View Orders Back to AntiqueArts Home Page Come and view all that's new! Come and view all that's new! More than 135 upscale Antiques shops Would you like to sell your antiques here? A guide to more than 40,000 antique shops nationwide Have a question or suggestion? A comprehensive guide to antiques resources on the World Wide Web
Antique Arts Showcase
What's New in the Collector's Showcase?
The Most Recent Additions to This Category are First!


 Architectural Antiques
 Art
 Arts & Crafts Era
 Art Deco
 Autographs
 Bed Bath & Vanity
 Books
 China & Dinnerware
 Clocks & Watches
 Coins & Currency
 Cultures & Ethnicities
 Dolls
 Figurines
 Furniture & Accessories
 Glass
 Jewelry
 Lamps & Lighting
 Memorabilia
 Metalware
 Militaria
 Miscellaneous
 Music Related
 Paper & Ephemera
 Photographica
 Political
 Porcelain & Pottery
 Religious
 Silver
 Textiles
 Toys




Bust of General McClellan and * This Medal Of G.B. McClellan * Price, on the obverse. "One Cent" within wreath with Union shield on the reverse. Very fine.  


6 1/4 x 3 3/4, imprint, color. Map of the Northwestern part of Virginia with adjacent parts of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Maryland. This map came out of an 1861 dated pocket atlas that was issued under the auspices of General-in-Chief Winfield Scott, U.S.A., with maps that were carefully prepared from the best available authorities, including the latest Government surveys, with the special purpose to make them convenient and reliable. The atlas was entered according to an Act of Congress, in the year 1861, by Samuel D. Backus, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, for the Southern District of New York. Light age toning and wear. I will include a Xerox copy of the original front cover of this pocket atlas which includes an illustration of General Scott. Uncommon.  


<b>The famous abolitionist who was executed for his raid on Harpers Ferry, Virginia</b>


(1800-59) John Brown was a white abolitionist who believed armed insurrection was the only way to overthrow the institution of slavery in the United States. During the 1856 conflict in Kansas, Brown commanded forces at the Battle of Black Jack and the Battle of Osawatomie. In 1859, Brown led an unsuccessful raid on the Federal armory at Harpers Ferry, Va. that ended with his capture. Brown's trial resulted in his conviction and a sentence of death by hanging. 


Handsome display with a strand of John Brown's hair from the Dow collection. 8 x 10, double matted with dark green linen and gold filigree mats, featuring a strand of Brown's hair enclosed at the center with an iconic oval copy photograph of a bearded Brown at the top, and descriptive text. Comes with a letter of provenance. The strand of John Brown's hair in this display originated from a small lock of his hair encased and authenticated by the legendary autograph and handwriting expert Charles Hamilton. Also included is a copy of an affidavit made in 1996 by historical hair expert John Reznikoff, who has the largest collection of celebrity hair in the world, attesting that he witnessed the original lock of hair being broken up and that this strand originated from that lock. Comes shrink wrapped.   


Authentic, original woodcut engraving that was published on the front page of the July 16, 1864 issue of Harper's Weekly. Full standing view of General Grant posing with one hand resting upon a tree with his camp chair and tent in the view. Caption: Lieutenant General Grant at His Headquarters. Photograph by Brady. This is one of the most iconic images to come out of the Civil War. 11 x 16. Harper's Weekly, date and their ornate illustrated masthead at the top. Extremely desirable.

Civil War Patriotic Token, General Georg $95.00

 

Civil War Map, Northwestern Virginia

 

John Brown Hair Display $275.00

 

General Ulysses S. Grant in 1864




7 1/2 x 6 1/4, imprint, color. Map of the Mississippi River and Vicinity Lower Section. This map came out of an 1861 dated pocket atlas that was issued under the auspices of General-in-Chief Winfield Scott, U.S.A., with maps that were carefully prepared from the best available authorities, including the latest Government surveys, with the special purpose to make them convenient and reliable. The atlas was entered according to an Act of Congress, in the year 1861, by Samuel D. Backus, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, for the Southern District of New York. Light age toning and wear. I will include a Xerox copy of the original front cover of this pocket atlas which includes an illustration of General Scott. Uncommon.  


<b>By Order of General Oliver O. Howard</b>


4 3/4 x 7 1/2, imprint.


HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH CORPS

Army of the Potomac

Middletown, Md., June 27, 1863


General Orders

No. 16


I. Hereafter, no citizen will be allowed to enter or pass out of the picket lines of the Corps, unless he has a pass from these Headquarters. The officer in command of the picket will be held responsible for the instruction of the sentinels on outpost duty in this respect.


II. All civilians applying for admission into the lines will state their business in writing and deliver it to the officer of the picket guard, who will transmit the same without delay to the Provost Marshal at these Headquarters for examination. The Provost Marshal will upon sufficient evidence that the applicant should be admitted into camp, send a passport for the admittance of the same, by the soldier bringing the communication.


III. No officer or soldier will be allowed to pass out of or into the lines without a pass from Corps Headquarters, or Headquarters Army of the Potomac; and the officer of the picket guard will examine each pass in person, to see that no imposition is practiced.


IV. All persons sent into these Headquarters must be accompanied with a statement of the charges on which they were arrested, with such other information as may be useful or necessary for their proper disposal.


V. The duties of the field officer of the Corps are supervisory. The Commanders of Divisions and Brigades and the field officers of the Divisions are held responsible for the negligence of the pickets. A Staff Officer should be detailed by each Division and Brigade Commander, who should visit the pickets at least once in twenty four hours, and report all cases of negligence on the part of the officers or men. The officers of the Inspector General's Department will also visit and examine the pickets as often as convenient.


BY ORDER OF MAJOR GENERAL HOWARD:


T.A. MEYSENBURG

Assistant Adjutant General


Wear and age toning. There is a small hole at the upper right corner which does not affect any of the content. Small area of paper loss at the lower left corner which also does not affect any of the content. Rare 11th Corps field order issued by General Oliver O. Howard, Commander of the 11th Corps, Army of the Potomac, only four days before the epic three day battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania commenced. The two great armies commanded by General Robert E. Lee and General George G. Meade were maneuvering into position for the greatest fight that ever occurred on the American continent.  <b>States, April 13, 1861</b>


Antique engraving, 21 3/4 x 16. Published in Harper's History Of The Great Rebellion. Folded at center. Excellent scene of the opening shots of the War Between The States.  


