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<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"Dear I am out of postage stamps.  I wish you would send me a few if you please.  Well we have a big snow here.  It commenced on Saturday night and snowed till last night.  It is over one foot deep, but the weather is not very cold."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife.


<b><u>Romney, Va., Feb. 23rd, 1863</b></u> 


My ever Dear and loving wife,


After my love to you and the children I will inform you that I recd. your letter of the 18th and 19th about 1 half hour ago.  I was very glad to hear from you but very sorry to hear of the accident that befell Willey, but hope it will not prove fatal.  It does seem that you have troubles and trials to endure than any other person, but I do hope that we may both live to see the time that we shall dwell in peace and happiness together with our little family.  We have seen many happy days together.  I do hope that it will not be long until I shall get home and then I think we shall be happy again.  I know it will be a happy day for me when I can get home to stay with you and my dear little children.  I wrote a letter to you yesterday in which I said what I thought in regard to old Katy’s talk about you.  I do not think her worth a minding for I think she will meet what she deserves if not in this world she will in the next, and as to my believing any such abominable lies I would as soon think of cutting my own throat as to believe such stuff.  I know that through all the ups and downs of life that you have been as true to me as the sun has been to shine and Dear I have been true to my promise to you for it does seem that I never loved you so much as I have since I have been away from you.  Well Dear, in regard to the money that you have on hand if you do not want to keep it all you may pay Uncle John the balance that I owe him, and I owe Gatchel I think about ten dollars which you may pay him, and if Mother wants any you might let her have some, and about that money of Mr. Neff’s I have written to him but have got no answer.  I would like to get from five hundred to one thousand dollars if I could get it.  I want you to send him word if you can and see what he will do and when I can get the money.  We have not been paid off yet but are still looking for it.  I want to come as soon as I get my money or at any rate by the middle of next month.  If Neff can let me have the money let me know it as soon as you can, and I will try and make arrangements to come after it as soon as possible.  Dear I am out of postage stamps.  I wish you would send me a few if you please.  Well we have a big snow here.  It commenced on Saturday night and snowed till last night.  It is over one foot deep, but the weather is not very cold.  Well Dear, I must conclude with my love to you and the children and to Mother.  I still remain your ever loving husband and may God bless you and keep you safe is my daily prayer.


Lieut. L. Lupton


Light staining and wear. 


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  


4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, November 10, 1863


General Orders

No. 363


Commanding officers of regiments will report in their monthly returns of deserters, the names of men joined from desertion, as well as those who deserted during the month.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Small stain at upper right edge which does not touch upon any of the content.  


4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, November 13, 1863


General Orders

No. 368


Paragraph 1420, General Regulations, edition of 1863, (paragraph 1389, edition of 1861), is modified, by inserting after the words "to his command," in the first sentence, the following sentence:


The Commanding Officer of a Regiment or Battalion serving in the field, will be accountable for all the surplus and reserve Ordnance Stores of the Regiment. The transportation of these stores will be provided for the same as the transportation of other stores, under the direction of the Commanding General.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Small stain at upper right corner which does not touch upon any of the content.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with illustration of a Union soldier standing at attention with musket and fixed bayonet with waving flag above with the motto, "The Union Forever." 5 1/2 x 3.

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

1863 Order Regarding Deserters $10.00

 

1863 Order Regarding Ordnance Stores $7.00

 

The Union Forever




<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"Well Dear, our Regiment is somewhat down in the mouth in regard to the way Captain Brown acted on last Monday.  I stated in my other letter that they went out on a foraging expedition and were surprised.  It seems that the facts of the case is about this, Capt. Brown and Lieut. Martin with 45 men of their Company and 8 cavalry went to guard a train of twenty seven wagons that went after hay.  They went about 12 miles, got their hay and had got back about 4 miles when they were surprised by 26 secesh cavalry.  Our men were scattered along on the wagons and did not see them until they were right in amongst them and they ordered them to surrender which they id without pretending to show fight.  Capt. Brown was pretty near the fore part of the train and when some of the men asked him what they should do he told them he did not know and then put spurs to his horse and left them to take care of themselves.  Where Lieut. Martin was nobody knows but he got to camp that evening."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife and children.


<b><u>Romney, Va., Feb. 20th/63</b></u> 


My Dear and loving wife and Children,


I thought as I had not much to do today I would talk to you a little on this sheet of paper.  I dreamed last night that I was at home with you and oh how happy I felt, but I was sadly disappointed when I woke and found it was only a dream.  I often think of what you told about John Couplin saying that when he was in the army that he hardly ever thought of home, but it is very different with me for I do not think of much else, that is while I am awake, and when I sleep I dream of you and oh how anxiously I wait for the mail in hopes that I will hear from home, but I have been very much disappointed of late for I have recd. only two letters from home since D. Barrett came from there, one from you and the other from Margy, but I think I will get one this evening.  Well Dear, our Regiment is somewhat down in the mouth in regard to the way Captain Brown acted on last Monday.  I stated in my other letter that they went out on a foraging expedition and were surprised.  It seems that the facts of the case is about this, Capt. Brown and Lieut. Martin with 45 men of their Company and 8 cavalry went to guard a train of twenty seven wagons that went after hay.  They went about 12 miles, got their hay and had got back about 4 miles when they were surprised by 26 secesh cavalry.  Our men were scattered along on the wagons and did not see them until they were right in amongst them and they ordered them to surrender which they did without pretending to show fight.  Capt. Brown was pretty near the fore part of the train and when some of the men asked him what they should do he told them he did not know and then put spurs to his horse and left them to take care of themselves.  Where Lieut. Martin was nobody knows but he got to camp that evening.  They took all but 6 of Brown’s men and two cavalry and nearly all the teamsters prisoner.  In all they took 79 men and about 100 horses and mules and burnt 20 wagons, 2 wagons got away and they left 5 which we got the next day, but it is quite a slur on the Regiment to have the secesh take three men to one of theirs.  They took our men about forty miles and then paroled them.  Brown’s men started right on for the balance of the men got back to the Regt. yesterday.  About one half of the men that were captured belonged to the cavalry and artillery that are here.  I tell you the men are down on Capt. Brown with a vengeance for his cowardly conduct for he has been one of our big fighters.  To hear him talk you would have thought that he was a match for about 10 common men, but he has shown what he could do with a vengeance.  They have him and Lieut. Martin under arrest and if they do not dismiss them from the service I shall think they will not serve them right, is certain that they are not fit to command men in the army.  Well I must bring my letter to a close Dear.  Remember me in your prayers and may the good Lord bless you.


