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Unused, patriotic envelope with vignette of a Union soldier with musket with fixed bayonet and a blanket roll visible on his back. He is in the process of grabbing a Rebel by the throat while taking his pistol away with his other hand. The Rebel is holding a knife in his other hand. The imprint above reads, "Now, boasting Southron, hold thine own, No maiden's arms are round thee thrown! A Northern Freeman holds thee fast- Yield! or this moment is thy last!" Published by S.C. Upham, 310 Chestnut St., Phila. Light staining and mounting traces on the reverse.  


8 1/2 x 14, two sided imprinted form, filled out in ink.


Application of Widow of a Soldier of the Late Confederacy. For Mrs. R.J. Brown, the widow of A.J. Brown, who enlisted in the service of the Confederate States in the State of Mississippi, in the fall of 1862, and served in the 9th Miss. until the close of the war. Dated Sept. 5, 1910 and bears the the signature of R.J. Brown,  T.Q. Brame, Chancery Clerk, and several witnesses. Also comes with a small note stating that A.J. Brown was born Jan. 25, 1822, and died July 15, 1899, age 77 years, 5 months and 20 days. 


Light age toning and wear and some fold chips at the edges. Confederate pension documents are scarce to find, this application filed by the State of Mississippi.  


 7 3/4 x 3, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


Assessor And Collector's Office, Liberty County, Novm. 14th, 1863. Received of John Brown the sum of forty dollars, in full of his State and County Tax, for the year 1862, the amount Recd. on account of Special loan. Tax is to exchanged for Specie at the Treasury. M.L. White, Assessor & Collector Liberty Co. Staining and wear. Uncommon war date Texas imprint.


John Brown, served as a corporal, in Co. E, 11th Spaight's Texas Cavalry and Infantry Battalion during the War Between The States.   


Unused, patriotic envelope with vignette of spread winged eagle in flight carrying banner with the slogan, "Majestic monarch of the cloud, Who rear'st aloft thy regal form. Child of the sun! to thee 't is given, To guard the banner of the free." Light wear at the top edge.

Patriotic Cover, Yield Boasting Southron

 

Pension Application For Widow of Decease

 

1863 Confederate Texas Tax Receipt $35.00

 

Patriotic Cover, Majestic Monarch of the




Unused, patriotic envelope with illustration of Confederate Vice President Alexander H. Stephens in Shakespearean costume. Imprint below, "Vice Prest. Stephens, C.S.A. I would give up all hopes in this world and the next were I well out of this scrape. (What he said to a friend.)" Light age toning and minor staining with some mounting traces on the reverse.  


Unused, patriotic envelope with vignette of the famous war correspondent William H. Russell lying on the ground and looking through a pair of field glasses. Titled, "Russell trying to see the Fight at long range." Imprint below, "Russell- Oh! Dear me! I can't see the Fight- I shall have to pick up an account from some of the volunteers to write home." Published by Magee, 316 Chestnut St., Phila. Light age toning and wear with some mounting traces on the reverse.


<u>William H. Russell</u>: (1820-1907) Prominent English war correspondent who developed a reputation as Britain's finest military reporter. He came to America in 1861 to cover the American Civil War for the London Times. When General Irvin McDowell marched his inexperienced troops to the 1st battle of Bull Run, Va., Russell termed them a "rabble" army. Ironically, he was given the nickname "Bull Run" Russell for his panic stricken skedaddle from that battlefield. He published his Civil War experiences, which were titled, "My Diary, North and South." He was knighted in May 1895.  


3 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Elizabeth Lupton, to her husband, Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry.


<b><u>Jerusalem, [Ohio], March the 6th</b></u>


My Dear Husband,


After love to you I will inform you that we are in tolerable good health except Mag.  She has the jaw ache.  It is gathered and she has a very bad cough.  Well dear, I got your letter you sent by Mr. Hudson today and got one by mail yesterday.  I am very glad you have such good health.  I cannot brag of my health.  I ought not to complain while I can keep up well.  I feel a little jealous of the Capt., but I will make it all right.  When you get home I would like to have that kiss myself, but it will be good when I get it if there is not too much wool on the upper lip.  Well concerning Miss Margaret I do not blame you for writing to her, but it tickled me when you thought you had [?] her.  I knew she had wrote another to you.  I am a going to write one to her and send it to you and I want you to send it to her.  She will not know my handwriting.  They think it is [an] affable letter you wrote to her so they cannot get any on you to law.  I do not care.  I wish the boys would write soon to her.  If she could get about six I think she would quit cold.  Tom wants to get something to lay about before Luke Tipton has a discharge.  I reckon John Belly will be easy a little while until the draft comes.  I am so glad they are going to draft.  I will quit.  I have nothing worth writing.  Sid Eaton is [?] that is a good egg.  We got a letter from R.A. Doudny.  She is well and sends her love to you.  Good by my Dear.


From your loving wife,


E.H. Lupton


Light age toning and wear.


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.      

 


Compiled and edited by Emanuel Hertz. Bramhall House, New York, 1986, hard cover with dust jacket, 698 pages, index. Excellent.


Abraham Lincoln once remarked to his law partner, William H. Herndon, that publishers ought to stock biographies with blanks to be filled in with high sounding praise if a man happened to die.


"Lincoln Talks" is a biography of which its subject might have approved, for it is an oral biography, told not by one man, but by a thousand of Lincoln's contemporaries, who "recorded" his words, not with a tape recorder, but as treasured memories of Father Abraham.


From newspaper files, from long forgotten magazines, from out of print books, government documents, and closely guarded manuscripts, the book's editor Emanuel Hertz gathered the stories and identified their sources. He arranged them in an order which illuminates Lincoln's career in each of its phases; youth, lawyer, politician, president, and Commander-in-Chief.


Around the stove in the general store in New Salem, riding the circuit with his fellow lawyers, arguing for his clients before the informal courts of the frontier, stumping the Middle West and debating Stephen Douglas, guiding the faltering steps of the nation during the tragic years of the Civil War, Lincoln was constantly "reminded" of a story. And the stories always threw light both on the subject at hand and on the narrator. In these anecdotes, Lincoln talks, and smiles and weeps. 


For anyone who wants to write or talk of Lincoln, who wishes to understand the true personality of this great leader, these stories are worth a library of those "high-sounding" biographies that Lincoln found so amusing. And his own words prove Lincoln's reputation as the "Aesop of the American prairie."

Patriotic Cover, Vice President Alexande $20.00

 

Patriotic Cover, Russell Trying to See t

 

Letter Written to Lieutenant of the 116t $35.00

 

Lincoln Talks, An Oral Biography




Unused patriotic envelope with illustration of a large pine tree with verse below, "The Massachusetts Pine. I give my rafters to his boat, My billets to his boiler's throat; And I will swim the ancient sea, To float my child to victory, And grant to dwellers with the pine, Domination o'er the palm and vine." Light age toning and mounting traces on the reverse.  


<b>Written by Clark S. Edwards, Colonel of the regiment


He commanded the 5th Maine during the battle of Gettysburg!


Promoted to Brevet Brigadier General


War Date Letter With Cover that has been franked by the Major of the 5th Maine Infantry


"I have just come in from a ride.  I left camp this morning and went into Reynold’s Corps about four miles from here.  My first call was at Lieut. Twitchell of the 5th Battery.  I had a fine time with him for an hour or two.  Del is a fine fellow and brave as a lion. He is in charge of the Battery the most of the time."</b>


(1824-1903) Edwards was 37 years old when the news of the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter reached the small town of Bethel, Maine.  He was high on a ladder shingling his roof and he immediately climbed down, obtained permission from the appropriate authorities to form a company of volunteers, and set out to gather recruits from Bethel and the surrounding towns.  This group of men became Company I, of the 5th Maine Volunteer Infantry, with Edwards commissioned as their captain on June 24, 1861.  He rose through the ranks and was appointed colonel of the regiment, on January 8, 1863, commanding the 5th Maine Infantry from that date forward. He was promoted to brevet brigadier general, on March 13, 1865, for his gallant and meritorious Civil War service record.