Indian wearing headdress encircled by stars with the year 1863 on the obverse. "Not One Cent" within wreath on the reverse. Very fine.

Civil War Map, The Mississippi River & V

 

Gettysburg Campaign Orders, 11th Corps, $150.00

 

Bombardment of Fort Sumter By The Batter

 

1863 Civil War Patriotic Token $25.00




American flags, drum, wand with liberty cap and crossed cannons with the years [17]'76 and [18]'61 on the obverse. "Our Country" within wreath with an American shield on the reverse.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a Union officer brandishing a sword in one hand and holding an American flag in the other. Slogan below, "By the Eternal It shall wave." Published by Mumford & Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 5 3/8 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.  


Top piece with pin back on the reverse and "MEMBER" trimmed in silver color bar on the obverse. Below is a beautiful royal blue color ribbon with silver imprint, "9th RE-UNION 30th Reg't N.J. VOLUNTEERS, At Bound Brook, N.J., Oct. 4, 1899." Attached below the ribbon by a hook is a large 1 3/4 inches wide oval celluloid medallion with design of a 1st Division, 1st Corps badge. Manufacturer's label on the reverse, "Telephone 513. Made By The Sommer Badge M'F'G CO., 13 William St., Newark, N.J. Very nice looking reunion badge which incorporates a 1st Corps badge. Overall size is 6 inches in height. Scarce. New Jersey regiments are hard to find and they are very desirable!   


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a spread winged eagle perched on top of an American shield. Slogan below: Let independence be our boast, Ever mindful what it cost. Churcn's Newsstand, Cinn., O. Light staining. 5 3/4 x 3 1/8. 


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

Civil War Patriotic Token, Our Country $25.00

 

By The Eternal It Shall Wave $10.00

 

1899 Badge, 9th Re-Union 30th New Jersey $75.00

 

Let Independence Be Our Boast




Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of an Indian wearing headdress surrounded by slogans. Nice looking design. Light staining. 5 3/8 x 3. Published by Magee, 316 Chestnut St., Phila. 


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


4 1/8 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, July 6, 1863


General Orders

No. 208


I..Phonographic reporters employed under the authority of the 28th section of the act of Congress approved March 3, 1863, will be allowed not exceeding yen dollars per day, and when the place of meeting of the Court is changed, their actual traveling expenses; but no reporter will be employed except in cases of importance, and when the other duties of the Judge Advocate will not allow him to take down the testimony in the ordinary way.


II..Hereafter no officer or agent under the control of the War Department, disbursing public money, will pay any claim or account presented through agents or collectors, except on regular power of attorney, executed after the account or claim is due and payable, and unless such agent or collection is considered by the disbursing officer amply able to reimburse the United States, or the disbursing officer, in case such claim or account shall, subsequent to payment, prove to be unjust or fraudulent; and when an account is presented in person by an individual who is not known to the disbursing officer, the latter will require such evidence of identity as will secure the Government against fraud.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Very fine.  


<b>Regarding the career of her husband, the Honorable William Hawkins Polk, and the Confederate Monument in Warren County, North Carolina she was responsible for erecting!</b>


6 pages, 5 x 8, in ink. Comes with a 2 3/8 x 2 3/8, diagram of the proposed Confederate memorial with a written description.


Mrs. Lucy Eugenia Polk, was the wife of William Hawkins Polk, a Mexican War veteran, U.S. Statesman & Congressman  from Tennessee. William H. Polk was the youngest brother of United States President James K. Polk.


<b><u>Warrenton, [North Carolina], Nov. 5th</b></u>


My dear Jessie,


Your letter of the 17th Sept. was received & as you spoke of going to the Reunion at Paris, Ky. I postponed arriving until your return to Henderson, but I have delayed my reply longer than I intended.  You asked if I would give you some of Maj. Polk’s experiences in Mexico.  I wish I could.  He sometimes spoke of the war in the home of the Aztec’s, [1] but the great Civil struggle came along destroying & obliterating the past so completely for the four years of its continuance & kept us so busy trying to keep body & soul together that our past experiences like sand heaps were wiped out by the great conflict & carnage of Brotherhood.  As President of the Memorial Association of Warrenton I have given much time to try & erect a monument to the brave sons of Warren who fell in a cause, the lost still just & hope before next Decoration [Day] to have a statue in Italian marble the first ever erected in the county unveiled at Fairview & when this is completed I shall resign the Presidency & return to private life…the big old world will turn around just as jolly as if I was at the helm.  My late husband Hon. William H. Polk of Columbia, Tenn. was appointed by President Tyler to represent the United States at the Court of Rome & Naples.  President Polk succeeded Tyler & war with Mexico was declared in Polk’s administration.  Mr. [William] Polk asked to be recalled to the United States.  He then joined the Army & went to Mexico as Major of the 3d Dragoons & remained there until the close of the war.  I think I am right patriotic but don’t think my patriotism would have prompted me to resign a pleasant position abroad with a salary of nine thousand dollars to go to Mexico to be shot at & punctured with the thorns of the cactus which grows so abundantly in that country.  After his return home he represented his District in [U.S.] Congress.  He was afterwards the Democratic Elector for Tennessee.  He died in Nashville not very long after the Civil War commenced & I returned to Carolina to be with my mother the most perfect Christian I ever knew.  Was much pleased with the City & its fine Institutions of learning.  On the return stopped at [?] for a week or two & had a delightful visit to dear old friends.  Wish I could see them right now.  Wharton has always felt so near to me & Genl. Green & Mrs. Green how I loved them.  I often think of the pleasant winter spent at the Old National, "a long shot back for memory’s over," but the recall of this past is full of pleasant memories.  Tasker [2] has three beautiful bright children who keep things stirred up & lively.  There is little of local interest to write & what I have written is done so miserably.  I feel it would be just to myself & you too to throw it in the waste basket & try again, but don’t know when I shall do any better.  With the very kindest regard for your Father & Mother, tell them in the flight of time no silver threads amongst the old have made their appearance & while I do not quite reach a hundred in weight I can keep pace with others many years my juniors.  I say this not boastingly but thankfully.  Friends have come in so I must say good bye.