From your loving husband.


Lieut. L. Lupton


Evening- the mail has come and I got no letter. Oh Dear.


Light age toning and wear. 


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  Six Thonet Bentwood Chairs with L-shaped arms in original condition.  Original upholstery, curved backs.  Perfect with any Mid century modern or contemporary table.  


Dimensions:


33" H x 23.2" W x 21" D  Six Thonet Bentwood Chairs with L-shaped arms in original condition.  Original upholstery, curved backs.  Perfect with any Mid century modern or contemporary table.  


Dimensions:


33" H x 23.2" W x 21" D  Beautiful 19th C. American Victorian Renaissance ladies swivel chair with carved inlaid crest. This elegant chair is executed in walnut and upholstered in the finest, most supple black leather with brass tack trim finish. We have a pair in stock.


Antiquarian Traders' chairs are reinforced so that when the user rocks back and forth, he can be assured that the chair will not break. A swivel base has been added and the legs have been hand carved to fit each chair. This chair is as beautiful as it is comfortable!

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

1369 Thonet Bentwood Chairs-set of 6 $4800.00

 

1369 Thonet Bentwood Chairs-set of 6 $4800.00

 

1533 American Renaissance Revival Ladies $1600.00




<b>Letters, Memoranda, and Other Writings of John G. Nicolay, 1860-1865</b>


Edited by Michael Burlingame. Published by Southern Illinois University Press, 2000. Soft cover, 274 pages, index, illustrated front piece. Brand new condition.


From the time of Abraham Lincoln's nomination for the presidency until his assassination, John G. Nicolay served as the Civil War president's chief personal secretary. Nicolay became an intimate of Lincoln and probably knew him as well as anyone outside his own family. Although he did not keep a diary, Nicolay recorded his conversations with the president in a series of memos. He wrote numerous letters to his assistant John M. Hay and others, describing the mood at the White House and expressing opinions that were almost certainly shaped by Lincoln. In this expertly edited collection, Michael Burlingame compiles Nicolay's memoranda, journal entries describing Lincoln's activities, and excerpts from most of the nearly three hundred letters Nicolay wrote to his fiancée, Therena Bates. This first paperback edition of "With Lincoln in the White House" offers essential information about Abraham Lincoln.


"Lincoln scholars will feast on this book." John Y. Simon, Executuve Director, Ulysses S. Grant Association


"Burlingame deserves thanks for making these important letters readily available to scholars and the general public." Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society


Burlingame, who has blessed us with a series of edited volumes of papers from Lincoln's White House circle, now brings together Nicolay's papers, carefully selected and annotated in marvelous and useful detail..."With Lincoln in the White House" is both editorially neat and brimming with glimpses into the very heart of the Lincoln administration." The Civil War News  <b>Burnside</b>


4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, November 16, 1863


General Orders

No. 369


I..By direction of the President of the United States, Major General J.G. Foster will relieve Major General A.E. Burnside in the command of the Department and Army of the Ohio. On being relieved, Major General Burnside will report in person to the Adjutant General of the Army.


II..The Department will hereafter consist of the State of Kentucky north of the Tennessee River, and such part of the State of Tennessee as may be occupied by the troops of that Army.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Small stain at upper right corner which does not touch upon any of the content. Desirable order.  Large 19th C. French Empire executive desk executed in mahogany with beautiful bronze trim.


This desk was rented by 20th Century Fox and featured in the 2011 film In Time starring Justin Timberlake and Amanda Syfried.  


<b>Signed by a captain who was wounded in five different battles, including Gettysburg, and was killed in action in 1864 at the battle of the Wilderness, Va.!</b>


16 x 10, two sided imprinted form filled out in ink. 


Return of Lieut. John Daugherty, Company F, of the 105 Regiment of Pa. Vols. Infantry, Army of the United States, Colonel C.A. Craig, for the month of June 1863. Itemized account of those present, absent, etc. Also accounts for enlisted men who are on extra duty and lists the enlisted men who are absent because of wounds and sickness. Includes 6 men who were wounded at the battle of Chancellorsville, Va., on May 3, 1863, and 2 who were wounded at [2nd] Bull Run, Va., Aug. 29, 1862. Signed at the bottom, W.J. Clyde, Capt. Co. A, Commanding Company. Light age toning and wear. Very desirable regiment. This document was for the period just before the regiment went into action at Gettysburg! 


William J. Clyde, enlisted on Sept. 6, 1861, as a 1st sergeant, and was mustered into the 105th Pennsylvania Infantry. 


He was wounded in action on the following dates and places:


June 30, 1862, Glendale, Va.

Aug. 29, 1862, 2nd Bull Run, Va.

Dec. 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va.

May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville, Va.

July 2, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.


He was killed in action on May 6, 1864, at the Wilderness, Va., holding rank of captain at the time of his death.


He is buried in the Fredericksburg National Cemetery, Gravesite #193


The hard fought 105th Pennsylvania Infantry saw action in many of the Civil War's greatest battles including; Yorktown, Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, Glendale, Malvern Hill, 2nd Bull Run, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Kelly's Ford, the Mine Run campaign, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Petersburg, and Sailor's Creek.


WBTS Trivia: In his after Gettysburg battle report, Colonel Calvin A. Craig, commanding the 105th Pennsylvania Infantry wrote, "The regiment never fought better or with more enthusiasm. The list of casualties proves with what determination they contested every inch of ground. All seemed to feel that they were fighting on the soil of their native State, and that they would either conquer or yield up their lives in her defense."

With Lincoln in the White House $25.00

 

President Lincoln Directs General Foster $25.00

 

7572 French Empire Desk in Mahogany w / B $7500.00

 

June 1863 Return, 105th Pennsylvania Inf




4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, October 19, 1863


General Orders

No. 345


The one hundred dollars bounty due at expiration of enlistment, will be paid by Paymasters to Veteran Volunteers re-enlisting, upon the usual discharge papers from their first enlistment.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning.  


