches, dried currents and plenty of can fruit of all kinds. I am having the best times now I ever had. I have to work pretty hard but I am able to do it.  I have not been out of hearing of the musketry 24 hours at a time since we left Graysville. I received your two last letters. The reason I did not write before is because we did not lay in one place long enough to write a letter. I got a letter from Hank about a week ago. He was getting along as well as could be expected. I shall have to close for this time so good by for this time. Write soon.  


From your son,

C.V. Bogart


Light age toning and wear. Archival tape repairs on fold splits.


Charles V. Bogart served in Co. G, 18th U.S. Infantry during the Civil War. After the war he was a member of G.A.R. Post #780, General Willich Post, in Des Plaines, Illinois. He died on November 26, 1909.


The 18th U.S. Infantry fought in the battles of Shiloh, Perryville, Stones River, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and in the Atlanta campaign.   


<b>For private captured at the 1st battle of Bull Run, Virginia


He was also captured at New Market, Va. in 1864</b>


7 1/2 x 9 7/8, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


Certificate To Be Given To Volunteers At The Time Of Their Discharge To Enable Them To Receive Their Pay, &c. I Certify, on honor, that Stiles Middleton, a Private of Captain Elcock's Company E, of the 14th Regiment of New York State Militia, of the State of New York, born in New York, aged 18 years, five feet, five inches high, florid complexion, hazel eyes, brown hair, and by occupation a clerk, having joined the company on its original organization and enrolled in it at the muster into the service of the United States at Brooklyn, New York, on the sixth day of July, 1861, (or was mustered in service as a recruit, by Captain Stears, at Arlington Heights, Va., on the 10th day of July, 1861, to serve in the Regiment) for the term during the present war, and having served honorably and faithfully with his Company in Virginia, is now entitled to a discharge by reason of an order from the War Department authorizing and directing to discharge all prisoners of war on parole. Other information regarding his pay and clothing accounts. Hd. Qrs. Milty. Dist. of Wash., Washington, D.C.,  this fifteenth day of April, 1862, by command of Brig. Genl. Wadsworth. Signed by an A.A.A.G. 


This certificate is glued to another document, an imprinted form, 7 1/2 x 9 7/8, filled out in ink, which his travel and subsistence voucher recording the expenses to get him home to Brooklyn from Washington. Signed by Stiles Middleton.


The documents show some age toning, edge chipping fold wear and staining. Scarce.


Stiles Middleton served in the 14th N.Y.S.M., also known as the 84th New York Infantry. He was captured on July 21, 1861, during the 1st battle of Bull Run, Virginia, and confined as a prisoner of war in Richmond, Va. As noted in the document he was discharged by virtue of an order authorizing the discharge of paroled prisoners of war. Early in the war, the Confederate and U.S. governments had a prisoner exchange program. This was dropped later in the war when the Union realized their overwhelming population gave them a huge advantage over the Confederacy so they stopped exchanging prisoners.


Stiles Middleton, re-enlisted later in the war, and was mustered in as a private in the 5th New York Heavy Artillery. He was captured on June 20, 1864, at New Market, Va., and was paroled on November 20, 1864.

18th U. S. Infantry Letter, Nashville, Te $35.00

 

18th U. S. Infantry Letter, Murfreesboro, $35.00

 

18th U. S. Infantry Letter, Near Atlanta, $65.00

 

Certificate Issued at Discharge, 14th Ne




2 pages, 7 3/4 x 8, and 7 3/4 x 9 3/4, in ink, written by Charles V. Bogart, to his mother.


<b><u>Head Qrs. Regular Brigade, Graysville, Georgia, March 29th, 1864</b></u>


Dear Mother,


I thought I would sit down this evening for a pass time and write you a few lines to inform you that I am still alive and well hoping these few lines will find you all the same. It is some time since I have heard from you, only by others writing. I understand that Uncle Charles has sold out and gone to Dundee to live, and Uncle Mart has moved in Uncle Charles old house. Did Uncle Mart buy him out. What is Uncle Dan a doing this spring. Is he a going back to California this summer and Geo. Van Valcanburg &c and Mrs. Eliza Van how does she get along, and where is she. Has Cousin Gene & Joel got back yet and Matt and Brain, how do they make it go. Tell them I am very glad to hear from them so often. I hope they will procede. There isn't any news to write so I will have to close for this time so good bye.


From Your Son,

C.V. Bogart


Write soon.


Light age toning and wear. Top of first page is trimmed. 


