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<b>The Photographic History of a Confederate and American Icon


Autographed by the author</b>


By Donald A. Hopkins. Published by Savas Beatie, El Dorado Hills, California, 2013. Hard cover, 7 x 10 1/4, with dust jacket, 195 pages, index, profusely illustrated. New condition.


Robert E. Lee is well known as a Confederate general and as an educator later in life, but most people are exposed to the same handful of images of one of America's most famous sons. It has been almost seven decades since anyone has attempted a serious study of Lee in photographs, and with Don Hopkins's painstakingly researched and lavishly illustrated Robert E. Lee in War and Peace, the wait is finally over.


Dr. Hopkins, a Mississippi surgeon and lifelong student of the Civil War and Southern history with a recent interest in Robert E. Lee's "from life" photographs, scoured manuscript repositories and private collections across the country to locate every known Lee image (61 in all) in existence today. The detailed text accompanying these images provides a sweeping history of Lee's life and a compelling discussion of antique photography, with biographical sketches of all of Lee's known photographers. The importance of information within the photographer's imprint or backmark is emphasized throughout the book. Hopkins offers a substantial amount of previously unknown information about these images, how each came to be, and the mistakes in fact and attributions other authors and writers have made describing photographs of Lee to the reading public. Many of the images in this book are being published for the first time.


In addition to a few rare photographs and formats that were uncovered during the research phase, the author offers- for the first time- definitive and conclusive attribution of the identity of the photographer of the well-known Lee "in the field" images, and reproduces a startling imperial size photograph of Lee made by Alexander Gardner of Washington, D.C.


Students of American history in general and the Civil War in particular, as well as collectors and dealers who deal with Civil War era photography, will find Hopkins's outstanding book a true contribution to the growing literature on the Civil War.



"This is an iconic revalation. In decades of photographic research, I have never seen several of these Lee images. Equally impressive is the background research that Hopkins employs to provide context and enriched meaning to each image. His work deserves to be acclaimed a milestone in Lee biography as well as in the broader field of Civil War photographic history." William C. Davis, award winning Civil War author, Virginia Center for Civil War Studies, Virginia Tech



"With the publication of Robert E. Lee in War and Peace: The Photographic History of a Confederate and American Icon, Donald Hopkins has accomplished an unprecedented and noteworthy feat: he has published every known photograph of Robert E. Lee in a single volume. It's a terrific browsing book, but for those who want more, Hopkins provides an exhaustive examination of each image and where it came from, and identifies the photographer, and everything known about the image. Being able to examine the full visual array of known images of Lee in a single fascinating volume, history students and Lee devotees alike will gain a better sense of one of the most idolized men in American history." Bob Zeller, President and Co-Founder of The Center for Civil War Photography

 


<b>With imprint of Vannerson & Jones, Richmond, Va.</b>


(1818-93) The 4th highest ranking officer in the Confederacy. Graduated #2 in the West Point class of 1838. Brevetted captain and major for gallantry in the Mexican War. He was in command at Charleston, S.C., in April 1861, during the bombardment and capture of Fort Sumter and rose to instant fame in the Confederacy. He also saw action at 1st Manassas, Shiloh, the 1863-64 Charleston, S.C. campaign, Bermuda Hundred and Petersburg. Beauregard was a railroad executive in the 1860's and early 1870's and later served as Commissioner of public works in New Orleans and Adjutant General of Louisiana.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform. Backmark: Vannerson & Jones, Richmond, Va., with 2 cents orange George Washington tax stamp. Light age toning and wear.  <b>by General Martin Luther Smith


Autograph Note Signed on the telegram by General P.G.T. Beauregard</b>


<u>General P.G.T. Beauregard</u>: (1818-93) The 4th highest ranking officer in the Confederacy, and one of the best known Confederate Generals to come out of the War Between The States. He graduated #2 in the West Point class of 1838, and was brevetted captain and major for gallantry in the Mexican War. He was in command at Charleston, S.C., in April 1861, during the bombardment and capture of Fort Sumter, and rose to instant fame in the Confederacy. He also saw action at 1st Manassas, Shiloh, the 1863-64 Charleston, S.C. campaign, Bermuda Hundred and Petersburg, Va. Beauregard was a railroad executive in the 1860's and early 1870's and later served as Commissioner of public works in New Orleans, and Adjutant General of Louisiana.



5 1/2 x 8 1/4, imprinted South-Western Telegraph Company telegram form, filled out in ink. 


Tupelo, June 12th, 1862

By Telegraph from Vixburg 12 1861[2]

To Genl. Beauregard


Have detained Capt. Harris for three or four days to complete works.


M.L. Smith


General Beauregard has written the following response on the telegram in his own bold and neat pencil hand: "Capt. Harris' services are also lately required at Columbus. Keep his assistants for 3 or 4 days only. G.T.B."


Docket on the reverse: Vicksburg, June 12th. M.L. Smith, Brig. Gen. Has detained Capt. Harris.


The document shows paper loss at the edges and corners but it does not affect any of the content. Heavily stained but all of the content is easily read. There are two very small archival tape repairs on the folds on the reverse. If this telegram were in choice condition it would easily sell for more than twice my asking price. Rare early war telegram sent to one of the War Between the States most prominent generals with his handwritten note on it. This telegram is regarding the construction of the defenses of Vicksburg, Mississippi which was supervised by General M.L. Smith. 


<u>General Martin Luther Smith</u>: (1819-1866) Graduated in the celebrated West Point class of 1842 which contributed 9 Confederate generals, and 13 Union generals during the Civil War. M.L. Smith was commissioned an officer in the topographical engineers and during the Mexican War he was brevetted for meritorious conduct for mapping the valley of Mexico City. Promoted to colonel of the 21st Louisiana Infantry at the commencement of the Civil War, his main duty was that of engineering. Appointed brigadier general in the Confederate army on April 11, 1862, and major general. on November 4, 1862, he played a very important role in the planning and construction of the defenses of New Orleans and Vicksburg. He was captured with the Vicksburg garrison on July 4, 1863, and spent seven months as a prisoner of war. He was subsequently appointed chief engineer of the Army of Northern Virginia and later of the Army of Tennessee. In the closing months of the war he served under General Beauregard and helped to prepare and supervise the defenses of Mobile, Alabama. He died about a year after the end of the war, on July 29, 1866.     


8 1/4 x 10, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


Requisition for Forage for Two Private Horses in the service of D.C. McCoy, Lt. Col. 83 R.[egiment] P.[ennsylvania] V.[olunteers] U.S. Army In the Field for Thirty days, commencing the 1 of April, 1864, and ending the 30 of April, 1864. Itemized account for hay and oats for Lieutenant Colonel McCoy's two horses received in the field by Lt. D.W. Clark, Regt. Q.M. The requisition has been signed twice by McCoy, D.W. McCoy, as Lt. Col., 83 Regt. Pa. Vols. Very fine.


