View Orders Back to AntiqueArts Home Page Come and view all that's new! Come and view all that's new! More than 135 upscale Antiques shops Would you like to sell your antiques here? A guide to more than 40,000 antique shops nationwide Have a question or suggestion? A comprehensive guide to antiques resources on the World Wide Web
Antique Arts Showcase
What's New in the Collector's Showcase?
The Most Recent Additions to This Category are First!


 Architectural Antiques
 Art
 Arts & Crafts Era
 Art Deco
 Autographs
 Bed Bath & Vanity
 Books
 China & Dinnerware
 Clocks & Watches
 Coins & Currency
 Cultures & Ethnicities
 Figurines
 Furniture & Accessories
 Glass
 Jewelry
 Lamps & Lighting
 Memorabilia
 Metalware
 Militaria
 Miscellaneous
 Music Related
 Paper & Ephemera
 Photographica
 Political
 Porcelain & Pottery
 Silver
 Textiles
 Toys

 Single linen pillowcases all hand stitched late 1800s.

This  handmade pillowcase measures 22 by 33 inches, the French stitched seams are sewn by hand.  The linen is soft with a cool, fluid hand found only in quality antique linens.  There is a 1/3 inch hole on one side, the case is otherwise in very good condition, I have washed and pressed it.

 Pair linen pillowcases all hand stitched late 1800s.

This pair of handmade pillowcases measures 22 by 33 inches, the French stitched seams are sewn by hand.  The linen is soft with a cool, fluid hand found only in quality antique linens.  Both pillowcases have some light to moderate stains, on one they are small in a group on one side, on the other they are large and mostly on one side. I think some time laid out wet in the bright sun for an hour or 2 will take them out (the sun takes out almost any stain) they are otherwise good.  I have washed and pressed them.

  Pair linen pillowcases all hand stitched late 1800s.

This pair of handmade pillowcases measures 22 by 33 inches, the French stitched seams are sewn by hand.  The linen is soft with a cool, fluid hand found only in quality antique linens.  One pillowcase is excellent, no stains or holes, the other case has some grey stains on one side, it is otherwise good.  I have washed and pressed them.

 Quality linen queen size sheet circa 1910

This white linen sheet set measures 90 by 104 inches, circa early 1900s, it has a hand stitched monograms that read HG.  The sheet is in excellent condition, I have washed and pressed it.  The linen is very soft, cool to touch with a drapey, fluid hand found only in antique linens of high quality.

Single linen pillowcases all hand stitch $25.00

 

Pair linen pillowcases all hand stitched $60.00

 

Pair linen pillowcases all hand stitched $75.00

 

Quality linen queen size sheet circa 191 $140.00

Queen linen sheet and pillowcase circa 1910

This white linen sheet set circa early 1900s consists of a sheet measuring 90 by 104 inches and a single pillowcase 24 by 36 inches, they have matching hand stitched monograms that read HG.  The pillowcase is entirely hand stitched, there is a small 1/3 inch hole at one corner, it is otherwise all good.  The sheet has 3 small specs at the bottom, it is otherwise in excellent condition, I have washed and pressed them.  The linen is very soft, cool to touch with a drapey, fluid hand found only in antique linens of high quality.

 


<b>For a private wounded in the 1864 battle of Spotsylvania, Virginia</b>


10 1/8 x 15 1/2, two sided, imprinted form, filled out in ink. The United States In Account with Private Asbury Eckman, of C Company, Ninety Third Regiment of Penna. Infantry on Account of Clothing during his enlistment; the money value of each issue being hereby acknowledged. Enlisted at Lebanon, Pa., on the Sixteenth day of September 1861. Individual entries are dated from October 1861 to August 1862, with the appropriate money values. Includes a notation that he lost articles in the battle of Fair Oaks, Va., in May 1862. The document has been signed 5 times by Asbury Eckman, and has been witnessed 5 times by William W. Murray. Murray also signs the document one more time at the bottom as Captain Commanding the Company. The opposite side of the document has the clothing account of Private Daniel H. Fries, who also enlisted in Co. C, 93rd Pennsylvania Infantry, at Lebanon, Pa., on the Tenth day of September 1861, and has been signed 4 times each by Fries and William W. Murray, plus the additional signature of Murray at the bottom as Captain Commanding the Company. Light age toning and edge wear. Very fine. 


Asbury Eckman, was wounded in action on May 12, 1864, at the battle of Spotsylvania, Va.  


The 93rd Pennsylvania Infantry saw action in the 1862 Virginia peninsular campaign, the 7 Days battles, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg and Appomattox, to name but a few of their battle honors.

 


<b>Governor of Florida</b>


(1831-89) A lawyer by occupation, he served as a judge for Escambia County, Florida from 1857 through 1861. During the War Between the States, Perry fought with distinction for the Confederacy, rising from the rank of private to brigadier general. In May 1861, he enlisted in the "Pensacola Rifle Rangers," which was later designated Company A of the 2nd Florida Infantry, and was elected as its captain. A year later, he was elected colonel of the regiment. In June 1862, he was wounded during the battle of Glendale, Va. during the Peninsula campaign. On August 28, 1862, he was promoted to rank of brigadier general and he returned to active duty the following year. He led an all Florida brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia at the battle of Chancellorsville, but was stricken with typhoid fever and missed the Gettysburg campaign. Perry returned to the Army of Northern Virginia to command his brigade in the Bristoe campaign in the fall of 1863. He was severely wounded in the battle of the Wilderness on May 6, 1864. He briefly returned to the trenches during the Siege of Petersburg, but had not recovered sufficiently for active duty. Hence, he was sent to Alabama for the duration of the war, serving in the Confederate Invalid Corps. After the war he resumed his law practice, and served as Governor of Florida from 1885-89.


Antique photograph, in Confederate uniform. This is a late 1800's copy photograph of an engraved portrait of Perry. Overall size is 7 3/8 x 9. Light staining. General Perry is extremely rare to find in a war date image.  


<b>Medal of Honor recipient for gallantry at the 1863 battle of  Chancellorsville, Virginia


Document Signed</b>


(1837-1922) Gilmore enlisted at Potsdam, N.Y., as a captain, and was commissioned into the 16th New York Infantry. He was promoted to major, on September 29, 1862, and was awarded the Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry during the battle of Chancellorsville, Va., when on May 3, 1863, he seized the regimental colors and rallied his men who were under devastating Confederate fire. He was mustered out on May 22, 1863, upon the expiration of the regiment's term of service. He re-enlisted on March 24, 1865, and was commissioned lieutenant colonel of the 193rd New York Infantry. He mustered out of the volunteer service on January 18, 1866. Gilmore subsequently served in the Regular U.S. Army from 1866 to 1901. He saw duty on the western frontier, he served as Assistant Adjutant General of the U.S. Army, and during the Spanish American War he served as Chief of Staff to Lieutenant General Nelson A. Miles, serving in both Puerto Rico and Cuba. He was also a member of the board of officers who prepared the Infantry, Cavalry, and Light Artillery Drill Instructions and Manual of Guard. He is buried at Arlington National Cemetery.


<u>Document Signed</u>: 7 3/4 x 9 3/4, imprinted Special Orders, signed in ink.


Headquarters Of The Army

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, October 17, 1892


Special Orders

No. 244


Extract


6. Under the provisions of General Orders, No. 128, October 29, 1890, from this office, a board of officers, to consist of 


Colonel Henry L. Abbot, Corps of Engineers;

Colonel Cyrus B. Comstock, Corps of Engineers;

Colonel Davis C. Houston, Corps of Engineers;

Colonel Charles T. Alexander, assistant surgeon general;

Major Ezra Woodruff, surgeon;


is by direction of the acting Secretary of War, appointed to meet, at the call of the senior member thereof, in the rooms of the Board of Engineers, Army Building, New York City, to examine such officers of the Corps of Engineers as may be ordered before it, with a view to determining their fitness for promotion, as contemplated by the act of Congress approved October 1, 1890. The junior engineer officer will act as recorder.  