The 5th Regiment Maine Volunteer Infantry was one of the first Maine regiments to be mustered into the Union Army.  They fought in many battles from 1st Bull Run to Petersburg.  During the battle of Rappahannock Station the regiment is credited with capturing 4 Confederate battleflags and 1,200 prisoners.  Known as one of Maine's best fighting regiments, it captured more prisoners than the entire number of men who served in the regiment, and three times the number of battle flags than any other Maine regiment.  After three long years of hard fought service only 193 men were mustered out of the regiment when their term of service expired.  Among their battle honors are written the names of 1st Bull Run, Gaines' Mill, 2nd Bull Run, Crampton's Gap, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Rappahannock Station, Rapidan Crossing, Mine Run, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor and Petersburg.


4 pages, 7 3/4 x 9 3/4, in ink. Comes with the envelope addressed in the hand of Edwards to his wife, Mrs. C.S. Edwards, [thus his full signature] Bethel, Maine, with Washington, D.C. postmark, and stamped Due 3. Franked at the top right, Soldier's Letter, H.R. Millett, Maj. 5th Me. Vol. Docket at left edge, Nov. 25th, 1862. As was her custom, this docket was written by Mrs. Edwards so that she knew the date the letter was written without having to take it out of the envelope.


<b><u>Camp 5th Me. Vol., Near Stafford Court House, Nov. 25th, 1862</b></u>


My Dear wife,


I find myself once more seated to write you although I have but little to write.  It is now sixteen days since I heard from you, that is sixteen days since your last letter was dated as it was dated the 9th of this month.  I think you would find some fault with me or the P.[ost] Office department if you went that length of time without hearing from me.  I will now go on with my letter.  I have just come in from a ride.  I left camp this morning and went into Reynold’s Corps about four miles from here.  My first call was at Lieut. Twitchell * of the 5th Battery.  I had a fine time with him for an hour or two.  Del is a fine fellow and brave as a lion.  He is in charge of the Battery the most of the time.  I saw in his camp one of [?] T. Bartlett’s boys that was looking well and hearty.  I also saw one of Samuel Holt’s boys that was well and some others that you do not know.  I left there about eleven and went into Doubleday’s Division and found Marshall.  He is looking well. I had a nice time with him.  I stopped and took dinner with him.  I think he is getting along well.  We had fried meat & boiled potatoes for dinner, also coffee & hard bread  & sugar.  We sat down on the ground and ate off newspapers.  I have not seen Capt. Robinson since I saw him at Maryland.  I could write something if I saw fit but I had rather someone else do it as I have always intended to say nothing about anyone unless it was in their favor.  You know that by my letters that is away from Bethel.  I have just heard the Paymaster has arrived but we shall not get our pay till the last of the week as he pays off four Regts. before ours.  I shall use the most of my pay in paying my bills and fixing up for winter.  As soon as we get our pay I will send you some, but not but little at this pay day.  I shall try to get a leave of absence sometime the first of December and if I cannot get one I may resign.  I am in hopes to be able to save the most of my next pay as I want to fix up some of these every day callers you speak of.  It is now near four o’clock and I must go on dress parade as I am in command as the Col. is gone away somewhere.  I will close this tonight.


Tuesday Evening:  I am still writing and as the &c says I write about all the time.  Buxton never writes to his folks but Warren writes about the same as I do.  We are expecting a mail tonight but none came as yet.  I am almost tired out waiting for it.  I have but little to write as we get nothing new here in camp.  I was in hopes the paymaster had come but I learn it is not so this evening.  I want you to send me by Chas. & Lee Sawyer the little things I spoke about and a few little things to eat such as a few pies or a cake.  The things you sent by Brown I never got not by Oliver last spring.  You can do as you think best about Dolley.  If you think you can take care of her you can send and have her brought up to your place if you need her.


Thanksgiving Day Near Noon:  We have got no mail as yet nor pay from Uncle Sam so you can see that we cannot feel very thankful.  However we are getting up quite a dinner.  I will enclose in this our bill of fare of this day.


Friday Afternoon:  I did not get time to close this yesterday so will now fetch it to a close.  Yesterday passed off very quietly, not but a few of the officers and men drunk, but if they had been paid off there would have been more of the kind.  I have but little to write as we yet no mail.  It is now nineteen days since I heard from you or your letter of the 9th was the last I have received.  I am in hopes of receiving a letter or something tonight as the Maj. has gone to Washington after some things that is at the Express Office.  I am in hopes I will get my coats when he comes as I am in much need of them.  I now wear a sort of a flannel blouse with no lining in it.  I have got along well so far but cannot go much longer in this way.  If you have not sent them as yet you will please send them as soon as you receive this.  Put in anything you please in the box.

  

Friday Evening: The mail has just come in but no letter for me so I have none to answer.  I do not understand it but they will all come to once soon I hope.  We have nothing of interest to write in this unless I write a [?] letter which I know you are sick of.  There is nothing new in the Regt.  The boys are all well as usual.  Bryce & David are the same.  Dan Stearns is not very well.  Capt. Walker is all right.  Quincy the same as ever.


Love to you all,


C.S.E. [Clark S. Edwards]    


Light age toning and wear. Very fine letter.


Henry R. Millett, who signed the envelope, was a 28 year old resident of Palmyra, Maine, when he enlisted in the 5th Maine Infantry as a sergeant, on June 24, 1861. He was promoted to captain, August 6, 1861; major, September 24, 1862; lieutenant colonel, January 8, 1863; and was mustered out of the service on July 27, 1864.


* Adelbert B. Twitchell, a resident of Bethel, Maine, enlisted on June 1, 1861, and was assigned Quartermaster Sergeant, 5th Maine Infantry. He was discharged on December 1, 1861, for promotion to lieutenant and went into the field and staff of the 5th Maine Battery. He was wounded in action on May 5, 1863 [place not stated] and was promoted to captain, June 15, 1864. He later served in the 7th Maine Light Artillery.   Popularly referred to as a Recorder, Tin Whistle or Penny Whistle the history of these mostly <I>folk music</I> instruments reaches back to the earlier 19th century.  Gracing many a Civil War soldier’s evening respite from the days military activity or wood stove <I>concert</I> in winter camp, the little tin recorder was a favorite at many a mid 19th century entertainment.  Fashioned from thin tinned sheet iron rolled into a tube with hand lead soldered mouth piece and seam, the <I>penny whistle</I> was light in the haversack or knapsack, yet durable. This example measures 13 ½ inches in length with good evidence of age and period use.  A rich natural age patina, good evidence of period hand soldering and the charm of period use and carrying while remaining in pleasing, even playable condition, will set this all original little musical instrument well in any Civil War collection.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !


 


 Illustrated here with a US quarter for size comparison, this all original U. S. wreath forage cap insignia was by regulation worn by Union Generals and Staff officers.  All in fine condition, we acquired this piece years ago when we were fortunate enough to purchase our old friend Dr. Francis Lord’s Union insignia show display.  Our letter will come with this piece attesting to its origin from the author’s collection.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

Patriotic Cover, The Massachusetts Pine $15.00

 

5th Maine Infantry Letter $125.00

 

antique tin RECORDER or PENNY WHISTLE $95.00

 

Civil War – U. S. & Wreath Staff Officer $275.00

A neat pair of vintage clothespins hand cut from a young sapling or tree branch (illustrated here with a U.S. quarter for size comparison) and bound with a strip of tinned iron to form what must have been a very effective clothes pin.  We have seen this style in years past usually found among 19th century household and camp things but like most everyday utilitarian items of the period they seem to have vanished. With pleasing age and originality this pair will go well with other period country items or in any grouping of Civil War vintage personal things. <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 An especially pleasing design and all original, with good evidence of age and originality while remaining in excellent untouched condition, this period classic will show of well in any vintage grouping, field camp, or home and hearth.  The 5 7/8 inch diameter bowl is of one piece die struck tinned sheet iron with a soldered receptacle for insertion of a flanged die struck candle holder / catch basin. (Removable to facilitate the clearing away and reclaiming unburned candle wax.) The oversized finger ring is of rolled and soldered sheet iron.  An especially nice piece of country lighting.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  


 Untouched and as found from a Maine estate attic is this wonderful antique presentation walking stick. 