4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, October 26, 1863


General Orders

No. 348


The Provost Marshal General having been authorized, September 5, 1863, to organize the companies of the Invalid Corps into Regiments, the limitation in paragraph 5, of General Orders, No, 173, under which no officer of the Corps can receive a commission higher than the grade of Major, is removed. The grades of Colonel and Lieutenant Colonel are authorized from September 5, 1863.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning.  <b>of the Army of the Tennessee</b>


4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, October 27, 1863


General Orders

No. 349


By direction of the President, Major General William T. Sherman is appointed to the command of the Department and Army of the Tennessee, Headquarters in the field, and Major General John A. Logan to the command of the 15th Army Corps.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning. 


 <b>Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina and Virginia</b>


Plate CXLII. Original atlas map that accompanied the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, 1861-65. Multi colored, includes parts of the states of Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina and Virginia on the same side of one large sheet that measures 29 x 18 1/2.


Includes scale of miles. Light age toning and edge wear.

Order Regarding Bounty Due Veteran Volun $7.00

 

1863 Order Regarding the Invalid Corps

 

President Lincoln Appoints General Willi $25.00

 

Topographical Map Showing Parts of Kentu




By Lloyd Lewis. Introduction by Mark E. Neely, Jr. Published by University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln, Ne., 1994. Softcover, 367 pages, index. Brand new condition. 


The Civil War officially ended at Appomattox soon after President Lincoln's second inauguration. During his first term he had been widely viewed by special interest groups as a good natured, indecisive bungler, and worse. In the South he was still despised, and many in the North, especially the radicals in the Republican party, distrusted and derided his leniency toward the vanquished. On the evening of April 14, 1865, an assassin's bullet irrevocably altered the way Abraham Lincoln would be viewed by Americans. In life a cunning politician, Lincoln became in death a selfless martyr. Lloyd Lewis explicates the mythology that evolved out of Lincoln's death, the outpouring of national grief, the pursuit of John Wilkes Booth and the conspirators, Booth's fate, and the frequent moving and reburial of Lincoln's coffin.


"One of the standard works on the drama and events around Lincoln's death and the realities and the myths that came after." Carl Sandburg


"Indispensable...to any historian of Lincoln's times, and it is fascinating reading. Lloyd Lewis presents in substance a brilliant study of the creation of myth out of natural event, and of the deification of a national hero." Outlook


  


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view wearing 4 button sack coat. Imprint on the front mount: J.A. Seibert, Northwest Corner Fifth and Market Streets, Saint Louis. Light age toning. J.A. Seibert was a known Civil War photographer.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of General John C. Fremont with American flag draped above him, with sword below. Major General J.C. Fremont, For President in 1864. "The stone which the builders rejected, the same is become the head of the Corner." Bible. Light staining. 5 1/2 x 3 1/8.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of Union gunboats and quote from Confederate newspaper, "There is no disaster of the present war which it is so difficult to bear with any degree of patience or philosophy, as the almost uniform success of the enemy's gunboats on our land batteries. It is a thing absolutely unprecedented in the history of warfare!" Richmond Dispatch, Feb. 21, 1862. Light staining. 5 x 3.

The Assassination of Lincoln; History an

 

CDV, Union Soldier Photographed in St. L $35.00

 

General John C. Fremont For President in

 

Our Gunboats Attacking The Rebel Forts

<b>of Fredericksburg, Virginia</b>


4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, November 7, 1863


General Orders

No. 360


Satisfactory evidence having been produced to the War Department that a bronze equestrian statue unlawfully taken from a private house in Fredericksburg, at the time of the capture of that place by the Union forces, was the private property of Mr. Douglas Gordon, of that city, it is-


Ordered: That it be restored to Mrs. Annie C. Thomas, the sister of Mr. Gordon, who has made application therefor.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning.  


4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, November 9, 1863


General Orders

No. 361


By direction of the President of the United States, Assistant Surgeon Benjamin King, U.S. Army, is hereby retired from active service, and his name will be entered on the retired list of officers of the grade to which he now belongs, in accordance with section 12, act approved July 17, 1862, he having been borne on the Army Register more than forty five years.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning.  <b>Army Corps


Major Generals McCook & Crittenden are relieved from duty pending an investigation of their conduct in battle!</b>


4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, D.C., September 28, 1863


General Orders

No. 322


I..The President of the United States directs that the 20th and 21st Army Corps be consolidated and called the 4th Army Corps, and that Major General Gordon Granger be the commander of this consolidated Corps.


II..It is also directed that a Court of Inquiry be convened, the detail to be hereafter made, to inquire and report upon the conduct of Major Generals McCook and Crittenden, in the battles of the 19th and 20th inst. These officers are relieved from duty in the Department of the Cumberland, and will repair to Indianapolis, Indiana, reporting their arrival, by letter, to the Adjutant General of the Army.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. Townsend

Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning.  


4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, September 28, 1863


General Orders

No. 325


Paragraph 156, Revised Army Regulations, 1861, is hereby amended, to read as follows:


A reward of thirty dollars will be paid for the apprehension and delivery of a deserter to an officer of the Army at the most convenient post or recruiting station. Rewards thus paid will be promptly reported by the disbursing officer to the officer commanding the company in which the deserter is mustered, and to the authority competent to order his trial. The reward of thirty dollars will include the remuneration for all expenses incurred for apprehending, securing, and delivering a deserter.


All Regulations and General Orders in conflict with this are hereby revoked. 


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning.

Bronze Equestrian Statue is Stolen at th $20.00

 

President Lincoln Orders Retirement of A $7.00

 

President Lincoln Orders the Consolidati $25.00

 

1863 Order Regarding Rewards For Deliver $15.00




<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"We met with a considerable loss yesterday. Three of our teams with 24 teams from the 123rd Regt. went out about 14 miles after hay and 48 men out of Capt. Brown’s Comp. went along as guards.  They had got their hay and were returning when they were surprised by a small squad of rebel cavalry variously estimated at from 30 to 200 men.  The surprise was so complete that I guess our men surrendered without any resistance.  Capt. Brown and Lieut. Martin and 7 men escaped.  They took near one hundred men in all and about one hundred horses and mules.  They destroyed about 20 wagons, the others got off."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife.