Sincerely,

L.E. Polk


[P.S.] Tomorrow is the circus & little William is looking forward with much pleasure seeing the elephants & monkeys.  Tasker has not been very well but daily at his office.  His new office will soon be completed on Main Street, very pretty & comfortable & I hope he may long enjoy it. Lucy Hawkins spent her summer vacation in Nashville.


Included is a small diagram of the Confederate monument park Mrs. Polk is writing about in her letter. The following is written on the back of the illustration: "Plan of Confederate Square- 52 feet- Southern Cross with mound & statue in the center with 11 evergreens [representing the 11 Southern States of the Confederacy]- name & date of each State as seceded. Ask your Father what he thinks of my plan- mound & pedestal 10 ft."


Light age toning and wear. Very fine.


Excellent content written by Mrs. Lucy Eugenia Polk regarding the career of her husband, William Hawkins Polk; a Mexican War veteran, U.S. Statesman & Congressman, and about the Confederate monument she was responsible for erecting in Warren County, North Carolina. Very desirable!


[1] This is a reference to the Aztec Club a historic society founded in 1847 by United States Army officers of the Mexican–American War.


[2] Tasker Polk was the son of William H. Polk and Lucy E. Polk.


<u>William Hawkins Polk</u>: (1815-62) Born in Maury County, Tennessee, he was the youngest brother of U.S. President James K. Polk. In 1838, William H. Polk killed Robert Hayes, a young Nashville lawyer, following an altercation at the Nelson House in Columbia, Tenn. The two had apparently been arguing when Polk insulted Hayes, and Hayes responded by throwing a cup at Polk. Polk then obtained a whip and lashed Hayes with it, prompting Hayes to flee. Shortly afterward, Hayes attempted to ambush Polk with a derringer, but his lone shot missed. Polk drew his own gun and returned fire, killing Hayes. Polk was tried for murder, but convicted of a lesser charge, and sentenced to six weeks in jail and a $750 fine. He was defended at trial by his brother's former law partner, Gideon Pillow, a future Confederate General. Polk graduated from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1839, and commenced practice in Columbia. He was a member of the Tennessee State House of Representatives, 1841-45; appointed as U.S. Minister to the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, serving 1845-47, and he fought as a major of the 3rd U.S. Dragoons in the Mexican War. He ran for Governor of Tennessee in 1861, but lost to the secessionist incumbent, Isham G. Harris. In late 1862, Polk fell ill while staying at the St. Cloud Hotel in Nashville. He died suddenly on December 16, 1862. His sister-in-law, former First Lady Sarah Childress Polk, arranged for his body to be taken to Columbia (which was behind enemy lines) under a flag of truce for burial. He is interred at Columbia's Greenwood Cemetery.


The monument discussed in Mrs. Polk's letter was erected in Fairview Cemetery, Warrenton, N.C., and was named Confederate Dead of Warren County, Warrenton, N.C. It was designed by the Cooper Brothers, of Raleigh, N.C., and the sculptor of the statue was Harry Dempster. It consists of a marble statue of a Confederate soldier standing on a granite pedestal; a young mustachioed soldier, at ease resting against a tree trunk and leaning on his rifle, looks forward and downward with his hat in his hand. The inscription reads: Brave And Fearless, Proud And Peerless Were Warren's Sons Who Wore The Gray. Erected By The Memorial Association Of Warren County. To The Confederate Dead Of Warren County, N.C. Erected By The Efforts Of Mrs. Lucy E Polk. Dedicated August 27, 1903.


William H. Polk married Lucy Eugenia Williams on July 14, 1854 in Montmorenci, North Carolina. She died on January 11, 1906 in Warren County, North Carolina.        

 


6 1/4 x 3 3/4, imprint, color. Map of the Northern part of Maryland with adjacent parts of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware and Virginia. This map came out of an 1861 dated pocket atlas that was issued under the auspices of General-in-Chief Winfield Scott, U.S.A., with maps that were carefully prepared from the best available authorities, including the latest Government surveys, with the special purpose to make them convenient and reliable. The atlas was entered according to an Act of Congress, in the year 1861, by Samuel D. Backus, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, for the Southern District of New York. Light age toning and wear. I will include a Xerox copy of the original front cover of this pocket atlas which includes an illustration of General Scott. Uncommon.

Union And Liberty Now And Forever

 

1863 Orders Regarding Phonographic Repor $15.00

 

Letter Written by Mrs. Lucy E. Polk $150.00

 

Civil War Map, Northern Maryland




8 1/2 x 3 1/2, imprint, filled in ink, for freight which includes flour shipped on the railroad during August and September [1861]. Edge wear and light age toning.  Portrait of a woman, 19th Century with gilt frame, unsigned.  Portrait of a lady, oil painting under glazed glass with gilt frame; 19th century, excellent condition, unsigned  


Civil War patriotic envelope with a  vignette of Uncle Sam at the center cranking a machine to make rope for a hangman's noose with the slogan, "Hemp For Traitors North or South" on it, printed below him is "Manufactures," to his left are hemp plants with "Agriculture" below, and to his right is a gallows with a noose and the title, "Fine Arts." Scarce.

Receipt, The New Orleans, Jackson and Gr $20.00

 

Oil Portrait of a Woman, 19th Century $7500.00

 

Oil Portrait of a Lady under Glazed Glas $7500.00

 

Patriotic Cover, Hemp For Traitors North $35.00




4 1/8 x 6 1/2, imprint, 2 pages.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, July 7, 1863


General Orders

No. 209


Court Martial document which details the charges, specifications, findings and sentence of 2nd Lieutenant John W. Stiles, 34th Massachusetts Volunteers.


Lieutenant Stiles was charged with drunkenness on duty and conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman. 


The specification states that Stiles, "while on fatigue duty, did, with two non-commissioned officers of said Company, visit and drink whiskey at a low hovel, kept by Irish and negro women, thereby degrading himself in the opinion of the men. This at or near Fort Lyon, Virginia, on about the 2d day of April, 1863." 


Lieutenant Stiles was found guilty and sentenced to be cashiered from the army.


"The proceedings of the Court in the above case are disapproved by the Major General Commanding the Department of Washington, and the sentence has been suspended until the pleasure of the President of the United States shall be made known." 


More interesting content. Very fine. 


