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Still housed as found in a period dovetailed slide top box from the pharmaceutical company <B>POWERS & WEIGHTMAN, Philadelphia</B>, this nice old chess set remains in fine condition and is offered here untouched just as it came from a country Maine attic.  Illustrated here with a US quarter for size comparison, the game pieces are of turned white birch with the black pieces of the same material, stained.   A staple of the 19th century era turning mills here in Maine as they produced clothespins, spools, dowels and all manner of goods from this tight grain <I>North Woods</I> white birch.  An extra nice period chess set, complete and ready to set in any Civil War era grouping.  The identification to <B>J. H. Griffin</B> will be of special interest  as the set came out of a Freeport, Maine where <B>James H. Griffin</B> of the <B>30th Maine Infantry</B> lived.  The only Maine <I>J. H. Griffin</I> serving in the Civil War, Griffin enlisted and was mustered in on December 18, 1863 as a Private of Co. B 30th Maine Vols.  He mustered out in Savannah, Georgia on August 20, 1865.  Not as tight a provenance as is most desirable but a probable connection to a good, hard fought, Maine regiment worthy of passing along to be preserved with this nice chess set.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 We have all manner of state of Maine Civil War MILITARY paper! (Muster Rolls, Equipment Issue & Military Stores, Commissions, Discharges &c ) If you have a special interest in any of the following <B>Maine Regiments</B> or <U> a person who served in one of the following</U> let us know what or who you are looking for and as time permits we will check for your wants. If we have something we will get back to you with price and particulars.


<CENTER><FONT COLOR=#0000FF><B>1st Cav., 1st Heavy Art., 2nd Cav., 2nd  Bat. Lt. Art., 2nd Inf., 4th Inf., 6th Inf., 11th Inf., 12th Inf., 13th Inf., 14th Inf., 15th Inf., 16th Inf., 17th Inf., 19th Inf., 23rd Inf., 24th  inf., 26th Inf. </FONT COLOR=#0000FF></B></CENTER>


<CENTER><B><I>Thanks for visiting GunsightAntiques.com </I></B></CENTER>



 


By Champ Clark and the Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1985. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with full color illustration of Confederate General Lewis A. Armistead, waving his hat on the tip of his sword as he spearheads the charge of General George Pickett's division on the third day of the Battle of Gettysburg. Armistead was fatally wounded at the peak of the advance up Cemetery Ridge, known thereafter as the "High Water Mark of the Confederacy." Also has U.S. and C.S. belt plates, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title printed in blue. Title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 176 pages, index, maps, profusely illustrated. Brand new condition. Excellent book on the epic 1863 battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.  


<b>With scarce Yankee counter stamp</b>


State of South Carolina, Columbia, June 28, 1861. Vignette of Palmetto tree at center, farmer holding wheat at left, and dog at right. Counter stamped in red at upper center, "Sample of Old Jeff Lucifer's Bonds." This is a really scarce Yankee counter stamp on this early war Confederate South Carolina note. The note was probably captured at the fall of Columbia and stamped as a patriotic collectible. Fine. The note shows circulation with some folds and a very tiny hole at the center where two folds intersect. Bright, attractive note that will display well. Very desirable Confederate note.

extra nice! Civil War era turned birch C $145.00

 

Civil War MAINE DOCUMENTS – MISCELLANEO $0.00

 

Gettysburg, The Confederate High Tide $35.00

 

1861 Corporation of Columbia, South Caro $125.00




<b>Written by an officer who was captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.!


From Libby Prison, Richmond, Virginia</b>


1 plus pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, to his wife. 


<b><u>Libby Prison Hospital, Feb. 7th/64</b></u>


My Dear and loving wife,


After my love to you I will inform you that I recd. 3 letters from you this week dated the 3rd to 10th.  The first and last done me good to read but the other made me sick at heart to think of the troubles you have to endure on my account.  I wrote to you 2 weeks ago stating that I was sick but mending.  I had something like the dysentery and had got ptty weak over it and ate too much and it turned into the diarrhea which run me pretty well down.  I was very weak but not dangerous and I am gaining fast now and I think I will be well in a few days.  I am in the hospital and have everything I need and all the care necessary but it is not home.  I hope to be exchanged soon so do not fret any more than you can help and God bless you and keep you is the prayer of your loving husband.


Lt. L. Lupton


On the reverse: I wish Father or Lt. Tipton would [get] Wm. F. Hunter to write to Jim Morris to try to get me exchanged.


From Lt. Lupton

To

Mrs. E.H. Lupton

Jerusalem, Monroe Co., Ohio


Monday 29th- still better


Light staining, age toning and wear.


Very desirable Yankee officer's P.O.W. letter written from the notorious Libby Prison in Richmond, Virginia by one of "the boys in blue" who would not survive this cruel war!


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.  


4 pages, 3 3/4 x 6 1/4, in ink, written to Lieutenant Charles W. Broadfoot by his mother. Comes with cover addressed to Mr. C.W. Broadfoot, Company D, 43d Regt. N.C.T., Drewry's Bluff, Va., with partial Fayetteville, [N.C.] postmark, stamp cut off. 


<b><u>Oct. 26 [1863]</b></u>


My Dear Son,


I will now answer yours of 22d.  I have just written to Grandma in answer to hers in which she said Uncle G was afraid he would not have upper leather enough for the boots but would try & get 2 sides for me if I said so.  I asked him to do so by all means.  It is very doubtful if he can get one.  I am glad to hear Drewry’s Bluff is so well fortified & wish every place the Yankees may approach was equally so.  The ladies are at work, even Lizzie is going to knit.  I hope the soldiers will get supplies before real winter sets in.  It is pretty cold today & I wish I had known before Terry left that there was members of your company sockless for we could have sent some.  I do not think G has any idea of the exposure he will have to undergo.  I have provided what I could for him but he hardly seems to think he can take charge of extras.  I understand Capt. Mc N thinks they will soon be placed under [General J.E.B.] Stuart.  George has not a horse yet.  I hope he will get one here & not depend on getting one from a man in the company that wants to sell his in order to go home for one for himself.  Thos. McLean is barefoot.  I believe the company on the whole is about as needy as any.  Is it not too bad they have not got even their pay.  Gov’t can make enough of paper money I should think to supply them with.  Liza & Fan tell me they have written you a long letter.  I am looking out for the acknowledgement of the things by Terry.  Grandma thanks you for wanting her to have some of your papers.  She writes all her letters on little scraps & I wish I could get some to her but it will cost all it is worth by mail.  I must now close.  God bless you.


Your aff.[ectionate] Mother


Very fine Confederate letter.


*The George that Mrs. Broadfoot is referring to in her letter was George B. Broadfoot, her other son in the Confederate army, and the brother of Charles. George was a 17 year old student when he enlisted on June 19, 1862, and was mustered into the Confederate army as a private in Company A, 5th North Carolina Cavalry. He was transferred out of this regiment on May 4, 1864, and was mustered into Company B, 13th Battalion North Carolina Light Artillery. He was paroled on April 29, 1865 at Greensboro, N.C.


The father of Charles and George Broadfoot was W.G. Broadfoot, a Confederate official in the C.S.A. Depository at Fayetteville, North Carolina.


The recipient of this letter, Charles W. Broadfoot, was an 18 year old student when he enlisted as a private on July 15, 1861, and was mustered into Company H, 1st North Carolina Infantry. He was mustered out of this regiment on November 12, 1861. He then served in Company D, 43rd North Carolina Infantry, and was discharged for promotion on September 7, 1862, being commissioned 1st Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp, on the staff of General Theophilus H. Holmes. On July 1, 1864, he was commissioned into the Field & Staff of the 1st North Carolina Reserve Infantry, with rank of lieutenant colonel and colonel. His date and method of discharge are unknown.    


By Ronald H. Bailey and the Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1984. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with photograph of Confederate dead lying beside an abandoned limber on the Antietam battlefield east of the Dunker Church. The men were killed during the early morning fighting on September 17, 1862, as this position was being defended by the Confederate artillery battalion led by Colonel Stephen D. Lee. Also has U.S. and C.S. belt plates, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title printed in blue. Title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 176 pages, index, maps, profusely illustrated. Brand new condition. Excellent book on the 1862 battle of Antietam, Maryland.  Nice early wick trimmer shears.  Unmarked as to maker, as is most commonly the case in American country made products, these iron trimmers remain in excellent condition and are the style of the 2nd quarter of the 19th century.  A nice companion item for the 1812 through Civil War eras. please note:   <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  If you are new to our catalog and wish additional ordering information or just to learn who we are, please check out our home page.  Thanks for visiting our catalog!!