<b><u>Romney, Va., Feb. 17th, 1863</b></u> 


My ever Dear and loving wife,


After my love to you and the Dear children, I will inform you that I recd. your letter of the 11th last night which found me well and be sure I was glad to hear from you again.  There is nothing that does me so much good as getting a letter from home, but it would do me more good to get to come home, but I don’t know just when that will be.  I thought the most of us officers would have been discharged, but they have never took us through an examination yet and I don’t know when they will for I guess the committee has played out.  Well I am glad you can get around to see our relations for I think it will do you so much good to get away from home once in a while.  Well dear I guess you had better let old Katy alone and she will soon kill herself especially among all sensible people.  The old thing wants something and she don’t know what, but if she keeps on talking until I come home I will tell her what she needs.  If it was not for the traitors and secesh I think we would get home before long.  Well we met with a considerable loss yesterday.  Three of our teams with 24 teams from the 123rd Regt. went out about 14 miles after hay and 48 men out of Capt. Brown’s Comp.[any] went along as guards.  They had got their hay and were returning when they were surprised by a small squad of rebel cavalry variously estimated at from 30 to 200 men.  The surprise was so complete that I guess our men surrendered without any resistance.  Capt. Brown and Lieut. Martin and 7 men escaped.  They took near one hundred men in all and about one hundred horses and mules.  They destroyed about 20 wagons, the others got off.  Our wagoneers went out after some of the wagons today.  There is great blame laid on Capt. Brown for suffering himself to be surprised and I think it likely he deserves it for it seems to me that they must have been very careless or they need not have been surprised, but our company has been thrown into gloom and sorrow today by a sad accident that happened to one of our men resulting in his immediate death.  There is two brothers in our Company by the name of Byers.  They with about 25 of our men had been out on picket and came in about 10 o’clock when by some accident in putting their guns away one of them was discharged.  The ball struck Amos Byers [1] just behind the left ear making an awful wound & killed him instantly.  It was a sad sight to us all, but more so to his poor brother.  He leaves a wife and two children, a mother and sister to mourn his loss.  Well Dear, I must conclude with my love to you and the children.  I remain your ever loving husband.


Lieut. L. Lupton


Light age toning and wear. 


[1] Amos S. Byers, was 27 years old, when he enlisted as a private, on August 15, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was accidentally killed on February 17, 1863, at Romney, Va. Private Byers was buried in the Winchester National Cemetery, Winchester, Va.


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  


4 1/8 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, September 28, 1863


General Orders

No. 324


I.. The time for enlisting Veteran Volunteers under the provisions of General Orders, No. 191, current series from this Office, is hereby extended to December 1, 1863. This extension will not be considered as securing rank and pay to officers after August 25, the limit fixed in paragraph VI of the said order. 


II..Under paragraph III of the aforesaid order, the first installment of bounty [section 1] is hereby increased to $60, thus making the "total payment on muster" $75; and the "remainder of the bounty," [section 8] at the expiration of three years service, is reduced to $40.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning.  


<b>United States Congressman from Indiana</b>


(1822-93) Born in Dubois County, Indiana, he attended Indiana University, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1843, and commenced practice in Vincennes. He was a member of the Indiana State House of Representatives, 1849-50; member of the Indiana State Senate, 1850-53; Judge of the third judicial district, 1854-59; served as U.S. Congressman, 1857-61; member of the Indiana State House of Representatives, 1862-63; delegate to the Democratic National Conventions in 1864, 1868, and 1876; served again as a U.S. Congressman, 1865-75; Judge of the Indiana Supreme Court, 1877-89.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 3/8 x 2 3/4, in ink, W.E. Niblack, Vincennes, Indiana.  


<b>United States Congressman from Ohio</b>


(1816-70) Born in Onondaga County, New York, he attended the public schools, was employed as a clerk in the canal collector's office, and moved to Toledo, Ohio in 1849, where he worked as an agent in a merchant company. He later became engaged in transportation and the manufacture of illuminating gas and of coke. Served as U.S. Congressman, 1869-70.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 3/8 x 2, in ink, Truman H. Hoag, Ohio.

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

Order Regarding the Enlistment of Vetera $9.00

 

Autograph, William E. Niblack $9.00

 

Autograph, Truman H. Hoag $5.00




<b>United States Congressman from Delaware


Governor of Delaware</b>


(1821-93) Born near Summitt Bridge, New Castle County, Delaware, attended Pennington Seminary in New Jersey, taught school for awhile and then attended Wesleyan University, Middletown, Conn. He was a member of the State constitutional convention in 1853, and became interested in railroad operations and was a director of the Kent & Queen Annes Railroad. Served as a U.S. Congressman, 1869-73, and was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1872. Served as Governor of Delaware, 1887-91. 


<u>Signature With Sentiment and State</u>: 5 3/8 x 2 3/8, in ink, Your obdt. Servt., Benjamin T. Biggs, Delaware.  


<b>United States Congressman from Ohio</b>


(1810-74) Born in Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio, he learned the art of printing and subsequently became editor of the Gazette and Enquirer at Lancaster. He then studied law, was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in 1838 in Lancaster. He was a delegate to the Whig National Convention in 1852, and had an unsuccessful run for Governor of Ohio in 1856. He was a delegate to the Bell and Everett State convention in 1860 and served as president. He served as Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, 1862-67. Served as a U.S. Congressman, 1867-73, and was President of the Democratic State convention in 1869.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 1/2 x 4 1/2, in ink, P. Van Trump, Lancaster, Ohio.  <b>within the lines of the military occupation of the U.S. Army</b>


4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office 

Washington, October 9, 1863


General Orders

No. 331


THE PRESIDENT ORDERS:


1.. All houses, tenements, lands, and plantations, except such as may be required for military purposes, which have been or may be deserted and abandoned by insurgents within the lines of the military occupation of the United States forces in States declared by Proclamation of the President to be in insurrection, will hereafter be under the supervision and control of the Supervising Special Agent of the Treasury Department.