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:


E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


 


Civil War patriotic imprint with  full color vignette of American flags, and a Union shield within a large star and the motto, "Union" in stars and stripes letters. Below is an arch with the names of each state in the U.S. listed. The pillar at the left has Union on it, and the one at the right, Constitution. Light staining. 5 1/2 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item   


5 1/4 x 8 1/4 imprint, 7 pages, with illustration of a G.A.R. membership badge at upper left.


Headquarters

Department of New York

Grand Army of the Republic

Capitol

Albany, N.Y., May 1st, 1916


General Orders No. 6


I. The long, dreary days of winter have at last surrendered to that delightful season when Nature, in her most attractive garb, is welcomed by the melodious warbling of song birds, the gleeful laughter of happy children and the grateful appreciation of all her creatures. The month of May- "Flowery May," the poets call it, that ushers in this charming season, embraces three days of more than ordinary interest to every member of the Grand Army of the Republic; days of sweet, sad memories dear to the heart of every survivor of the Civil War.


MOTHER'S DAY, THURSDAY, MAY 11


II. This day, never to be forgotten, is an occasion of sacred memories to the veteran of the Civil War, reminding him of the constant, vigilant care; the ceaseless love and enduring devotion of his mother. On this day the thoughts of the veteran revert to the time long gone by when as a child he knelt in devotion at his mother's knee, and a little later received her blessing when with trembling voice and tear dimmed eyes she embraced him, for the last time for ought she knew, as he sadly turned away in obedience to his country's cry for help. The boy went out but not alone, for he took with him his mother's love, aye her very heart, and she was left to distracting fear, to terrible doubt, to dreadful apprehension as day by day she waited and watched and prayed for his safe return. 


Much more excellent content. Other topics include Memorial Sunday; Memorial Day; President Lincoln's Address at Gettysburg, November 19, 1863; Flag Day; The National Encampment; In Memoriam, and more. 


Issued by command of Zan L. Tidball, Department Commander. 


Light age toning and wear. Very desirable.  


 


Indian with headdress, United States of America, and the year 1897 on the obverse. One Cent within wreath with American shield on the reverse. Fine.

Court Martial of an Officer, 34th Massac $25.00

 

Union

 

General Orders No. 6, G. A. R. Department $35.00

 

1897 One Cent Piece $9.00




7 7/8 x 3 1/8 imprint, with patriotic vignette of Liberty holding wand with liberty cap, and an American shield with eagle perched on top, filled out in ink. Grenada, Miss., Dec. 22, 1859. Six months after date we promise to Pay to the order of A.J. Boon & D. Rosser, Admn. of the Estate of A.G. Boon, Desd. five 15/100 Dollars. Bears two signatures at the bottom. Very fine antebellum Mississippi document.    


Civil War patriotic envelope with vignette of a hand with the initials W.S. below it. This represents Union Commander-in-Chief General Winfield Scott. The hand is reaching out to catch Confederate President Jeff Davis who has the wings of a fly and is holding a skull and cross bones flag with the initials J.D. below. The slogan below the illustration reads, "This tells its own story." Very fine, early war, satirical Union cover. Desirable.  


Bust of General George B. McClellan in uniform on the obverse with his name above and the year 1863 below, with Army & Navy within wreath on the reverse and crossed sabers at the bottom. Very fine.  


4 1/8 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, July 9, 1863


General Orders

No. 211


Order abolishing Military Governorship of Arkansas


Ordered, That the appointment of John S. Phelps, as Military Governor of the State of Arkansas, and of Amos F. Eno, as Secretary, be revoked, and the office of Military Governor in said State is abolished, and that all authority, appointments, and power heretofore granted to and exercised by them, or either of them, as Military Governor or Secretary, or by any person or persons appointed by or acting under them, is hereby revoked and annulled.


BY ORDER OF THE PRESIDENT:


E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Very fine.

1859 Mississippi Promissory Note $15.00

 

Patriotic Cover, This Tells Its Own Stor $25.00

 

1863 Civil War Patriotic Token, General $90.00

 

Order Abolishing Military Governorship o $25.00

<b>During the Rebellion</b>


5 x 8, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, April 11, 1867


Circular


Officers who have been appointed in the army under the Act of July 28, 1866, are requested to immediately forward to the Adjutant General a statement showing all the volunteer organizations in which service was rendered during the rebellion.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning and wear. There are 2 tiny holes at the left edge which do not affect any of the content.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of Miss Liberty wearing an American flag dress, and holding an American shield and wand with Liberty cap. U.S. is in stars and stripes letters below her. Light staining. 5 1/4 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item   


Indian wearing headdress with encircling stars above and the year 1862 below on the obverse. J. Ferguson Grocer, Corner 9' & Vine St., Cincinnati. Goods Delivered Free Of Charge on the reverse. Very fine. Scarce.  


3 3/4 x 6 1/4, imprint, color. Map of the Mississippi River and Vicinity Middle Section. This map came out of an 1861 dated pocket atlas that was issued under the auspices of General-in-Chief Winfield Scott, U.S.A., with maps that were carefully prepared from the best available authorities, including the latest Government surveys, with the special purpose to make them convenient and reliable. The atlas was entered according to an Act of Congress, in the year 1861, by Samuel D. Backus, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, for the Southern District of New York. Light age toning and wear. I will include a Xerox copy of the original front cover of this pocket atlas which includes an illustration of General Scott. Uncommon.

War Department Circular Regarding Office $8.00

 

Miss Liberty, U. S. $10.00

 

1862 Civil War Merchant Token, Ferguson

 

Civil War Map, The Mississippi River, Mi




Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of American flags, shield, spread winged eagle and slogan, "Our Glorious Union Forever." Light staining. 5 1/2 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item   


Indian with headdress, United States of America, and the year 1861 on the obverse. One Cent within wreath with American shield at the top on the reverse. Very fine.  <b>Veteran Volunteers


The gallant 9th New Jersey Infantry's battle flag was the first to be raised over the captured Confederate city of Goldsboro, North Carolina in 1865!</b>


Top bar with celluloid badge, "9th N.J. Vet. Vols." with pin back on the reverse. Attached below this is a cream colored ribbon with a full color cloth American flag sewn on, and below the ribbon attached by a hook is a large celluloid medallion with photograph of a Union officer who appears to be one of the colonel's of the regiment. The reverse of the button has the reunion information: "16th Annual Re-Union Of The Ninth Regiment N.J. Vet. Vols., Sommerville, N.J., Sept. 25th, 1901. Manufactured by Sommer B. Co., Newark, N.J. Excellent New Jersey reunion badge from one of the Garden State's hardest fought regiments! Scarce. 