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $150.00

 

Confederate Mother Writes to Son in 43rd

 

The Bloodiest Day, The Battle of Antieta $35.00

 

Early iron WICK TRIMMER $45.00

A nice solid Civil War issue percussion cap box, this offering remains solid with <U>sound stitching and no breaks or weak spots</U> in the belt loops or closure tab.  Some age crackling to the surface as you can see but with no flaking, this box is untouched and as found with telltale green verdigris at the rivets and finial.  The box retains its original wool linger. As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !



 A nice Civil War vintage crochet cotton misers purse.  Narrow in the middle and closed at both ends, miser's purses ranged in the course of their history from 8 to 10 inches long.  A knitted or crocheted <I>tube</I> with short slit in the narrow midsection to let the carrier drop coins or other small objects into either end of the tube.  The purse was closed by moving the rings, or sliders toward the ends, gathering the fabric snugly around the contents. The <I>toes</I>or ends were usually tasseled, one end was generally square the other rounded.  Frequently categorized by collectors as being exclusively for ladies use, the misers purse was an equally popular personal item of both sexes.  All in excellent original condition, this classic example of period ladies or men’s fare remains solid and suitable for careful use or will fit well in any period accessory or personal item collection.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  A handwritten document ( 7 3/4 X 6 ½ inch. ) executed in Charleston, South Carolina August 24,1861 by <B>Capt. Wm. K. Bachman</B>  as commander of <B> BACHMAN'S Company of GERMAN LIGHT ARTILLERY, HAMPTON'S LEGIONS</B> and bears two signatures of Bachman.  This original Confederate document remains in excellent condition without tears or repairs, and is complete and with two examples of the hard fighting Confederate Commander's signature.   Before the close of the Civil War this battery commander would lead his South Carolina company as Hampton’s Legions left their mark on such battlegrounds as the Seven Days Battles, Second Manassas, South Mountain, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg and at <FONT COLOR=#FF0000 ><I><B> GETTYSBURG</B></I></FONT> where as part of Hood’s Division 1st Corps, Capt. Bachman’s battery fought gallantly firing toward Meade's Union center in support of Pickett and Pettigrew.  A desirable Confederate document with a hard to find autograph.  (see: Confederate Military History, The Official Records, The Confederate Veteran, Time / Life’s – The Civil War, Sifakis’ Compendium of the Confederate Armies and more.) <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  


By Champ Clark and the Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1987. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with photograph of President Lincoln, U.S. and C.S. belt plates, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title printed in blue. Title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 176 pages, index, profusely illustrated. Brand new condition. Excellent book on the 1865 assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.

Civil War - Ordinance Department Inspect $165.00

 

CIVIL WAR era MISER’S PURSE $75.00

 

Hampton's Legions - CONFEDERATE SUBSISTE $225.00

 

The Assassination, Death of the Presiden $35.00




(1824-1881) Graduated in the West Point class of 1847. Mexican War veteran. Serving on the western frontier, he was wounded in a skirmish with Apaches in 1849. He resigned his commission in 1853, invented a breech loading rifle, was appointed a Major General of the Rhode Island State Militia and was elected to Congress as a Democrat. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he organized the 1st Rhode Island Infantry, becoming their Colonel. He was in command of a brigade at 1st Bull Run. Having become a Lincoln favorite, he was given command of the expedition against the coast of North Carolina, fought at Antietam, and in December of 1862 commanded the Army of the Potomac during their bitter defeat at Fredericksburg. Burnside also saw action at Knoxville, the Overland Campaign, and Petersburg. In his post war career he was elected Governor of Rhode Island three times, and later a U. S. Senator.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Very fine view in uniform with rank of major general. No imprint. Light wear and age toning.  


New Orleans, Jan. 1, 1862. Vignette of dog and safe at center, Indian maiden at right. 25 CENTS in red over print at center. VG.  


<b>Written by an officer who was captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.!


From Libby Prison, Richmond, Virginia</b>


1 plus pages, 9 3/4 x 7 7/8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, to his wife and children. 


<b><u>Libby Prison, Sabbath afternoon, Dec. 6th, 1863</b></u>


Dear Wife and Children,


After my love to you, I will inform you that I am well with the exception of a cold and that is better, and I think I will have it cured in two or three days.  Some things in that box helped it very much.  Dear, the box and contents came through all safe, but it laid here about 8 days before I got it, and some things got a little moldy from the damp in the cellar where they were stored.  I recd. the box on Friday and wrote you a few lines, but I was so worried and excited that I don’t know whether you could read it or not.  I also recd. a letter from you on Thursday dated the 18th of last month and was truly glad to hear of your good health.  Dear, you cannot imagine how good victuals taste that come from home.  It seems almost like eating at home, at least having them cooked at home, and those cakes and apples, I have ate nothing so good for the last six months, and there is enough to last me half the winter.  Well Dear, if I do not get out before these are used up, I will write to you for another box of provisions when I need them, but I do hope that I may get out of this before that time.  This has been one of the quietest Sabbath’s that I have seen here, but oh what would I give for one Sabbath at home with my dear little family.  Dear, try and keep in good heart and pray for me, and I hope the good Lord will keep you safe until we meet again is the daily prayer of your loving husband.


Lieut. Levi Lupton


Write once a week if you can.


Written on the reverse:


I am much obliged to you for the comfort[er] and pillow.  We are well supplied with blankets and comfort[ers] from different and various sources. All we lack is the U.S. to sleep comfortable, but we have got used to the floor so that we are pretty well.

 

Lt. Lupton


[Addressed to:] Mrs. E.H. Lupton, Jerusalem, Monroe Co., Ohio


Light staining and wear. Very nice letter.


Very desirable Yankee officer's P.O.W. letter written from the notorious Libby Prison in Richmond, Virginia by one of "the boys in blue" who would not survive this cruel war!


As a general rule of thumb, prisoner of war letters were limited to one page and subject to censorship. Lieutenant Lupton gets around the first part of this rule by opening up his letter sheet and laying it out flat so that what normally would have been two pages in its folio format were now two full pages of content all written on one side of the stationary!  


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864. 

 


<b>"The Little Giant"</b>


Civil War patriotic imprint with black mourning borders and illustration of Senator Stephen A. Douglas with quotes below. "Tell them to obey the Laws and support the Constitution." "There are no longer any parties, save these two- Patriots and Traitors." "The slavery question is a mere excuse. The election of Mr. Lincoln is a mere pretext! The present Secession movement is the result of an enormous conspiracy formed more than a year since." Very desirable imprint circa 1861.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.


<u>Stephen A. Douglas:</u> (1813-1861) Known as "The Little Giant," Douglas was an outstanding legislator, and orator, and was one of the founders of the Democratic Party in Illinois. Served as U.S. Senator, 1843-61. He is best known for his debates in 1858 against Abraham Lincoln. He was narrowly defeated for the Democratic nomination for president by Franklin Buchanan in 1856. He did gain the Democratic nomination in 1860, but was defeated for the presidency by his old friend and rival Abraham Lincoln. Upon secession, and the outbreak of the Civil War, he supported Lincoln and his policies. He died of typhoid fever in 1861.

CDV General Ambrose E. Burnside $50.00

 

1862 New Orleans 25 Cents Merchant Scrip $50.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $175.00

 

United States Senator, Stephen A. Dougla $35.00




Grayson Co., Va., June 28, 1862. The County of Grayson Will Pay FIFTEEN CENTS. Very fine. This is one of the scarcest of all Virginia county Civil War date notes to obtain. Very desirable.   