Dewitt C. McCoy, enlisted on Sept. 3, 1861, as Captain, and was commissioned into Co. F, 83rd Pennsylvania Infantry. He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, Jan. 25, 1864, and Brevet Colonel, Aug. 1, 1864. He was mustered out of service on Oct. 14, 1864.


The 83rd Pennsylvania Infantry was one of the best regiments in the Union army. Their first colonel was Strong Vincent who was mortally wounded at Gettysburg. Just prior to Gettysburg, Colonel Vincent, was elevated to brigade command. In his Gettysburg battle report, Captain O.S. Woodward, who commanded the regiment, wrote, "I have the honor to report the following as to the operations of my command. At about 2:30 p.m. was ordered into position on our extreme left, the 44th New York on my right, the 20th Maine on my left. At 3:15 p.m. the enemy advanced and engaged my skirmishers, pressing on in force, with bayonets fixed. They soon drove in my skirmishers and engaged my regiment, posted behind rocks and stones hastily thrown up for defense. The contest continued lively until nearly 6 p.m., when the enemy fell back. I instantly threw forward a strong line of skirmishers, who captured between 50 and 60 prisoners and 250 stands of arms. My men and officers acted splendidly. All did so well. My loss amounted to 10 killed and 45 wounded. I deem it but proper to state that but for the prompt and skillful disposition made by Colonel Vincent of the troops under his command, the 3rd Brigade, the enemy would have succeeded in turning our left. I regret to state that Colonel Vincent was severely wounded. My command, his regiment, esteemed him highly as a gentleman, scholar, and soldier, and bitterly avenged his injury." The action Woodward described took place on Little Round Top, Gettysburg, July 2, 1863.

Robert E. Lee in War and Peace $45.00

 

CDV General P. G. T. Beauregard $150.00

 

1862 Telegram From Vicksburg Sent to Gen $295.00

 

1864 Requisition, 83rd Pennsylvania Infa $39.00




<b>To the Chief Quartermaster, Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, La.</b>


7 1/2 x 9 3/4, in ink, on imprinted letter sheet, signed by Captain William McKim.


Assistant Quartermaster's Office

Boston, Mass., December 17th, 1863


Col. S.B. Holabird, U.S.A.

Chief Qr. Mr. Dept of the Gulf

New Orleans, La.


Colonel,


I have forwarded to you per Bark "P.R. Hazeltine" the Commissary stores described in the enclosed Invoice and Bill of Lading, which please deliver as addressed and advise me of their receipt.


I am Colonel

Very Respectfully

Your Obt S[v]t.

Wm. McKim

Capt. & A.Q.M.


Very fine.


William McKim, was commissioned captain, A.Q.M., August 3, 1861; promoted to colonel & quartermaster, August 2, 1864. He resigned from the U.S. Army on March 8, 1866. 

  


C.D.S., New Orleans, La., Feb. 21, 1863. The large black stamped "3" at the center indicates that 3 cents postage was due on the mailing of this envelope. Docketed at left edge, "Soldier's Letter, A.J. Willets, Surgeon, 176th Regt. N.Y. Vol." Addressed to, "George Leacole, care of Thaddeus Davids & Co., 127 William St., New York." Edge wear. Fine war date cover sent by a New York surgeon from New Orleans, Louisiana.


WBTS Trivia: The 176th New York Infantry Volunteers were known as the "Ironsides" regiment.


The regiment left the state under command of Colonel Charles C. Nott on Jan. 11, 1863, and embarked on transports for New Orleans, La.  On its arrival it was stationed in the defenses of New Orleans for several weeks and was attached to General Christopher C. Augur's division of the 19th corps, when that corps was organized.


It formed part of the garrison of New Orleans during the siege of Port Hudson, La., and took an active part in repelling the advance of the enemy under General Richard Taylor. During June, 1863, detachments of the regiment participated in the skirmishes at Pattersonville, La., Fourche Crossing, Thibodeaux, Fort Buchanan, Bayou Boeuff and Brashier City, La.


In the action at La Fourche Crossing, the regiment was commanded by Major Morgan and behaved most gallantly, in the actions at Fort Buchanan, on the Atchafalaya, and at Brashear City, the regiment met with serious disaster, over 400 men being captured. This 

disaster was not due to lack of bravery on the part of the men.


There was no one in command, but the men fought with all the bravery that could be expected. The loss of the regiment in the above actions amounted to 464 killed, wounded and captured or missing. In the spring of 1864, they were attached to the 3rd brigade, General Cuvier Grover's division, 19th army corps, it took part in General N.P. Banks Red River campaign, being engaged at Mansura and Simsport.


In July it returned to Virginia with the first two divisions of the 19th corps and took an active part in General Philip H. Sheridan's brilliant campaign in the Shenandoah Valley against General Jubal A. Early, including the battles of Berryville, the Opequan, Fisher's Hill, and Cedar 

Creek, Va.


Its loss at the Opequan was 47 killed, wounded and missing, and at Cedar Creek, 53. In the assault on Fisher's Hill it captured 4 guns from the enemy. It remained in the valley until January, 1865, when it was ordered to Savannah, Ga., with General Grover's 

division.


In March it was ordered with the division, now commanded by General Henry  W. Birge, to North Carolina, where it was temporarily attached to the 10th corps and took part in the final campaign of the Carolinas, ending with the surrender of General Joseph E. Johnston at Bennett's House, N.C.


Soon after this it returned to Georgia and was finally mustered out of the U.S. service at Savannah, Ga., on April 27, 1866.  The regiment lost during service 2 officers and 31 men killed and mortally wounded; 4 officers and 177 men died of wounds and other causes of whom 1 officer and 17 men died in the hands of the enemy.


Source: The Union Army, Vol. 2  


<b>Written by an officer who was captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.!</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, on regimental patriotic stationary, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, to his wife. 