Charles V. Bogart served in Co. G, 18th U.S. Infantry during the Civil War. After the war he was a member of G.A.R. Post #780, General Willich Post, in Des Plaines, Illinois. He died on November 26, 1909.


The 18th U.S. Infantry fought in the battles of Shiloh, Perryville, Stones River, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and in the Atlanta campaign.   


By Harry W. Pfanz. The University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, N.C., 1993. Hard cover with dust jacket, 507 pages, index, maps and illustrations. Brand new condition.


In this companion to his celebrated earlier book, "Gettysburg; The Second Day" Harry Pfanz provides the first definitive account of the fighting between the Army of the Potomac and Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia at Cemetery Hill and Culp's Hill, two of the most critical engagements at Gettysburg on 2 and 3 July 1863. Cemetery Hill, located at the northeast end of the battlefield, was the curve of the hook shaped Union position, while Culp's Hill formed the barb of the hook on the right of the main Union line. 


Pfanz provides detailed tactical accounts of each stage of the fighting and explores the interactions between and decisions made by generals on both sides. He begins by introducing two of the principal protagonists, Confederate Lieutenant General Richard S. Ewell and Union Major General Oliver O. Howard, reviewing the operations that brought them and their armies to Gettysburg; Ewell's sweeping raid into Pennsylvania and Howard's selection of Cemetery Hill as the keystone of the Union position at Gettysburg.


On 1 July the outnumbered Union forces that retreated from the fields west and north of town rallied on Cemetery Hill and extended their line right to Culp's Hill and left down Cemetery Ridge. Pfanz illuminates Ewell's controversial decision not to attack Cemetery Hill that day. He also discusses General Lee' plan for Ewell to attack both hills on 2 July, as General Longstreet assaulted the Union left, and Culp's Hill on 3 July at the time Longstreet attacked the Union center. Pfanz suggests that Union blunders nearly resulted in a victory for Ewell on 2 July, although defeat came the next morning at the hands of Union troops fighting from behind breastworks at Culp's Hill.


Pfanz explores other salient features of the fighting as well, including the Confederate occupation of the town of Gettysburg, the skirmishing in the south end of town and in front of the hills, and the small but decisive fight between Union cavalry and the Stonewall Brigade.  


By Harry W. Pfanz. The University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, N.C., 1987. Hard cover with dust jacket, 601 pages, index, maps, illustrations. Brand new.


The second day's fighting at Gettysburg, the assault of the Army of Northern Virginia against the Army of the Potomac on 2 July 1863, was probably the critical engagement of that decisive battle and, therefore, among the most significant actions of the Civil War.


Harry Pfanz, a former historian at Gettysburg National Military Park, has written a definitive account of the second day's brutal combat. He begins by introducing the men and units that were to do battle, analyzing the strategic intentions of Lee and Meade as commanders of the opposing armies, and describing the concentration of forces in the area around Gettysburg. He then examines the development of tactical plans and the deployment of troops for the approaching battle. But the emphasis is on the fighting itself. Pfanz provides a thorough account of the Confederates smashing assualts at Devil's Den and Little Round Top, through the Wheatfield and the Peach Orchard, and against the Union center at Cemetery Ridge. He also details the Union defense that eventually succeeded in beating back these assaults, depriving Lee's gallant army of victory.


Pfanz analyzes decisions and events that have sparked debate for more than a century. In particular he discusses factors underlying the Meade-Sickles controversy and the questions about Longstreet's delay in attacking the Union left. The narrative is also enhanced by thirteen superb maps, more than eighty illustrations, brief portraits of the leading commanders, and observations on artillery, weapons, and tactics that will be of help even to knowledgeable readers.


"Gettysburg; The Second Day" is certain to become a Civil War classic. What makes the work so authoritative is Pfanz's mastery of the Gettysburg literature and his unparalleled knowledge of the ground on which the fighting occurred. His sources include the Official Records, regimental histories and personal reminiscences from soldiers North and South, personal papers and diaries, newspaper files, and last but assuredly not least, the Gettysburg battlefield.


Pfanz's career in the National Park Service included a ten year assignment as a park historian at Gettysburg. Without doubt, he knows the terrain of the battle as well as he knows the battle itself.



"For Civil War readers not familiar with Harry Pfanz, be advised that he is today the greatest living authority on Gettysburg. What he has done here is to produce the most complete acount of the main fighting on July 2 that will ever be written; both a fast paced narrative and an all inclusive encyclopedia." James I. Robertson    


By Harry W. Pfanz. The University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, N.C., 2001. Hardcover with dust jacket. 472 pages, index, maps, illustrated. Brand new condition.