Halifax C.[ourt] H.[ouse], Va., July 1862. The County Of Halifax, One Dollar. Very good. This is one of the scarcer Virginia county Civil War date notes to find.  This attractive little hand lamp was constructed with a cast pewter font on a sheet iron tinned base and classic long brass burner tube for use with camphene.  All original and untouched just as it was set aside decades ago. Most popularly in use in the 1840s & 1850s, camphene lighting fuel from, highly refined turpentine produced a bright clean light. Largely replaced in lighting by coal oil in the 1860s, camphene was extremely volatile necessitating the small diameter wick and longer burner tubes than were used with whale oil lighting fuel.  The longer burner tube and generally smaller fuel reservoir, with a broad base were all common safety features of these little camphene finger lamps.  A nice all original little lamp illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison.   <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best.  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  Packed away since we acquired them years ago when Maine country attics held a myriad of such 19th century remnants of everyday use, we have uncovered a small lot of earlier through mid 1800s clothes pins and are offering them here <U>priced by the pair</U> for the collector who would like a couple for display.  These antique clothes pins were hand cut from a sapling or small tree branch which was split then bound with a strip of tinned iron to form what must have been a very effective clothes pin.  We have seen this style in years past but like most everyday utilitarian items of the period, they seem to have mostly vanished. With pleasing age and originality, a pair of these original will go well with other period country items or in any grouping of Civil War vintage personal things. <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

1862 Grayson County, Virginia 15 Cents N $95.00

 

1862 Halifax County, Virginia $1 Note

 

c. 1840 / 1850 pewter HAND LAMP

 

hand crafted Civil War vintage CLOTHES P $35.00

This attractive sheet brass embroidery stencil remains in fine original condition untouched and retaining that rich patina that comes to this material only with decades of age.  Hand cut, measuring 8 ¾ X 2 7/8 inches the delicate brass sheet remains in pleasing condition untouched condition and the finely cut patriotic design is without flaws of any kind.  A beautiful piece to lay in with period sewing material or textiles, from the War of 1812 through the Mexican War and Civil War. 

An exceptional piece of Americana! <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  


<CENTER><FONT COLOR=#800000>If you have an interest in neat Civil War period things or Maine in the time, you may enjoy our museum site at:</FONT COLOR=#800000></CENTER>

<CENTER><B><I>MaineLegacy.com</I></B></CENTER>


 Some years ago we acquired a small group of things emanating from the <B>Vincent Mountfort Post 22</B> Department of Maine, Grand Army of the Republic.  A special acquisition to us as this was the Brunswick, Maine based home post of General Joshua L. Chamberlain who commanded the 20th Maine at Gettysburg.  Nestled in among the grouping of remnants of the long defunct G. A. R. Post 22 were the remains of the painted silk post flag which we have maintained in our personal collection.  One of the more charming relics was the large brass cuspidor or <I>spittoon</I> offered here.  One of our favorite GAR relics for years it is now time to make some room and move it along.  Larger than the usually encountered example, this cuspidor measures 11 ¼ inches across the upper rim and stands 8 ¼ inches high and was clearly sized to meet the demands of public gathering.  Offered here just as it came to us with some surface corrosion on its rim and an attractive rich patina over all, both serving as good evidence of period use and age, one can only imagine the stories and war reminisce the old GAR hall spittoon has been exposed to.  (Enter <I>Mountfort</I> in our search feature to see other related material.)  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


<CENTER><FONT COLOR=#800000>If you have an interest in neat Civil War period things or Maine in the time, you may enjoy our museum site at:</FONT COLOR=#800000></CENTER>

<CENTER><B><I>MaineLegacy.com</I></B></CENTER>


 As seen in the Illinois Lincoln Museum collection this inkwell will beust as at home with goose quill or early steel nib dipping pen, this circa 1700s, early to mid 1800s turned wood inkwell remains in pleasing condition, ready for display.  Measuring 3 7/8 in diameter this classic old inkwell was fashioned with a blown glass ink reservoir which remains sound and ready for use.  Complete with ink staining from period use and remnants of original paint finish over a naturally age patinated surface, this all original writing desk or (with a natural cork stopper in place) <I>traveling </I> inkwell will set well in any period grouping.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!  


Confederate patriotic cover with vignette of the South Carolina flag with palmetto tree and moon and slogan below, "We Are Seven." Light wear. "Necessity" cover which looks like it was made out of a piece of stationary. Very fine.

Civil War vintage Patriotic Embroidery S $225.00

 

antique CUSPIDOR from Chamberlain’s home $225.00

 

antique TREEN INKWELL as used by Abraham $95.00

 

Confederate Patriotic Cover, South Carol $45.00

Based on the French 1862 fire helmet but with considerable redesign, this fire helmet style was first used by the London Metropolitan Fire Brigade in 1868 the design was quickly adopted by the vast majority of London fire brigades then by nearly all British fire brigades to become an iconic symbol of the later half, 19th century fire fighter.  With good evidence of period use, yet remaining in pleasing original condition with a soft natural age patina and its rarely found original split leather sweat band, this classic fire helmet with its high relief fire breathing dragons and torch crest of crossed fire axes with entwined hose, this impressive brass fire helmet will display well by itself or set in any firefighting collection.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!



 


The Battle of Shiloh, also known as the Battle of Pittsburg Landing, was fought April 6-7, 1862, in southwestern Tennessee. A Union army under Major General Ulysses S. Grant had moved via the Tennessee River deep into Tennessee and was encamped principally at Pittsburg Landing on the west bank of the river. Confederate forces under Generals' Albert Sidney Johnston and P.G.T. Beauregard launched a surprise attack on Grant there. On the first day of the battle, the Confederates struck with the intention of driving the Union defenders away from the river and into the swamps of Owl Creek to the west, hoping to defeat Grant's Army of the Tennessee before the anticipated arrival of Major General Don Carlos Buell's Army of the Ohio. The Confederate battle lines became confused during the fierce fighting, and Grant's men instead fell back to the northeast, in the direction of Pittsburg Landing. A position on a slightly sunken road, nicknamed the "Hornet's Nest," defended by the men of Brigadier Generals' Benjamin M. Prentiss's and W. H. L. Wallace's divisions provided critical time for the rest of the Union line to stabilize under the protection of numerous artillery batteries. The Confederates were forced to retreat form the bloodiest battle in United States history up to that time. 


Handsome 11 x 14 display, double matted, in gray and red, and ready to put in a frame. Includes a small remnant of a captured Confederate flag with white and red cloth visible. A rare relic from the Battle of Shiloh. Comes with COA and copy of the original note found with the flag fragment.  


Unused, patriotic envelope with vignette of the Virginia State Seal and their motto, Sic Semper Tyrannis. Imprint of Magee, 316 Chestnut St., Phila. Light age toning. Very fine.


WBTS Trivia: "Sic Semper Tyrannis" was what assassin John Wilkes Booth shouted from the stage of Ford's Theater in Washington, D.C., after he shot President Abraham Lincoln. It translates from the Latin to "thus always to tyrants."  <b>& General George B. McClellan</b>


Unused, patriotic envelope with an ornate bronze colored vignette featuring portraits of President Abraham Lincoln and his Commander-in-Chief General George B. McClellan. They are surrounded by a ship, with anchor, an American flag and shield, two Zouaves seated; one on a drum, and a full standing infantryman with shako, musket, cape, knapsack, etc. A banner below the central figures proclaims, Review Of The Army. Imprint of Chas. Magnus, 12 Frankfort St., N.Y. Mounting traces on the corners of the reverse. Very scarce.

Antique LONDON FIRE BRIGADE HELMET $425.00

 

Battle of Shiloh Captured Confederate Fl $295.00

 

Patriotic Cover, Rebel Arms of Virginia

 

Patriotic Cover, President Abraham Linco

Our photographs will do best to describe this wonderful old Civil War relic except to advise that we acquired the piece some years ago when it was made available to us along with a number of other Civil War related items that had been rescued from the unfortunate <I>urban renewal</I> demolition of what had been the last active Department of Maine, Grand Army of the Republic building.   A wonderful size for display, this approximately 12 ¾ X 10 ½ inch coarsely loomed wool, hand stitched, 3rd Division, 25th Army Corps flag will satisfy with respect to age and originality.  Another treasure gleaned from our accumulation of fifty years of scouring the country side and <I>squirreling</I> away special finds.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


<CENTER><FONT COLOR=#800000>If you have an interest in neat Civil War period things or Maine in the time, you may enjoy our museum site at:</FONT COLOR=#800000></CENTER>

<CENTER><B><I>MaineLegacy.com</I></B></CENTER>

 


<b>Written by an officer who was captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.!


From Libby Prison, Richmond, Virginia</b>


1 page, 7 1/2 x 5 1/4, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, to his wife and children. 