<b><u>Head Quarters, 116th Reg't Ohio Vol. Inf., Co. C, Camp Fort Ackenoe, June 12th, 1863</b></u>


My Dear and loving wife,


I thought that I would write you a few lines this morning to let you know that I am still in very good health and hope these few lines may find you enjoying the same blessing.  Well dear we are still staying here and there is not much prospect of doing anything else very soon.  We just got paid for two months this week and I was in hopes that I would have got to come home but the prospect is not very good at present as the Captain is still under arrest and Lieut. Mann and me has to attend to all the duties of our Company.  Well Dear I understand that Rebecca Evens and Mary Morris is talking of coming out here to see their men and as you talked of coming to see me I thought it would be a good chance to come with them.  I would be very glad to see you come to see me if you could but I donít know whether to advise you to come or not for the uncertainty of our being left in any one place for the next two weeks is very great but dear just do as you think best.  If you come it would be best to get some young women to come with you to help to take care of the little general on the road, but I think I could take care of him if I had him here.  If you should come you can get someone to bring you to Barnesville in the morning, get on the cars and if they make the connection at Bellair you can be here the next evening.  You would be one night on the cars and when you get to Martinsburg you will find a stage ready to bring you to Winchester.  They will see to get you a pass from the Provost Marshal there for to let you through the lines and right through.  Well dear just do as you wish for I would be very glad to see you here and I donít know whether I can get to come home before our next pay day which will be about a month yet, but Ďo how long it seems for to wait for I do want to see you so bad.  I feel so lonesome that it almost makes me sick.  I do hope I will soon get out of this business and then it would take something handsomer than I have ever seen yet to get me to leave my little family again so long.  Well we had like to have had a big time in our Company last night.  Some of our men got tight on cider and cut a pretty big swell on night before last.  Some four or five got tight and I told the man not to let them have anymore but the boys begged so hard for cider that I told them they might have a little if they would keep sober, but there was five or six of them got as drunk as fools and wanted to fight everybody that came about them, but the cider is all gone so I think they will not get tight soon again.  Well dear I must fetch this to a close for I have but very little to write of interest.  I think I will get a letter from you today which would make me very glad so good by dear.  May the good Lord bless you is the prayer of your loving husband for I am still the same.


Lieut. L. Lupton             


Light staining and edge wear. Scarce regimental letter sheet. 


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.     


Light blue ribbon with black imprint and gold bullion tassels at the bottom. 53rd Massachusetts Co. "K" Vol. Inf., 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 19th Army Corps, Army of the Gulf. No pin. Light wear and aging.

1863 Letter From Assistant Quartermaster $25.00

 

War Date N. Y. Surgeon's Envelope Sent Fr $20.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $95.00

 

53rd Massachusetts Infantry Ribbon $45.00




Shreveport, March 1, 1864. Vignette of three ships and fort at center. Liberty at left. About uncirculated condition.  14 handmade filet lace insert squares circa 1900

This is a set of 7 and a different patterned set of 7 handmade filet lace squares, new old stock.  The lace squares all measure 2.25 inches square, design elements are floral.  The lace squares are in excellent unused condition.  These would be great to replace filet lace pieces on antique linens or for a project design of your own!

 5 handmade filet lace insert triangles circa 1900

This is a set of 5 handmade filet lace triangles, new old stock.  The lace squares measure 4.25 by 7.75 inches, design elements are floral.  The lace squares are in excellent unused condition.  These would be great to replace filet lace pieces on antique linens or for a project design of your own!

 7 handmade needle lace inserts circa 1900

This is a set of 7 new old stock needle lace inserts, they measure 4.75 inches in diameter.  They are in excellent, unused condition,  there is age related discoloration that will wash out.  These would be great to replace lace pieces on antique linens or for a project design of your own!

1864 State of Louisiana 50 Cents Note $65.00

 

14 handmade filet lace insert squares ci $12.00

 

5 handmade filet lace insert triangles c $20.00

 

7 handmade needle lace inserts circa 190 $20.00




<b>Civil War Congressman and Senator from Illinois</b>


(1811-75) Born near Lexington, Ky., he attended Centre College at Danville, Ky., and Transylvania University, at Lexington, Ky., taught school, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1831 and practiced in Shelbyville, Illinois. He served as a member of the Illinois State House of Representatives, 1836-38, and 1844-46, and was speaker in 1844. Was a member of the Illinois State Senate, 1838-42. Was a presidential elector on the Democratic ticket in 1844. He fought in the Mexican War as a captain and was promoted to the rank of major. Served as U.S. Congressman, 1847-56, and 1861-63. Was the Chairman of the Committee on Territories. Served as U.S. Senator, 1863-65.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 6 x 1 1/2, in ink, W.A. Richardson, Rushville, Ill. Cut slightly close at the top. Bold autograph.    


State of Alabama. Montgomery, Oct. 1, 1861. Vignette of slaves loading wheat on a mule driven wagon at center. Baskets of cotton and slaves working in the fields at lower right. Very fine. Scarce note.  


Antique battle engraving that has been hand tinted in color. Caption: Battle Of Mill Spring, On The Cumberland River, Near Jamestown, Between A Confederate Force, 8,000 Strong, Under General Zollicoffer, And The Federal Troops, 4,000 Strong Commanded By General Thomas, Fought Sunday, January 19th, 1862- Flight Of The Confederate Army. 21 3/4 x 16. Very fine Civil War battle scene.  


There are four other black and white illustrations on the reverse:


#1: The Military Authorities At Washington, D.C., Examining Passes In 1861.


#2: Taking Away The Colors Of The Seventy-Ninth New York Regiment For Insubordination And Mutiny, Washington, D.C., August 14th, 1861.


#3: Scene In Camp Life- Company Mess Of The Thirteenth Volunteers In Their Camp Before Corinth, Miss.


#4: Fort Built Around The Officers Quarters Of The First Minnesota Regiment, Colonel Sully Near Fair Oaks, Va.


Four of the five illustrations have a  lengthy descriptive text printed under the illustration. Light corner and edge wear. Circa 1800's.   


Civil War patriotic imprint done in red, white and blue in the design of an archway with the motto, "Liberty And Union" and the names of each state in the U.S. at the start of the Civil War. 5 1/2 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

Autograph, William A. Richardson $20.00

 

1861 State of Alabama $2 Note

 

The Battle of Mill Spring, Kentucky

 

Liberty And Union $8.00




Group lot of five antique postcards in full color featuring the home of Abraham Lincoln in Springfield, Illinois, the only home that Mr. Lincoln ever owned. All cards have descriptive text and makers info on the reverse. #1: Abraham Lincoln's Home, Corner Eighth and Jackson, Springfield, Ill. Lincoln Lived Here from 1844-1861. #2: Abraham Lincoln's Home, Springfield, Illinois. #3: Dining Room, Abraham Lincoln's Home. #4: Dining Room, Abraham Lincoln's Home. #5: Kitchen, Abraham Lincoln's Home.  All cards are in excellent condition. Very nice collection.  


5 x 7 1/4, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, August 15, 1861


General Orders

No. 58


I..The officers of the Regular Army now on mustering duty in the principal cities are appointed disbursing officers of the funds appropriated by act of Congress "for collecting, drilling, and organizing volunteers, under the act authorizing the President to accept the services of five hundred thousand men," &c. They will be charged with the payment of all proper claims presented to them under this act, duly authenticated and certified to, by the various volunteer recruiting officers. These disbursements will be made in the manner prescribed for the Recruiting Service of the Regular Army. The premium for accepted recruits as laid down in par. 1315 General Regulations will not, however, be allowed in the Volunteer service. The officers charged with these disbursements will immediately make requisitions on this office for the requisite funds.


II..Camps of rendezvous and instruction for volunteers will be established at or in the vicinity of New York, Elmyra, N.Y., Harrisburg, Pa., Cincinnati, Ohio, and other convenient places, under charge of officers of the regular service.