2.. All commanders of military departments, districts, and posts, will, upon receipt of this Order, surrender and turn over to the proper Supervising Special Agent such houses, tenements, lands, and plantations, not required for military uses, as may be in their possession or under their control; and all officers of the Army of the United States will, at all times, render to the Agents appointed by the Secretary of the Treasury, all such aid as may be necessary to enable them to obtain possession of such houses, tenements, lands, and plantations, and to maintain their authority over the same.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


There are 2 tiny punch holes at the left edge which do not affect any of the content. Light age toning.  


<b>"...appears to be a plan of the rebels for the destruction of the water transportation in the Valley of the Mississippi, and thus crippling the movements of our armies."</b>


4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, October 19, 1863


General Orders

No. 344


The Court of Inquiry instituted by Special Order, No. 408, of September 11, 1863, from the War Department, whereof Major General David Hunter, U.S. Volunteers, is President, and which convened in the city of St. Louis, Mo., September 21, 1863, "to investigate the circumstances attending the loss of a large amount of funds, by the destruction of the steamer Ruth by fire," has reported the following:


OPINION:


"After the examination of many witnesses and documents, and a careful inquiry into all the circumstances of the case, the Court is of the opinion that the steamer Ruth was fired by an incendiary. Not for the particular purpose- although that may have been an additional object- of destroying the public funds on board, but in conformity with what appears to be a plan of the rebels for the destruction of the water transportation in the Valley of the Mississippi, and thus crippling the movements of our armies." 


The Court is of opinion that "no Government officer, or agent of the funds, has been to blame for misconduct or neglect of duty in the premises." 


The foregoing opinion, having been duly submitted, is approved.


The Court of Inquiry, of which Major General Hunter is President, is dissolved.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning.

Autograph, Benjamin T. Biggs $10.00

 

Autograph, Philadelph Van Trump $8.00

 

Order by President Lincoln Regarding Reb $25.00

 

Order Regarding the Destruction of a Mis $18.00




4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, October 16, 1863


General Orders

No. 339


I- A declaration of Exchange having been announced by R. Ould, Esq., Agent for Exchange, at Richmond, Virginia, dated September 12, 1863, it is hereby declared that all officers and men of the United States Army captured and paroled previous to the 1st September, 1863, are duly exchanged.


The officers and men herein declared exchanged will immediately be sent to join their respective regiments.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:


E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning.  


4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, October 12, 1863


General Orders

No. 333


The Counties of Hancock, Brooke, and Ohio, in West Virginia, are hereby detached from the Department of the Monongahela and added to the Department of West Virginia, under Brigadier General B.F. Kelly.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


There are two tiny punch holes at the left edge which do not affect any of the content. Light age toning.  


<b>Signed by North Carolina soldier captured at Bentonville, N.C. and confined at Point Lookout Prison</b>


8 1/2 x 11, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


May the 13, 1901. To the United Daughters of the Confederacy: The undersigned residing at Blount Creek, Beaufort Co., N.C., who is an Ex-Confederate Soldier, but not a member of any Camp, hereby makes application for a Confederate Cross of Honor. Applicant entered the service of the Confederate States on the 5 day of April 1862, as a private in Company C of the 40 Regiment of North Carolina Volunteers, C.S.A., and was at that time a resident of Beaufort County, N.C. Your applicant was honorably discharged from said service by General Johnston after the fight at Bentonville, near Charlotte on the 5 day of April or about that time 1865, at which time he held the rank of a private. Respectfully, J.W. Weston, Applicant. We endorse the above application. B.C. Cox, Member Co. I, Reg't 10 Vols., C.S.A. W.N. Long, Member Co. C, Reg't 40 Vols., C.S.A. There are 2 small punch holes in the document at top edge which do not affect any of the content. Light age toning. 


Wilson N. Long, one of those who signed this document, was captured at the battle of Bentonville, N.C., and was confined as a prisoner of war at Point Lookout, Md. He took the oath of allegiance to the U.S. and was released on June 28, 1865.  


<b>United States Congressman from New York</b>


(1826-1908) Born in Blenheim, New York, he studied law in Ithaca, was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in 1848; served as the superintendent of schools in Schoharie County, N.Y., 1852-57, and was supervisor, 1857-60; district attorney of Schoharie County, 1859-62; member of the New York State Assembly in 1863; U.S. Congressman, 1869-71, and 1877-79; Judge of Schoharie County, 1883-87; delegate to the Democratic National Conventions in 1884 and 1892; Judge of the Supreme Court of New York and afterward presiding justice, 1886-96.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 4, in ink, S.L. Mayham, Schoharie, N.Y.

Order Regarding Exchange of Prisoners of $15.00

 

Order Realigning the Department of West $10.00

 

Application For a Confederate Cross of H $35.00

 

Autograph, Stephen L. Mayham $8.00

<b>by the President</b>


4 1/2 x 6 1/2, 100 pages, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, September 18, 1863


General Orders

No. 316


Promotions and appointments in the Army of the United States, made by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, and by the President alone, since the publication of General Orders No. 181, of November 1, 1862, and up to July 1, 1863. Those made by the President alone are designated by a star. Lengthy document listing promotions which are organized by army departments, branches of the service, regiment, rank, etc. Some very interesting notations are included such as in the case where a promotion was caused by the death of another officer. For example on page one under Adjutant General's Department- Major James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant General, to be Assistant Adjutant General, with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, December 31, 1862, vice Garesche, killed in battle. In the section that lists those officers who have been promoted to the rank of Major General, some have died since their promotion; for example, Joseph K.F. Mansfield, died of wounds in battle; Isaac I. Stevens, killed in battle; Hiram G. Berry, killed in battle; and Amiel W. Whipple, died of wounds in battle. This 100 page document is full of interesting information such as on the last page where Major General Fitz John Porter is listed as having been cashiered from the army on January 21, 1863. Signed in print by E.D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant General, the order having been issued by order of the Secretary of War. Small stain at the upper right edge of the pages which is just barely visible. The left edge of the pages have 2 very small punch holes which do not affect any of the content, and there is some edge chipping and wear. Very interesting 1863 imprint listing many officers who earned fame in the Civil War and who you would be quite familiar with.       Reminiscent of the popular English fired Wedgewood is this appealing little jasperware decorative dish.  Unmarked as to maker but showing good evidence of age while remaining in pleasing condition with no chips, cracks or other condition issues, this plate measures approximately 4 11/32 inches in diameter.  An attractive item for the Lincoln collector. <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best.  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !


 This eye appealing wicker bottle stands just over 13 ¼ inches high and is about 4 ¾  inches in diameter and remains in excellent original condition with lots of eye appeal.  Good age coloration and an easily displayable size will make this all original Civil War vintage personal item fit well in any period grouping.  please note:  ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!.  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  Published weekly by patients and a former nurse, the <I>Armory Square Hospital Gazett</I> was produced for the staff and patients of the hospital from January, 1864 through August, 1865.  Armory Square Hospital received some of the worst soldier casualties from Virginia’s battlefields.  Published in an unusually small format of only four 13 X 10 ½ inch pages, the little paper has become a sought after memento of the well-known hospital as it recorded the tragedy of the war through its frequently lengthy casualty rosters.  Though assured a National prominence by virtue of its Washington D. C. location and multiple visits by President Lincoln and the poet turned nurse Walt Whitman, the little hospital<I>house organ</I> was produced limited in numbers with, what by circumstance, was a high mortality rate.  Surviving examples are thus quite rare with those recording major battles and other significant occurrences especially prized.  This example of the <I>Armory Square Hospital Gazette</I> is dated April 29, 1865.  General Robert E Lee has surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia and a lengthy front page article is titled <B> Death of the Rebellion</B> followed by<B> The Murder of Mr. Lincoln -- The Enormity of the Crime – The Assassin </B>  Early reports prompt a one line notation separately set at a column end at the bottom of the page.  <B><I>Booth the murderer of the President was captured at Port Royal, Maryland.</I></B>  The all too brief notation reflects the initial news of Booth’s capture but lacks important details.  The appearance of the notation fitted in by its self in standard column font at the bottom of the second page would indicate that the news of Booths capture had just been receiver at press time.  Limited in size as it is, the back page of the <I>Gazette</I> is devoted to advertising.  Clearly aimed toward the interests of the masses of soldiers in the Capitol City, more particularly ambulatory patients of the Hospital, the ads tout the services of photographers, druggists, military goods suppliers, gold watch and jewelry buyers and sellers and more.  A more somber notice offers a directory of <I>Sons of Temperance</I> then the large advertisement headed <B>Dr. Holmes - Embalming of the Dead</B>.  Considered the father of modern embalming  the ad touts Dr. Thomas Holmes as <I>The First Embalmer of the United States; The First in Washington City & in the Union Army</I> and offers a roster of the names and dates of his embalming the bodies no fewer than 45 Army officers from General rank through Major, adding that he has done <I>upwards of 2018 other soldiers of our Army, among whom were a large number of Captains and Lieutenants.</I>  (Dr. Holmes embalmed Col. Elsworth and young Willie Lincoln.  The first of U. S. Presidents to be embalmed, it was at the request of Mrs. Lincoln, remembering Dr. Holmes service to her son Willie and Colonel Ellsworth, that her fallen husband was embalmed.)  A rarely surviving  issue of the <I>Armory Square Hospital Gazett</I> with limited publication in the tumult of Washington City the closing of the Civil War and the assignation of Abraham Lincoln.  All original and in solid condition with no rips, tears or repairs.  Period quarter folds have not impacted on the integrity of the sheet.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

1863 Promotions and Appointments Made in $35.00

 

unusual - vintage Abraham Lincoln Jasper

 

Civil War era WICKER JUG $55.00

 

original Civil War - Armory Square Hospi $225.00

A rare specialty item for the collector of early antique medical instruments and equipment is this set of six ivory vaccinating points.  Believed to hold special properties in the transfer of material for immunization against smallpox these ivory points were a staple in any early medical bag.  These are still housed in their original embossed paper mache case, the construction of which is the same as seen in 1700s early to mid 1800s razor cases.  Case and ivory points are in fine original condition. <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best.  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  In a collecting field steeped with variations requiring a specialized appreciation of those variations, there is likely someone out there that will recognize this attractive Zouave fez as indicative to a particular regiment but we will leave that to the experts relying on our knowledge of textiles and our fifty plus years of paying attention to Civil War relics in general as we offer our description of this rarely surviving period fez.  With that our photos will still offer the best description of this wonderful crimson red fez of that wonderfully soft  heavy wool felt so indicative of period examples.  Most desirable to hungry moths it seems as original examples in this material seldom survive in any kind of condition, this one displays some moth tracking as evidence of age and originality but is solid with no holes. Weather the early <B>A</B> button with bullion trim is a remnant of the original wearer’s personal preference or a variation indicative of a particular group will be left to those sepia lists we mentioned earlier.  The <B>A</B> company designation is of the period lead filled variety with wire fasteners and like the button and bullion tape embellishment appears original to the fez.    With a collector’s reluctance to part with such a find we have had this piece set aside in one of our storage tubs for years but as we try to pare down it is likely best placed in a more appreciative home.  A scarcely surviving example of the popular basic style of Civil War Zouave headgear.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques ! 


<CENTER><FONT COLOR=#800000>If you have an interest in neat Civil War period things or Maine in the time, you may enjoy our museum site at:</FONT COLOR=#800000></CENTER>

<CENTER><B><I>MaineLegacy.com</I></B></CENTER>

  


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a Union cavalryman on horseback with tents in the background. 5 5/8 x 3 1/4.  