<b><u>Libby Prison Hospital, Sabbath, March 27th, 1864</b></u>


My Dear Wife and Children,


After my love to you and earnest prayers for your welfare I will inform you that I am still in the Hospital but nearly well except weakness.  I have nothing new to write only that I think we will get away from this place soon, perhaps this week and oh how anxious am I for that time too.  No one can tell only in the same situation.  Try and keep your spirits up trusting that it will all be well and may the Good Lord give you health and peace is the prayer of your loving husband.  Farewell.  This is all I am allowed to write.


Lt. Levi Lupton


Addressed on the reverse to: Mrs. E.H. Lupton, Jerusalem, Monroe Co., Ohio. 

      

Light staining and wear. Very desirable Yankee officer's P.O.W. letter written from the notorious Libby Prison by one of "the boys in blue" who would not survive the war!


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.     


<b>Published by Alexander Gardner</b>


Libby Prison, established March 26, 1862, was situated on the corner of Cary and 20th streets, on the James River in Richmond, Virginia. The building was the warehouse of Libby and Sons, ship chandlers, before the Civil War. Outside of Andersonville Prison, Libby Prison was perhaps the most notorious Confederate Prison.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. This is a wartime view of the famous Confederate prison originally taken by Rees of Richmond in 1863. Tents, Confederate soldiers and a horse are visible in the foreground. This particular image was published by Alexander Gardner and the card has his imprint on the reverse: Gardner, Corner 7th & D Strs., Washington, D.C. Light age toning and wear. Very scarce.  


Includes a 3 3/4 x 3 inch piece of tide water cypress which originated from a beam from Libby Prison. Handsomely displayed within double mat boards of cream and red, and highlighted with two modern copy photographs, and descriptive text. The photo at the top of the display is a Civil War period view showing Libby as a Confederate prison. Captain Turner, the commandant of Libby Prison, is one of the men standing in front of the tents in the foreground. The bottom photograph is a view of the reconstructed interior of Libby Prison as it appeared on display in Chicago in the late 1800's showing the cypress beams. Overall size is 11 x 14. Comes with documentation. Very neat original Civil War relic from one of the war's most infamous prisons! 


Libby Prison, established March 26, 1862, was situated on the corner of Cary and 20th streets, on the James River in Richmond, Virginia. The building was the warehouse of Libby and Sons, ship chandlers, before the Civil War. Outside of Andersonville Prison, Libby Prison was perhaps the most notorious Confederate Prison. 


*Please note that our scan is cropped as the display is too large to fit it in entirely on our scanner. The original display has nice full borders.

Original! Civil War 25th Army Corps – 3 $395.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter as a Prisoner

 

CDV Libby Prison, Richmond, Virginia $250.00

 

Libby Prison Display $125.00




Authentic, original piece of the Confederate battle flag that flew over Fort Morgan, Alabama, when it was captured by Admiral David G. Farragut in 1864. Handsomely displayed within cream and red, double mat board design. Includes a copy vignette of the naval battle of Mobile Bay, in the upper window opening, while the original Confederate battle flag remnant is prominently shown at the center of the display. The following descriptive text highlights the display at the bottom: Confederate Battle Flag of Fort Morgan, Battle of Mobile Bay. The Battle of Mobile Bay was a naval battle fought on August 5, 1864. Commanding the Union forces was Admiral David Farragut, while Admiral Franklin Buchanan led the Confederate fleet. The battle took place off the coast of Alabama, at the mouth of Mobile Bay, which was defended by two Confederate forts, Fort Morgan and Fort Gaines, and by a torpedo field (in modern terms, a minefield) that created a single narrow channel for blockade runners to enter and exit the bay. The biggest challenge for Farragut was entering the bay. With eighteen vessels, he commanded far greater firepower than the Confederate fleet of four. The Union fleet suffered the first major loss when the U.S.S. Tecumseh was critically damaged by an exploding torpedo after it wandered into the field. Within three minutes, the vessel was completely submerged. 94 men went down with the ship. Under fire from both the Confederate fleet and Fort Morgan, Farragut had to choose between retreating or risking the minefield. He then issued his famous order, "Damn the torpedoes! Full speed ahead!" Farragut took his flagship through the minefield safely, followed by the rest of the fleet. When Union fleet reached the bay, they defeated the Confederate flotilla led by the giant ironclad, C.S.S. Tennessee. Buchanan surrendered to Farragut aboard the U.S.S. Hartford. After several weeks of bombardment from land and sea resulting in severe damage to Fort Morgan with the citadel being burned and the walls severely damaged by shot and shells, the Confederate Commander, General Page surrendered Fort Morgan on August 23, 1864 to Federal forces. This flag relic came from a small section of the Confederate flag shot down over Fort Morgan and retrieved by Fleet Surgeon James C. Palmer upon entry into the fort by Union forces and is authenticated by his note (a copy of which is) seen on the accompanying certificate. Included with the display is certificate of authenticity which incorporates a computer copy of Surgeon Palmer's original note which was pinned to the original flag relic. Overall size of the display is 11 x 14. Rare and very desirable Confederate flag relic from this famous fort! Please note that our scan is cropped because the display is larger than our scanner. The original display has nice full borders.  


<b>Killed at the battle of Ball's Bluff, Virginia in 1861</b>


(1811-61) He read law and was admitted to the bar at the age of 19. A private during the Black Hawk War, he moved to Springfield, Illinois where he became a close friend of Abraham Lincoln. Lincoln later named his second son, "Eddie," after Baker. Attaining prominence as a great orator, he soon became involved in politics and became a representative of the Illinois general assembly; defeated Lincoln to become a representative in Congress; served in the Mexican War as colonel of the 4th Illinois Infantry; was again elected to Congress; was a presidential elector in 1848; and four years later moved to California where he became a prominent lawyer and public speaker. In 1860, Baker moved to Oregon at the request of the Republican Party of the newly admitted state and in October of that year was elected to the U.S. Senate. He did much to hold the Pacific coast in the Union by delivering several remarkable speeches. Shortly after Lincoln's inauguration he raised a regiment in New York, and Pennsylvania, named the 71st Pennsylvania Volunteers and became their colonel. He was appointed major general of volunteers, Sept. 21, 1861, and was killed in action while commanding a brigade at Ball's Bluff, Va., on Oct. 21, 1861.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view in civilian attire. Backmark: "E.A." [early war E. Anthony, New York imprint]. Col. E.D. Baker is written in period ink on the front mount. Excellent.


WBTS Trivia: Edward D. Baker had known "Willie" Lincoln since he was a baby in Springfield. When Baker was killed at Ball's Bluff, Va., the entire Lincoln family was grief stricken, and Willie wrote a tribute to the fallen Baker in the form of a poem, and wrote the following note to the editor of the Washington National Republican: "Dear Sir, I enclose you my first attempt at poetry. Yours truly, William W. Lincoln." 


The editor thinking the lines quite creditable, especially for one so young, published them in his newspaper on November 4, 1861.


There was no patriot like Baker,

So noble and so true;

He fell as a soldier on the field,

His face to the sky of blue.


His voice is silent in the hall,

Which oft his presence grac'd,

No more he'll hear the loud acclaim,

Which rang from place to place.


No squeamish notions filled his breast,

The Union was his theme,

No surrender and no compromise,

His day thought and night's dream.


His country has her part to play,

To'rds those he has left behind,

His widow and his children all,

She must always keep in mind.


William W. Lincoln, 1861    


 


Civil War patriotic cover with mocking theme featuring Jeff Davis portrayed as an ape in uniform wearing a chapeau, holding a sword and a  Confederate flag with skull and cross bones tied to his tail. He is also barefooted. In front of him, portraying a Confederate drummer, is a dog in uniform playing his drum with C.S.A. on the front. The slogan reads: Recruits wanted for the Brave Southern Army- Good pay, (in Confederate Bonds) and good quarters, (in a horn). Published by D. Murphy's Son, 65 Fulton & 372 Pearl Street, N.Y. Very desirable.  