More content. By Order of L. THOMAS, Adjutant General. Very fine.  


Nov. 1, 1862. Vignette of railroad train at center, Indian at left and maiden at right. "Faith of the State Pledged" and "50" in blue over print. Green background. Very fine. One of the scarcer Mississippi war date issues.   


Used, 3 1/2 x 5 1/2 postcard, with illustration of monument with Confederate soldier holding musket. Confederate Lot, Lexington, Ky. C.D.S., Lexington, Ky., Feb. 8, 1909, with 1 cent Ben Franklin postage stamp. Light age toning and wear.

Abraham Lincoln Home in Springfield, Ill $25.00

 

1861 Orders Regarding Collecting, Drilli

 

1862 State of Mississippi $50 Note

 

1909 Postcard, Confederate Monument, Lex $5.00

 

This is a set of 6 new old stock needle lace inserts, they measure 3 inches in diameter.  They are in excellent, unused condition,  there is age related discoloration that will wash out.  These would be great to replace lace pieces on antique linens or for a project design of your own!

 12 handmade needle lace inserts circa 1900

This is a set of 12 new old stock needle lace inserts, they measure 2.25 by 4 inches in a triangle shape.  They are in excellent, unused condition, still stitched into their lot of 12 pieces, there is age related discoloration that will wash out.  These would be great to replace lace pieces on antique linens or for a project design of your own!

 24 handmade needle lace inserts circa 1900

This is a set of 24 new old stock needle lace inserts, they measure 1.25 inches in diameter.  They are in excellent, unused condition, still stitched into their lot of 12 pieces (there are 2 sets of 12 pieces each) there is age related discoloration that will wash out.  These would be great to replace lace pieces on antique linens or for a project design of your own!

 


<b>Vice President & President of the United States</b>


(1808-75) Congressman, Senator and Governor of Tennessee. He was nominated and elected vice president of the United States on the Union Republican ticket in 1864. Upon Abraham Lincoln's assassination in April 1865, he became our 17th president and resolved to follow Lincoln's plans for reconstruction without bitterness or malice. His reconstruction plan clashed drastically with that of the Radical Republicans in congress, and Johnson's term was one humiliation after another, culminating on February 24, 1868 with a resolution of impeachment against him. This failed by one vote to pass, and he served out his term.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view pose. No imprint. Corners of the mount are trimmed. Light age toning and edge wear. Very fine portrait.

6 handmade needle lace inserts circa 190 $12.00

 

12 handmade needle lace inserts circa 19 $19.00

 

24 handmade needle lace inserts circa 19 $15.00

 

CDV Andrew Johnson




Unused, 3 1/2 x 5 1/2, postcard, with beautiful full color embossed illustration. Female figure in robes with laurel wreath and a bronze tablet with striking bust view of President Abraham Lincoln and his birth and death years, 1809-1865. Floral display in the foreground. Circa early 1900's.  <b>the Conspiracy & Aftermath</b>


By Dorothy Merserve Kunhardt & Philip B. Kunhardt, Jr. Foreward by Bruce Catton. Published by Newcasthe Publishing Co., Inc., North Hollywood, California, 1985, First Paperback Edition, 8 1/4 x 10 3/4, 312 pages, index, profusely illustrated, very fine. A must have book for all Abraham Lincoln Assassination collections.


"Here is one of the pivotal tragedies in our national story, now so completely familiar that we think we have it by heart. Yet there is still something for us to learn about it, and now in this extraordinary book we have the opportunity to do so." From the Foreword by Bruce Catton


This beautiful book, containing more than 300 illustrations, tells the moving story of twenty fateful days in America's history: from the night of April 14, 1865, when Abraham Lincoln was shot, to the afternoon of his burial in Springfield, Illinois.


Only five days after Lee's surrender at Appomattox, the man who had led the country through its darkest hours was cut down. This brutal act- the first assassination of an American president- over-whelmed and united people both North and South. Overnight the mood of elation and relief at the ending of the war was transformed to a shock and grief that were almost too much to bear.


"Twenty Days" is based in large part on firsthand eyewitness accounts searched for over many years, and on the great Frederick Hill Meserve photographic collection, it reconstructs the awful events of the assassination, describes the six ensuing days in Washington, which culminated in the elaborate state funeral, and then follows the special train that slowly carried Lincoln's body home, stopping at eleven major cities along the way for their last tributes. It includes the dramatic story of the arrest, trial, and execution of the conspirators, and closes with the moving ceremonies in Springfield attended by the President's old friends and neighbors.   <b>Spanish Fort, Ala., etc.</b>


Plate LXXIX. Original atlas map that accompanied the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, 1861-65. Multi colored, includes seven individual maps on the same side of one large sheet that measures 29 x 18 1/2.


1. Map of the Environs of Petersburg, Va., From the Appomattox River to Ft. Howard, Showing the Positions of the Intrenched Lines Occupied by the 9th Army Corps, A.P. During the Siege


2. Plat Showing the Position of the Army of the Tennessee Under the Command of Maj. Gen. O.O. Howard During the Battle of Bentonville, N.C., March 20th and 21st, 1865


3. Map Showing the March Routes of the Army of the Tennessee, Under the Command of Maj. Gen. O.O. Howard, During the Winter Campaign in the Carolinas


4. Topographical Map Showing the Positions of the 14th and 20th Corps Commanded by Maj. Gen. Slocum, and Kilpatrick's Cavalry, in an Engagement Near Bentonville, N.C.


5. Map of Battle of Averysborough, N.C., Fought March 16, 1865


6. Map of the Battlefield of Pea Ridge, Ark. Showing the Positions of the United States and Confederate Forces on the 8th of March 1862


7. Plan  No. 8 Siege Operations at Spanish Fort, Mobile Bay, by the U.S. Forces Under Maj. Gen. Canby, Captured by the Army of West Mississippi on the Night of April 8 and 9, 1865  


Maryville, Tenn., December 16, 1862. The County of Blount. Vignette of railroad train at center. Crisp uncirculated golden rod colored note with black imprint. Scarce.

President Abraham Lincoln Memorial Postc $10.00

 

Twenty Days; The Authoritative Account o

 

Atlas Map, Petersburg, Va. , Bentonville,

 

1862 Blount County, Tennessee $1 Note




Plate VIII. Original atlas map that accompanied the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, 1861-65. Multi colored map that measures 29 x 18 1/2. Surveys For Military Defenses Compiled in Topographical Engineers Office at Division Headquarters of General Irvin McDowell, Arlington, January 1, 1862, Corrected From Recent Surveys and Reconnaissances Under Direction of the Bureau of Topographical Engineers, August 1, 1862. Includes scale of miles, Data Used in Compilation, and an alphabetic listing of the Names of Points With Elevations Above Tidewater. Used to Accompany the Reports of Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan, and the Record of the McDowell Court of Inquiry.   <b>and Medical Departments</b>


5 x 8, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, May 14, 1861


General Orders

No. 20


I..There will be added to the General Staff of the Army, four Quartermasters and eight Assistant Quartermasters, to be promoted and selected according to existing Laws and Regulations.