By Order Of Major General Schofield:

R. WILLIAMS

Adjutant General


Official:

J.C. Gilmore

Assistant Adjutant General


[to] Col. Abbot

Thro Chief of Engrs.



Comes with an 8 x 10, glossy black and white copy photograph of Gilmore in uniform from the U.S. Army Military History Institute.


Nice large and bold signature of Gilmore. This is the copy of this order that was sent to Colonel Henry L. Abbot.

Queen linen sheet and pillowcase circa 1 $155.00

 

1861 Clothing Account, 93rd Pennsylvania $25.00

 

General Edward A. Perry, Confederate Sta $10.00

 

Autograph, Lieutenant Colonel John C. Gi $50.00




Antique, silver print photograph. 4 3/4 x 7 3/4. Half view seated pose of a Confederate officer wearing a double breasted frock coat. Old pencil inscription on the reverse, "Lt. Williamson of Richmond, Va." Light wear. Circa early 1900's vintage copy photograph.   


By Harris Andrews, Christopher Nelson, Brian Pohanka and Harry Roach. A Military Images Publication From Guidon Press, E. Strousburg, Pa., 1988, softcover, 8 1/2 x 11, 96 pages, profusely illustrated, new condition. Autographed and presented on the title page,"To Len Rosa, Friend & Colleague, Chris Nelson, Gettysburg 125th." Signed on the 125th Anniversary of the battle of Gettysburg. This excellent book on Civil War cavalry comes from my own personal collection. 


Front Cover Photograph: Private William H. Harding, 3rd Battalion, 5th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, photographed at Camp Dennison, Ohio, on November 2nd, 1862. Half plate tintype in a private collection.


In the 19th Century no branch of military service proved more appealing to recruits, or more inspiring to public imagination, than did the cavalry. Soldiers on horseback seemed bigger than life, and born for the charge. Foam-flecked mounts, thundering hoofs, flashing sabers, the bugle's stirring blast- this was the ethos of the cavalryman, and war an arena for his deeds of glory.


Here within these pages are a superb selection of images representing both Union and Confederate cavalry troopers from some of the best private collections in the country.


It has been said that the American Civil War was the last of the old wars and the first of the new. As you observe these remarkable images you will see not only the moving, human faces of war, but also the soldiers at that crucial point in military history when the romance of war began to give way to the stark reality of its death and destruction.     Tambour lace veil museum de-accession late 1800s.  

This Tambour lace veil is a de-accession from the MET (Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York).  The veil measures 55 inches in width and 43 inches in length, the lace was made using a machine made mesh with the chain stitched designs added by hand.  There are several holes in the center of the veil that you should be able to make out in the pics, the bottom part with the most decoration is in good shape.


 Princess lace wedding veil museum de-accession early 1900s.

This lovely lace veil is a de-accession from the MET (Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York).  The veil measures 126 inches in length and is 54 inches wide.  The lace is made by hand stitching the designs onto the mesh.  There are no holes or flaws other than age related color that should soak out, the color is dark cream now.  The veil is still sturdy and in excellent shape.  It is folded over a cable in the pictures to get the whole veil in.  It could be worn covering the face or with the top gathered at the crown, either way would look lovely!

Lieutenant Williamson, Confederate State $15.00

 

Photographs of American Civil War Cavalr

 

Tambour lace veil museum de-accession la $35.00

 

Princess lace wedding veil museum de-acc $545.00

 Summer weight Linen sheet provenance c1900.

This linen sheet measures 70 by 100 inches, the top hem is hand stitched there is a hand embroidered I in on top corner.  This sheet came from the Iselin estate, a direct descendent of Charles Oliver Iselin Captain of the winning yachts of the America’s Cup fame in Premium Point, New Rochelle NY in the early 1900s who traveled widely and enjoyed high quality items.  When I bought them, these linens were stored in the best (Goyard and Louis Vuitton trunks no less).  I will include some family history to the buyer when I ship the sheet.  There is a 1 inch weave flaw near the top (not a hole just a slight difference in the weave pattern) and a 1/2 inch darn at one of the edges it is otherwise in very good condition, I have washed and pressed it.

 Summer weight Linen sheet provenance c1900.

This linen sheet measures 70 by 100 inches, the top hem is hand stitched there is a hand embroidered I in on top corner.  This sheet came from the Iselin estate, a direct descendent of Charles Oliver Iselin Captain of the winning yachts of the America’s Cup fame in Premium Point, New Rochelle NY in the early 1900s who traveled widely and enjoyed high quality items.  When I bought them, these linens were stored in the best (Goyard and Louis Vuitton trunks no less).  I will include some family history to the buyer when I ship the sheet.  This sheet is in excellent condition, I have washed and pressed it.

 Lot 3 handmade hankies circa 1850 to 1940s.

Lot of 3 hankies as follows top left circa 1940s, measures 15 inches square with hand applique tulips in very good as found condition, should come clean and usable with a soak.  Top right circa about 1900, scalloped edges with whitework floral edges and needle lace centers and a fish caught in a net in the corners.  There are some hand darns and a few holes but still in good condition.  Bottom circa mid 1800s with the wide hems that were stylish during that time period, plain with a stamped ink letter P in one corner, no holes, storage staining that should soak out.

 


4 pages. HIGHLY IMPORTANT! Progress of Gen. Banks' Army. Victories in Western Louisiana. Admiral Porter Captures Alexandria. Occupation of New Iberia. Guerrillas Near Baton Rouge. They Capture a Cotton Dealer With $10,000 in Greenbacks. Important Southern News. Important Intercepted Despatches from General Magruder. Mexico and the Confederacy. Overtures for an Alliance Between the Empire and the Rebellion. Weak Federal Force in Texas. Speech of Jeff Davis. Attempt to Burn the Rebel War Department. Raid Into Kentucky. General Beauregard Hunting Beeves. Confirmation of Major General David B. Birney. A Presidential Message to the Senate. Capture of a Richmond Broker. The Army of the Potomac and its Reorganization. General Burnside's Army. Great Fires in Richmond. Burning of the Shell and Fuze Factory, and much more. Scattered wear and a couple of small stains. Small edge chip. Overall a fine 1864 newspaper.

Summer weight Linen sheet provenance c19 $85.00

 

Summer weight Linen sheet provenance c19 $95.00

 

Lot 3 handmade hankies circa 1850 to 194 $35.00

 

The Evening Telegraph, Philadelphia, Mar $25.00




By Ross J. Kelbaugh. Thomas Publications, Gettysburg, Pa., 1991. Softcover, 48 pages, illustrated, Glossary of Terms, and much more. Excellent condition. An extremely handy reference book on the subject of Civil War photography with numerous photographs illustrating the various types of images of the period.  Lot 3 handmade whitework hankies circa early to mid 1800s.

This lot of 3 hankies is a follows top left whitework hankie circa very early 1800s, it measures 19 by 19.5 inches with sheer handwoven batiste fabric and hand embroidered floral whitework at the scolloped edges and embroidered initials in one corner, easily seen holes.  Top right circa 1820 or 30s hankie measures 17 by 17.5 inches, finely embroidered initials in one corner and flowers with tiny needle lace centers around the scalloped edges, all beautiful handwork, there are some nicely done hand darns and also some holes as shown.  Bottom circa mid to 3rd quarter of the 1800s measures 15 inches square with Swiss whitework flowers and scalloped border. Some hand darns and plenty of holes.  These hankies make fine examples for study.

 Lot 2 handmade whitework and lace hankies circa 1700s to 1800s

This lot has 2 hankies as follows on the left is a whitework and lace hankies measuring 19 by 20 inches circa early 1800s with the handmade valenciennes lace added later as its from the late 1800s.  The whitework is lovely, done by a skilled hand with tiny little needle lace centers in the work so small you need magnification to see the threads, lots of holes as shown in the pics, still it would be a fine piece for study.  The right hankie is from the late 1700s, it measures 20 by 22 inches with a drawnwork near the edge with Buckinghamshire lace around the edge which I believe is original to the piece.  The lace is in excellent condition, the body of the hankie has some fine hand darns and some holes with a rip in the corner of the drawnwork but over all reasonable condition for its age.