The slave trade between Africa and the Western Hemisphere flourished until the early 19th century when many European countries outlawed slave commerce. Importation of slaves was prohibited in the United States after 1807 and slave traders such as Jim Bowie brought in slaves through Texas and through the thin net of Navy ships patrolling the U.S. coast. The three artifacts included in this display date from the early 19th century and are relics from the slavery era. (A) Button manufactured for the slave trader Thomas Porter who sold slaves in the Caribbean area during the turn of the 19th century. This button originated in Antigua, British West Indies and was produced in London. The name Porter may have been an Anglo version of Porteous as there was a French family who ran slave ships in the 18th century. There have been reports of these buttons being found off the Georgia coast and supposition is that these were worn by his slaves prior to sale. (B) Striated Venetian glass bead imported for the slave trade in Africa during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. These were particularly popular due to the colorful patterns in the glass. Similar beads have been excavated in New Orleans in "Congo Square" where the slaves were allowed to socialize on Sundays. (C) Burned cotton taken from the wreck of the Confederate blockade runner, "Nashville," which was sunk by the Union ironclad "Montauk" in 1863. This is definitely slave produced cotton on the way to England in exchange for arms for the Confederate government. Nicely displayed in an 8 1/4 x 6 1/4 glass faced case, with descriptive text and illustrations of two 1838 slave tokens. Below are three separate windows cut out in the cream colored mat board to display the relics.

Fort Morgan, Alabama, Confederate Battle $295.00

 

CDV General Edward D. Baker

 

Patriotic Cover, Recruits Wanted For The

 

The Slave Trade Display $95.00




3 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written to Lieutenant Charles W. Broadfoot by his mother.


<b><u>Oct. 25th [1863]</b></u>


My Dear Son,


I received yours dated the 21st a day or two since.  Did not answer it with my usual promptness, because the boys had just written.  Jack Frost has just paid us a visit & with it an increase in the price of wood.  I hope they will soon have it in Wilmington sufficient to kill the fever, I mean the frost.  I do not think Lydia has given up her visit but she has not specified any time for it.  Yesterday I left home for the first time since you left.  I went to see Elizabeth & Mrs. Mysoon, the latter has been & is still quite sick, has fever such as I had but is more completely prostrated.  She is broken down by her labors in the soldier’s aid society.  You know she is very much interested & energetic.  She says she won’t have a carpet on her floor this winter that will answer for the soldiers.  Mrs. Lutterbohs are all made into blankets & others are doing the same.  I propose to send the only one I had but your Pa said I might keep it with a clear conscious.  The ladies have gone to work later this fall but I hope they will get the soldiers supplied in time.  George has not got a horse yet.*  I am having a scarf knit for him.  Have made him a comfort & shall insist on his taking them.  I do not think he has any idea of the hardships he may have to endure tho he did go 2 days without any thing to eat.  I have made a good many pickle peppers & have some tomatoes in preparation.  My homespun is very much admired.  I find it very comfortable.  I shall hear today about your boots & will let you know in my next.  You know I don’t hear from the office in time to write by return mail.  I intend to send Ella some money to invest in wine for me.  She says her brother will not charge me war prices.  His wine is I think the best I ever drank, but you might think it rather sweet.  I must now close & get ready for breakfast.  God bless you.


Your aff.[ectionate] Mother


Very fine condition.


*The George that Mrs. Broadfoot is referring to in her letter was George B. Broadfoot, her other son in the Confederate army, and the brother of Charles. George was a 17 year old student when he enlisted on June 19, 1862, and was mustered into the Confederate army as a private in Company A, 5th North Carolina Cavalry. He was transferred out of this regiment on May 4, 1864, and was mustered into Company B, 13th Battalion North Carolina Light Artillery. He was paroled on April 29, 1865 at Greensboro, N.C.


The father of Charles and George Broadfoot was W.G. Broadfoot, a Confederate official in the C.S.A. Depository at Fayetteville, North Carolina.


The recipient of this letter, Charles W. Broadfoot, was an 18 year old student when he enlisted as a private on July 15, 1861, and was mustered into Company H, 1st North Carolina Infantry. He was mustered out of this regiment on November 12, 1861. He then served in Company D, 43rd North Carolina Infantry, and was discharged for promotion on September 7, 1862, being commissioned 1st Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp, on the staff of General Theophilus H. Holmes. On July 1, 1864, he was commissioned into the Field & Staff of the 1st North Carolina Reserve Infantry, with rank of lieutenant colonel and colonel. His date and method of discharge are unknown   

 


<b>Third President of the United States</b>


(1743-1826) Among the many highlights of "Founding Father" Thomas Jefferson's political career were; principal author of the Declaration of Independence, a representative of Virginia in the Continental Congress, 2nd Governor of Virginia, United States Minister to France, 2nd Vice President of the United States, and 3rd President of the United States.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view portrait. No imprint. Very fine, and a desirable card of one of our "Founding Fathers."  


<b>First President of the United States


1862 Civil War dated card</b>


(1732-99) "The Father of Our Country." George Washington was the Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War, and served as the first president of the United States.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 1/4 card. Bust view portrait. Backmark: Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1862, by David Nichols, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court, of the District of Massachusetts. Printed legend on the reverse: "G. Washington. This was done in New York 1790 and is acknowledged by all to be a very strong likeness. B. Goodhue." Some surface scratching to the front of the card none of which touch the subject. Light age toning. Uncommon to find with this 1862 imprint. Very desirable. No doubt some proud American, North or South, displayed this image of George Washington in a parlor album or possibly on a mantle in plain view to show their patriotism!  A bit late for the Civil War collector but of special interest to the early post war Western frontier, Americana and Indian Wars era enthusiast, will be this attractive <B>GOODELL’S</B><I>Star Butcher</B> marked knife.  Included with the knife is its period hand crafted heavy leather sheath attesting to the popular period use of the stout bladed style <I>butcher</I> as a belt or boot knife.  Measuring 10 5/8 inches in total length, the 5 7/8 inch blade retains its maker marking though the <I>Pat.1868</I> marking one usually sees on these blades is not visible.  The blade shows good evidence of age, period use and honing yet is in overall pleasing condition with no dings or chips in the edge.  The cocobolo grip with its heavy pewter bolster and decorative acorn and star inlay offers good evidence of age yet remains in excellent condition with no dings, splits or other condition issues.    

     As an aside the Goodell Co. was founded by David Goodell a New Hampshire native who patented a host of gadgets including apple slices and corers, cherry pitters, cutlery and a machine to aid farmers in planting seeds. His first and likely best known invention (c. 1864), was an apple peeler he called the <I>Lightning.</I> <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

Mother Writes to Her Son, a North Caroli $50.00

 

CDV President Thomas Jefferson $25.00

 

CDV General George Washington $25.00

 

Goodell’s Pat. 1868 ‘Star Butcher’ BELT $195.00

Illustrated here with a U.S. quarter for size comparison, this neat little period pewter whistle remains in excellent working condition with no flaws or repairs, just natural age patina that comes to this material with decades of age.  Difficult to find nowadays, Civil War site digger/historians have well documented examples of the period style and material. Will lay in well in any period personal grouping. (see: <I>Excavated Artifacts from Battlefields & Campsites of the Civil War</I> by Phillips)  As with all direct sales, we are pleased to offer a no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased! Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !    With lots of charm that comes to an antique pipe only with good evidence of the rigors of period use and carrying, this old gutta-percha tobacco pipe bears the figure of George Washington and offers the historic appeal of personalization by its owner.  With a hand cut cross on one side panel and the initials <B>C W D</B> carved into the other, this old Washington pipe clearly was a favorite of C.W.D’s who carried it and smoked it with a vengeance as testified to by its period <I>make do</I> string repair and reed stem in combination with the sound but well used condition of the gutta-percha bowel.  An attractive piece of antique Americana.  please note:   <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!


 Illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison, this commercially prepared ink well remains in pleasing original condition.  Fashioned from soldered sheet iron around a plaster encased glass bottle with a natural cork stopper, the piece retains its period label on the bottom.  Couldn’t make it show in the illustrations but under proper light the print <I> Improved Non-Conducting Metallic Ink - Patent ??</I>.