With  the finely engraved inscription <B></I>Samuel Soule to C. F. Webster San Francisco Cala. June 2, 1884</B></I> on its silver head, the shaft of the stick is of Lignum Vitae root worked to the shape of an entwined serpent around a knobby shaft reminiscent  of the vintage Irish shillelagh.  Those familiar with the history of the tough, hard to work lignum vitae wood will appreciate the workmanship of the heavy shaft.  All solid with no cracks or restoration, yet with evidence of age and originality with period use and carrying all preserved by the passing on of this piece just as it came out of decades of attic storage.  <B>Samuel Soule</B> may be found in the 1880 Federal Census listed as a resident <I>capitalist</I> in San Francisco, California.  Born in Maine about 1808, the 1850 census finds Soule in Lynn, Massachusetts where he owned an apothecary.  In 1860 our <I>Yankee</I> entrepreneur in running a restaurant there.  It will take some additional research to determine when and what Soule was up to in San Francisco.  His death is listed as 1889 in that place.  Also Maine born (about 1818) was <B>Charles F. Webster</B> who is listed as a <I>money broker</I> in San Francisco in the 1870 census.  The history buff will enjoy pulling together additional research material on the two Maine born, San Francisco money men.   As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

 


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"I don’t think I ever felt so lonesome in my life as I did that night, not one person that I was acquainted with and no way of transportation could I find until the next morning when I had the good luck to meet with a Captain Berry of the 123rd O.V.I."</b>


3 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife and children.


<b><u>Petersburg, Dec. 22nd, 1862</b></u> 


My Dear and loving wife and Children,


I felt so lonely this afternoon I thought I would talk to you a few minutes.  Well I left Barnesville about 9 o’clock at night and got to Bellair where I staid until morning.  I then started for New Creek where I arrived about sunset.  I don’t think I ever felt so lonesome in my life as I did that night, not one person that I was acquainted with and no way of transportation could I find until the next morning when I had the good luck to meet with a Captain Berry of the 123rd O.V.I.  He was going to take a team out to this place and he offered to take me and my luggage which was a great favor.  We left New Creek about 2 o’clock in the afternoon and got as far as Burlington 14 miles that night.  There I met our four wagoners.  They had come after rations.  Be sure I was glad to see them.  They soon got me a good warm supper and then we had a good night’s rest in a barn.  We had plenty of hay and blankets.  We started on again on Saturday morning for this place distant 29 miles.  I got into camp about 7 o’clock at night.  I was tolerably tired but was glad to get to my journey’s end.  I had a little touch of the cholera morbus yesterday.  We had a lot of sausages for dinner and I ate more than my stomach would bear so I had to throw it up again, but I will try and not do so any more.  Well in regard to our future movements I don’t know where we shall go, but the talk I that we will go back to New Creek this winter.  Well I must bring this to a close as it is almost time for dress parade, so good by my dear family.  Write whenever you can and may the good Lord have you in his holy keeping.

  

From your ever loving husband and Father,


Levi Lupton


Direct to Petersburg, Hardee Co., Va.


Co. C, 116th O.V.I.  


Light age toning and wear. Very fine letter. 

    

Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.

hand crafted vintage CLOTHES PINS $45.00

 

Civil War era tinned sheet iron CANDLE H

 

San Francisco Presentation Walking Stick

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $85.00




<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"...all I can do is to pray to our heavenly Father to spare my Dear little girl until I can get home for it seems that it would almost kill me if I do not get to see her again."</b>


1 page, 7 1/2 x 9 3/4, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife.


<b><u>Camp Jessie, Nov. 26th, 1862</b></u> 


My Dear wife,


After my love to you I will inform you that I recd. your letter of the 22nd on Monday evening and I was very sorry to hear that my Dear little girl was so bad and it seemed to me that I could not stand it any longer without coming home.  I went right to see the Colonel and he told me to make out a statement of the facts and he would recommend it to the General.  I did so and got it made out but I then found that I would have to wait until I could send it to Gen. [Jacob D.] Cox so that I will not get home before next Tuesday, but I think if the papers do not miscarry that I will be home at that time so that all I can do is to pray to our heavenly Father to spare my Dear little girl until I can get home for it seems that it would almost kill me if I do not get to see her again.  Well Dear, I must conclude as we have to go out for inspection.  Good by my ever loving wife.  May God have you in his holy keeping.


Levi Lupton


Light age toning and wear. Touching letter written by a heartbroken father away from his sick child during the Civil War. 

    

Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  


Unused, patriotic envelope with illustration of General Nathaniel P. Banks. Imprint, "One of the Banks in Baltimore that has not suspended operations. Hon. N.P. Banks of Mass. Commanding at Fort M'Henry." Published by Upham, 310 Chestnut St., Phila. Light age toning and mounting traces on the reverse.  


Unused, patriotic envelope, with full color vignette of a Union sailor, American flag and shield, eagle with cannon and ship's mast head in the view. Verse below, "A Union of lakes, and a Union of lands, A Union of States none can sever, A Union of hearts, and a Union of hands, And the flag of our Union forever." Light age toning and mounting traces on the reverse.   


By E.F. Conklin. Thomas Publications, Gettysburg, Pa., 1993. Hard cover, 430 pages, index, illustrations. Out of print. New condition. Excellent addition to any serious Gettysburg collection.


"Women at Gettysburg 1863" is a compilation of forty biographies of women who served, nursed, or aided the soldiers at the Battle of Gettysburg in July 1863. The paricipation of women during the Civil War was critical, if not essential to the survival of many soldiers. They served their meals, nursed their wounds, wrote their letters, and comforted their pain as only a woman can do, and in most cases had a dramatic effect on their survival. "Women of Gettysburg 1863" gives the reader a chance to experience their adventures first hand and visualize the horrible and traumatizing effects that war had on the soldiers, civilians, and nature.

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $65.00

 

Patriotic Cover, General Nathaniel P. Ba

 

Patriotic Cover, Union Sailor, American

 

Women at Gettysburg 1863




<b>United States Congressman from Illinois</b>


(1835-1921) He graduated from Lombard College, in Galesburg, Illinois, in 1856, and from the law department of the University of Louisville, Kentucky, in 1857, was admitted to the bar in 1857, and commenced practice in Petersburg, Illinois. He was a member of the Illinois Constitutional Convention in 1862, and served as U.S. Congressman, 1869-73. He was a delegate to the Democratic National Conventions of 1872, 1892, and 1896. 


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 3, in ink, T.W. McNeely, Petersburg, Illinois.


 


<b>United States Congressman from Kentucky</b>


(1825-1904) Born near Flemingsburg, Kentucky, he studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1847 and commenced practice in Paducah. He was a member of the Kentucky State House of Representatives, 1851-52; Judge of the Criminal Court of the First Judicial Circuit of Kentucky, 1856-60; was the president of the New Orleans & Ohio Railroad Co., 1860-65; served as U.S. Congressman, 1865-71.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 5 1/2, in ink, L.S. Trimble, Paducah, Ky.  


<b>United States Congressman from Ohio</b>


(1818-1881)  He worked on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers as a clerk and as an engineer, from 1835-48; was general ticket agent for the Little Miami Railroad, 1848-67; and served as U.S. Congressman, 1869-71.  


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 3 1/4, in ink, P.W. Strader, 1st Ohio, Cincinnati.  


5 x 8, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, October 16, 1865


Memorandum


To Chief Commissary of Musters

Military Division of the Tennessee


The following instructions are furnished for your information and guidance:


Men belonging to regiments which were raised in the States of Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi, and who, being absent at the muster out of their regiments, and did not receive their discharges, will, upon application to you, be furnished a discharge, if entitled to it, and (if the paymaster who paid the regiment has closed his rolls) be directed to apply to the Paymaster General U.S. Army, for such arrears of pay, bounty, &c., as may be due them. 


Circular letter from this Office dated June 29, 1865, does not apply in such cases.


In furnishing such papers every precaution will be taken by investigation, &c., to prevent the issuing of duplicate discharges, and a report will be made monthly to this Office of all discharges furnished, except when furnished regularly to men at the time of muster out on regular muster-out rolls, giving a separate list for men of each regiment on a muster and descriptive roll blank, embracing in the first report all discharges furnished up to October 1, 1865.


Please notify Mustering Officers to prevent any misunderstanding.


Official.


Assistant Adjutant General.


Light age toning and edge wear with 2 very tiny holes at the left edge, and a tiny area of paper loss at the bottom left corner, none of which affect the content.