II..There will be added to the Medical Department of the Army, ten Surgeons and twenty Assistant Surgeons.


The Surgeons will be promoted according to existing Laws and Regulations from the Senior Assistant Surgeons, and the Assistant Surgeons will be appointed from civil life after having passed the usual examination by a Board from the Medical Department of the Army.


Due public notice of the appointment and time and place of meeting of the Board will be given.


By Order:


L. THOMAS

Adjutant General


Official:

Assistant Adjutant General


A couple of light stains and a vertical fold. Very early war Federal Army orders signed in print by Adjutant General Lorenzo Thomas. 


 


Raleigh, Jan. 1, 1863. Vignette of the State Capitol at Raleigh at center, and D.W. Courts at right. "X" and "TEN" in red over print at center. Very fine plus.  


Used, 5 1/2 x 3 1/2 postcard, with full color embossed vignette of a banner with spread winged eagle, crossed cannons artillery insignia, American flag, and the slogan, In Loving Memory. Copyright 1909, L.R. Conwell, N.Y. No postage stamp. C.D.S., Poughkepsie, N.Y., May 30, 1913.

Atlas Map, Northeastern Virginia and Vic

 

1861 Orders Regarding Adding Officers to $10.00

 

1863 State of North Carolina $10 Note $75.00

 

G. A. R. Postcard, In Loving Memory $5.00

Extremely rare 1922 William Paterson #46 Ty Cobb baseball card graded very good to excellent by PSA.  


Authentic, original woodcut engraving that was published in the February 21, 1863 issue of Harper's Weekly. Caption: The Effects of the Proclamation; Freed Negroes Coming Into Our Lines at Newbern, North Carolina. 15 1/2 x 10 3/4. Harper's Weekly and date are printed in the margin. Historical 1863 illustration. 


WBTS Trivia: The Proclamation referred to in the caption is President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation which was issued on January 1, 1863.  <b>Are Confined


Original 1860 woodcut engravings of slaves!</b>


Authentic, original woodcut engravings that were published in the June 2, 1860 issue of Harper's Weekly. Captions: #1- The Princess Madia-[From A Daguerreotype]. #2- The Only Baby Among The Africans-[From A Daguerreotype]. #3- An African-[From A Daguerreotype]. #4- The Barracoon At Key West Where The Africans Are Confined-[From A Daguerreotype]. Includes some printed text regarding these illustrations. 10 1/2 x 16. Harper's Weekly and date are printed in the margin. Rare.   


(1801-1870) He entered the navy as Midshipman in 1810 after having been virtually adopted by Commodore David Porter. The friendship between the two families began when Porter's father was buried on the same day as Farragut's mother in New Orleans. He fought in the Mexican War and was awaiting orders at his Norfolk, Va. home when the Civil War broke out. Told that a person with Union sentiments could not live in Virginia, he packed up his family and Virginian wife and moved north. He was given command of the New Orleans expedition in December 1861, and helped capture the city in the spring of 1862. Promoted Rear Admiral in July 1862 for his success in opening up the Mississippi River to Vicksburg, he spent the next year in operations against Port Hudson, La., and returned to NYC in August 1863 to a hero's welcome. He returned to the Gulf in January 1864 to prepare for the assault on Mobile Bay, taking the port on August 5th. It was during this attack that Farragut was to have coined the famous expression, "damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead." He again returned to NYC, this time in failing health. The city gave him a public reception and $50,000 to purchase a home there, and on Dec. 23, 1864, he was promoted to Vice Admiral, the rank just having been established. He was one of the first to enter Richmond after it's capture. On July 25, 1866, he was promoted to full Admiral, the first in the U. S. Navy to ever hold that rank!


Wet plate, albumen photograph, mounted to 4 1/4 x 6 1/2 card. Standing view wearing his naval uniform, cap, 2 piece belt plate, with sword attached to belt. Backmark: Sarony & Co., N.Y. Light age toning and edge wear with a tiny thumbtack hole in the extreme upper border edge. Very fine.

RARE 1922 PATERSON #46 TY COBB BASEBALL $8500.00

 

Freed Negroes Coming Into Our Lines at N $50.00

 

Slaves & The Barracoon at Key West, Flor $125.00

 

Photograph, Admiral David G. Farragut $75.00

Measuring 13 Ĺ inches over all with a 10 inch slip case of split leather over pasteboard, this attractive old straight razor strop remains in pleasing condition and yet with good evidence of age, period use and originality.  The original paper label offers a patent date of <B>1852</B> by <I>Geo. Saunders, Broadway, New York</I> who is listed in directories back to the 1840s as a barber and strop maker.   The label also provides directions as to use of the four sided leather covered strop to include dressing with a <I>little sperm oil</I>.  A nice item to lay in with Civil War era personal items or as a companion item for a single or grouping of period straight razors.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!


 Offered here just as we acquired it from attic storage some years ago, is this <B>2nd Connecticut Heavy Artillery</B> (a.k.a. <B>19th Conn. Infantry</B> troopís <I>UNION WRITING CASKET</I>.  Advertised in the February 15, 1862 <I>Harpers Weekly</I> seeking <I>sales agents</I> to purchase Stationery Packages for resale claiming they will retail rapidly to soldiers, travelers &c at twice wholesale.  <I>Send  for Circular (free) and be convinces</I> says the advertiser J. W. Yale of Syracuse, New York.   <B>Benjamin Willman</B> (a.k.a. Benjamin Williams) penned his name as <I>agent</I> on the back.  We found Benjamin Willman in the <I>Conn. in the Civil War</I> roster serving in the <B>2nd Regiment Connecticut Heavy Artillery</B> (also designated <B>19th Conn. Infantry</B>)  Erroneously listed as Benjamin <I>Williams</I> in a good number of records, Benjamin was mustered in on New Years Day, 1864 as a Private of Co, D and was discharged May18, 1865.  He was <U>wounded at <B>Cold Harbor</B> on June 1, 1864.</U>  One wonders how well our man did selling the <I>THE UNION CASKET</I> with its interesting content of stationary, writing equipment and trinkets to his buddies.   We will rely on our photos to list the original content, all unfortunately lost or used up with the exception of a small dipping pen.  A rarely surviving item for the Civil War writing equipment or personal item enthusiast.   As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !


 Measuring approximately 3 X 6 1/2  inches and remaining in nice all original condition with no rips, tears or repairs, this 1864 presidential ballot for Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson was printed for use in the field in voting for the Lincoln / Johnson ticket under newly established absentee voting provisions.  With no federal statute addressing absentee voting, each state determined their own process for its soldiers' to vote.  California, Connecticut, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin establishing absentee voting procedures. Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Nevada, New Jersey, Oregon, and Rhode Island, did not pass legislation allowing soldiers to vote in the field.  The Ohio ticket offered here reflects that stateís process of balloting by home county. A nice piece of political Americana.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !   Harkening back to the days when folks gathered together in darkened country halls and city theaters to marvel at beautifully hand colored views offered by the turn of the century traveling <I>Magic Lantern</I> projectionist, this nicely slide show travel case offers its original content of 28 <B>McAllister Magic Lantern Slides</B>.  Each hand colored glass slide remains in excellent condition with no chips, cracks or condition issues.  As most of these patriotic sets have been broken up with individual views offered separately, <I>show</I> sets of the most popular and now most collectable Historic Americana and Patriotic War views are seldom found.  Included in this set are illustrative historical views from Columbus, the landing of the Pilgrims, Revolutionary War views to include Washington at Valley Forge, battle views and the Surrender Of Cornwallis.  Included are Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans then Civil War views to include Confederate artillerists active in the  Bombardment of Fort Sumter, Lincoln rallying the troops the Battle of Gettysburg and finally peace as illustrated by a pair of Union and Confederate veterans shaking hands before the American flag. 

With a sprinkling of attractive  Lady Liberty and Stars and Stripes views the collection is concluded by Spanish American War views.  Explosion of the Battleship Maine in Havana Harbor then views of land and sea battle round out the grouping with views current to the time in which the show would have been presented. As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

Pat. 1852 G. SAUNDERS Ė ĎMetallic Tablet $75.00

 

Civil War soldierís WRITING PACKET envel $175.00

 

original - 1864 Abraham Lincoln PRESIDEN $145.00

 

MAGIC LANTERN SLIDE SHOWĖ Pilgrims Ė Re $335.00




<b>Colonel 15th Illinois Infantry during the Civil War


United States Congressman from Illinois</b>


(1815-74) He studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1840, and commenced practice in Freeport, Illinois. Judge of the probate court of Stephenson County in 1842. Postmaster of Freeport in 1844. State district attorney in 1845. Established the first weekly newspaper in Stephenson County called the Prairie Democrat. Served as U.S. Congressman, 1847-49. Member of the Illinois State House of Representatives in 1854, serving as speaker of the house. Elected the first mayor of Freeport, Ill., in 1855. He was a delegate to the peace convention held in Washington, D.C., in 1861 in an effort to devise means to prevent the impending Civil War. Served as Colonel of the 15th Illinois Infantry, 1861-62. Was a member of the constitutional convention in 1863. 


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 6 x 1 3/4, in ink, Thos. J. Turner, Freeport, Ill. Light age toning.  


<b>The Little Giant!


U.S. Senator from Illinois


Ran for president in 1860 against Abraham Lincoln</b>


(1813-1861) An outstanding legislator, and orator, he was one of the founders of the Democratic Party in Illinois. Served as U.S. Senator, 1843-61. He is best known for his debates in 1858 against Abraham Lincoln. He was narrowly defeated for the Democratic nomination for president by Franklin Buchanan in 1856. He did gain the Democratic nomination in 1860, but was defeated for the presidency by his old friend and rival Abraham Lincoln. Upon secession, and the outbreak of the Civil War, he supported Lincoln and his policies. He died of typhoid fever in 1861.


<u>Autograph With Place</u>; 5 1/4 x 1 1/4, in ink, S.A. Douglas, Chicago, Ills.

 


<b>Original 1860 woodcut engraving of slaves!</b>


Authentic, original woodcut engraving that was published in the June 2, 1860 issue of Harper's Weekly. Caption above the illustration: The Africans Of The Slave Bark "Wildfire," From Our Correspondent," and caption below: "The Slave Deck Of The Bark "Wildfire" Brought Into Key West On April 30, 1860. From a Daguerreotype." Lengthy descriptive text below the illustration that is dated from Key West, Florida, May 20, 1860. 10 3/4 x 16. Harper's Weekly and date are printed in the margin. In less than a year from the time this illustration was published the United States would be fighting a devastating, and ruthless Civil War with the horrible institution of slavery being one of the central issues. Rare and historic 1860 slave illustration!    


<b>United States Senator From Massachusetts</b>


(1811-74) After graduating from Harvard, he became a lawyer. A staunch abolitionist, he was violently opposed to the extension of slave territory, and was elected Senator in 1851 on this ticket. In 1856 he delivered an invective laden speech called "The Crime Against Kansas" in which he insulted a South Carolina senator who was not present. Two days later, Representative Preston Brooks, of S.C., a relative of the reviled man, attacked Sumner viciously with a cane. Sumner did not recover for three years, although he continued to hold his Senate seat. After secession he refused to let the Senate consider a compromise between the sections and constantly urged emancipation and equal rights for negroes. He was one of the people in the room when President Lincoln died. Although he had supported Lincoln, he was one of the leaders in the impeachment proceedings against President Andrew Johnson. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 3/4 card. Mount is trimmed. Standing pose. Backmark: E. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Small stain at the bottom portion of the card mount. Very fine portrait of this important U.S. Senator.

Autograph, Thomas J. Turner $25.00

 

Autograph, Stephen A. Douglas $125.00

 

The Slave Deck of the Bark Wildfire Brou $150.00

 

CDV Charles Sumner




Stereo view. Pair of wet plate albumen photographs, mounted to 6 3/4 x 3 1/4, yellow card mount. This is a photo of a memorial made to honor the slain President Abraham Lincoln circa 1865 after his assassination. The central figure is a cross with a bust view likeness of Lincoln at the center, with his name, and birth and death dates. It is surrounded by an arrangement of leaves and flowers. Imprint on the reverse, Joseph L. Bates, Boston, with nice illustration of a stereoscope. Light age toning and wear. Very fine. Desirable Lincoln assassination related item.  


<b>Includes numerous cases against New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Ohio, Kentucky, Illinois and Indiana soldiers</b>


3 pages, 5 x 7 1/4, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, August 22, 1863


General Orders

No. 292


I..The following defects in the records of a General Court Martial, which convened in May last at the Headquarters, 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 6th Corps, of which Lieutenant Colonel E.L. Campbell, 15th New Jersey Volunteers, was President, before which were tried Privates John Miller, Charles Haskard, A. Dobson, J. Johnson, and P. Ferguson, 1st New Jersey Volunteers, and T. McClusky, A. Baldwin and J. Mulgrove, 2d New Jersey Volunteers, and J.W. Priestly, 15th New Jersey Volunteers, are published for the information and guidance of all concerned:


The records in each case fail to show that the Court was organized as the law requires, or that it was organized at all. Much more very interesting content.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Very fine.


Please click on the zoom feature to see all three pages and read the full content of this 1863 document.