<u>9th New Jersey Infantry Volunteers</u>


They received their baptism of fire at the battle of Roanoke Island, N.C., where from first to last the conduct of the 9th N.J.V. was in the highest degree courageous. It lost in that battle 9 killed and 25 wounded. In the battle of New Berne, N.C., where it did gallant service, the regiment lost 4 killed and 58 wounded, one-sixth of the entire Union loss.


Few achievements of the North Carolina campaign were more gallant than that of the 9th at Rawle's Mill, where it crossed a burning bridge and routed the enemy strongly posted beyond. The regiment participated in the affair at Deep Creek, and the engagement at Southwest Creek, a preliminary to 

the battle of Kinston. After a combat of some two hours at Whitehall, the Confederates retired and the object being accomplished the command to which the regiment belonged resumed its march toward Goldsboro, where the 9th was one of two regiments that were engaged, and after burning a bridge at Goldsboro, the desideratum of the march to the place, the regiment resumed its march toward New Berne.


The term for which the 9th had volunteered was nearing its close when, on Jan. 21, 1864, two-thirds of the entire number reenlisted for "three years or the war." 


The regiment participated in the unequal contest at Port Walthall Junction, Va., and after continuing the engagement for about two hours retired, but on the following day the contest was renewed and the regiment lost in these two days of fighting 53 men in killed and wounded.  


The next day being Sunday, the regiment remained in camp, but on Monday morning both corps of General Butler's command moved southward to Swift Creek, 3 miles from Petersburg, Heckman's brigade having the advance. The loss of the 9th in the ensuing engagement was 1 man killed and 9 wounded.  


On the following day Heckman's brigade was not engaged, but on the 12th the whole army again advanced, encountering the enemy on the Richmond & Petersburg Railroad.  It being rumored that the Confederates were evacuating Fort Darling at Drewry's Bluff, General Heckman dispatched Captain Samuel Hufty with 100 men of the 9th to reconnoiter the enemy's position, which duty was 

satisfactorily performed, the party returning before daylight of the 14th with a report that the enemy still occupied the fort, their lines being established as during the previous day.

  

Then followed the battle of Drewry's Bluff, in which the 9th lost heavily, over 50 per cent of those engaged. At the commencement of the engagement the regiment had 19 officers, 13 of whom were either killed or wounded, and 3 were taken prisoners. From first to last the men fought with characteristic gallantry. Reaching the scene of action at Cold Harbor on June 3, the 9th was ordered to the front line and almost immediately became engaged.  


Grant having determined to pass the Chickahominy far to Lee's right, General Smith's Corps gradually withdrew from its position, the 9th covering the withdrawal, and marched directly to White House, where it embarked for Bermuda Hundred. The total loss of the 9th during the operations at Cold Harbor, from June 3 to 12, was 5 killed and 30 wounded.


On the morning of June 16 the brigade moved out from its breastworks, charged and entered the Confederate fortifications, which it held during the day, the 9th participating in several skirmishes, and on retiring burned all the buildings which had been used by Beauregard as headquarters 

and for other purposes.  


On June 21 the 9th crossed the Appomattox and took possession of the rifle pits beyond the City Point & Petersburg Railroad, where on the day following it assisted in repelling a charge of the enemy, losing 1 man killed. It remained in the works some days longer, participating in several sharp conflicts brought on by the enemy, who was in all cases repulsed.  There in the front line the regiment remained, with brief intervals of relief in the second line, until July 29, losing several men, but not having any pitched engagement.  


On the 29th marching orders were received and the command proceeded to a new position to act as a reserve to the 9th corps in front of which the Burnside Mine was exploded on the 30th. 


A day or two afterward it returned to its position and again went into its entrenchments, remaining for a fortnight exposed to a steady fire from the enemy.  


On August 16, Major Hufty was wounded in the left arm, and the staff of the regimental state colors was cut down by Confederate sharpshooters with nine bullets passing through the colors. 


The regiment was transferred to N.C., on December 9th, with detachments of several other regiments and 2 pieces of artillery, advanced from Plymouth in the direction of Gardner's Bridge, where the enemy's cavalry was met in some force. The 9th, with the gallant Stewart at its head, charged on a double quick, speedily dispersing the Confederates, who left several of their wounded behind. The following day a fierce engagement lasting over an hour took place at Foster's Bridge, when the enemy again withdrew, destroying the bridge as he retired. In this affair the 9th had 2 men wounded, but took a number of prisoners, including a lieutenant, who took the oath and followed the column for several days. The regiment also took a prominent part in the engagement at Butler's bridge on the day following. Advancing on the line of the railroad leading to Goldsboro, the command on March 7, 1865, reached a point 5 miles east of Southwest Creek, where the enemy was encountered in strong force, and a sharp skirmish ensued, the 9th being engaged during the entire day. That night the regiment fell back half a mile, joining the line of battle, where it remained during the following day behind hastily constructed breastworks. In the night fighting was renewed, the enemy, late in the afternoon, making seven  distinct charges on the Union left, resting on Wise's Forks, but was each time repulsed. The 9th on this day was 

ubiquitous, moving rapidly from one point to another at one time repulsing a charge on the left, at another returning on the double quick to the center, charging the foe being ever in the thickest of the conflict and always at the very front.


The following day a force of eleven brigades charged in solid column several times in succession, but their desperate assaults were fruitless, the Federal line standing as immovable as a wall of granite. The loss of the regiment amounted to 1 officer and 9 men wounded. 


At Goldsboro the enemy had a force of 1,500 cavalry and 225 infantry. Brisk skirmishing was commenced, but the Confederates were steadily driven, the 9th pushing forward with resistless velocity in its eager desire to enter the city, and its was the first Federal flag raised over Goldsboro.  The war soon closed and the regiment was mustered out of service at Greensboro, N. C., July 12, 1865.  