  Lot 3 linen and whitework hankies early to mid 1800s

There are 3 hankies in this lot, all of them have major issues but remain good examples for study and fine handwork.  They are as follows far top left measures 13.5 inches square, early 1800s, fine hand done scalloped  whitework border, some tears clearly seen in the pictures but lovely embroidery.  Top right hankie with inked signature in the center measures 13.75 inches square, mid 1800s hand embroidered flowers in the corners, hand darns and holes.  The last measures 14 inches square early 1800s edged with handmade Valenciennes lace with initials embroidered into the lower corner, lots of holes in the fabric but the lace is mostly good.  These are good for showing some of the different styles of work that could be passed around to a group and handled without worrying about it much.

Introduction to Civil War Photography

 

Lot 3 handmade whitework hankies circa e $40.00

 

Lot 2 handmade whitework and lace hankie $75.00

 

Lot 3 linen and whitework hankies early $25.00




Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1996. 10 1/4 x 10 1/4, hardcover with dust jacket, 168 pages, illustrated, index. The dust jacket shows very light edge wear. A tear in the spine area of the dust jacket has been repaired on the inside with archival tape. The book is in brand new condition.


This book is by and of the soldiers and civilians who experienced the Chancellorsville campaign. Through their words and images you can relieve the emotions, the terrifying rush of events, the horrors- and even the human comedy- of one of the Civil War's major campaigns. Thus you hold in your hands an album of personal recollections, from letters, diaries, photographs, sketches, and artifacts.


To compile this special volume, we combed hundreds of sources, both published and unpublished.  We had invaluable help from a network of consultants. Using our own diverse resources and historical materials in libraries and archives around the United States, we were able to assemble a dramatic narrative told from many perspectives: manuscript letters and journals- some previously unpublished- regimental histories and privately printed memoirs, articles in little known historical society publications, and more. Then we set about the painstaking task of locating photographs of these soldiers and townsfolk to accompany their personal accounts.


That so many firsthand accounts survived is due to a few accidents of history. Soldiers could mail a letter home for only three cents. And the mail systems set up by the opposing armies were amazingly reliable. Mail packets were even exchanged across enemy lines. A surprising number of recruits could write, and write vividly. Corporal Nicholas Weeks of the 3d Alabama described the fray at Chancellorsville: "What a din. What a variety of hideous noises. The ping of the Minnie ball, the splutter of canister, the whistling of grape, the where are you, where are you of screaming shells and the cannon's roar from a hundred mouths went to make up the music for the great opera of death."  


Field sketches abound, too. Before photoengraving was developed to reproduce photographs in newspapers and magazines, periodicals such as Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper and Harper's Weekly employed artists who traveled with the army to depict events for readers. These correspondents, or specials, drew virtually everything of possible interest: pitched battles, lounging soldiers, the odd piece of military equipment. Sketches dashed off in a few minutes during a battle- often at great personal peril- were taken by courier to the publication, where they were transformed into woodblock engravings suitable for printing. 


Another element that adds to the unique texture of this album is the photographs. Technical innovations during the 1850's brought the fledgling craft into its own, and the Civil War was the first in history to be extensively recorded by the camera. In the blockaded South, photographers lacked supplies and equipment and rarely covered the action. The North's activities, by contrast, are well chronicled, thanks to the efforts of men who endured great hardship. Travel was tedious with cumbersome equipment and portable darkrooms mounted on wagon beds. But photographers like Captain Andrew J. Russell, who captured images of the Chancellorsville campaign, spent months following the army, etching with light the brave faces of the soldiers, as well as the bodies stiffened on the field. When Mathew Brady's stark photographs of the dead were first exhibited in New York City in 1862, the public thought, albeit briefly, that such horrific images could actually bring the war to an end.  


So here you find living testimony from the fighting fields of Chancellorsville. As you look into the eyes of these husbands and wives, sons and daughters, as you read the words of soldiers and civilians dazed by the violence or by the grief that follows the fighting, perhaps it will be possible to perceive more clearly the shattering experience that was the Chancellorsville campaign.  


Cover Photograph: In a photograph by Andrew J. Russell taken on May 1 or 2, 1863, two Union officers standing just beyond enemy musket range survey Rebel positions southwest of Fredericksburg while their infantrymen take cover in captured rifle pits. On May 3 these troops of William T.H. Brooks' division would advance toward Chancellorsville and suffer a bloody repulse at nearby Salem Church.


Cover quotation: "Let us cross over the river, and rest under the shade of the trees." Lieutenant General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson.  A nice all original hand carved <I> Jack Straws</I> (a.k.a. <I>pickup sticks</I>) game still housed in their period slide top box.  A popular game of the Civil War era such handmade <I>pickup sticks</I> games as this may be found in many of the best known Civil War museum collections such as the Gettysburg Visitor’s Center, and Museum of the Confederacy collection in Richmond.  Not part of the game but included just as we found the set is a folk art carved knife and fork. All original and in excellent condition just as it was set aside in attic trunk storage decades ago.    As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B>  A bit of a departure from our usual fair but we couldn’t resist when we found these in an old sewing basket.   An attractive  group of 8 buttons each fashioned from an original buffalo nickel pressed so as to be convex with a loop fastener.  Three are Indian head and five are buffalo side out.  The classic American <I>buffalo nickel</I> was minted between 1913 and 1938 and remains a favorite among Americana enthusiasts.   please note:   <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!  Fine linen sheet with Provenance c1900.

This sheet measures 72 by 108 inches, it is summer weight of the very finest French linen.  There is a hand embroidered monogram in one corner that reads COHI for Charles Oliver Iselin.  This sheet came from the Iselin estate, a direct descendent of Charles Oliver Iselin Captain of the winning yachts of the America’s Cup fame in Premium Point, New Rochelle NY in the early 1900s who traveled widely and enjoyed high quality items.  When I bought them, these linens were stored in the best (Goyard and Louis Vuitton trunks no less).  I will include some family history to the buyer when I ship the sheet.  This sheet is in excellent condition, I have washed and pressed it.

Voices of the Civil War, Chancellorsvill $35.00

 

Civil War era folk art – Jack Straws - G $95.00

 

8 BUFFALO NICKEL BUTTONS $65.00

 

Fine linen sheet with Provenance c1900 $150.00

 Vintage Porthault linen sheet king size with tag c1970s.

This fine linen sheet measures 104 inches wide by 118 inches in length, it will fit king beds but also a queen, my bed is a queen size and I often use king size sheets on it as its easy to just tuck the extra under the mattress or let it hang for a truely decadent drape.  The linen quality is what one would expect from Porthault with a soft almost liquid hand and drape.  There are a couple of small hand darns at the edge, and a small opening 1/4 inch at the fold on the bottom hem, the sheet is otherwise in very good condition, I have washed and pressed it.

 Magnificent handmade pt lace and linen tablecloth c1900 Provenance

This  handmade tablecloth from the early 1900s measures 90 by 215 inches, the pictures do NOT do this tablecloth justice, not even close, it's just gorgeous! The French linen is of the highest quality, smooth weighty linen with a fine hand, the handmade Pt de Rose Venise lace is fine handwork, teensy individual stitched making up the lace bridges and designs, the work of skilled artisans all hand stitched to the linen.   There are two large lace monograms, (MEG probably for Mary Edith Goddard Iselin's wife's mother) each 6.5 inches long inside a lace medalion 15 inches long.  The lace insert in the body of the tablecloth measures 29 by 98 inches.  This tablecloth came from the Iselin estate, a direct descendent of Charles Oliver Iselin Captain of the winning yachts of the America’s Cup fame in Premium Point, New Rochelle NY in the early 1900s who traveled widely and enjoyed high quality items.  When I bought them, these linens were stored in the best (Goyard and Louis Vuitton trunks no less).  I will include some family history to the buyer when I ship the tablecloth.  There are just a few very small, almost pinprick specs that didn't come out in the wash (you will have to really look to find them), the tablecloth is otherwise in excellent condition, I have washed and pressed it.