 


<b>1863 Philadelphia imprint</b>


(1826-85) Graduated in the West Point class of 1846 and fought in the Mexican War. Hailed at the beginning of the Civil War as the "Young Napoleon," he proved to be a brilliant military organizer, administrator, and trainer of men, but an officer totally lacking in the essential qualities of successful command of large forces in battle. He saw action at Rich Mountain, W.V., in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign and at the battle of Antietam, the bloodiest single day in American history. He was defeated for the presidency in 1864 by Abraham Lincoln.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of major general. 1863 imprint on the front mount, F. Gutekunst, 704 & 706 Arch St., Philadelphia. Backmark: F. Gutekunst, Philadelphia, with 2 cents blue George Washington U.S. Inter. Rev. tax stamp. Very fine, sharp quality image.  


Unused, 5 1/2 x 3 1/2 postcard, with full color illustration of the General McClellan Statue, in Washington, D.C. Published by A.C. Bosselman & Co., New York. Very fine. Circa early 1900's.

Stereo View Photograph, President Lincol

 

1863 Orders Regarding Defects Found in C

 

CDV General George B. McClellan $95.00

 

General George B. McClellan Monument, Wa $2.00

24 handmade needle lace inserts circa 1900

This is a set of 24 new old stock needle lace inserts, they measure 1.25 inches in diameter.  They are in excellent, unused condition, still stitched into their lot of 12 pieces (there are 2 sets of 12 pieces each) there is age related discoloration that will wash out.  These would be great to replace lace pieces on antique linens or for a project design of your own!

 24 handmade needle lace inserts circa 1900

This is a set of 24 new old stock needle lace inserts, they measure 1.25 inches in diameter.  They are in excellent, unused condition, still stitched into their lot of 12 pieces (there are 2 sets of 12 pieces each) there is age related discoloration that will wash out.  These would be great to replace lace pieces on antique linens or for a project design of your own!

 12 handmade filet lace insert squares circa 1900

This is a set of 12 handmade filet lace squares, new old stock.  The lace squares measure 2.25 inches square, design elements are floral.  The lace squares are in excellent unused condition, they are still with the original paper and thread holding them in their lot of 12.  These would be great to replace filet lace pieces on antique linens or for a project design of your own!

 12 handmade filet lace insert squares circa 1900

This is a set of 12 handmade filet lace squares, new old stock.  The lace squares measure 1.75 inches square, design elements are floral.  The lace squares are in excellent unused condition, they are still with the original paper and thread holding them in their lot of 12.  These would be great to replace filet lace pieces on antique linens or for a project design of your own!

24 handmade needle lace inserts circa 19 $15.00

 

24 handmade needle lace inserts circa 19 $15.00

 

12 handmade filet lace insert squares ci $10.00

 

12 handmade filet lace insert squares ci $10.00

12 handmade filet lace insert squares circa 1900

This is a set of 12 handmade filet lace squares, new old stock.  The lace squares measure 1.75 inches square, design elements are floral.  The lace squares are in excellent unused condition, they are still with the original paper and thread holding them in their lot of 12.  These would be great to replace filet lace pieces on antique linens or for a project design of your own!

 


<b>The Little Giant!</b>


(1813-1861) An outstanding legislator, and orator, he was one of the founders of the Democratic Party in Illinois. Served as U.S. Senator, 1843-61. He is best known for his debates in 1858 against Abraham Lincoln. He was narrowly defeated for the Democratic nomination for president by Franklin Buchanan in 1856. He did gain the Democratic nomination in 1860, but was defeated for the presidency by his old friend and rival Abraham Lincoln. Upon secession, and the outbreak of the Civil War, he supported Lincoln and his policies. He died of typhoid fever in 1861.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view pose with name imprinted on the front mount, and a period ink ID at bottom of the print. No backmark. Very fine portrait of the distinguished Illinois senator.

 


<b>Includes Map of the Scene and Plan of the Battle of Port Royal, S.C.</b>


8 pages. The Great Naval Expedition. The Latest War News. The Possession of Beaufort, S.C. Celebrate the Union Victories. THE WAR FOR THE UNION. Dismissal of Gen. Fremont's Staff. Great Fright at Richmond. Reconnaissance's of Rebel Position. The Piketon Victory. Trade to be Opened with the South. Great Product of Arms at Springfield. The Chicopee Works Taken Possession of by the Government. The Arming of Union Men of Color. The Secretary of War's Opinion. Cameron's Frank Talk at Springfield. Stampede From Rebeldom. General Heintzelman's Division. Runaway Negroes. Beaufort to be a Port of Entry. No More Slave Catching by Our Troops. Conviction of a Slaver. The Rising in East Tennessee. Five Railroad Bridges Burned. The Cumberland Bridge Destroyed. Great Alarm Among the Traitors. Gen. Zollicoffer in Peril. News From the North Potomac. Arrest of Gen. McKinstry. The Fight at Piketon. The Great Expedition. Rebel Accounts of the Action. The Effect upon the Fire Eaters. Their Rage at Their Defeat. The Black Flag Raised by the Fiends. Union Prisoners to be Murdered. Col. Corcoran, Three Captains, and 18 Lieutenants Selected for Death. If the Savannah's Crew is Condemned, They Will be Hung. The Vessels Engaged in the Action. Sketches of Gen. Sherman and Staff. The Fleet at Beaufort. From Missouri. Gen. Hunter's First Official Orders. His Policy During the Kansas Invasions. Gen. Lane and the Irrepressible Negro. Tribute to a Dead Soldier. Col. Cochrane's Speech. Another Rebel Account of the Port Royal Battle. Map of Port Royal. Scene and Plan of the Battle. More content. Edge chipping and light wear.     


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a tree with numerous American flags in its branches with the names of the states of the U.S. on them. "Union" is in large red, white and blue stars and stripes letters to the right, and a verse below the tree reads, "Traitor! spare that Tree, Cleave not a single bough, In youth it sheltered me, and I'll protect it now." Published by Mumford & Co., Cincinnati. 5 1/2 x 3 1/4. 


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

12 handmade filet lace insert squares ci $10.00

 

CDV Senator Stephen A. Douglas

 

New York Daily Tribune, November 15, 186 $45.00

 

The Union Tree $8.00




(1826-85) Graduated in the West Point class of 1846 and fought in the Mexican War. Hailed at the beginning of the Civil War as the "Young Napoleon," he proved to be a brilliant military organizer, administrator, and trainer of men, but an officer totally lacking in the essential qualities of successful command of large forces in battle. He saw action at Rich Mountain, W.V., in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign and at the battle of Antietam, the bloodiest single day in American history. He was defeated for the presidency in 1864 by Abraham Lincoln.


Wet plate, albumen cabinet card photograph, mounted to 4 1/4 x 6 1/2 card. Bust view in civilian attire. Warren's imprint on the front mount. Period ink inscription below the portrait, "Genl. George B. McClellan, U.S." Backmark: Warren's Portraits, 465 Washington St., Boston. Very fine image.  