Source: The Union Army, Vol. 3

 


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a spread winged eagle perched on top of an American shield with riband with the slogan, Love One Another. There are stars around the edges each one with a name of a state in the United States. Stained at the corners. 5 1/2 x 3 1/8.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item

Our Glorious Union Forever

 

1861 One Cent Piece $45.00

 

1901 Badge, 16th Annual Reunion of the N

 

Love One Another




Civil War patriotic imprint with full color illustration of a zouave soldier in full regalia holding his musket with the above slogan. 5 1/2 x 3 1/8. 



***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item  



 Our photo illustration will likely offer the best description of this colorful old print except to say that it measures 10 X 13 ½ inches and it is offered just as we found it torn from a June 16, 1894 issue of the satirical publication <I>Judge</I>.   The cartoon is titled <I>THE DEMOCRATIC RICHELIEU </I> and is captioned - DEMOCRATIC SENATOR (ex-confederate brigadier):  <I> ‘Take away the sword. States can be ruined without it. Bring me the pen,it is mightier than the sword!’</I>  The graphic satire refers to an all too common division between North & South during Reconstruction and the strong feeling by many in the North that ex-Confederate leaders were continuing their attack against the Union utilizing the pen and politics.  A colorful conversation piece, this neat old piece of Americana will frame up nicely.

please note:   <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!

 <B><I>Statistical Gazetteer of the United States of America from Official State & Federal Returns & the Census of 1850</B></I> by Richard s. Fisher M.D.  Published by J. H. Colton & Co., New York 1857   A wonderful antebellum resource or simply a nice item to set out on a period desk, reading table or book shelf.  Leather bound with lots of evidence of age and period use, the leather cover and spine could use treatment with a proper dressing, but the spine is tight and pages are solidly bound with expected age but complete with no stains, tears or repairs or other condition issues. (Offered here un-touched and as found so the new owner can decide what leather dressing to use. We would do no more than that.) An outstanding accumulation of material from population and land use, to industrial and governmental information, this volume will be of special interest as it offers insight into the antebellum south.

As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  


 Once again our illustrations should serve best to describe this attractive Civil War era folding camp chair.  A classic all in nice condition with no repairs or other condition issues even to its original carpet seat, the chair folds to approximately 20 X 17 inches.  An especially nice display item as companion to all manner of period collectables.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

The Zouave Defenders $15.00

 

colorful post Civil War Southern Reconst $45.00

 

1850 U. S. Statistical Gazetteer $85.00

 

Civil War vintage folding CAMP CHAIR $225.00

This all original and as found excavated NCO belt plate is a recovery from Fort Morgan, Alabama. The condition and originality of this piece will be best described by our photo illustrations.  The presence of the NCO regulation applied silver wreath is best illustrated in this excavated example, by the missing portion of the soldered on wreath on the lower left and right side of the plate. The plate will come with our letter as preservation of its Ft. Morgan origin and the fact that we acquired the piece as such several years ago  when we were fortunate enough to purchase several groupings from the personal collection of our longtime friend, Dr. Francis Lord.  A pioneer Civil War collector from a day when nearly no one else paid much attention to the details of many now valued Civil War collectable categories, Francis authored the  widely known, multi volume, pioneer reference,  <I>Lord’s CIVIL WAR COLLECTORS ENCYCLOPEDIA</I>.  While a lot of detailed knowledge has been gained as the interest and <U>value</U> of Civil War collectibles increased so dramatically over the years, Dr. Lord’s first and second volumes in particular and his <I>Civil War Sutlers & Their Wares</I>, continue to offer valuable and reliable reference to Civil War collectors.  (Use <I>Lord</I> in our search feature to find other Lord collection items.) Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 Measuring approximately 12 inches in length including the belt hook, this antique hand sewn leather <I>blackjack</I> offers good evidence of age and period carrying yet remains in excellent original condition, flexible and sound with no seam splits or weak leather even to the strap.  This example is a bit different than others we have seen in that it was fashioned with an iron belt hook.  Once considered <I>required equipment</I> by many a police officer, detective, or the like, the lead weighted blackjack was more frequently a private purchase or handmade item.  Unlike the larger police baton or <I>billy</I> club whose presence was frequently a deterrent, the usual <I>blackjack</I> was carried neatly out of sight with nothing but the unobtrusive yet handy strap protruding from a back pocket.  This example would more than likely been carried under a frock or waist coat suspender from a waist belt.  The <I>blackjack</I> was most frequently deserving of its reputation.   <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  


Civil War patriotic imprint with hand pointing at an American flag with the motto, Stand By It! The Union Forever. 5 3/8 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item   


4 x 6 1/2 imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, July 3, 1863


General Orders

No. 206


The attention of Commanding Officers of regiments, battalions not included in regiments, independent companies or batteries, and detachments, surgeons in charge of hospitals or detachments, and all persons in the military service commanding or controlling commissioned officers or enlisted men on special or detached service, is directed to General Orders, No. 72, from this Office, of March 24, 1863.


The "Reports of Deserters," therein called for, must be promptly and regularly forwarded as directed. "Monthly Reports" will embrace only such desertions as may have occurred during the month, and will not be a consolidation of previous reports.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Stain at left edge which does not affect any of the content.


WBTS Trivia: On the very day that this order was issued the climatic Pickett's Charge was happening at the battle of Gettysburg, Pa.

Lord collection: Fort Morgan, Alabama ex $295.00

 

antique BLACKJACK $135.00

 

Stand By It, The Union Forever

 

1863 Orders Concerning Reporting Deserte $15.00




1 1/2 pages, 5 x 7 1/2 imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, July 17, 1862


General Orders

No. 81


Court martial document that details the charge, specifications, finding and sentence which was brought against Lieutenant Wesley F. Miller, Seventh U.S. Infantry, when he served at Fort Columbus, New York Harbor. He was charged with "repeated neglect of duty, to the prejudice of good order and military discipline." 


"Finding Of The Court. After mature deliberation, the Court finds the accused, First Lieutenant Wesley F. Miller, Seventh Infantry, Guilty of the charge and specifications preferred against him, and does therefore sentence him to be reprimanded in General Orders from the War Department."


"II..The proceedings of the General Court Martial in the foregoing case have been submitted to the Secretary of War, and the following is his order thereon: Lieutenant W.F. Miller, Seventh Infantry, is found guilty of neglect and violation of duty, deserving the serious censure of the Department."