Will go well with a period quill, dipping pen or  traveling writing desk. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  


 Functionally sound and complete with eye pleasing age and good evidence of period use and carrying, this classic little Allen & Wheelock <I>SIDE HAMMER</I> was a popular and reliable little private purchase arm of the Civil War.  This .32 rimfire is marked <B>ALLEN & WHEELOCK WORCESTOR, MASS. U.S. / ALLEN’S PATENTS SEPT. 7, NOV 9, 1858</B> on the side of its 4 inch barrel.  On the frame, forward of the cylinder and indicating that it is a 2nd Model, is the inclusion of a <B>July 3, 1860</B> patent date.  This patent date and the assembly number <B>564</B> appearing on bottom of the barrel under the cylinder pin with an additional assembly number (7) added to the 564 on the rear of the cylinder and on the frame under the grips, tell us the arm was manufactured after July 1860, most likely in 1861.  Allen produced about 1,000 of these little pocket revolvers from 1859 to 1862 when production ceased.  A nice arm to lay in any Civil War personal item collection without spending a ton of money.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


<U>A note about firearms:</U>   WE SUPPORT RESPONSIBLE CONTROL OF MODERN FIREARMS AND EMPHASIZE HERE THAT THIS PIECE IS CONSIDERED AN ANTIQUE / COLLECTABLE AND IS THEREFORE OUTSIDE  RESTRICTIONS APPLICABLE TO COVERED (MODERN) FIREARMS. THE PIECE IS OFFERED AS A HISTORICAL COLLECTABLE ONLY AND THOUGH MECHANICALLY OPERABLE, IS NOT TO BE CONSIDERED  FIREABLE UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES.  <U>PURCHASE OF THIS ITEM WILL CONSTITUTE A FULL UNDERSTANDING OF AND AGREEMENT WITH  THE ABOVE. </U>

Civil War vintage PEWTER WHISTLE $55.00

 

well smoked antique - gutta-percha Georg $75.00

 

earlier to mid 1800’s Ink Well $65.00

 

Civil War vintage antique Allen & Wheelo $475.00




Austin, June 26, 1862. Vignette of a large sailing ship at left. "TEN DOLLARS" in red over print at center. Red lace network background. Choice uncirculated condition. Bright and attractive note that is scarce to find in this condition.  


8 pages. Front page illustration of Brigadier-General Michael Corcoran. Arrival of General Corcoran. His Reception in Philadelphia. One Continued Ovation From Washington to This City. Full Account of Incidents on the Route. Speeches, etc., etc. The Latest News. Affairs at the Federal Capital. Important Southern News. List of Union Citizens in Prison at Salisbury, N.C. Their Arrest and Confinement by the Rebels for Loyalty to the United States. [Long List of these citizens by name and their respective states of residence]. The War in Missouri. Retreat of the Rebels. Union Troops in Hot Pursuit. Movements of the Rebel Col. Coffey. Guerrilla Band Broken up at Montevallo. Rebel Rout Near Forsythe. Major Hubbard Surrounded at Newtonia. Union Convention at New Jersey. New Jersey Politics. Marcus L. Ward of Essex Co. Nominated for Governor of New Jersey. The War in the West. News From General Curtis' Army. Capture of Clarksburg. The Coming Draft. General Lew Wallace. Latest News From the South. The Fight at Cedar Run. Dash Into Front Royal. Official Dispatch of Stonewall Jackson. McClellan Evacuating Harrison's Landing. A Tennessee Soldier Shot by the Rebels. Interesting Letter From a National Officer; a Prisoner of War, and much more war news. Repair in the upper left margin with some light staining, edge chipping with some paper loss, and the folds and edge tears have been repaired with archival tape. This 1862 Philadelphia newspaper with its very desirable front page woodcut engraving of General Michael Corcoran, [the engraving itself is in very nice condition] commander of "Corcoran's Irish Legion," who died in 1863, would easily sell for $65.00 to $75.00 if it were in excellent condition. I have priced it very fairly.     


8 pages. Important From New Orleans. Capture of Alexandria by Admiral Porter. General Banks' Forces in Possession. Previous Bombardment and Capture of Fort De Russy. The Great Cavalry Raid Through Mississippi. Safe Arrival of Col. Grierson's Command at Baton Rouge. Detailed Account of Their Exploits. Immense and Irreparable Damage Inflicted Upon the Enemy. Only One of Our Men Killed and Six Wounded. Proposed Organization of a Corps D'Afrique by Gen. Banks. The Great Raid in Mississippi. A Detailed Narrative of the Exploits of Our Cavalry. Wonderful Cavalry Exploit. Important From General Grant. The Rebels Report That he Has Captured Jackson, Miss. The Cavalry Raid in Virginia. Operations by the Force Under Command of Lieut. Col. Davis. From the Army of the Potomac. Visit of Senators Wade and Chandler to Falmouth, and much more. Nice 1863 issue with exciting news of Colonel Benjamin H. Grierson's cavalry raid.  <b>of the Gulf to be Paid</b>


5 x 7 3/4, imprint.


Headquarters Department of the Gulf

New Orleans, August 27, 1862


General Orders No. 65


Commanders of Brigades in this Department will have their respective commands mustered for pay on the last day of this month.


By command of

MAJOR-GENERAL BUTLER


WM. H. WEIGEL, 1st Lieut. And A.A.A.G.


Excellent. Scarce Department of the Gulf imprint.

1862 State of Texas $10 Treasury Warrant $150.00

 

The Philadelphia Inquirer, August 22, 18 $20.00

 

The New York Times, New York, May 18, 18 $35.00

 

General Ben Butler Orders Soldiers in th $15.00




8 pages. IMPORTANT REBEL NEWS. Progress of the Siege of Charleston. Cummings Point Severely Bombarded by the Ironsides and Two Monitors. Fort Sumter and Two Rebel Batteries Engaged. A Counter Bombardment of Our Works on Morris Island. The Expedition in North Carolina. The War in Tennessee. An Expedition Into the Enemy's Country. The War in Indian Territory. Movements of the Blockade Runners. Arrival of the Florida. Quarrelling Over a Wrecked Rebel Prize. The Doings of the Rebel Pirates. The Law of the Blockade. Liability of Vessels Proceeding to Neutral Ports to Load for Blockaded Ports. Opinion of the Attorney General. Ship Building for the Rebels. Views of a Southern Paper on the Negro Question. The Negroes and Colonization. The Metropolitan Police. Their Services During the Riot Week. Their Honorable Record, and more news. Age toning and light wear.     <b>to the Quartermaster's Department


1862 orders by General "Beast" Butler in New Orleans</b>


5 x 7 3/4, imprint.


Headquarters Department of the Gulf

New Orleans, August 29, 1862


General Orders No. 66


No officer who is not entitled by regulations to a horse will be allowed to keep one.


All officers not so entitled, having horses, will turn them over to the Quartermaster's Department forthwith, and all Assistant and Regimental Quartermaster's will see to it that such horses are returned to the Chief Quartermaster, and will beheld responsible for them.


By command of

MAJOR GENERAL BUTLER


R.S. DAVIS, Capt. And A.A.A.G.


Excellent. Scarce Department of the Gulf imprint. 


 


<b>Killed in the battle of Wilson's Creek, Missouri in 1861</b>


(1818-61) Graduated from West Point in 1841 ranking #11. During the years before the Civil War he fought against the Florida Seminoles and was brevetted captain for gallantry in the Mexican War. More than any other man he saved Missouri for the Union in 1861. He was killed in action at the battle of Wilson's Creek, Mo., August 10, 1861.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view portrait in uniform with epaulets. No imprint. Very fine.  


8 pages. Front page illustration of The Late Colonel E.D. Baker. THE GREAT REBELLION. The Potomac Effectually Blockaded. A Battery of Eighteen Guns Near Mathias Point. The Battle At Leesburg. The Death Of Col. Baker. His Body to be Taken to Washington. Colonel Baker's Remains. The President and Mrs. Lincoln Desire Them to be Brought to the White House. The Battle at Edwards Ferry. Lieut. Williams of the California Regiment among the Killed. Arrest of Secessionist in Delaware. From Gen. Banks Column. The War In Missouri. Another Victory at Frederickton. Jeff Thompson Routed-Col. Lowe Killed-Four Guns Captured. The War In Kentucky. The Rebel Zollicoffer Repulsed. Late From New Orleans. United States Ship Vincennes Still Afloat. The Rebels Admit a Heavy Loss at Santa Rosa Island. Latest Foreign News. Rumor that France will Recognize the Rebel Government. The Latest From Washington. Includes a map on page 8 titled, "The Battle Ground In The Vicinity Of Leesburg." Much more news. Edge chipping with some paper loss. Edge and fold tears have been repaired with archival tape.

The New York Times, August 4, 1863 $25.00

 

Officers Not Entitled to a Horse Will Ha

 

CDV General Nathaniel Lyon

 

The Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia,




8 pages. IMPORTANT FROM WASHINGTON. The Harper's Ferry Investigation. Stampede of Abolition Witnesses. Army Intelligence. Bill to Prevent Invasion. The Mississippi Commission to Virginia. Supreme Court of the United States. Proceedings of the Louisiana House of Representatives and the Senate. Detection of Counterfeiters. Valuable Slaves at Auction. Choice Plantation Slaves For Sale. Sale of Real Estate and Slaves. Runaway Slave Ads, and much more. Typical light wear and age toning. This New Orleans newspaper was issued less than two months after the hanging of John Brown for his Harper's Ferry Raid, and less than 15 months before the commencement of the War Between the States.  