Autograph, Thompson W. McNeely $10.00

 

Autograph, Lawrence S. Trimble $10.00

 

Autograph, Peter W. Strader $7.00

 

War Department Memorandum to Military Di $10.00




By Edwin B. Coddington. Published by Morningside Bookshop, Dayton, Ohio, 1984. Hard cover with dust jacket. 866 pages, index, maps, illustrated. Very good. The dust jacket is worn and has a few tiny tears. However, the gray cloth boards with purple and gold imprint are in excellent condition. The end pages show a few small areas of dirtiness (black spots) and there are 2 very tiny stains on the end pages. Overall the book itself is very tight with clean bright pages. An excellent reading copy. Civil War scholars consider Professor Edwin B. Coddington's book to be one of the best studies ever written on the Gettysburg campaign. Out of print in hard cover, I have seen copies of this book without the dust jacket selling on the secondary market for $150.00 to $225.00. A must have for any serious student of the Gettysburg campaign.  


     


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"We have just got our brigade filled out.  We have the 110th, 116th, 122nd and 123rd Regts. and 1 battery.  We are under General Milroy.  There is 12 Regts. of infantry here at this time."</b>


2 pages, 7 3/4 x 9 3/4, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife.


<b><u>Camp Jessie, New Creek, Va., Nov. 21st, 1862</b></u> 


Dear wife,


After my love to you I will inform you that I am still enjoying good health and how I wish that you could say the same, but from your letter of the 17th which I recd. last night I am sorry to learn that you are so poorly and that the children are still so poorly.  I was in hopes that they would have been well before this time, but it seems that the good Lord has thought best to order it otherwise.  Well dear, I thought that I would have been at home before this time but circumstances have been so that I could not get off.  I cannot get a furlough without getting either General Milroy or Cox to sign it and I have not had a chance to get to see them.  We have just got our brigade filled out.  We have the 110th, 116th, 122nd and 123rd Regts. and 1 battery.  We are under General Milroy.  There is 12 Regts. of infantry here at this time.  The present prospect is that our Regiment will be detailed to guard the railroad between here and Clarksburg this winter.  There will not be much to do and we can have good comfortable quarters to winter in.  Well Dave Barrett and myself have just returned from the rock called the Maidens Leap, a mountain in Maryland which is just across the river from where we are encamped.  There is a splendid view of the mountains around indeed.  You cannot see anything but mountains.  It is the roughest country that I ever seen.  We picked up some pieces of rock on top of the mountain.  It appears to be made of sea shells and bones and leaves.  Well dear, if there is a chance to sell Jerry I think you had better let him go for it is too hard for you to tend to him for you have too much to do without tending to him.  Well dear, I must conclude for I have nothing interesting to write. I want Margy and Laura to write a letter to me and Dear don’t forget to pray for me for I feel so bad about my little family.  I feel like I need the prayers of my Dear and children to uphold me.  So good by Dear and may God bless you and keep you in his holy care is the prayer of your ever true and loving but erring husband.


Levi Lupton


Direct to New Creek Station, Balt. & O.[hio] R.R., Hampshire Co., Va.


Co. C, 116th Regt., O.V.I.


Light age toning and wear. Very fine letter. 

    

Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  


Unused, patriotic envelope with vignette of Uncle Sam holding a candle, with an eagle at his side, and a Rebel pointing a gun at him. Uncle Sam says, "Halloa! What Do You Want Here?" The Rebel replies, "I Want To Be Let Alone." Imprint below, "I've been a Thief and Traitor Against the Laws I own, But I wish to "to go to Dixie," And "there be let alone." 1861 imprint on the back flap, J. Magee, 316 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Small areas of mounting traces on the corners of the reverse.    


Unused, patriotic envelope with vignette of Jeff Davis with his head popping out of the top of a refrigerator with a slave standing at his side saying, "You had better get out dere, Massa Jeff, and go Norf, dey soon cool you or any oder man." Mounting traces on the corners of the reverse.

The Gettysburg Campaign, A Study in Comm

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $95.00

 

Patriotic Cover, Uncle Sam and a Rebel

 

Patriotic Cover, Confederate President J




<b>United States Congressman from Pennsylvania</b>


(1826-1886) Born in Somerton, Philadelphia County, Pa., he graduated from the Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, in 1847, and began a practice in Philadelphia.  He later graduated from Hahnemann College, Philadelphia, and practiced homeopathy.  Served as U.S. Congressman, 1869-70.  


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 3 1/2, in ink, John R. Reading, Somerton, Penn.  


<b>United States Congressman from New York</b>


(1797-1880) Born in Colchester, Delaware County, New York, he was engaged in agricultural and mercantile pursuits, and taught school in Delaware County.  Was a member of the New York State Assembly in 1841.  He later moved to Deposit, N.Y. where he organized a bank in 1854 and became its president.  Served as U.S. Congressman, 1869-71.  


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 3/8 x 3 1/2, in ink, Charles Knapp, Deposit, N.Y.  The oval Staffordshire platter presented has a pleasing purple transfer pattern depicting a sailboat on a river setting with exotic buildings, including a minaret behind  Prominent in the foreground is an urn with oversized, stylized flowers.  The surround has floral designs and mini-flowers.  


It measures 15 by 12 inches and is free of chips and cracks.  One pit exists on the white area at ten o-clock as visible on the picture.


The William Ridgway pottery produced this platter.  It bears the backstamp of the pottery and dates to 1830.  


By Craig L. Symonds. Published by Oxford University Press, 2008. Hard cover with dust jacket. 430 pages, index, illustrated, maps. Brand new condition.


Abraham Lincoln began his presidency admitting that he knew "but little of ships," but he quickly came to preside over the largest national armada to that time, not eclipsed until World War I. Written by naval historian Craig L. Symonds, "Lincoln and His Admirals" unveils an aspect of Lincoln's presidency unexamined by historians until now, revealing how he managed the men who ran the naval side of the Civil War, and how the activities of the Union Navy ultimately affected the course of history.


Beginning with a gripping account of the attempt to re-supply Fort Sumter-a comedy of errors that shows all too clearly the fledgling president's inexperience-Symonds traces Lincoln's steady growth as a wartime commander-in-chief. Absent a Secretary of Defense, he would eventually become de facto commander of joint operations along the coast and on the rivers. That involved dealing with the men who ran the Navy: the loyal but often cranky Navy Secretary Gideon Welles, the quiet and reliable David G. Farragut, the flamboyant and unpredictable Charles Wilkes, the ambitious ordnance expert John Dahlgren, the well-connected Samuel Phillips Lee, and the self-promoting and gregarious David Dixon Porter. 


Lincoln was remarkably patient; he often postponed critical decisions until the momentum of events made the consequences of those decisions evident. But Symonds also shows that Lincoln could act decisively.


Disappointed by the lethargy of his senior naval officers on the scene, he stepped in and personally directed an amphibious assault on the Virginia coast, a successful operation that led to the capture of Norfolk. The man who knew "little about ships" had transformed himself into one of the greatest naval strategists of his age.


In this portrait of the president and the admirals under his command, Symonds offers a unique and illuminating account of Lincoln and the nation at war.

Autograph, John R. Reading $7.00

 

Autograph, Charles Knapp $7.00

 

W Ridgway Purple Transferware Platter, P $250.00

 

Lincoln And His Admirals

It is rare to find an antique white ironstone pitcher and bowl in such excellent shape, free of chips and cracks as is this one.  The shape is Scalloped Decagon, one of the early shapes, dating to 1853.


The bowl measures 18 inches wide by 4 1/2 inches tall.  It has a nice border on the 14-sided rim which repeats the ogee shapes so important to this design.

It is marked with the English registry mark and the Davenport backstamp.


The ewer is 11 1/2 inches tall.  Note the panels and same ogee shapes on its eight sides.  It, too bears the same underside markings.


I think it best for the buyer to wait for me to pack up this set before paying for shipping.  I want to see the most economical way to ship it depending on the location of the buyer.  I will enter details for weight calculation; however, this shipment will be pricy, so let's have a look before finalizing the sale to see if I can save that person some money.  