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

L. THOMAS

Adjutant General


Excellent. Uncommon to find a court martial document related to Fort Columbus in New York harbor.


WBTS Trivia: Fort Columbus was named after the famous explorer Christopher Columbus. It was located on Governors Island in New York Harbor, and it played an important role in the military life of New York City as the largest army post defending the city.       


Piece of a fired artillery shell fragment found at Gettysburg. Measures about 3 x 2. This came out of a very old local Gettysburg collection which I purchased many years ago when I lived in Gettysburg. Nice large fragment.   


With Supplement. By W. Reid McKee and M.E. Mason, Jr. Published by Rapidan Press, Mechanicsville, Virginia, 1980. Hard cover, 203 pages, profusely illustrated. New condition. Long out of print, this is an extremely desirable reference book regarding small arms and artillery projectiles used during the Civil War.  


<b>Plan Of Organization For Contributing Societies</b>


8 1/2 x 13 3/4, imprint. Published by the Committee on Correspondence and Organization, Room 22 Bible House, New York. Outlines the Name, Object, Officers, Duties of Officers, Meetings-Order of Business, etc. The reverse of the document has a very interesting handwritten section in ink titled, "Preamble and Constitution of the Peruville [N.Y.] Freedman's & Union Relief Association. It includes the Preamble and 7 Articles of their Constitution. Light age toning and wear. Uncommon. Desirable.


***Please note that the borders on the actual document are wider than our scan indicates. The document as shown on the website is cropped because it is larger than our scanner bed.

1862 Court Martial of an Officer at Fort $25.00

 

Artillery Shell Fragment Found at Gettys $20.00

 

Civil War Projectiles II Small Arms & Fi

 

Imprint, New York National Freedman's Re $75.00




Bust of George Washington encircled by stars, American flags and the year 1863 on the obverse. "Exchange" within wreath with drum, cannon barrels, sword and bayonets at the bottom of the reverse. Very fine.  


T-66. Richmond, Feb. 17, 1864. Bust view of Confederate President Jefferson Davis. Fancy blue reverse. Extra fine.   


3 3/4 x 6 1/4, imprint, color. Map of the Mississippi River and Vicinity Upper Section. This map came out of an 1861 dated pocket atlas that was issued under the auspices of General-in-Chief Winfield Scott, U.S.A., with maps that were carefully prepared from the best available authorities, including the latest Government surveys, with the special purpose to make them convenient and reliable. The atlas was entered according to an Act of Congress, in the year 1861, by Samuel D. Backus, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, for the Southern District of New York. Light age toning and wear. I will include a Xerox copy of the original front cover of this pocket atlas which includes an illustration of General Scott. Uncommon.  <b>It Must And Shall Be Preserved</b>


Brass Civil War patriotic token with the above slogan with stars on the obverse. Army And Navy within wreath design with anchor and crossed sabers on the reverse. Extra fine condition.

1863 Patriotic Token, George Washington

 

1864 Confederate $50 Note $100.00

 

Civil War Map, The Mississippi River, Up

 

Civil War Patriotic Token, The Federal U




Civil War patriotic imprint with tree full of American flags each one with the name of a state of the United States, and 1776 at the bottom. The motto Tree Of Liberty is spelled out in stars and stripes letters at the top. Verse below: The Union Tree of Liberty, Shall outlive treason's storm, And all the world seek shelter Beneath its noble form. 5 3/8 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item    


8 1/4 x 11, two sided imprinted form filled out in ink, with vignette of spread winged eagle with shield at top. 


VOLUNTEER ENLISTMENT. State of Ohio, Town of Unionville. I, George W. Duty, born in Russell Co., in the State of Virginia, aged twenty seven years, do Hereby Acknowledge to have volunteered this fourteenth day of August, 1864, to serve as a Soldier in the Army of the United States of America, for the period of one year, unless sooner discharged by proper authority: Do also agree to accept such bounty, pay, rations, and clothing, as are, or may be, established by law for volunteers. And I, George W. Duty, do solemnly swear, that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the United States of America, and that I will serve them honestly and faithfully against all their enemies or opposers whomsoever; and that I will observe and obey the orders of the President of the United States, and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to the Rules and Articles of War. Sworn and subscribed to, at Union Township, this fourteenth day of August, 1864, Before A.J. Booth, 2nd Lieut., 183rd O.V.I. George W. Duty.


I Certify, On Honor, That I have carefully examined the above named Volunteer, agreeably to the General Regulations of the Army, and that, in my opinion, he is free from all bodily defects and mental infirmity, which would in any way disqualify him from performing the duties of a soldier. David Coleman, 11th Cong. Dist. Ohio, Examining Surgeon. 


The document goes on to give more information about George W. Duty and it has also been signed by A.J. Booth, 2nd Lieut., 183 Regiment of Ohio Infantry Volunteers, Recruiting Officer, and Benj. F. Cory, Capt. & Mustering Officer.


The reverse of the document includes the Declaration of Recruit which has been signed by George W. Duty and A.J. Booth.


Light age toning and wear.      


Imprinted envelope addressed to the Assistant Adjutant General, Department of New York, G.A.R., Capitol, Albany, N.Y. Very fine.  


<b>Signed by an officer captured at Winchester, Virginia in 1863</b>


8 1/2 x 11, imprinted discharge form, with vignette of eagle on shield with American flag, filled out in ink. For David Litwiler, Co. I, 111th Regiment of Infantry Pennsylvania Volunteers. Issued at Annapolis, Md., June 22, 1865. Full of personal information and more about Private Litwiler. Signed by George Kies, 1st Lieut., 18 Conn. Vols. The discharge has also been signed by a captain at Camp Parole, Annapolis, Md. Light age toning and wear.


David Litwiler, enlisted as a private on December 31, 1861, and was mustered into Co. I, 11th Pennsylvania Infantry. He was captured on March 25, 1865, the place not stated, and was released on April 6, 1865. He was discharged on June 22, 1865.


The 111th Pennsylvania Infantry fought in the battles of Cedar Mountain, Antietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Wauhatchie, Tenn., Lookout Mountain and in the Atlanta campaign.