 


<b>United States Senator from Alabama


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1836-93) Born in Champion, Jefferson County, N.Y., he pursued a classical education at Montreal College in Canada. He later moved to Iowa and was secretary of the Iowa State Senate in 1856. He studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1857 and commenced practice. During the Civil War he served in the Union Army as aide-de-camp on the staff of General John M. Thayer; was A.A.G. on the staff of General Grenville M. Dodge; served as Colonel of the 1st Alabama Cavalry; was Chief of Staff to General Grenville M. Dodge; and was promoted to Brevet Brigadier General, for gallantry during the Atlanta and 1865 Carolina's campaigns. Upon the readmission of Alabama to the Union, he served as U.S. Senator from 1868-79 which included the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress. He was chairman of the Committee on the District of Columbia, and also served on the Committee on Military Affairs.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 2 1/2, in ink, Geo. E. Spencer, Ala.  


Authentic, original steel engraving with marching troops in the center and foreground. Imprint below the illustration, Evacuation of Cumberland Gap. Entered according to Act of Congress 1865 by the American Publishing Co., Clerk's Office of the District Court of Connecticut. Overall size is 8 1/2 x 5 1/2.


WBTS TRIVIA: The Cumberland Gap is a narrow pass through the Cumberland Mountains within the Appalachian Mountain range near the junction of the states of Kentucky, Virginia and Tennessee. Explored by the famous American pioneer Daniel Boone in the 1770's, it was the site of several Civil War engagements. In June 1862, General George W. Morgan captured the gap for the Union, and in September of that year, Confederate forces under General Edmund Kirby Smith occupied the gap during General Braxton Bragg's Kentucky invasion. The following year, in September 1863, Union Army troops under General Ambrose E. Burnside forced the surrender of 2,300 Confederates defending the gap, gaining Union control of the gap for the remainder of the war.

Vintage Porthault linen sheet king size $275.00

 

Magnificent handmade pt lace and linen t $1600.00

 

Autograph, General George E. Spencer $45.00

 

Evacuation of Cumberland Gap




<b>United States Senator from New Jersey


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1816-94) Born in Salem, N.J., he was elected to the New Jersey state assembly in 1840; served as clerk, 1842-44; and was a member of the State constitutional convention in 1844. He moved to Philadelphia in 1846 where he was engaged in business and banking; served as a member of the Philadelphia Common Council, 1848-54; and organized the Corn Exchange Bank and was president 1858-71. He moved to Merchantville, N.J. in 1863; was elected as a Republican to the United States Senate and served from 1866 to 1871 which included the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress. Served as chairman of the Committee on the Library. He was appointed by President Ulysses S. Grant as a member of the first United States Civil Service Commission and served two years, resigning to accept a position of United States financial agent in London, serving 1874-74. Served as a member of the New Jersey Board of Tax Assessors 1884-91, and was president 1889-91. He was appointed a member of the State board of Education in 1891 for a term of three years.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 2, in ink, Alex. G. Cattell, New Jersey.    Handmade Irish crochet lace c1900

This handmade Irish crochet lace measures 4.5 inches wide by 96 inches in length, it is in excellent as found unused condition.  Design elements are floral with a scalloped bottom edge.

  Handmade filet and Irish lace original card C1900.

This handmade lace lots has two types of lace one is Irish crochet lace measuring 3.5 by 84 inches, the second lace is filet measuring 2 by 144 inches (4 yards) so 6 yards total of lace plus a bit more.  The design elements are classic with a scollped edge at the bottom and roses over the body.  This lace is in excellent, as found condition on its original card.

 Unusual handmade 3-D filet lace original card C1900.

This cool handmade lace measures 3 inches by 6 yards.  The design is added to the lace by hand, one stitch at a time adding a three dimentional effect to the lace for a very cool look.  The design elements are classic with a scollped edge at the bottom and roses over the body.  This lace is in excellent, as found condition on its original card.

Autograph, Alexander G. Cattell $20.00

 

Handmade Irish crochet lace c1900 $6.00

 

Handmade filet and Irish lace original c $10.00

 

Unusual handmade 3-D filet lace original $24.00

Handmade filet lace original card C1900.

This handmade lace measures 3.25 inches by 7.5 yards.  The design elements are classic with a scollped edge at the bottom and roses over the body.  This lace is in excellent, as found condition on its original card.

 Handmade filet lace original card C1900.

This handmade lace measures 3 inches by 7.5 yards.  The design elements are classic with a scollped edge at the bottom and roses over the body.  This lace is in excellent, as found condition on its original card.

  Handmade filet lace original card C1900.

This handmade lace measures 3.25 inches by 12.5 yards.  The design elements are classic with a scollped edge at the bottom and scrolls, leaves and flowers over the body.  This lace is in excellent, as found condition on its original card.

  Handmade filet lace original card C1900.

This handmade lace measures 2.5 inches by 7.5 yards.  The design elements are classic with a scollped edge at the bottom and scrolls, leaves and flowers over the body.  This lace is in excellent, as found condition on its original card.

Handmade filet lace original card C1900 $18.00

 

Handmade filet lace original card C1900 $15.00

 

Handmade filet lace original card C1900 $24.00

 

Handmade filet lace original card C1900 $16.00

Handmade Irish and filet lace original card C1900.

This lot consists of a handmade Irish crochet ribbon lace camisole top measuring 18 inches wide (36 inches around)by 3 inches deep, there are slits to place a ribbon through the lace, it is in good condition.  There are 2 original cards of handmade filet lace, one measures 3.75 by 108 inches and the other 1.5 inches in width by 8 yards in length.  They are both in excellent as found condition.

 Wide handmade Irish ribbon lace original card C1900.

This pretty lace measures 5 inches wide and 4.5 yards in length, the design elements are floral with slits that will take up to 1/2 inch wide ribbon, the bottom has scalloped edges.  This lace is still on its original card and is in excellent, unused as found condition.

 


<b>United States Senator from Arkansas


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1832-1903) Born near Lock Haven, Clinton County, Pa., he attended Lewisburg University, Lewisburg, Pa. He moved to Kansas in 1857 and was engaged in general business. He served in the Union Army during the Civil War. He became interested in banking and settled in Little Rock, Arkansas, and was a member of the State constitutional convention. Upon the readmission of the State of Arkansas to the Union he was elected as a Republican to the U.S. Senate serving from 1868-71, which included the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress. He was commissioned by President Chester Arthur to examine the conditions of two divisions of the Northern Pacific Railroad in 1885. He was later engaged in the development of railroads.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 1 3/4, in ink, A. McDonald, Ark.  


Selected Images from the Collection of the Adams County Historical Society. Compiled by Timothy H. Smith. Afterword by William A. Frassanito. Thomas Publications, Gettysburg, Pa., 2005. Autographed on the title page by, "Timothy H. Smith." 8 1/2 x 11, softcover, 55 pages, illustrated. Brand new condition. A must for all Gettysburg photograph collections! 


William H. Tipton was a native of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. He was apprenticed to the Tyson Brothers of Gettysburg as early as 1862. Following the 1863 Battle of Gettysburg, he assisted the Tysons in recording a series of views of the town and battlefield. In the postwar era, Tipton established himself as one of the best known photographers in the country. By 1888, he claimed to have possessed over 5,000 battlefield views and 100,000 portrait negatives.


In September 1966, Ellen Tipton Buchler, granddaughter of William Tipton, donated three large volumes of his work to the Adams County Historical Society. These sample books contain over 1,000 images, many of them not available anywhere else. In addition, the Society has received donations of hundreds of glass plate negatives, stereographic views, cabinet views, and group views over the years. The views that appear in this volume are just a fraction of those in the collections of the Adams County Historical Society.