<b>For a private who was wounded and captured in the battle of the Wilderness, Va., and died as a prisoner of war at Andersonville Prison</b>


7 3/4 x 9 3/4, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


Certificate To Be Given To Volunteers At The Time Of Their Discharge To Enable Them To Receive Their Pay, &c. I Certify, on honor, that Mark Chase, a Private of Captain Davenport's Company H of the 6 Regiment of Infantry Volunteers, of the State of Vermont, born in Fayston, State of Vermont, aged 26 years, 5 feet, 11 1/2 inches high, blue eyes, black hair, and by occupation a laborer, having joined the company on its original organization at Roxbury, and enrolled in it at the muster into the service of the United States on the 14 day of Aug., 1861, to serve in the Regiment for the term of three years, and having served honestly and faithfully with his Company to the present date, is now entitled to a discharge by reason of Surgeon's Certificate of Disability. The said Mark Chase was last paid by Paymaster to include the 28 day of Feb., 1862, and has pay due him from that time to the present date. Given in duplicate, at Carver Hosp.[ital], this 19 day of May, 1862. By command of General Wadsworth, Wm. A. Bradley, Asst. Surg., U.S.A. in Charge of Hosp.  


Light age toning and wear. There is a small hole in the document at left. This causes the loss of a few of the imprinted words, but none of the handwritten content. Slightly trimmed at the edges. Very desirable Vermont regiment, and anything associated with Andersonville is always in high demand.


Mark Chase, enlisted on August 14, 1861, as a private, and was mustered into Co. H, 6th Vermont Infantry. He was discharged on May 19, 1862 for disability. He re-enlisted as a private on November 27, 1863, and was mustered back into Co. H, 6th Vermont Infantry. He was wounded and captured on May 5, 1864, in the battle of the Wilderness, Va., and confined in the notorious  Andersonville Prison, Ga. He died at Andersonville on June 3, 1864, and is buried in Andersonville National Cemetery, Grave #2811.


The hard 6th Vermont Infantry, was part of the famous "Vermont Brigade." The regiment received its "baptism of fire" during the Peninsular campaign in the spring of 1862, at Lee's Mills, Va., where they crossed Warwick Creek, through water up to their waist, under a severe and galling fire, and attacked the enemy's works. During this action the regiment lost 23 killed, and 57 wounded. They also fought in the battles of Williamsburg, Golding's Farm, Savage's Station, where the regiment lost 21 killed, and 54 wounded and missing, White Oak Swamp, Crampton's Gap, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, where they captured 250 Rebel prisoners, Gettysburg, Funkstown, Md., Rappahannock Station, the Mine Run campaign, the Wilderness, where out of the 441 men that went into the battle, 69 were killed, and 127 wounded, thus losing almost half of their strength, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Weldon Railroad, Ream's Station, Fort Stevens, Charlestown, W.V., Winchester, Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek, and Sailor's Creek.  


 


<b>United States Congressman from New York</b>


(1822-1902) Born in Cairo, Greene County, New York, he attended the academies in Prattsville and Catskill, N.Y., studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1848, and commenced practice in Greene County.  Served as District Attorney of Greene County, 1856-59; was a Greene County Judge, 1863-67; and served as U.S. Congressman, 1869-71.   


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 1/2 x 2 3/4, in ink, G.A. Griswold, Catskill, N.Y.  


Unused, patriotic envelope with illustration of John Brown. Imprint at top: "His Last Words- I die for the inalienable right of mankind to freedom, whatever hue the skin may be." Copyright secure by Stimson & Co., 79 Cedar St., N.Y. A couple of small tears at the bottom edge repaired on the reverse with archival tape. Mounting traces on reverse. Rare!

Davenport White Ironstone Pitcher and Bo $275.00

 

6th Vermont Infantry Certificate Issued $50.00

 

Autograph, John A. Griswold $7.00

 

Patriotic Cover, John Brown $45.00




<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"We are about 22 miles from Cheat Mountain and 6 from Rich Mountain.  This is a desolate looking part of the country.  It shows the ravages of war.  There is a good many houses been destroyed and there is hardly any fences left on the farms.  The soldiers are not very particular where they get fire wood."</b>


2 pages, 7 1/2 x 9 1/2, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, to his wife.


<b><u>Beverly, Nov. 14th, 1862</b></u> 


My Dear wife,


After my love to you and the children I will inform you that I still [am] in the enjoyment of good health and oh how I wish this would find you all enjoying the same blessing for there is nothing that would do me so much good at this time as to hear that you were all well, but I fear that I shall not have that pleasure very soon for I do fear that the trouble and labor that you have to endure will bring a spell of sickness on you, and then what would become of my little family, but I think nothing would keep me from coming home even at the risk of my life.  Well dear I recd. your letter of the 8th and was truly glad to hear that the children were better and do hope that they may continue to improve in health, but it made me feel sorry indeed to think of the labor that have to perform, it is too much for you to endure and I do wish that you would try and get somebody to do the outdoor work for you for if you should get sick I fear that I never will get forgiveness for leaving you as I did, but I think that I will be punished sufficiently for what I have done in the anxiety and uneasiness that I have felt for my little family since I have been away from home and I hope that my Heavenly Father will forgive my misdeed and give me grace for days to come to try and do better.  Well Dear, we have been here since Monday evening.  We are encamped in the valley of the Taggert River and we are surrounded with mountains.  We are about 22 miles from Cheat Mountain and 6 from Rich Mountain.  This is a desolate looking part of the country.  It shows the ravages of war.  There is a good many houses been destroyed and there is hardly any fences left on the farms.  The soldiers are not very particular where they get fire wood although our men have not been very bad at destroying things not near so bad as some of the rest.  Well dear we have got marching orders again but not towards the enemy.  We have been ordered to Webster 42 miles distant from this, but twenty miles nearer home.  It is situated on the Railroad from Parkersburg to Grafton and it is likely we will winter somewhere in that section.  I am in hopes that we will meet [General] Milroy there for I think he will give me a furlough to come home.  Well dear I must conclude as the drum has beat for the lights to be put [out] and to go to bed for we have to be off by seven o’clock in the morning.  Farewell Dear.  May God bless you and the children and keep you safe until my return.


From your loving and faithful husband,

Levi Lupton


Direct to Webster, Va.

Co. C, 116th Reg. O.V.I.   

 

Light age toning and wear. Very fine letter. 

    

Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va.  He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.  Here is a Staffordshire white ironstone sugarbowl dating to 1867.  This shape has two names, Laurel Wreath and Victory Shape.  This particular item's backstamp bears the latter name.


It measures 8 inches tall by 6 1/2 inches wide.  The shape is memorable because of its many unique elements.  Note the tightly knotted design on the finial, the wreath design which appears on both side, the ribbing on both lid and base, and the thumbprints, also on both pieces.  There is no shape quite like this one!


It is in fine condition, free of flaws.  It bears the pottery's backstamp.  The Staffordshire vegetable server presented once was paired with a domed lid; however, I only can offer the octagonal base which measures 10 inches measured angle-to-angle across the top by 5 inches tall.


It bears the  T&R Boote backstamp and English Registry Mark.  The year letter is difficult to read, but I think it is a P, making the year of production 1851.


I believe this is 1851 Octagon Shape, a classic design with panels on the sides.


It is in great shape, free of chips and cracks.  The antique oval Staffordshire white ironstone platter presented has the Sydenham type ogee shapes on the surround.  This is Columbia Shape, one of several designs using shapes similar to Sydenham and dating to the same period. The English Registry Mark dates it to 1855.


It measures 15 1/2 by 12 1/2 inches and is in fine shape, free of chips and cracks.  It bears the backstamp of the pottery with the words, Wooliscroft and "Opaque China"

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

Elsmore & Forster White Ironstone Sugar $125.00

 

T&R Boote Pedestalled Vegetable Server, $50.00

 

Wooliscroft White Ironstone Oval Platter $125.00

This attractive old three section fife measures 20 ½ inches in length with good age, originality and evidence of  period use and carrying yet remains in eye appealing condition.  This nice period musical instrument will display nicely with any Civil War era musical grouping without spending a lot of money.

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !




 Whether a Civil War era collector or just a fancier of antique lighting devices or the work of early country tinsmiths, this wonderful all original lamp oil can will fit the bill.  Entirely original and as found with pleasing evidence of age and period use, this classic old <I>oiler</I> remains in pleasing condition with no repairs or condition issues and is ready for your collection.  Its classic construction style will be appreciated by the experienced collector. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I> All direct sales are backed by </I> <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased !</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item is being returned per these previsions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  A classic style iron ball mold best described by our photos except to advise the viewer that it measures about 5 inches in overall length and offers an especially desirable cavity size suitable for and most often related to, use with a heavy flintlock or percussion pistol rather than the more common and much smaller ball mold of the period hunter.  The mold is marked with the <B>#18</B> which, consistent with the early smooth-bore ball sizing system, indicates that the mold casts balls at eighteen to the pound.  (Approximately 5/8 inch in diameter.)  A nice companion piece with an antique powder horn, with a period musket or with a nice hunting bag.  ( Illustrated here with a vintage quarter for size comparison. )  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !


 The reflections of five years of life on a New England farm, are left to the reader of <B>Alfonso L. Anderson’s</B> (see period U. S. Census Records)  pocket journals of <B>1867, 1868, 1871, 1872, 1874</B>.  The simplicity of Anderson’s carefully penned record of just post-Civil War life on a Massachusetts farm, leaves the reader with a clear impression of the Spartan lifestyle of the time. Little is recorded of leisure in Anderson’s life save the reading of the paper on Sundays, a picnic, or <I>Sabbath School celebration</I> on July 4th are out classed only by a single notation on the occasion of going to see Barnum’s Col. Tom Thumb.  It seems that with the possible exception of a visiting neighbor, even Christmas was a day of labor as Anderson records <I>fixed the horse stable floor</I> and <I>chopped in the woods</I> as his only comment except that the weather was fair, Christmas day 1874.   Besides the usual published material, (calendar, interest tables, foreign gold and silver coin values, postal rates, astrological tables &c ) these little pocket journals offer a simple insight as Anderson dutifully records the bare activities of each and every day.  Simple notation such as <I> cut wood, bought cloth for a shirt, killed hog, put hams in smoke, cleared stone from wheat field, planted peas, early potatoes & sweet corn</I> are combined with a number of references to <I>hired work</I> especially in winter.  Anderson had a talent for filing saws and repairing looms that carried him about the countryside.  The country farmer closed most of his yearly journals with a summary of the success or failure of his crops for that year.  Such notations <I> With regard to my own crops; corn good, wheat a failure, potatoes half a crop</I>, in his 1867 year end synopsis leaves one to wonder how they survived in such times.  Such concern becomes even more acute in light accounting notations in the back of each year’s journal.

     All complete and quite easy to read in Anderson’s careful brown ink hand, these journals will offer interesting reading and will lay in well with a variety of period antiques.  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

mid 19th century ROSEWOOD KEYED FIFE

 

Earlier to mid 1800s tinned sheet iron L

 

American Revolutionary War through Civil $65.00

 

5 years of late 1860s early to mid 1870s $95.00

An exceptionally nice looking import leather shako complete with  original die struck brass American eagle over infantry horn plate as illustrated in Stanley Philip’s, <I> Excavated Artifacts from Battlefields & Campsites of the Civil War</I>.  All original and complete, this example even retains the chin strap with original strap retainer in the crown.  Both original features are generally long since gone.  This one even sports its period dress wool pompom.  Known to have been imported early in the Civil War the use of this handsome shako has been well established by virtue of camp site and battle field excavations with records of use by Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and New York regiments.   Offers good evidence of age and originality yet all in excellent condition with nice original finish and solid construction even to its original 2 ¾ inch wide sweat band.  An attractive piece of Civil War head gear at a reasonable price!  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !


 <b> 16th Mississippi Regiment, who was paroled at Appomattox Court House, Va.


Also includes doctor's letter</b>


8 1/2 x 14, two sided imprinted form, filled out in ink. Plus 1 page letter written by J.B. Thigpen, M.D.


Form No. 3. Application for Indigent Blind Widow of Soldier or Sailor of the late Confederacy, Under Chapter 73, Acts of 1900. This is for the widow of B.F. Everett who enlisted in the service of the Confederate States in  May 1861, and served in Company F, 16th Mississippi Volunteers. States that he served until the close of the war and was paroled at Appomattox. The document has been signed and witnessed and is dated August 3, 1901. 


Included with this form is a doctor's letter, 6 x 6 3/4, written in ink: 


Lake Como, Miss., Sept. 5, 1914 


To the Hon. Pension Board of Jasper County, [Miss.]


Greetings:


This certifies to you that Mrs. Bettie Everett who is applying for an increase in her pension is under treatment a good deal of the time and not at any time able to do any work. 


Very truly yours, 

J.B. Thigpen, M.D. 


Light age toning and wear with some slight paper loss at the edges. Small archival tape repairs.


Benjamin F. Everett, served in Co. F, 16th Mississippi Infantry Volunteers, 1861-65. 


<u>16th Mississippi Infantry Regiment</u>


Organized in June 1861, about 950 officers and men were mustered into the Confederate service. Sent to Virginia, the regiment was brigaded under Generals Trimble, Featherston, Posey and Harris. After fighting in General Stonewall Jackson's Shenandoah Valley campaign, they participated in the campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days Battles to Cold Harbor, then shared in the Petersburg siege and the Appomattox campaign. The 16th Mississippi lost 6 killed and 28 wounded at Cross Keys; had 15 killed, 51 wounded, and 19 missing at Gaines' Mill and Malvern Hill; 63 per cent of the 288 engaged at Sharpsburg were disabled; they reported 23 wounded at Fredericksburg; and sustained 76 casualties at Chancellorsville. The regiment took 385 men into the battle of Gettysburg. On April 9, 1865, it surrendered at Appomattox Court House with 4 officers and 68 men. [Source: Units of the Confederate States Army].

 


8 pages. Important From Washington. New Points of Policy in the Conduct of the War. Executive Order Regarding the Seizure of Property in Rebellious States. Order in Regard to Aliens and the Oath of Allegiance. Arrival of General Halleck. Explanation of the Law Making Postage Stamps Currency. News From The Peninsula. The Rebels Quiet on the James River. Our Transports and Mail Boats Not Interfered With. How the Rebels Suffered in the Late Battles. Gen. Burnside Gone to Washington. The Retreat to the James River. Absurd Rumors of Changes in the Cabinet at Washington. The Cotton Supply Question. The Battles Before Richmond. List of Wounded in the Different Encounters. Names of the Prisoners in Richmond. Military Power of the Rebels Exhausted. The War on the Mississippi. Unsuccessful Attempt to Destroy the Rebel Ram Arkansas. Farragut's Fleet Again Below the Vicksburg Batteries. The Guerrilla's in Kentucky. Morgan Overtaken and Defeated. His Band Scattered. Cannon, Horses and Other Property Recovered. The New Call For Troops. Recruiting in the City. Military Matters in Brooklyn. The Battle of Seven Pines and more. Very fine issue.  


7 1/2 x 3 3/4, manuscript in ink.


Assessor and Collector's Office

Liberty, June 15th, 1864


$57.86. Received of John Brown the sum of fifty seven dollars and eighty six cents in full of his State and county tax for the year 1863. Includes two signatures. Light age toning and wear. Texas Civil War material is considered to be uncommon.


John Brown, served as a corporal, in Co. E, 11th Spaight's Texas Cavalry and Infantry Battalion during the War Between The States.

Civil War IMPORT INFANTRY SHAKO $1250.00

 

Application of Widow of Private Benjamin

 

The New York Times, July 23, 1862

 

1864 Confederate Texas Tax Receipt $35.00




Unused, patriotic envelope, with vignette of two negroes in conversation, one is a well dressed gentleman wearing a top hat, the other a laborer wearing a felt hat. Imprint at right: The Result of Secession. Julius- "Is your massa Union or Session? Sam- "Why he's Session." Julius- "Den I pitys yer- you was as good a leben hundred dollar nigga as eber I see- an now yer aint wuf wun cent!" Published by D. Murphy's Son, Printer, 65 Fulton & 572 Pearl Sts., N.Y. Small mounting trace spots on the four corners of the reverse. Scarce and very desirable black related cover.   <b>From Armies of the Potomac, Tennessee and Georgia</b>


5 x 8, imprint.


War Department

Paymaster General's Office

Washington, D.C., June 22, 1865


Memorandum


All Veteran Volunteers in Batteries of Volunteer Artillery mustered out as organizations, from Armies of the Potomac, Tennessee and Georgia, under recent orders, are mustered out "on account of their services being no longer required," and are entitled to balance of Veteran Bounty. 