George Kies, who signed this discharge, was a resident of Killingly, Connecticut, when he enlisted as a 2nd lieutenant, on August 10, 1862, and was commissioned into Co. K, 18th Connecticut Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on August 18, 1862, and was captured in the battle of Winchester, Va., on June 15, 1863, and confined at Macon, Ga., and Columbia, S.C. He was paroled on December 10, 1864, at Camp Asylum, S.C., and was discharged from the Union Army on June 27, 1865.

The Tree of Liberty

 

1864 Volunteer Enlistment Form, 183rd Oh

 

Envelope, Department of New York, G. A. R. $5.00

 

Union Discharge, 111th Pennsylvania Infa $75.00




Bust view of General Andrew Jackson in uniform with the slogan, "For Our Country Common Cause" on the obverse. Motto, "Now And For Ever" on the reverse. Very fine.


Andrew Jackson served as the 7th President of the United States, 1829-37.  


Bust of William Henry Harrison in uniform with Maj. Gen. W.H. Harrison, stars and the year 1841 on the obverse. A spread winged eagle with American shield on its chest and an olive branch and arrows in its talons. Riband above with the motto, "Go It Tip," and below, with the motto, "Come It Tyler" with encircling stars around the edges. There is a very tiny hole in the top of the token where it was once worn by a chain.


"Tippecanoe and Tyler Too", originally published as "Tip and Ty", was a very popular and influential campaign song of the Whig Party's colorful Log Cabin Campaign in the 1840 United States presidential election. Its lyrics sang the praises of Whig candidates William Henry Harrison (the "hero of Tippecanoe") and John Tyler, while denigrating incumbent Democrat Martin Van Buren.


William Henry Harrison  was the ninth President of the United States (1841), an American military officer and politician, and the last President born as a British subject. He was also the first president to die in office. He was 68 years, 23 days old when inaugurated, the oldest president to take office until Ronald Reagan in 1981. Harrison died on his 32nd day in office of complications from pneumonia, serving the shortest tenure in United States presidential history. His death sparked a brief constitutional crisis, but its resolution settled many questions about presidential succession left unanswered by the Constitution until the passage of the 25th Amendment in 1967. He was the grandfather of Benjamin Harrison, who was the 23rd President from 1889 to 1893.


Before election as president, Harrison served as the first territorial congressional delegate from the Northwest Territory, governor of the Indiana Territory and later as a U.S. representative and senator from Ohio. He originally gained national fame for leading U.S. forces against American Indians at the Battle of Tippecanoe in 1811, where he earned the nickname "Tippecanoe" (or "Old Tippecanoe"). As a general in the subsequent War of 1812, his most notable action was in the Battle of the Thames in 1813, which brought an end to hostilities in his region. This battle resulted in the death of Tecumseh and the dissolution of the Indian coalition which he led.   


Imprinted business card of O.H. Oldroyd, 516 Tenth Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. Includes illustration of President Abraham Lincoln at upper left corner of the card with a very neat caption below, "Smallest Portrait of Lincoln ever made." 3 7/8 x 2 1/4. Light age toning. Desirable President Lincoln item.


WBTS Trivia: 516 Tenth Street N.W. was the address of the Petersen House in Washington, D.C., the house where President Abraham Lincoln died in the early morning hours of April 15, 1865.


Osborn H. Oldroyd, enlisted as a private, at the age of 19, on October 15, 1861, and was mustered into Co. E, 20th Ohio Infantry. He was promoted to sergeant, and was discharged from the Union army on July 16, 1865. Oldroyd kept a journal of military events and personal recollections and in 1885 he published portions of this under the title, "A Soldier’s Story of the Siege of Vicksburg." Oldroyd and his family moved to Springfield, Illinois and rented the former home of President Abraham Lincoln, which Oldroyd converted into "The Lincoln Museum" in 1884. On view was Oldroyd’s expanding collection of Lincoln memorabilia. After the Lincoln home was donated to the State of Illinois in 1893, Oldroyd moved his family and Lincoln collection to the Petersen House in Washington, D.C., where Lincoln died. He sold the 3,000 piece collection to the U.S. government for $50,000 in 1925. The government moved the collection to Ford's Theatre, where Lincoln had been assassinated. Oldroyd published The "Assassination of Abraham Lincoln" in 1917. The narrative account of Lincoln’s death became a quick popular success. The Oldroyd collection is now located in the Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library. [Source: University of Chicago Library].  


6 1/2 x 3 1/2, imprinted envelope with illustration of President Abraham Lincoln. Program Centenary Of Lincoln's Birth, O.H. Oldroyd, Publisher, 516 Tenth St., N.W., Washington, D.C. Light age toning. Desirable Lincoln related cover.


WBTS Trivia: 516 Tenth Street N.W. was the address of the Petersen House in Washington, D.C., the house where President Abraham Lincoln died in the early morning hours of April 15, 1865.


Osborn H. Oldroyd, enlisted as a private, at the age of 19, on October 15, 1861, and was mustered into Co. E, 20th Ohio Infantry. He was promoted to sergeant, and was discharged from the Union army on July 16, 1865. Oldroyd kept a journal of military events and personal recollections and in 1885 he published portions of this under the title, "A Soldier’s Story of the Siege of Vicksburg." Oldroyd and his family moved to Springfield, Illinois and rented the former home of President Abraham Lincoln, which Oldroyd converted into "The Lincoln Museum" in 1884. On view was Oldroyd’s expanding collection of Lincoln memorabilia. After the Lincoln home was donated to the State of Illinois in 1893, Oldroyd moved his family and Lincoln collection to the Petersen House in Washington, D.C., where Lincoln died. He sold the 3,000 piece collection to the U.S. government for $50,000 in 1925. The government moved the collection to Ford's Theatre, where Lincoln had been assassinated. Oldroyd published The "Assassination of Abraham Lincoln" in 1917. The narrative account of Lincoln’s death became a quick popular success. The Oldroyd collection is now located in the Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library. [Source: University of Chicago Library].

Token, General Andrew Jackson $45.00

 

1841 Presidential Token, William Henry H $75.00

 

Business Card of O. H. Oldroyd, Washingto

 

Envelope, Program Centenary of Lincoln's




< prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 next >

AntiqueArts.com home page! How to use this page! How to advertise here How we manage your personal information Terms of use TIAS home page