Handmade Irish and filet lace original c $16.00

 

Wide handmade Irish ribbon lace original $18.00

 

Autograph, Alexander McDonald

 

Gettysburg's Battlefield Photographer, W

One of those Civil War treasures we have <I>hung on to</I> for years as a reflection of our special interest in identified personal items, but not in our area of special interest in Maine related relics, we have decided to offer this <I>keeper</I> to a new home.  All in nice original and period condition yet with good evidence of age, originality and period use and carrying, this little leather bound pocket New Testament was printed by the Oxford University Press in 1858.  On the front and back fly leaves the Testament bears the period stencil identification <B><I>PETER F. RAFFERTY * 69th N. Y. V. *</B></I>.  A quick <I>Google</I> will offer much more detail on Rafferty and his <I>Irish Brigade</I>, <B>69th New York Infantry</B> but suffice it to say here that Pvt. Rafferty won the <B>Congressional Medal of Honor</B> for action at <B>Malvern Hill, Virginia</B>, in early July 1862 as he remained to fight with his 69th New York Volunteers despite a <I>gunshot wounds of the face and side</I> and the evacuation of wounded to the rear.  (see: <I>Deeds of Valor</I> where Rafferty’s own words are used to record action against the Confederate <I>Louisiana Tigers</I> that day and his wounding.  <I>I got two bullets in the mouth and the lower part of the jaw, which smashed the bones and carried away part of my tongue</I> says he, further advising, <I> I was left on the field for a long time, and two days later was captured and sent to Libby, reaching there on the Fourth of July. </I>) Adding additional charm to Rafferty’s Testament is a <I>tipped</I> in figure of then Colonel Michael Corcoran the <I>Irishman</I> who was captured at as he led his 69th N.Y.V. into action at 1st Bull Run.  Corcoran’s imprisonment by the Confederates led to his prominence as a national figure and of special account among the Irish   If not acquainted with the Irish General’s fascinating history, a quick Google search will bring an appreciation of his Civil War experience and the text found under his figure pasted into Peter Rafferty’s pocket testament. <B><I>SONS OF ERIN!  Let the watchword be Corcoran! Rescued if living, avenged if dead! </B></I> The face of the fly leaf offers additional patriotic words pasted above Rafferty’s stenciled identification.

   Picked years ago from a miscellaneous lot of New York related Civil War material offered at the Brimfield Antique Market, (Those were the days!) our loss will be some fortunate collector / historian’s gain as we clear away some of the accumulation of our lifelong interest in such.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

 Not sure what’s there today but the last time we visited the Jefferson Davis home in Richmond, Virginia they had one of these laid out on display in the upstairs Davis children play room. A classic skill toy of the Civil War era, this all period example retains most of its original bright red grain painted surface while offering good evidence of age and period use.  Of interest to the Civil War collector / historian will be that the cord that fastens the wooden ball to the cup and handle is the same as frequently found holding bundles of government war time <I>docketed</I> documents.  So common was the use of the red cotton tape by the government in the field and in Washington that it fostered the term <I>government red tape</I> that is still used today when referring to military bureaucracy.  Not a big deal but an interesting bit of Civil War trivia.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

 

 A bit late for our usual fair but the charm and eye appeal of this old burlap potato sack was more than we could resist.   Our photo illustration will do best as a description except to say the <B>MAMMY BRAND</B> sack measures approximately 19 X 29 inches and remains in excellent original condition, solid with no holes, stains or other condition issues.  The colorful old sack originally held 50 lbs. of potatoes put up by D. M. Camp & Sons, Bakersfield, California.  A neat old piece of collectable Black Americana. please note:   <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!  Published by William H. Hortsmann and Sons, Philadelphia, this 1851 folio (11 ¾ X 14 7/8 x ½ inch thick) 1st edition of 1851 is Illustrated from the <I>Original Text and Drawings in the War Department. </I> Drawn by G. C. Humpries.  Nine pages of text outline and describe the new (1851) uniform and dress code for artillery, infantry, riflemen, insignia, swords, and dragoons; officers and enlisted.  Detailed illustrations cover all manner of dress to include buttons, swords and sashes as well as horse furniture for <I>General Officers</I> and the <I>Cavalry Corps</I>.  This highly collectable volume offers seven finely colored plates from chromolithograph printing and four additional original hand colored plates. Thirteen additional lithographic line drawing plates show uniform details.  The volume is rebound with new boards and black <I>library</I> covering, new brown end papers and retaining its original gold embossed <I><B>UNIFORM AND DRESS OF THE UNITED STATES ARMY</I></B> on the front board.  All else original and as published with good evidence of age, originality and moderate period use but no tears, repairs or objectionable condition issues.  An outstanding item for the <I>deep dish</I> Civil War enthusiast this piece has been in our own library for over thirty years.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

69th NY – Irish Brigade – MEDAL OF HONOR $525.00

 

Civil War era CHILD'S TOY

 

Black Americana - MAMMY BRAND Potato Sac

 

Rarely seen! Horstman & Sons 1851 - U $2350.00




Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1997. 10 1/4 x 10 1/4, hardcover with dust jacket, 168 pages, illustrated, index. New condition.


This book is by and of the soldiers and civilians who experienced the battle of Fredericksburg. Through their words and images you can relieve the emotions, the terrifying rush of events, the horrors- and even the human comedy- of this pageant of unimaginable courage and bloodshed. You hold in your hands an album of personal recollections, embellished with drawings, maps, photographs of artifacts, and, especially, images of people.


To compile this special volume, we combed hundreds of sources, both published and unpublished.  We had invaluable help from a network of consultants. Using our own diverse resources and historical materials in libraries and archives around the United States, we were able to assemble a dramatic narrative told from many perspectives: manuscript letters and journals- some previously unpublished- regimental histories and privately printed memoirs, articles in little known historical society publications, and more. Then we set about the painstaking task of locating photographs of these soldiers and townsfolk to accompany their personal accounts.


That so many firsthand accounts survived is due to a few accidents of history. Soldiers could mail a letter home for only three cents. And the mail systems set up by the opposing armies were amazingly reliable. Mail packets were even exchanged across enemy lines. A surprising number of recruits could write, and write vividly. Private Alexander Hunter of the 17th Virginia Infantry, on the hopeless Federal assault against Marye's Heights, said, "From the hill back of the heights the division of Pickett watched the advance, filled with wonder and a pitying admiration for men who could rush with such unflinching valor, such mad recklessness into the jaws of destruction...Across the plain, with no martial music to thrill them, only a stillness that would strike terror into spirits less gallant- across the plain still onward sweeps the dauntless brigade with serried lines and gleaming steel. It was superb!" 


Field sketches abound, too. Before photoengraving was developed to reproduce photographs in newspapers and magazines, periodicals such as Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper and Harper's Weekly employed artists who traveled with the Union armies to depict events for readers. Present at Fredericksburg were not only the best Northern artists but an Englishman working for the Illustrated London News who sketched some rare views behind Confederate lines. Such sketches, dashed off in a few moments during a battle- often at great personal peril- were taken by courier to the publication, where they were transformed into woodblock engravings suitable for printing. 


Another element that adds to the unique texture of this album is the photographs. Technical innovations during the 1850's brought the fledgling craft into its own, and the Civil War was the first in history to be extensively recorded by the camera. In the blockaded South, photographers lacked supplies and equipment and rarely covered the action. The North's activities, by contrast, are well chronicled, thanks to the efforts of men who endured great hardship. Photographers like Mathew Brady and his assistants spent months following the army, capturing powerful images of battlefields already transformed into hallowed ground.  


So here you find living testimony of the sanguinary clash of titanic forces at the quiet town of Fredericksburg, Virginia. As you look into the eyes and read the words of the soldiers who fought there and the townsfolk caught between the two armies, perhaps it will be possible to understand the extremes of tenacity, heroism, and folly on display during these fateful days.