<b>Front page illustration of General George A. Custer leading a cavalry charge on horseback brandishing his sword!</b>


Other illustrations include: full page portrait of General Hugh Judson Kilpatrick. Map of the Rebellion as it Was in 1861 and as it is in 1864. Double page centerfold of The Moon as Seen Through Dr. Henry Draper's Telescope. View of Hunstsville, Alabama. Dragging Artillery Through the Mud. General Logan's Command Crossing Look Out Creek Into East Tennessee. The 20th U.S. Colored Regiment Receiving Their Battleflag, and more. Light age toning and wear. Extremely desirable issue with General Custer on the front page!

early cased Ivory Vaccinating Points

 

Civil War era Zouave Fez $2500.00

 

United States Cavalry

 

Harper's Weekly, March 19, 1864




Civil War patriotic imprint with illustration of Colonel John K. Murphy with his name printed below and "Col. J.K. Murphy's 29th Regiment P.V." at top center. Published by Magee, 316 Chestnut St., Phila. Light staining. 5 1/2 x 3.  Four lovely 10 1/2 inch dinner plates in the Sandhurst pattern no. 9742 in excellent condition.  See photos for Noritake marks and our other auctions for other items in this pattern.  Combined purchase will result in shipping savings.  Four beautiful 8 1/2 inch luncheon plates in the Sandhurst pattern no. 9742 in excellent condition.  See photos for Noritake marks and our other auctions for other items in this pattern.  Combined purchase will result in shipping savings.  Four lovely 6 inch bread and butter plates in the Sandhurst pattern 9742 in excellent condition.  See photos for Noritake Japan marks and our other auctions for other items in this pattern.  Combined purchase will result in shipping savings.

Colonel J. K. Murphy, 29th Pennsylvania V $25.00

 

Four Noritake Sandhurst Dinner Plates $49.00

 

Four Noritake Sandhurst 8 in Luncheon Pl $40.00

 

Four Noritake Sandhurst 6 inch B + B Pla $45.00




<b>For soldier wounded in the battle of Winchester, Virginia</b>


8 x 10, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


The United States, To Dawson Burt, Private, discharged from K Company, 10 Regiment of Vermont Vols. For pay from 1 of July, 1864, to 16 of June 1865, being 7 months, 15 days, at 16 dollars per month. $120.00. Bounty Due, $75.00. For pay for traveling from Washington, D.C., the place of my discharge, to Newport, Vermont, the place of my residence, 599 miles, at twenty miles per day, equal to 29 days, at 16 dollars per month. $15.46. For subsistence for traveling as above, 29 days, at 50 cents per ration or day. $14.50. Deduct for clothing withdrawn, $144.62. Balance $168.60. Received of Maj. N.S. Brinton, Paymaster U.S. Army, this 3 day of July 1865, One hundred & sixty eight dollars and sixty cents, in full of the above account. Dawson Burt.


Very fine.


Dawson Burt, a 17 year old resident of Derby, Vermont, enlisted as a private on July 30, 1862, and was mustered into Co. K, 10th Vermont Infantry. He was severely wounded in the right forearm on September 19, 1864, in the battle at Winchester, Va. He was discharged from the 10th Vermont Infantry on June 16, 1865, and enlisted in the Regular U.S. Army serving until his discharge on January 17, 1868. 


The 10th Vermont Infantry participated in the battles of Antietam, Orange Grove, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Monocacy, Winchester, Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek, and Sailor's Creek.  


<b>Signed by an officer who was wounded at New Bern, N.C., 2nd Manassas, and Fredericksburg, Va., and was wounded and captured while in command of the regiment during Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg!


He was pierced by 11 bullets during the war and survived to be confined in a Yankee prison!</b>


7 3/4 x 5, in ink.  Camp Graham, for the period Jan. 22nd ending Jan. 29, [1862]. Capt. J. McLeod Turner's Co. F, Seventh Regiment of N.C.S.T. Includes itemized account for pork, flour, rice, rye, sugar, vinegar, candles, salt and soap for 77 men and 4 women.  Signed, J.M. Turner, Capt., Co. F, Comd. Co.  Light age toning and wear.


John McLeod Turner, was a 21 year old engineer, from Rowan County, N.C., when he enlisted on May 16, 1861, as a captain, and was commissioned into Co. F, 7th North Carolina Infantry.  He was wounded on March 14, 1862, at New Bern, N.C.; wounded on Aug. 29, 1862, at 2nd Manassas; wounded on Dec. 13, 1862, at Fredericksburg, Va.; promoted to major, May 3, 1863; wounded and captured on July 3, 1863, at Gettysburg; hospitalized at Gettysburg; hospitalized at Baltimore, Md.; confined at Fort McHenry, Baltimore; transferred to Fort Delaware, Del., Sept. 10, 1864; promoted to lieutenant colonel, Nov. 28, 1864; paroled on May 1, 1865, at Salisbury, N.C.  During the War Between The States, Captain Turner was pierced by 11 bullets, and was partially paralyzed!


The hard fought 7th North Carolina Infantry took an active part in the fight at New Bern, then moved to Virginia where they became part of the Army of Northern Virginia. After fighting at Hanover Court House, the regiment participated in the various campaigns of the A.N.V. from the Seven Days Battles to Cold Harbor, and were also involved in the siege of Petersburg. They suffered 51 casualties at New Bern, 253 out of the 450 engaged during the Seven Days Battles, 69 at 2nd Manassas, 52 at Sharpsburg, 86 at Fredericksburg, 37 killed and 127 wounded at Chancellorsville, of the 291 engaged at Gettysburg, 31% fell, 5 were killed and 62 wounded in the Wilderness, and 11 were killed and 28 wounded at Spotsylvania. On Feb. 26, 1865, the regiment was sent back to North Carolina where they eventually surrendered with the Army of Tennessee with 13 officers and 139 men. A detachment of the unit had also been left with the A.N.V. and they surrendered with only 1 officer and 18 men left.  Lovely 9 inch vegetable bowl in the Sandhurst pattern in excellent condition.  See photos for Noritake marks and our other listings for other pieces in this pattern.  Beautiful creamer and covered sugar in the Sandhurst pattern in excellent condition.  See photos for Noritake Japan marks and our other listings for other pieces in this pattern.

10th Vermont Infantry Pay, Bounty & Trav $35.00

 

7th North Carolina Infantry Provision Re

 

Noritake Sandhurst 9 inch Oval Vegetable $45.00

 

Noritake Sandhurst Creamer + Covered Sug $55.00

14 inch Noritake Sandhurst Oval Platter in excellent condition.  See photos for Noritake Sandhurst marks and our other listings for other pieces in this pattern.  