WBTS Trivia: The Harper's Ferry Raid, led by the abolitionist John Brown,  took place October 16-18, 1859. Brown was tried for murder, conspiring with slaves to rebel, and treason, at the old Court House in Charles Town, Va. Found guilty on all charges, he was hung at Charles Town on December 2, 1859.  


To Lieutenant Charles W. Broadfoot, from his mother.


4 pages, 6 5/8 x 8, in ink. 


May 14th [1863]


My Dear Son,


I received your letter about an hour since, your father having received one a few days ago.  Your letters were always a pleasure but now doubly so.  You do not seem to get mine very well for I have been right particular in writing.  I did not mean to draw such a picture of high prices as to make you gloomy, but I always write just as things are & you must not deprive yourself of any of the comforts you need to send means home.  Your Father does not yet know what his Gov’t Depository [job]* will be worth, but he is very bright & cheerful tho kept right busily employed.  The press of work will soon be over.  He is now cancelling notes.  The price of provisions has come down some.  I wish you could be with us now.  Uncle Will is here with his bride.  It is convention or rather council time tho there are so few delegates that there is some doubt whether there will be any convention.  Uncle George & Grandma are in Raleigh.  The former will come down tomorrow if he can get a seat in the stage.  For fear he should not, he sent his trunk down to me containing 3 hams, a peck of wheat (for coffee) 2 bottles homemade syrup- shoes, leather, thread, pins & linen coats.  He is indefatigable in his efforts to serve us.  I am quite anxious to see him.  Grandma will make a visit to Raleigh & sends word if we do not, some of us, go for her with gentle horses she will go back to Rowan.  She prefers riding in the cars to George’s horse & buggy.  I am trying to entertain Will & his wife in comfortable style.  We have some vegetables & plenty of strawberries, some cake, today I had a present, some new fresh butter from Mrs. Tom Hall & Mrs. Worth sent me some fresh meat so it is not like hard times here & the children are enjoying it.  We are all much pleased with our sister Mary.  She is just the wife for a poor clergyman & Uncle Will is very poor & needs a wife.  She is very plain looking but improves on acquaintance.  You will have learned by this time that there was no attack on Newbern & the one on Washington was abandoned.  I have received several letters from George** in the last fortnight also your gun & his flannel shirts & understand he has sent a blanket home.  His Regt. has been sent to Va.  There are a good many of his company here & it is gratifying to know that they all speak well of him.  He was one of 5 or 6 that got an old mule & young horse while on a scout.  [The] Government will buy the mule, [and] his horses back.  I spent the last money G[eorge] sent me for sugar & tho I have used a good deal of it have kept some to make wine.  I do not object to the smuggling if it is necessary for army supplies, but I hope it is not for ladies adornment at all.  Laura Ann was up to see us today.  She has heard from Jo who is all safe, only one man in his company wounded, 10 made prisoners.  I am glad you visit the ladies.  I know you can enjoy their company without being as susceptible as John & Theo.  We hear here that the Gen. is going to marry a widow Wright.  He deserves a good wife & if he wants to I hope will get one. W. Geer is staying with Aunt E- he has doubled in size almost since he was here before & I tell you what if he should stay long the horse & rockaway would give out.  William is still with James but I think is a little homesick tho he is enjoying fishing.  May is teething & today a little feverish which makes her right frightful.  You will say she was always so.  Andrew’s collar bone is well tho still quite a knot on it which will be absolved after a while.  Aunty’s family are all well except George’s wife who is still in bed under the Dr’s hands.  Mr. Watson gave us a first rate sermon today.  I got a ride down, cannot undertake to walk much.  The rest have gone down tonight & do not know that I am writing.  Frank will only be too glad to write.  I sent Peter Hale a mess of asparagus on your account.  Good night & God bless you. 


Very fine letter with some nice military content.


The recipient of this letter, Charles W. Broadfoot, was an 18 year old student when he enlisted as a private on July 15, 1861, and was mustered into Company H, 1st North Carolina Infantry. He was mustered out of this regiment on November 12, 1861. He then served in Company D, 43rd North Carolina Infantry, and was discharged for promotion on September 7, 1862, being commissioned 1st Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp, on the staff of General Theophilus H. Holmes. On July 1, 1864, he was commissioned into the Field & Staff of the 1st North Carolina Reserve Infantry, with rank of lieutenant colonel and colonel. His date and method of discharge are unknown.    


*The father of Charles and George Broadfoot was W.G. Broadfoot, a Confederate official in the C.S.A. Depository at Fayetteville, North Carolina.


**The George that Mrs. Broadfoot is referring to in her letter was George B. Broadfoot, her other son in the Confederate army, and the brother of Charles. George was a 17 year old student when he enlisted on June 19, 1862, and was mustered into the Confederate army as a private in Company A, 5th North Carolina Cavalry. He was transferred out of this regiment on May 4, 1864, and was mustered into Company B, 13th Battalion North Carolina Light Artillery. He was paroled on April 29, 1865 at Greensboro, N.C.  


Unabridged reprint of the 1866 edition. Published by Dover Publications, Inc., New York. 100 photographs, all original size, with lengthy descriptive text for each photo, also includes an index. Introduction by E.F. Bleiler. Paperback, 10 5/8 x 8 1/4. New condition. A must have book for every Civil War photograph collector and library.


Second only to Mathew Brady as the foremost early American photographer was Alexander Gardner, the one time manager of Brady's Washington salon and Brady's chief photographer in the field during the early days of the Civil War. Indeed, Gardner- who later photographed the War independently- often managed the famous horse-drawn photographic laboratory and took many of the pictures that used to be attributed to Brady. He accompanied the Union troops on their marches, their camps and bivouacs, their battles, and on their many hasty retreats and routs during the early days of the War.


In 1866 Alexander Gardner published a very ambitious two volume work which contained prints of some 100 photographs which he had taken in the field. A list of them reads like a roster of great events and great men; Antietam Bridge under Travel, President Lincoln and General McClellan at Antietam, Pinkerton and His Agents in the Field, Ruins of Richmond, Libby Prison, McLean's House Where Lee's Surrender Was Signed, Meade's Headquarters at Gettysburg, Battery D, Second U.S. Artillery in Action at Fredericksburg, the Slaughter Pen at Gettysburg, and many others. This publication is now among the rarest American books, and is here for the first time republished inexpensively.


Gardner's photographs are among the greatest war pictures ever taken and are also among the most prized records of American history. Gardner was quite conscious of recording history, and spared himself no pains or risk to achieve the finest results. His work indicates a technical mastery that now seems incredible when one bears in mind the vicissitudes of collodion applications in the field, wet plates, long exposures, long drying times, imperfect chemicals- plus enemy bullets around the photographer's ears. It has been said of these photographs; photography today, one hundred years later, is far easier, but it is no better.   


<b>With blind stamp imprint of Cook [Charleston, South Carolina]</b>


(1832-1913) The 29 year old Prince de Polignac came to the Confederacy with a distinguished record in the Crimean War, and was named Lieutenant Colonel and Chief of Staff to General P.G.T. Beauregard on July 16, 1861. After fighting at Corinth, he was named brigadier general on January 10, 1863 and served under General Richard Taylor in the Red River campaign of 1864. Put in command of a Texas Brigade, he met with disapproval, hostility and the nickname, "Polecat." He soon won their respect and admiration as a combat leader moving up to division command at Sabine Cross Roads, and on June 13, 1864 was appointed major general. About 6 foot 4 inches tall, and thin, he was a gallant and talented soldier as well as one of the war's most romantic figures. His statue is on the Sabine Cross Roads battlefield.


Antique photograph, 7 3/4 x 9 7/8. Chest up portrait in uniform with 3 stars on his collar and wearing kepi. Blind stamp imprint of "Cook" [Charleston, South Carolina] at bottom right corner. Circa early 1900's silver print. Excellent portrait. Scarce.