Cover Photograph: Colonel Robert Nugent, commanding the 69th New York Infantry, fell seriously wounded in the celebrated attack of the Irish Brigade at Fredericksburg. His men, although repulsed, were among the fallen who came closest to the Rebel held stonewall on Marye's Heights.  


<b>Chaplain 1st Nebraska Infantry during the Civil War


United States Senator from Nebraska


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1817-99) Born in Cadiz, Ohio, he graduated from Madison College in Pennsylvania in 1840, studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1844. He was a member of the Pennsylvania State House of Representatives in 1845. Ordained minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1856. Was a member of the 1859 Nebraska Constitutional Convention and the Nebraska Territory Council in 1860. Served as Chaplain of the 1st Regiment Nebraska Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War, 1861-65. Was a member of the Nebraska constitutional convention in 1867, and upon the admission of Nebraska to the Union he was elected U.S. Senator and served from 1867-75, including the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 2, in ink, T.W. Tipton, Neb.  


<b>United States Senator from Virginia and West Virginia


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1811-1900) Born in Monongalia County, Va., he graduated from Madison College in 1831, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1833 and commenced practice in Morgantown, Va. (now West Virginia). He was appointed clerk of the county court of Monongalia County in 1841 and later clerk of the circuit superior court and held both positions until 1852. He was a delegate to the Virginia constitutional convention in 1850 and 1851. Elected as a Unionist to the United States Senate from Virginia to fill the vacancy caused by the expulsion of James M. Mason and served from July 9, 1861, to March 3, 1863. He was the chairman of the Committee on Enrolled Bills. Was a delegate to the State constitutional convention of West Virginia and upon the admission of West Virginia as a State in the Union, he was elected as a Unionist to the United States Senate. He was reelected in 1865 as a Republican and served from August 4, 1863, to March 3, 1871, which included the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress. Was chairman of the Committee on Engrossed Bills, and served on the Committee on Patents and the Patent Office.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 3/8 x 2 7/8, in ink, W.T. Willey, West Va.   


8 pages. IMPORTANT FROM CHARLESTON. Arrival of the Mary Sanford with News to Saturday. Rebel Reports to Tuesday. Our Forces Expecting Batteries on the Upper End of Morris Island. Forts Moultrie and Johnson Firing on the Working Parties. Explosion of a Rebel Magazine, The Military and Naval Situation in Charleston Harbor. The Failure of the Gallant Attack on Fort Sumter. Alleged Barbarity of Beauregard. Details of Operations. The Storming of Fort Sumter. How the Enterprise Was Planned and Why it Failed. Gallantry of Our Naval Forces. Inhuman Threats From Beauregard. Torpedoes at Fort Wagner. How the Negroes Fight. B.C. Tilghman of the Third U.S.C.I. Writes from Morris Island. THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC. The Position on the Rapidan Unchanged. One Hundred and Fifty Prisoners Taken by Gen. Pleasanton. A Military Suggestion as to Lee's Movements. Perils of General Burnside's Army. Our Cavalry Operations. Gen. Pleasanton's Advance. Gen. Rosecrans' Army. Rebel Reports of the Situation. Skirmishing Near Dalton and Lafayette. A General Engagement Expected. Reported Junction With Burnside. A Voice From North Carolina. An Eloquent Plea for Peace and Reconstruction. A Declaration that it will be Better to Live with than Under the Northern People. The Subjugation of Mississippi and Louisiana Acknowledged. General Lee Stumping the North. The Rebel Military Movement. Parrott Guns Modern Artillery. Gen. Dix and Gov. Seymour. Employment of Slaves in the Army, and more war news. Some edge chipping at extreme left border which does not affect any of the content. Very fine 1863 issue.

Voices of the Civil War, Fredericksburg $50.00

 

Autograph, Thomas W. Tipton

 

Autograph, Waitman T. Willey $25.00

 

The New York Times, September 17, 1863 $45.00

      Inscribed on the fly,<B><I>C. G. GOULD / Washington, D.C.</B></I>, this 1864 Vermont Adjutant & Inspector General’s report was acquired from the Vermont estate library of Major Charles Gilbert Gould, <U>Congressional Medal of Honor</U> recipient who served in the <B>5th Vermont Infantry</B> and the <B>11th Vermont Infantry </B>.  The original 1864 publication covers the period between October 1, 1863 and October 1, 1864.  The book is leather bound at the spine with board covers and remains in excellent original condition, tight at the spine with no rips, tears, folds, stains or loose pages.  The cover and spine show evidence of period use and handling yet with no major issues and is sound at the spine with no splits or separations in the leather.  (Our illustrations will best describe condition.)  Both a personalized relic of a Civil War Medal of Honor hero and wonderful resource on all Civil War related Vermont <I>goings on</I> in the period to include recruiting, Vermont troop action in the field, killed wounded & missing totals, Commander reports by Regiment, Regimental Rosters with individual particulars and more.  

       Charles G. Gould enlisted 8/13/62 as a Private of Co. G 5th Vermont Infantry; promoted to Cpl. 12/27/63; Sgt. Mjr. 2/12/64; and was commissioned Lt. Co F of the 5th Vt. Vols. before transferring on 12/22/1864 to be commissioned into  Co. E  11th Vermont Vol. Infantry.  Wounded 4/2/1865 at Petersburg, Virginia Gould was awarded the Medal of Honor for Gallantry in assault and capture of Petersburg on that date. He was promoted Major 4/2/1865 by Brevet. Mustered Out on 6/19/1865.   

      <B>Buy with confidence! </B>This item will come with our illustrated letter of provenance.   We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

 Our photos will likely do best in describing this exceptionally nice Victorian era microscope.  Unmarked as to maker, the microscope remains in fine, as new condition.  Its original 8 x 3 7/8 x 3 hinged case remains in solid condition and is pleasing to the eye while it does offer evidence of age and period use.  A nice item for the optical enthusiast, this old Victorian microscope will set in well with period scientific or medical collectables.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  Our illustrations will do best to describe the sharp focus, crisp contrast and overall condition of this just pre or early Civil War  cased 6th plate ambrotype.  A Maine find where late 1850s and early Civil War issue forage caps of the  configuration and light color as is worn by our subject were in vogue, (see: <I>RALLY ROUND THE FLAG  / Uniforms of Union Volunteers of 1861</I> by Ron Field) this image of a well-dressed young boy in oversized military cut forage cap and ivory headed walking stick will lay in well with any Civil War era grouping and will be of special interest to the just post and early Civil War enthusiast as well as the collector of children photos of that period.   As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !


<CENTER><FONT COLOR=#800000>If you have an interest in neat Civil War period things or Maine in the time, you may enjoy our museum site at:</FONT COLOR=#800000></CENTER>

<CENTER><B><I>MaineLegacy.com</I></B></CENTER>

 All in nice original condition save two or three small fraying spots to the braided cord as evidence of period use and originality. (see photos)  Complete and eye appealing, retaining its original soft infantry blue without the usual fading to blue / gray as is so common with these infantry cords, this turn of the century U. S. Army issue aiguillette will make a nice companion piece with a period infantry spike helmet without spending a lot of money.   As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

1864 Vermont Adjt. & Ins. Gen. Report of $235.00

 

cased Victorian MICROSCOPE $125.00

 

6th plate ambrotype – Boy in early (gray $135.00

 