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"There is one thing that is working against our cause very much, and that is the disloyal sentiments that are expressed by those who are at home.  Some of them write to the soldiers and tell them that they are fools for staying in the army, that it is nothing but a negro war, and all this kind of stuff."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife and children.


<b><u>Romney, Va., Feb. 14th/63</b></u> 


Dear wife and children,


Although I have not heard from home for several days and have wrote to you twice since I got a letter from you my Dear, and you may believe that I am very anxious to hear from you again, but I will try and write two or three times every week any how.  Well, I am in good health at present and do sincerely hope that the few lines may find you enjoying the same blessing.  Well, we are still laying here and I don’t know how long we shall stay here, but perhaps all winter, and I believe I would as [soon] leave [as] stay here as any other place except at home with my little family for I shall not be very well contented any place until I can get home to stay, and I do hope that it may not be very long till that time arrives.  There is one thing that is working against our cause very much, and that is the disloyal sentiments that are expressed by those who are at home.  Some of them write to the soldiers and tell them that they are fools for staying in the army, that it is nothing but a negro war, and all this kind of stuff, and that if they will come home that they will help to keep the officers from getting them back again, but I am very thankful that we have none of that kind with us, but if our boys ever get home then these men will have to keep very quiet or they will get something that will help to quiet them for if we have to fight rebels we would fight them as quick in old Monroe as we would in old Virginia, and I have heard a good many of the boys say that they would never take a word of Northern Butternut or Copperhead, but to change the subject I will just say that the pay master has not been round yet, but we are still expecting him.  For my own part I do not care if he does not come before the middle of March so that he would be sure to come then.  Well there seems a very poor chance for a well man to get out of the army at this time.  Two Captains and two Lieuts. have resigned, and have gone home and I am glad of it.  There is two or three more that I wish were at home for they are not fit for service.   They are only in the road of better men for I think if they were gone that we would have their places filled with men that would be on hand for duty when ever they were needed.  Well, I got a letter from Father and Mother this week and was very glad to get a letter from them and to hear that they were well.  I also got one from Maggy which I answered.  Well, I will have to bring this letter to a close as I am officer of the guard today and will have to go on duty pretty soon.  I have been round to the pickets this afternoon along with the field officer of the day.  We went on horseback.  It takes about three hours to go the rounds.  It is about 14 miles ride.  I did expect to get a letter from home this evening but the cars ran off of the track and so we got no mail today so farewell Dear.  May the Lord bless you is the daily prayer of your still true and loving husband.


Lieut. L. Lupton


Light age toning and wear. 


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  Beautifully framed American silk embroidery. Framed under glass. Eagle crest with glass eye. Metallic threading for anchor. Stars and stripes shield panel. Banner reads 'Remembrance of My Cruise China, Japan and PI' Painting on silk in lower panel with silver threaded framing around it. Teddy Roosevelt decided that America needed to deal with its Asian neighbors so he opened trade with them. It was called the Open Door policy. Gunboat diplomacy originated here. These were made for the American fleet so that the sailors could be sent home souvenirs from the orient.


At the end of the 19th century the United States was rising as a world power. The U.S. Navy cruised the oceans to Show The Flag to emerging Far East countries. Merchants in the 'Treaty Port' cities of Hong Kong, Tokyo and Manila commissioned artisans to adapt their skills to create beautiful low relief embroideries for sailors and officers who visited their ports. They mixed gold, silver and copper silk thread along with hand painted panels of their ships to create a highly effective memorial of their visits to these ports.


Embroideries featured their national symbols in impressive compositions with lovely detail work. They came in various sizes and designs. The ones owned by AT represent the largest and most impressive of those ever created. These pieces featured their ships done in one off original paint, a series of flags from the different Treaty countries, a photograph of the young sailor and often times a photo of his captain. 


Most were special ordered and turned out in an efficient fashion in time for the sailor’s departure. These exceptional creations were the highest expression of this art form. They were also the most expensive and delicate works of the genre and consequently few were produced. 


These finely done highly detailed original guache paintings are portraits of U.S.Navy Armored Cruisers of the 'PENNSYLVANIA' or 'DREADNAUGHT' class, 1906, flying an Admiral's pennant these were likely the flagships of the Pacific Fleet. 


This rare example is exceptional in its size, condition, inclusion of the sailor's photograph, and inclusion of a fine original painting of his ship. We have presented it in a magnificent gilt frame so that it can hang in a man’s library as a piece of art.


Beautifully framed and measure 58"H x 48"W x 3"D.  A white ironstone platter decorated with the Blue Tulip design. It is 12 1/2 x 10 inches. Mint condition with excellent color and detail. Elsmore + Forster. It is actually stamped Foster incorrectly. Ca. 1850s.

Noritake Sandhurst 14 inch Oval Platter $65.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

7732 Framed Japanese Silk Naval Embroide $12500.00

 

WHITE IRONSTONE PLATTER, BLUE TULIP $80.00

A white ironstone platter decorated with the Blue Tulip design. It is 11 1/2 x 9 1/4 inches. Mint condition with excellent color and detail. Elsmore + Forster. Ca. 1850s.  Three white ironstone plates decorated with the Blue Ceres design. 8 3/4 inches D. Excellent condition. Made by Elsmore + Forster. Ca. 1850s. Price is for all 3.  Two white ironstone plates and one soup bowl. One 10 inch dinner plate made by Turner + Goddard in the Wheat shape. Excellent condition. One 9 1/2 inch Soup bowl in the Ceres shape. Exc. condition with a tight 1/2 inch lg. rim hairline. One 10 inch dinner plate in the Budded Vine shape. made by J + G Meakin. Has wear, crazing and minor bullseyes. All date to mid 1800s. Sold as one.  Three(3) white ironstone plates with Blue Tulip decoration. 6 1/2 inches D. Mint condition with nice color and detail. Price is for all 3. Made by Elsmore + Forster. Ca. mid 1800s.

WHITE IRONSTONE PLATTER, BLUE TULIP $80.00

 

3 IRONSTONE PLATES, BLUE CERES $45.00

 

WHITE IRONSTONE SOUP AND PLATES $30.00

 

3 IRONSTONE PLATES, BLUE TULIP $45.00




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