Heavy Artillery follows the general rule, not that for Field Artillery.


Official


Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning and staining with two very tiny holes at the left edge which do not affect any of the content.  


<b>For a private wounded in the battles of Fair Oaks, and Salem Heights, Virginia</b>


10 x 15 1/2, two sided imprinted form, filled out in ink. The United States In Account with Jacob Shay, of C Company, Ninety Third Regiment of Penna. Infantry on Account of Clothing during his enlistment; the money value of each issue being hereby acknowledged. Enlisted at Lebanon, Pa., on the Twenty fourth day of September 1861. Individual entries are dated from October 1861 to September 1862, with the appropriate money values. The document has been signed 4 times by Jacob Shay, and has been witnessed 4 times by William W. Murray. Murray also signs the document one more time at the bottom as Captain Commanding Company.


The reverse side is filled out for Cyrus Shay, probably the brother of Jacob, who enlisted at Lebanon, on the thirteenth of September 1861. It includes entries from October 1861 to August 1862. It has been signed 6 times by Cyrus Shay and witnessed 6 times by Captain William W. Murray, and signed one more time at the bottom by Murray as Captain Commanding Company. An interesting notation on the document states that that this account was not settled and placed in the October 1862 rolls listing Cyrus Shay as a deserter. 


Light age toning and edge wear.


Jacob Shay was wounded in action on May 31, 1862, at the battle of Fair Oaks, Va., and he was also wounded on May 3, 1863, at Salem Heights, Va., during the Chancellorsville campaign. He was promoted to corporal on September 1, 1862. The date of his muster out of the service is unknown.


Cyrus Shay was listed as a deserter, the exact date is unknown.


The 93rd Pennsylvania Infantry saw action in the Virginia peninsular campaign, the 7 Days battles, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg and Appomattox, to name but a few of their battle honors.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with illustration of Colonel Elisha B. Harvey with Head-Quarters Seventh Regiment, P.R.V.C., Gen. McCall's Division printed at upper right. 5 1/2 x 3.


WBTS Trivia: The 7th Pennsylvania Reserves, were also known as the 36th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment, and they were commanded by Colonel Elisha B. Harvey. Organized at West Chester, they were ordered to Washington, D.C., on July 21, 1861, where they were mustered into the U.S. service for a term of three years. The regiment fought gallantly at Gaines' Mill, where it was in the thick of the fighting and its losses were heavy. They saw action at Glendale, and Antietam where they again suffered heavy losses. The regiment made a gallant charge at the battle of Fredericksburg where they captured the battle flag of the 19th Georgia Infantry. In the Wilderness campaign, a large portion of the regiment was cut off and captured. Of the 272 men taken prisoner, many of them never returned home from their Rebel prisons.

Patriotic Cover, The Result of Secession

 

War Department Memorandum Regarding Arti $10.00

 

1861-62 Clothing Account, 93rd Pennsylva $25.00

 

Colonel Elisha B. Harvey, 7th Pennsylvan




<b>U.S. Civil War Congressman from Pennsylvania</b>


(1822-96) Born in Town Hill, Luzerne Co., Pa., studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1844, and commenced a practice in Allentown, Pa. Served as district attorney of Lehigh County, 1853-56. Was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1856, 1864 and 1868; and a delegate to the Union National Convention in 1866. Served as U.S. Congressman, 1862-65, and 1869-71. 


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 2 1/2, in ink, John D. Stiles, Allentown, Pennsylvania.  


<b>Colonel of the 57th Ohio Infantry during the Civil War


United States Congressman from Ohio</b>


(1821-87) He was a school teacher and editor and publisher of the Findlay (Ohio) Democratic Courier. Member of the Ohio State Senate, 1851-52. Studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1853, and commenced practice in Findlay. Delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1856. At the age of 40, he enlisted in the Union army, on September 27, 1861, and was commissioned lieutenant colonel, 57th Ohio Infantry. He was promoted to colonel on December 16, 1861, and was discharged for disability on April 24, 1863, at Young's Point, La. Served as U.S. Congressman, 1867-71, including the 40th U.S. Congress, which was the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress. 


<u>Signature with Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 2 1/2, in ink, W. Mungen, Findlay, Ohio.  


<b>U.S. Civil War Congressman from Massachusetts</b>


(1808-75) Born in Marblehead, Mass., he was engaged in the importing business in Boston, and later in the iron business. Member of the Massachusetts State House of Representatives, 1851-53; and the State Senate in 1858. Served as U.S. Congressman, 1861-75. Was Chairman of the powerful Ways and Means Committee. Also served on the Committee on Banking and Currency, and Committee on Coinage, Weights and Measures.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 3/8 x 2 1/2, in ink, S. Hooper, Boston, Mass.  


<b>Colonel of the 11th Michigan Infantry during the Civil War


Severely wounded during the 1864 Atlanta campaign resulting in the amputation of his leg


United States Congressman from Michigan</b>


(1827-88) He studied law, was admitted to the bar, and commenced practice in Sturgis, Michigan in 1851. Served as prosecuting attorney, 1855-59; was a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1860; and was appointed U.S. District Attorney for Michigan by President Abraham Lincoln in March of 1861. During the first summer of the Civil War, Stoughton, stirred by patriotic emotions determined that his place was with the army so he enlisted on August 24, 1861, and was commissioned lieutenant colonel of the 11th Michigan Infantry. Promoted to Colonel April 1, 1862, he was wounded in action on July 4, 1864, at Roughs Station, Ga., resulting in the amputation of his right leg. He was promoted to brevet brigadier and major general, March 13, 1865. He was a member of the Michigan State Constitutional Convention in 1867; served as Michigan Attorney General, 1867-68; and U.S. Congressman, 1869-73.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 4, in ink, Wm. L. Stoughton, Sturgis, Mich.

Autograph, John D. Stiles $15.00

 

Autograph, William Mungen $20.00

 

Autograph, Samuel Hooper

 

Autograph, General William L. Stoughton $35.00




8 1/2 x 11, imprinted form, filled out in ink, with vignette of spread winged eagle on shield.


To all whom it may Concern: Know ye, That Walter S. Waggner, Sergeant of late Captain Edward M. Koch's Company (I) Fifth Regiment of Maryland Volunteers who was enrolled on the Eight day of October one thousand eight hundred and Sixty one to serve three years or during the war, is hereby Discharged from the service of the United States this ninth day of October 1864, at Bermuda Hundred, Va., by reason of Expiration of term of Service.


Said Walter S. Waggner was born in Baltimore City in the State of Maryland, is twenty three years of age, five feet, nine inches high, light complexion, blue eyes, dark hair, and by occupation when enrolled, a Farmer. 


Given at Bermuda Hundred, Va., this Ninth day of October 1864. L.H. Bowen, Lt. & A.C.M.  John W. Worth, 2nd Lieut. Comdg. Co. I, Fifth Regt. Md. Vols. 


Light age toning and wear. Scarce. Very desirable Maryland Civil War regiment.


Walter S. Waggner, served in the 5th Maryland Infantry, from October 8, 1861, to October 7, 1864.


John W. Worth, enlisted on September 24, 1861, as a private, and was mustered into Co. A, 5th Maryland Infantry. He was promoted to corporal, sergeant, and 1st sergeant, exact dates unknown. Promoted to 2nd lieutenant, February 28, 1863; captured on June 15, 1863, at Winchester, Va., and confined in a Confederate prison at Macon, Ga.; promoted to 1st lieutenant, April 10, 1865; mustered out of the service, September 1, 1865.


Lewis H. Bowen, enlisted on June 5, 1861, and was commissioned 2nd lieutenant, 2nd Rhode Island Infantry. He was discharged for disability on July 18, 1862. He re-enlisted on August 4, 1863, and was commissioned 1st lieutenant, 5th Rhode Island Heavy Artillery. He was on detached service 1864-65, as Commissary of Musters; and was mustered out of the service, June 26, 1865.