Though a great deal has been written about the battle of Gettysburg, much of it has focused on the events of the second and third days. With this book, the first day's fighting finally receives its due. Harry Pfanz, a former historian at Gettysburg National Military Park and author of two previous books on the battle, presents a definitive account of the events of July 1, 1863.


Pfanz begins by sketching the background of the Gettysburg campaign and recounting the events leading up to the opening of the battle. After depicting the advances the earliest skirmishes just west of Gettysburg, he details the fighting that took place west and north of the town, the retreat of the Union forces through Gettysburg, and the Federal rally on Cemetery Hill. Highlights of Pfanz's narrative include his descriptions of the decimation of Iverson's North Carolina brigade, the smashing of the Eleventh Corps at Blocher's Knoll, the decisive morning and afternoon fighting at the railroad cuts, the bloody battles at McPherson's Woods, and the final Union stand at the seminary.


Throughout the book, Pfanz challenges some of the most common assumptions about the battle as a whole, most notably that Union cavalry only delayed the Confederate forces by skirmishing, rather than held them off by hard fighting on the first day, and that Richard Ewell's late day failure to press an attack against Union troops at Cemetery Hill ultimately cost the Confederacy the battle. 


Deeply researched and engagingly written, this book will ensure that the importance of the first day's battle at Gettysburg will be remembered in the ongoing exploration of the events that followed.



"With this installment, Harry Pfanz completes a three volume work that every serious student of the battle of Gettysburg must consult. Here is military history at its best." James I. Robertson


"Gettysburg; The First Day" continues Harry Pfanz's superbly researched, beautifully written, and exquisitely detailed study of the battle. The three volumes comprise a great classic, and the best Gettysburg material ever published." Robert K. Krick


"No one knows and understands the battle of Gettysburg better than Harry W. Pfanz. Since he joined the National Park Service as a historian in 1956, he has never been far from what for the public is America's best known and most controversial battle. His credentials as a researcher, raconteur, and historian par excellence are attested to by his applauded books on the battle's second and third days..."Gettysburg; The First Day" fills a void and completes in masterful fashion a trilogy long needed and guaranteed to stand the test of time." Edwin C. Bearss

18th U. S. Infantry Letter, Graysville, G

 

Gettysburg; Culp's Hill & Cemetery Hill

 

Gettysburg; The Second Day $20.00

 

Gettysburg; The First Day




3 pages, 5 1/4 x 7 1/4, in ink, written by Charles V. Bogart, to his Mother.


<b><u>Camp near Dechard Station, August 1/63</b></u>


Dear Mother,


Once more I am with the old 18th. I arrived here day before yesterday safe and sound. I am well at present hoping these few lines will find you the same. We are in camp in a very shady place and plenty of good spring water. [?] has been sick but he is about well now. Gill is well. Hank Swick is in a Company of Sharpshooters. I expect the Regiment had a pretty hard time of it after they left Murfreesboro. I expect you heard of Captain Thompson's death. **  He was taken to Chicago for to be buried. Gill was the only one in the Company that was hit but that did not hurt him. It first tore his pants a little. We have plenty to eat such as it is. We have lots of black berries here. I was out side of the pickets yesterday a blackberrying. I suppose you know that Phil Weaver has got back to the Regiment. He came back about two or three weeks ago. He is well. If you see any of Mr. Weaver's folks tell them where he is and that he is well. We have had lots of rain here lately. More than we want. I heard that Jane B. and John Finkle is married. Is it so. Did you get my last letter. I wrote it after I left the Hospital. I believe that is all at present so I will dry up. Write as soon as you get this. Good by.


From your Son,


Direct to C.V. Bogart

Co. G, 2nd Batt., 18 U.S. Inft.

Near Dechard Station, Tennessee


to follow the Regiment


Good by for this time.


Charles V. Bogart served in Co. G, 18th U.S. Infantry during the Civil War. After the war he was a member of G.A.R. Post #780, General Willich Post, in Des Plaines, Illinois. He died on November 26, 1909.


The 18th U.S. Infantry fought in the battles of Shiloh, Perryville, Stones River, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and in the Atlanta campaign.


** Captain John A. Thompson, 18th U.S. Infantry, was wounded in action on June 26, 1863, at Hoover's Gap, Tennessee. He died from his wounds on June 30, 1863.   


3 plus pages, 5 1/2 x 7 1/4, in ink, written by Charles V. Bogart, to his mother.