<b>Autographed by the author</b>


By William A. Frassanito. Published by Charles Scribner's Sons, New York. Hardcover with dust jacket, 304 pages, profusely illustrated. The dust jacket shows light discoloration and light wear. This book is from my own personal library and it has been autographed and presented to me by my old Gettysburg colleague, Bill Frassanito as follows, "Gettysburg, Pa., December 17, 1984, To Len- With best wishes, William A. Frassanito." My personal embossed library stamp is below the signature at the bottom corner of the page, "Library Of Leonard Rosa." The book is in excellent condition. An extremely desirable book which is a must have for any Antietam or Civil War Photographic library. This hardcover edition is long out of print.


In September of 1862, following Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's victory at Second Manassas, the Southern army turned northward in its first great invasion of the Civil War. The opposing Union army was commanded by Gen. George B. McClellan. In the battle that ensued in the fields and woods surrounding Sharpsburg, Maryland, and along Antietam Creek, 26,000 Union and Confederate soldiers were killed or wounded, making September 17, 1862, the bloodiest single day in American history- a distinction that has never been equaled.


Immediately following the battle two seasoned photographers, Alexander Gardner and James F. Gibson, recorded ninety five scenes of the freshly scarred battlefield and its environs. Their studies of dead soldiers were the first the American public had ever seen depicting the true carnage of war, and an exhibition of their work in a New York art gallery a month after the battle prompted a reporter to comment that if the photographers had not "brought bodies and laid them in our door-yards and along streets, they had done something very like it."


With the same analytical skill and meticulous historical research that earned his first book, Gettysburg, so much critical acclaim, William A. Frassanito re-creates the battle of Antietam through its photographs. By documenting the photographer, date, and camera location for each view, Frassanito provides a definitive report on the Antietam photographs and highlights Antietam's role as a landmark in the visual documentation of war.


Frassanito's treatment of the Antietam photographs, however, goes beyond the battle plan and the history of photography. To convey the personal tragedy that lies behind each photograph of the "Dead at Antietam," the talented author presents vignettes of some of the common soldiers who fought and died in the battle. Offering glimpses into men's private lives- their activities before the war, their military training and experiences, how their families coped with their deaths- Frassanito introduces us to the true subjects of Gardner's and Gibson's work at Antietam.


William A. Frassanito has been studying Civil War photography since the age of nine. He was educated at Gettysburg College and received his master's degree in American cultural history from the Cooperstown Graduate Program. He served as a lieutenant in the U.S. Army in both Germany and in Vietnam, where he was awarded the Bronze Star, he was assigned to the Joint Chiefs of Staff as an intelligence analyst. He is also the author of Gettysburg; A Journey in Time.


Front cover illustration: The grave of John Marshall, Company L, 28th Pennsylvania, by Alexander Gardner, September 19 or 20, 1862.


Back cover illustration: Antietam National Cemetery, Sharpsburg, Maryland.


  


<b>Written by an officer who was captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.!


"We have had it pretty hard for a few days as a good many troops are on extra duty and we have had to guard more than common as there was a report that there was some of the enemy not far off, but our scouts could not find them. I have been up half the night for 4 nights and one night all night, but I think we will have it easier soon as there is more troops coming in here and that will make the duty lighter."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, on regimental patriotic stationary, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, to his wife. 


<b><u>Head Quarters, 116th Reg't Ohio Vol. Inf., Co. C, Camp Ackenoe, June 5th, 1863</b></u>


My Dear and loving wife,


After my love to you I will tell you that I recd. your letter written on Sunday last and was glad to hear that you were well.  It found me well.  I have recd. two letters from you this week and this is the third letter I have written to you.  It is all the satisfaction I have either writing to you or reading your letters.  I do hope that I will get so near to you before long that I can dispense with writing for although it seems that you think that I donít try to get off.  I do want to get home and will as soon as I can with honor or decency, but I would rather stay here and bear the troubles for another year than to leave with such a name as some have done for I think that some that have left will not see much satisfaction if some of their men ever meet with them again.  Well Dear you said that you thought that I would not write about the Captain because he was a Mason, but that is a mistake for I donít know one man any better than another if his actions will not uphold him.  The truth of the matter as far as I know is this, the cars did not make the connection at Wheeling and so he had to lay over one day there which made him two days behind time.  He might have been drunk there, but he was sober enough when he came here, but Gen. Elliott was not willing for him to go and would not sign his papers so Gen. Milroy signed them and sent him without the consent of Elliott which I think made him mad at Cap and so he placed him under arrest which was very foolish for to keep him here idle for two or three weeks for two days absence it only makes it that much harder on Lieut. Mann and myself for we have to do the duty of all, but I think he will be returned to duty in a few days.  We have had it pretty hard for a few days as a good many troops are on extra duty and we have had to guard more than common as there was a report that there was some of the enemy not far off, but our scouts could not find them.  I have been up half the night for 4 nights and one night all night, but I think we will have it easier soon as there is more troops coming in here and that will make the duty lighter.  Well Dear I am sorry that you have had so much trouble to get your wood cut for you and I hope that it will not be long until I will cut it for you.  Dear I expect it did make you feel very bad to see folks going to meeting and you have to stay at home for it makes me feel mighty bad often to see men here with their wives and children about them.  Oh it makes me feel so lonely that I canít help but cry.  I go out almost every evening in the woods and read your last letters over and look at your likeness and kiss it and wish that it was you.  Well dear you might ask Jerry H. when he expects to go to England and report himself as the legal heir of the Earl of Kingswood for such he tried to pass himself for out here and that is one reason of his resigning and going home to prepare to leave.  Well Dear I must guess I read that long letter several times so write another long one for me.


From your loving husband,


Lieut. L. Lupton             


Very fine. Scarce regimental letter sheet. 


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.     


<b>Original 1859 woodcut engravings of slaves!</b>


Authentic, original woodcut engravings that were published on the front page of the November 19, 1859 issue of Harper's Weekly. EFFECT OF JOHN BROWN'S INVASION AT THE SOUTH! #1: "Much Obliged To Dar Ar Possum Wattomie For Dese Pikes He Gin Us- Dey's Turrible Handy To Dig Tatters Wid." #2: "What's Dem Fool Niggers Fraid On? I'd Like Ter See One O' Dem Folks Ondertake To Carry Me Off, I Would!" #3: A Southern Planter Arming His Slaves To Resist Invasion. 11 x 15 3/4. Harper's Weekly, date and their ornate illustrated mast head at the top. Historic and extremely desirable 1859 dated John Brown Invasion related illustrations on the entire front page of Harper's Weekly. Suitable for framing or display. RARE!

Photograph, General George B. McClellan $50.00

 

Antietam, The Photographic Legacy of Ame $125.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $125.00

 

Effect of John Brown's Invasion at the S $150.00




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