Indian Wars / Spanish American War - U. $85.00

Now and again we are fortunate enough to acquire a special item we have had before thus affording us the opportunity of renewed enjoyment in owning an especially nice relic and placing it in an appreciative home.    The offering of this all original excavated silver identification badge is just such a case. As recovered at Deep Bottom, Virginia and as photographed and illustrated in Wm. C. Davis’s  best-selling publication <I>Battlefields of the Civil War</I>, our illustrations should do best to describe the physical characteristics of this wonderful old silver badge so we will focus here on the service history of the <B>183rd Pennsylvania Infantry </B> troop who wore it until he was <U>wounded and lost his badge at Deep Bottom</U>.  <B>John S. Clark</B> mustered in on  November 12, 1863 as a Private in Co. C, of the  183rd Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry.  The Regiment was in its’ infancy with official organizational efforts only about to commence.  Though his health never seemed to be good and with frequent bouts of hospitalization for maladies to include typhoid fever and gonorrhea, Clark  remained with the 183rd P. V. I. until he mustering out with the Regiment on July 13, 1865.  During Pvt. Clark’s term of service the 183rd PVI  saw action in campaigns from the <B>Rapidan</B> to the <B>James River</B>  The hard fought 183rd P.V.I. saw action at the <B> Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Po River,  Spotsylvania Court House, Assault on the Salient, North Anna River, Totopotomoy, Cold Harbor and Petersburg</B>.  Clark’s regiment was present at the <B>Siege of Petersburg</B> and participated in action at <B> Jerusalem Plank Road, Weldon Railroad</B> and at <B>Deep Bottom</B> where per <U>records now in the National Archives</U>, Pvt. Clark was wounded.  It was here at Deep Bottom sometime before the wounded soldier was moved North to be hospitalized that Clark’s silver identification badge separated from the breast of his Army  blue coat and would lay where it fell until being<U> recovered in 1983 by veteran <I>digger</I> Civil War historian, John Duggan of Virginia.</U>   The history of the exact circumstances of the Clark’s loss of the little silver shield will, at this point, have to be left to supposition though further research could shed more light on the likelihood, based on the condition of the badge, that it came free from Clark’s breast when struck and wounded to the degree that he would not return to his Regiment until March or April 1865. (Records indicate that he was a patient at the 1st Division Field Hospital, Virginia.)  The particulars of Clark’s wounds suffered at Deep Bottom are key to completion of the story of the inscribed silver shield that would fall at Deep Bottom, Virginia where it would lie for decades before discovery and ultimately being featured in Wm. C. Davis’s – <I>BATTLEFIELDS of the CIVIL WAR</I> .    As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B>  <b>from Secession to Surrender</b>


Expanding and Revising the Earlier Works of Marjorie Crandall & Richard Harwell. By T. Michael Parish & Robert M. Willingham, Jr. Jenkins Publishing Co., Austin, Texas & Gary A. Foster, Katonah, N.Y. No publication year, but circa late 1980's I believe. Hard cover book with gray dust jacket and blue imprinted title information with a firing cannon with full color 1st Confederate National flag on the front cover. 991 pages, index, illustrated. Some minor wear and light age toning to the dust jacket. The book itself is extremely tight, clean and in like new condition. Out of print.


The first definitive bibliography of Confederate imprints, this formidable reference work will prove indispensable to all scholars, libraries, collectors, and booksellers interested in the Civil War era. Completely revising, correcting, and extending by forty percent the imprints listed in the standard works of Marjorie Crandall and Richard Harwell, the new "Confederate Imprints" provides a detailed listing of 9,500 books, pamphlets, broadsides, maps, pictorial prints, and sheet music produced throughout the South during the war, including Texas and all Confederate held territory in the Trans-Mississippi West.


A comphrehensive index, the first of its kind, provides references to all authors, titles, proper names, major subjects, printers, and places of publication. Location references are given for holdings of imprints in hundreds of libraries across the country, as well as many private collections. A useful appendix provides complete cross references to Crandall and Harwell numbers that correspond to new numbers.


Printed on acid free paper, Smyth sewn, and cloth bound.        


Civil War patriotic imprint with illustration of General George B. McClellan. Light age toning. Fine illustration of "Little Mac" one of the commanders-in-chief of the Union Army during the Civil War.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   <b>of the Soldiers' of the Northwest


Written on Third Annual Encampment, Soldiers' Reunion Northwest imprinted letter sheet</b>


8 1/4 x 10 3/4, imprinted letter sheet, filled out in bold pencil hand on the reverse by General Hiram Hilliard.


Headquarters, Third Annual Encampment, Soldiers' Reunion Northwest. President's Office, 103 State Street, Chicago, Ill., 1880. Includes vignette in red of G.A.R. membership badge, and list of officers printed in blue.


The letter written by General Hilliard is what I believe to be a mock battle communication written to General S.B. Sherer. It was not uncommon for the veteran Civil War soldiers who attended these reunions to put on a mock battle for the education and enjoyment of the people attending the encampment. 


The letter reads as follows:


Fort Lee, near Galesburg, Ill.

August 6, 1880


General S.B. Sherer

Comdg. Federal forces


General,


Having defended the position I hold with a persistence unparalled and having exhausted my supplies and finding that you are about to organize an assault upon my works, in order to spare the effusion of blood consequent upon such an assault which will prove equally destructive to both sides, I have been constrained to enquire as to the terms you are prepared to make should I see proper to surrender.


I Am Sir Very Respectfully,

Your Obt. Servant,

H. Hilliard

Maj. Gen. Comdg.


It is my opinion that the lines drawn on the imprinted side of the sheet represent Hilliard's position, or works as he describes them, at the top, and Sherer's troops, or battle line, at the bottom.


Light age toning and wear. Very fine and desirable imprinted letter sheet with some very neat content.  


Samuel B. Sherer, the recipient of this communication, was a resident of Aurora, Illinois, when he enlisted on August 20, 1861, as a 1st Lieutenant, and was commissioned into Jenks Company, Illinois Independent Cavalry. He was promoted to Captain, July 9, 1862. On December 15, 1862, he was transferred into Co. I, 15th Illinois Cavalry; promoted to Major, July 29, 1863, and mustered out of service on August 25, 1864. After the war he was prominent in G.A.R. affairs, and was a General in the Illlinois National Guard.


Hiram Hilliard, who sent this communication, was a resident of Chicago, and fought as major of the 17th Illinois Cavalry during the Civil War. He ended the war with rank of lieutenant colonel.

'Battlefields of the Civil War' featured $895.00

 

Confederate Imprints; A Bibliography of

 

General George B. McClellan $7.00

 

Battlefield Communication From 1880 Enca $25.00




<b>Written by an officer who was captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.!


"I wish you could be here for a few days to see how many ways the boys have to help pass away the time for it is mighty tiresome some times for the want of something to do.  You may see some writing letters, some reading, some playing cards, some playing dominoes, others playing marbles or ball, some dancing, playing the fiddle, some scuffling, some playing chess which is the only game that I have ever played since I have been out here."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, to his daughter. 


<b><u>Fort Ackenoe, June 9th, 1863</b></u>


Margy J. Lupton


Dear Daughter,


In reply to your letter of the 5th which I recd. this afternoon and which I read with delight for it does me lots of good to get a letter from my children, I will just say that I am well and was glad to hear that you were better than you were when Mother wrote, and I am in hopes that you will soon be well again.  I was sorry to hear that John was so bad, but I am in hopes that he may soon get well and was also sorry to hear of E. Tipton’s sickness.  Well Sis I should have been very glad to have stepped in and eat supper with you but did not start in time.  Well Sis our pay rolls has come and we have to sign them so I will have to quit till morning.

  

<b>Wednesday, June 10th- 3 o’clock morning</b>


Well Sis being on guard and having a little time between visiting the pickets I thought that I would finish this letter while all was quiet the most of them being asleep.  Matt Harris is on guard outside of our tent so there is no danger of being surprised or disturbed.  Well we will    get a little more money this morning I expect and I was in hopes that I would get to come home, but for the present it seems doubtful, but I hope it will not be long before I get home.  I must stop and go and wake up the guards as it is half past three o’clock and the second relief has to go on guard.  Well I have waked them up.  It is pretty hard on men to have to get up every 2 or 3 hours and go on guard, and I tell you I don’t like it a bit myself.  I would much rather be at home and wait on you when you are sick for then it would seem like I was doing some good, but to get up every other night at 1 o’clock and sometimes every night, and wander about in the dark is what I don’t like.  There is nine of our men that goes to three places, 3 in a place, and one stands and watches for two hours while the other two lay down on the ground and goes to sleep, and when his time is out he wakes one of the others up and he lays down, and that is the way they do every night.  Sometimes when we wake them up they will say it is not their turn and that they have not been in bed more than half an hour.  The time goes so much faster while they are asleep than it does when they are awake, but enough of standing guard for this time.  I wish you could be here for a few days to see how many ways the boys have to help pass away the time for it is mighty tiresome some times for the want of something to do.  You may see some writing letters, some reading, some playing cards, some playing dominoes, others playing marbles or ball, some dancing, playing the fiddle, some scuffling, some playing chess which is the only game that I have ever played since I have been out here, and that not much.  Well Sis it is getting day light and I must bring my letter to a close for I don’t think you can read what I have wrote for my pen is not good and I am nervous so good by Sis.  Kiss Mother and the baby for your Pop and may the good Lord bless you and keep you safe is the prayer of your loving Father.  Write often.