<b><u>Hd. Qrs., 2nd Brig., Chattanooga, Tenn., Nov. 10th/63</b></u>


Dear Mother,


Again I find myself seated to write a few lines to inform you that I am still alive & well and hearty and I hope these few lines will find you the same. We are still at Chattanooga yet and are likely to [stay] I think. The word has been that the Regular Brigade was a going North but I guess it is all knocked in the head. We are a getting a little more to eat now than we did a week or two ago. The boys had to suffer very much for a while but now there is plenty. I am very sorry to say, but I will have to, that poor Gill is out of his troubles and pains. Poor fellow he got along so well at first and now he is dead. Where is Nate and Cindy. I have not heard a word of them in a long time. Has Brian & Matt keeping house now? and how does Uncle Charles's folks get along and where is Pete. I have not heard from him in some time. When you see Grandma Lang tell her I saw [?] Carpenter the other day. He says he is a coming back if nothing splits more than a cough. Is Frank Bishop at home this winter. I have wrote to him often enough that I should think he might answer and Matt too. Why don't she write and let me know where the 12th Michigan Regiment is. The word is now that the 113 Ills. is a coming up here to help us. I hope they will for I would like to see some of them, and where is the 89th, Uncle Elie and all the rest! &c, &c, &c I guess I will have to bring my letter to a close for it is after bed time so good night to you all. Please write soon and oblige your son.


C.V. Bogart


Direct to Head Quarters, 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland


I had forgot to tell you we are expecting our pay in a few days. If we do get it the next letter will have some dollars in it. I shall have about 50 or 60 dollars for you. Write soon. Write all the news. Mr. C.V. Bogart, Mrs. C.V. Bogart.


Light age toning and wear.


Charles V. Bogart served in Co. G, 18th U.S. Infantry during the Civil War. After the war he was a member of G.A.R. Post #780, General Willich Post, in Des Plaines, Illinois. He died on November 26, 1909.


The 18th U.S. Infantry fought in the battles of Shiloh, Perryville, Stones River, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and in the Atlanta campaign.         


2 plus pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Charles V. Bogart, to his mother.


<b><u>Chattanooga, Tennessee, February 17th, 1864</b></u>


Dear Mother,


I thought I would sit down this evening and write a few lines to you to let you know I am still alive & well, hoping these few lines will find you the same. We are having pretty cold weather down here now that is cold for this country. It has been nice weather for a good while until day before yesterday, but since then it has not been pleasant. Do you remember what you was a doing two years ago today. If you don't remember what you was a doing I can remember what I done. Just two years ago today I put my name down for one of Uncle Sam's boys that is what I done. I have one year from today to stay that is if I don't re-enlist. I have a strong notion of it now. I am a going over to the regiment after I get this wrote. Perhaps I will get it in my head to try it three years longer. There is a great many of the boys that is re-enlisting and I can't see them all go and leave me back. If I do re-enlist tonight, the next letter you will get I will fetch myself. I believe I will close so good night. Write soon.


From your Son,

C.V. Bogart


Direct as before.


The bottom part of the last page has been cut off which does not affect any of the content of this letter. This was a common practice for soldiers to do as every scrap of writing paper could be precious to them, and that piece was most likely used to write another letter or note. Bold and neatly written.


Charles V. Bogart served in Co. G, 18th U.S. Infantry during the Civil War. After the war he was a member of G.A.R. Post #780, General Willich Post, in Des Plaines, Illinois. He died on November 26, 1909.


The 18th U.S. Infantry fought in the battles of Shiloh, Perryville, Stones River, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and in the Atlanta campaign.    


5 1/4 x 4, imprinted form, filled out in ink. 


No. 89. Treasurer of Amite County, $2.


Pay on the 1st day of May, A.D., 1862 to the order of H. McKnight, F.H. Sleeper, E.L. Tarvis, Wm. Jenkins and Thos. Garner Commissioners of the Military Fund of Amite County, the sum of Two Dollars, the same being the amount appropriated to J.M. Dye on the 23d day of January A.D., 1862, with interest at 8 per cent per annum from that date until paid.


Witness my hand and Official Seal this 5 day of February A.D., 1862, A.J. Whittington, Clerk, Moses Jackson, Pres't Board Police.


Written in ink on the reverse is T.H. Sleeper for Military Board. Filed & cancelled, May 19, 1862, A.J. Whittington. 


Embossed seal at lower left of the document. Light age toning and wear.

18th U. S. Infantry Letter, Dechard Stati

 

18th U. S. Infantry Letter $65.00

 

18th U. S. Infantry Letter, Chattanooga,

 

1862 Receipt Military Relief Fund Amite $40.00




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