The Daily True Delta, New Orleans, Louis $35.00

 

Letter to a North Carolina Officer in th $75.00

 

Gardner's Photographic Sketch Book Of Th $25.00

 

Photograph General Camille Armand Jules $45.00




<b>Plus Reward Imprint


STOLEN! One Bright Bay Horse- A reward of $25 will be given for the capture of the man or horse!</b>


Formed in 1863, in Luray and Millport, Missouri. Shortly after the commencement of the Civil War, lawless men in the border states- that is the states lying between the loyal and seceded states- banded themselves together for the purpose of plundering honest citizens. Missouri especially was subject to the depredations of these gangs, and in time the conditions became so bad that the law-abiding people found it necessary to take some action for defense. The first organization of this character was proposed at a meeting held at Luray, Mo., in September, 1863. At a second meeting held at Millport, Mo., about a month later, a constitution and by-laws were adopted, and as horses seemed to be the principal objects of theft, the society took the name of the "Anti-Horse Thief Association." The effectiveness of such an organization quickly became apparent, the order spread to other states, and in time covered a large expanse of territory. After the war was over, when the conditions that called the association into existence no longer existed, its scope was widened to include all kinds of thefts and a national organization was incorporated under the laws of Kansas. This national order is composed of officers and delegates from the state associations and meets annually on the first Wednesday in October. Next in importance is the state division, which is made up of representatives of the local organizations, and meets annually to elect officers and delegates to the national order. The sub-orders or local associations are composed of individual members and usually meet monthly.


Wall and McCarty, in their history of the association, say, "The A.H.T.A. uses only strictly honorable, legal methods. It opposes lawlessness in any and all forms, yet does its work so systematically and efficiently that few criminals are able to escape when it takes the trail...The centralization of "Many in One" has many advantages not possessed by even an independent association, for while it might encompass a neighborhood, the A.T.H.A. covers many states...The value of an article stolen is rarely taken into consideration. The order decrees that the laws of the land must be obeyed; though it costs many times the value of the property to capture the thief. An individual could not spend $50 to $100 to recover a $25 horse and capture the thief. The A.T.H.A. would, because of the effect it would have in the future...Thieves have learned these facts and do less stealing from our members, hence the preventative protection."  Thieves thought twice!


This lot includes the following two items:


1: 4 x 5 3/4, string-bound imprint, 12 pages. Constitution of the State Grand Orders of the Anti-Horse Thief Association. Articles include- Name and Jurisdiction; Sessions and Locations; Officers and Elections; Duties of Officers; Offences; Revenue; Charters; Obligation; Fees For Services; Officers' Salaries; Standing Committees; Black Book; Description of Stock; the Constitution of Subordinate Orders; the By-Laws, and much more. Light age toning and wear. 


#2: 5 1/8 x 3, imprinted card. STOLEN! July 7, 1887. One Bright Bay Horse, eight years old, fifteen hands high, black mane and tail (hair thin in both), one white hind foot. The thief is a man about thirty-four years old, 5 feet, ten or eleven inches high, heavy black moustache and chin whiskers, rather fair skin, large round dark eyes, and black hair, high forehead, small bald spot on back of head, weighs about 180 to 190 pounds, and wore a black suit of cloth clothes somewhat worn, and a light straw hat. A reward of $25 will be given for the capture of the man or horse. Address all information to J.B. ELLIS, Altomont, Kansas. The card was mailed to a person in Kansas as is evident by the address on the reverse. Imprinted Thomas Jefferson one cent postage stamp and C.D.S., Osage Mission, Kan., Jul. 12. Light wear and staining.


Very interesting, desirable, and uncommon 19th century Anti-Horse Thief imprints.    


A strand of General Robert E. Lee's hair in a very handsome historical display. The hair's provenance came from a small lock given to Laura Thomas on April 19th, 1869, by General Lee himself [a copy of the note is provided in the certificate of authenticity] and was separated by noted antiquarian Charles Hamilton in 1992. This 8 x 10 display includes a copy photograph of Lee in his Confederate uniform taken by Mathew Brady, at Lee's East Franklin Street home, in Richmond, Va., in 1865. The strand of hair is housed within a small magnified box for better viewing. The custom matting was done with an attractive scarlet suede outer mat, and gold Florentine trim. Comes shrink wrapped and ready to display in a frame of your choice.  


Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1997. 10 1/4 x 10 1/4, hardcover with dust jacket, 167 pages, illustrated, index. Some thin scratches to the back of the dust jacket. The book itself is in brand new condition.


This book is by and of the soldiers and civilians who experienced the Battle of Chickamauga. Through their words and images you can relieve the emotions, the terrifying rush of events, the horrors- and even the human comedy- of the Civil War's bloodiest two days. Thus you hold in your hands an album of personal recollections from letters, diaries, photographs, sketches, and artifacts.


To compile this special volume, we combed hundreds of sources, both published and unpublished.  We had invaluable help from an extensive network of consultants. Using our own diverse resources and historical materials in libraries and archives around the United States, we were able to assemble a dramatic narrative told from many perspectives: manuscript letters and journals- some previously unpublished- regimental histories and privately printed memoirs, articles in little known historical society publications, and more. Then we set about the painstaking task of locating photographs of these soldiers and townsfolk to accompany their personal accounts.


That so many firsthand accounts survived is due to a few accidents of history. Soldiers could mail a letter home for only three cents. And the mail systems set up by the opposing armies were amazingly reliable. A surprising number of recruits could write, and write vividly. Private William J. Oliphant of the 6th Texas Infantry remembered the horror of fighting at night at Chickamauga; "It was now quite dark but just ahead of us was a brilliant light. A field was burning and we were ordered to charge through it...The fence was on fire and the tall dead trees in the field were blazing high in the air. Dead and wounded men were lying there in great danger of being consumed." 


Field sketches abound, too. Before photoengraving was developed to reproduce photographs in newspapers and magazines, periodicals such as Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper and Harper's Weekly employed artists who traveled with the army to depict events for readers. These correspondents drew virtually everything of possible interest: battles, lounging soldiers, the odd piece of equipment. Sketches dashed off in a few minutes during a battle- often at great personal peril- were taken by courier to the publication, where they were transformed into woodblock engravings suitable for printing. 


Another element that adds to the unique texture of this album is the photographs. Technical innovations during the 1850's brought the fledgling craft into its own, and the Civil War was the first in history to be extensively recorded by the camera. In the blockaded South, photographers lacked supplies and equipment and rarely covered the action. The North's activities, by contrast, are well chronicled, thanks to the efforts of men who endured great hardship. Photographers like Mathew Brady and his assistants spent months following the army, etching with light the brave faces of the soldiers, as well as the bodies stiffened on the field. When Brady's stark photographs of the dead were first exhibited in New York City in 1862, the public thought, albeit briefly, that such horrific images could actually bring the war to an end. 


So here you find living testimony from the battlefield of Chickamauga. As you look into the eyes of these soldiers and civilians, as you read the words of those dazed by the violence around them or by the grief that follows the fighting, perhaps it will be possible to perceive more clearly the shattering experience that was Chickamauga. 


Cover Photograph: Lee and Gordon's Mills, about 12 miles south of Chattanooga, was the scene of some of the early skirmishes that started the two day Battle of Chickamauga. 


Cover quotation: "We must drop a soldier's tear upon the graves of the noble men who have fallen by our sides." General Braxton Bragg.  


<b>The famous abolitionist who was executed for his raid on Harpers Ferry, Virginia in 1859</b>


(1800-59) Fanatical abolitionist. His incendiary actions on the eve of the Civil War led to his death. He kept a station on the "Underground Railroad," and in 1855 he went to Kansas with his sons to help win the state for the anti-slavery forces. Asserting that he was an instrument of God, he, four of his sons, and two other men, deliberately murdered five pro slavery men on the banks of the Pottawatamie. Gathering a group of men, he led many attacks in the guerrilla warfare of the border states and became nationally known in the abolitionist press. Late in 1857, he began to lay his plans for a massed invasion of the South to free the slaves. In 1859, he seized the U.S. Armory at Harpers Ferry and took possession of the town. Local militia blocked his escape, and the next day a company of U.S. Marines commanded by Colonel Robert E. Lee assaulted the arsenal and captured Brown. He was tried and convicted of treason and was hung at Charlestown, Va., on Dec. 2, 1859.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Standing view portrait. "John Brown" is printed on the front mount. No backmark. Very fine.

Anti-Horse Thief Association Constitutio $75.00

 

General Robert E. Lee Hair Display $325.00

 

Voices of the Civil War, Chickamauga $35.00

 

CDV John Brown




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