Lieut. Lupton           


Light age toning and wear. Very interesting content describing how the picket guards are posted as well as how the soldiers entertain themselves in camp. 


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.     


Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1996. 10 1/4 x 10 1/4, hardcover with dust jacket, 168 pages, illustrated, index. New condition.


This book is by and of the soldiers and civilians who experienced the Antietam campaign. Through their words and images you can relieve the emotions, the terrifying rush of events, the horrors- and even the human comedy- of one of the Civil War's major campaigns. You hold in your hands an album of personal recollections from letters, diaries, photographs, sketches, and artifacts. 


To compile this volume, we combed hundreds of sources, both published and unpublished.  We had invaluable help from a network of consultants. Using our own diverse resources and historical materials in libraries and archives around the United States, we were able to assemble a dramatic narrative told from many perspectives: manuscript letters and journals- some previously unpublished- regimental histories and privately printed memoirs, articles in little known historical society publications, and more. Then we set about the painstaking task of locating photographs of these soldiers and townsfolk to accompany their personal accounts.


That so many firsthand accounts survived is due to a few accidents of history. Soldiers could mail a letter home for only three cents. And the mail systems set up by the opposing armies were amazingly reliable. Mail packets were even exchanged across enemy lines. A surprising number of recruits could write, and write vividly. William F. Goodhue of the 3d Wisconsin Infantry described his fellow soldiers at dawn on the day of the Battle of Antietam: "How pallied were the faces of all, with unkempt hair, thus giving them the appearance almost, of wildmen. They did not have the rosy hues of days in the past when arising from the clean and restful bed under the home roof, yet these men standing in battleline were scarcely old enough to be men and voters at home. They had grimy, sallow features and muscular bodies, lean and gaunt as hounds...for this was their third campaign since the spring flowers had bloomed." 


Field sketches abound, too. Before photoengraving was developed to reproduce photographs in newspapers and magazines, periodicals such as Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper and Harper's Weekly employed artists who traveled with the Union armies to depict events for readers. These correspondents, or "specials" drew virtually everything of possible interest: pitched battles, lounging soldiers, the odd piece of military equipment. Sketches dashed off in a few moments during a battle- often at great personal peril- were taken by courier to the publication, where they were transformed into woodblock engravings suitable for printing. 


Another element that adds to the unique texture of this album is the photographs. Technical innovations during the 1850's brought the fledgling craft into its own, and the Civil War was the first in history to be extensively recorded by the camera. In the blockaded South, photographers lacked supplies and equipment and rarely covered the action. The North's activities, by contrast, are well chronicled. Travel was tedious, with cumbersome equipment and portable darkrooms mounted on wagon beds. But photographers like Mathew Brady and his assistants spent months following the army, etching with light the brave faces of the soldiers, as well as the bodies stiffened on the field. When Brady's stark photographs of the dead were first exhibited in New York City in 1862, the public thought, albeit briefly, that such horrific images could actually bring the war to an end. 


So you hold in your hands living testimony from the battlefields on the route of Robert E. Lee's first invasion of the North. As you look into the eyes of these husbands and wives, sons and daughters, as you read the words of soldiers and civilians dazed by the violence around them or by the grief that follows the fighting, perhaps it will be possible to perceive more clearly the shattering experience that was the shattering experience that was the Antietam campaign.


Cover Photograph: Several days after the battle, Federal soldiers relax by a dead tree on the Mumma farm. At the foot of the tree is the new grave of Private John Marshall of the 28th Pennsylvania Infantry.


WBTS Trivia: September 17, 1862, the day the battle of Antietam was fought, (called the Battle of Sharpsburg in the South) was the bloodiest single day in all of American history!  


<b>Served in the 148th Pennsylvania Infantry


Wounded twice during the Civil War and had his hand amputated!


Pennsylvania State Congressman


Autograph Letter Signed with cover</b>


Meyer was a 21 year old resident of Rebersburg, Pa., when he enlisted on August 25, 1862, as a private, and was mustered into Co. A, 148th Pennsylvania Infantry. He was wounded in action on May 3, 1863, at the battle of Chancellorsville, Va. He was promoted to corporal on November 16, 1863. He was wounded a second time this coming on May 10, 1864, at the battle of Po River, Va., which resulted in the amputation of his left hand. He was discharged for wounds on September 10, 1864, at Campbell Hospital, Washington, D.C. After the war he served as a Pennsylvania State Congressman. 


<u>Autographed Letter Signed</u>: 5 1/2 x 9, in ink, on imprinted Pennsylvania House of Representatives letter sheet with State seal and his name and district printed at the top. Comes with the original imprinted cover with House of Representatives, State of Pennsylvania, Henry Meyer, Centre County, and State seal, C.D.S., Harrisburg, Pa., Feb. 12, with 3 cents green George Washington postage stamp. Addressed in the hand of Henry Meyer, to his wife, Mrs. Mattie J. Meyer, Rebersburg, Centre County, Pa.


Harrisburg, Pa. 

Feb. 10, 1883


Dear Mattie,


We had a Saturday's session today, but about seventy five members were absent, nearly all have gone home now. It is snowing fast tonight and no doubt till tomorrow there will be a deep snow. Brechbil and I had bad luck on Monday, his horse fell and broke a shaft of the sleigh. I suppose I will get to Coburn next Saturday till noon- or till 10 o'clock A.M. If our horse will be fit to drive then. Suppose you ask Woodling about it, and if Birds' eyes are not bad, perhaps he could send some one for me. There is nothing new. Please drop a note.


Yours &c,


H. Meyer


Very fine letter and cover with nice Pennsylvania House of Representatives imprints.

 


8 pages. THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC. Continued Advance of the Cavalry. Fighting at the Rapidan. Our Passage at Raccoon Ford Disputed. The Main Body of the Rebels Reported at Richmond. The Cars Running to Culpepper. THE SIEGE OF CHARLESTON. Important Reports. Half of James Island Said to be in Our Possession. A White Flag Flying Over Fort Moultrie. Two Monitors Lying Between Sumter and Moultrie. PRESIDENT'S PROCLAMATION. The Habeas Corpus Suspended Throughout the United States in Certain Specified Cases By the President of the United States. [Signed in print by Abraham Lincoln].  The Rebel Rams and Pirates. The Rebel Pirates. Ironclads in the Mersey. The Privateer Florida. Interesting News From Memphis. Another Pirate Afloat. A Bark rigged Cruiser in the South Pacific. Her Attempt to Capture the Clipper Ship Snow Squall. Interesting Narrative of Captain Dillingham. The War in Arkansas. Gen. Blunt's Brilliant Successes. Progress of General Steele's Expedition. One Hundred Thousand Square Miles Reclaimed From Rebel Rule. News From the Department of the Gulf and The Kansas Border. Much more war news. Some edge chipping which does not affect any of the content. Very nice bright and clean 1863 issue with important Lincoln Proclamation on the front page.

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $95.00

 

Voices of the Civil War, Antietam $50.00

 

Autograph, Henry Meyer $45.00

 

The New York Times, September 16, 1863 $45.00




< prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 next >

AntiqueArts.com home page! How to use this page! How to advertise here How we manage your personal information Terms of use TIAS home page