<u>5th Maryland Infantry Regiment</u>


Attached to the main body of the Army of the Potomac as part of the 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 2nd Army Corps, the 5th Maryland Infantry fought with that command in the battle of Antietam, being on that part of the field known as the "Bloody Lane," where the regiment lost 39 killed and 109 wounded. Some idea of the severity of this part of the battle may be gained from the fact that the commanding officers were all wounded and carried from the field. The battle honors of the regiment include Antietam, Charlestown, Winchester, the siege of Petersburg, the assault on the Confederate works at Petersburg during the mine explosion which became known as the "Battle of the Crater," the Second Battle of Fair Oaks, and the occupation of Richmond. The 5th Maryland Infantry were the equal of any regiment in the Union army for bravery and devotion to duty. During their service they lost 64 killed, while 97 died of wounds and disease. [Source: The Union Army, Vol. 2].  


<b>Signed by the colonel and adjutant of the regiment</b>


14 1/2 x 9 3/4, on vellum, filled out in ink, with vignette of a spread winged eagle with American shield.


The Commanding Officer Of The Fifth Regiment Of Maryland Vol. Infty. To all who shall see these presents, greeting: Know Ye, That reposing special trust and confidence in the patriotism, valor, fidelity and abilities of Walter Waggner, I do hereby appoint him Sergeant in Company "I" of the Fifth Regiment of Md. Vols. Infty. in the service of the United States to rank as such from the 23 day of April one thousand eight hundred and 63. He is therefore carefully and diligently to discharge the duty of Sergeant by doing and performing all manner of things thereunto belonging, And I do strictly charge and require all Non Commissioned Officers and Soldier under his command to be obedient to his orders as Sergeant. And he is to observe and follow such orders and directions from  time to time as he shall receive from me or the future Commanding Officer of the Regiment or other Superior Officers and Non Commissioned Officers set over him according to the rules and discipline of War. This Warrant to continue in force during the pleasure of the Commanding Officer of the Regiment for the time being.


Given under my hand at the Head Quarters of the Regiment at Point of Rocks, Md., this Twenty Third day of April in the Year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and Sixty Three.


By the Commanding Officer, Col. Wm. Louis Schley, Commanding the Regiment


John B. Wilson, Adjutant of the Regiment


Light age toning and wear. Scarce. Very desirable Maryland Civil War regiment.


Walter S. Waggner, served in the 5th Maryland Infantry, from October 8, 1861, to October 7, 1864.


William Louis Schley, was commissioned colonel of the 5th Maryland Infantry on September 4, 1861, and was mustered out of the service on October 6, 1864.


John B. Wilson, was mustered into Co. A, 5th Maryland Infantry, with rank of sergeant, on September 12, 1861. He was promoted to 2nd lieutenant, January 28, 1863; 1st lieutenant, April 20, 1863; was captured on June 15, 1863, at the battle of Winchester, Va., and confined in a Confederate prison at Macon, Ga.; mustered out of the service, on September 18, 1864. 


<u>5th Maryland Infantry Regiment</u>


Attached to the main body of the Army of the Potomac as part of the 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 2nd Army Corps, the 5th Maryland Infantry fought with that command in the battle of Antietam, being on that part of the field known as the "Bloody Lane," where the regiment lost 39 killed and 109 wounded. Some idea of the severity of this part of the battle may be gained from the fact that the commanding officers were all wounded and carried from the field. The battle honors of the regiment include Antietam, Charlestown, Winchester, the siege of Petersburg, the assault on the Confederate works at Petersburg during the mine explosion which became known as the "Battle of the Crater," the Second Battle of Fair Oaks, and the occupation of Richmond. The 5th Maryland Infantry were the equal of any regiment in the Union army for bravery and devotion to duty. During their service they lost 64 killed, while 97 died of wounds and disease. [Source: The Union Army, Vol. 2].


 


<b>Document Signed


Pension Certificate for Civil War Veteran who fought in the 5th Maryland Infantry</b>


(1829-1909) Born in Golconda, Illinois, he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1853 and practiced in his hometown until 1856, when he moved to Kansas and became identified with the Free State Party. He returned to Illinois in 1857, practiced in Harrisburg until the Civil War, and after the firing upon Fort Sumter made the first war speech in southern Illinois, at Metropolis. 


He entered the Union army as major of the 56th Illinois Infantry, Sept. 28, 1861, was promoted lieutenant colonel in June, 1862, and colonel on Aug. 31. He served with General William S. Rosecrans in the Army of the Mississippi, led a successful bayonet charge at Corinth on Oct. 4, 1862, and afterwards commanded a brigade in the Vicksburg campaign and also in the Chattanooga campaign being several wounded at Missionary Ridge, Nov. 25, 1863. During the Atlanta campaign he held the line of communications from Dalton to Acworth and from Kingston to Rome, and in Oct., 1864, reinforced Resaca and held it against Confederate General John Bell Hood. He was brevetted brigadier general of volunteers, on Sept. 19, 1864, received promotion to the full rank of brigadier general on Feb. 15, 1865, and was with General William T. Sherman on his march to the sea and in the assembling of his army in South Carolina, his final service being as commander of a brigade in the veteran corps at Winchester, Va. 


He resigned in May, 1865, was builder and first president of the Cairo & Vincennes Railroad in 1866, and from 1867-69 was a Republican U.S. Congressman from Illinois. He was president of the Illinois Republican Convention in 1866, and in 1876 was a delegate to the Republican National Convention. He was Commissioner of the Internal Revenue from 1876 to 1883; practiced law in Washington, D.C., until 1889; was Commissioner of Pensions, 1889-93, and was then engaged in the practice of law in Chicago. 


[Source: The Union Army, Vol. 8]


<u>Document Signed</u>: 7 3/4 x 10 1/2, imprinted form, filled out in ink, with vignette of a female figure with an American flag, stacked muskets, cannon balls, cannon and shield with Invalid Pension printed on it.


UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENT of the INTERIOR. Bureau Of Pensions. It is hereby certified That in conformity with the laws of the United States Walter S. Waggner who was a Private, Co. I, 5 Regiment Maryland Volunteer Infantry, is entitled to a pension under the provisions of the Act of June 27, 1890, at the rate of Eight dollars per month to commence on the Twenty ninth day of April one thousand eight hundred and ninety one. This pension being for "Disease of eyes and piles." Given at the Department of the Interior this Twelfth day of April one thousand eight hundred and ninety two and of Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and sixteenth. John W. Noble, Secretary of the Interior. [Noble's signature is stamped]. Counter signed, [hand signed in ink] Green B. Raum, Commissioner of Pensions. Light age toning and wear. Scarce Maryland Civil War unit.


Walter S. Waggner, served in the 5th Maryland Infantry, from October 8, 1861, to October 7, 1864.


<u>5th Maryland Infantry Regiment</u>


Attached to the main body of the Army of the Potomac as part of the 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 2nd Army Corps, the 5th Maryland Infantry fought with that command in the battle of Antietam, being on that part of the field known as the "Bloody Lane," where the regiment lost 39 killed and 109 wounded. Some idea of the severity of this part of the battle may be gained from the fact that the commanding officers were all wounded and carried from the field. The battle honors of the regiment include Antietam, Charlestown, Winchester, the siege of Petersburg, the assault on the Confederate works at Petersburg during the mine explosion which became known as the "Battle of the Crater," the Second Battle of Fair Oaks, and the occupation of Richmond. The 5th Maryland Infantry were the equal of any regiment in the Union army for bravery and devotion to duty. During their service they lost 64 killed, while 97 died of wounds and disease. [Source: The Union Army, Vol. 2].  


8 1/2 x 5 1/2, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


Certificate of Marks and Brands- Class 1. THE STATE OF TEXAS, County of Hardin. Be It Remembered, That on this 8th day of June 1885, Jane S. Brown of Liberty County had her Brand recorded in the Clerk's Office of said County, as follows, to wit: (shows an illustration of the Mark and Brand and states that the location of the brand is to be on the hip). To Certify Which, I hereunto sign my name and affix my official seal, (embossed seal at lower left of the document) this 8th day of June 1885. E.H. Callins, County Clerk, Hardin County. Imprint at upper right, Sold by Clarke & Courts, Stationers, Printers, Lithographers, Galveston. Light age toning and wear. Scarce. Desirable Texas imprint.

5th Maryland Infantry Discharge Certific $125.00

 

5th Maryland Infantry Appointment For Se $150.00

 

Autograph, General Green B. Raum $75.00

 

State of Texas Certificate of Marks and $50.00




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