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Civil War patriotic imprint with "From U.S.A., At Camp, and State of" printed at the upper left corner. The object was for the soldier to write in the name of the camp he was stationed at, and the state in which it was located in on the lines provided after the imprint. 5 1/2 x 3 1/8.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Civil War patriotic imprint with a beautiful full color vignette of a spread winged eagle on top of an American shield with a riband with the slogan, "Liberty or Death." The outer edges of the imprint are adorned with red stars containing the names of the individual states of the Union at the start of the Civil War. Light staining. 5 1/2 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Civil War patriotic imprint with illustration of General John Pope. Light staining at the corners. 5 3/8 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


3 1/3 pages, 4 1/8 x 6 5/8, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, D.C., November 13, 1863


General Orders

No. 366


The following revised order is published for the guidance of Mustering and Disbursing Officers in relation to their expenditures from the appropriation for "collecting, drilling, and organizing volunteers," and all previous orders or regulations conflicting therewith are hereby revoked. Gives the details of the above order in 13 numbered sections. By Order of the Secretary of War. Signed in print by E.D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant General. Small stain at the top of each page and trimmed at the edge neither of which affects any of the content. Interesting 1863 imprint.

From U. S. A. $10.00

 

Liberty or Death $15.00

 

General John Pope $8.00

 

1863 Orders Regarding Drilling & Organiz $10.00




(1811-68) He served as chief of staff of General John C. Fremont in 1861. Appointed brigadier general on March 21, 1862, he was wounded while in command of a division at the battle of Pea Ridge, Arkansas. In 1863, he was in command at Columbus, Ky., and he later commanded the District of West Florida. In 1864, at the battle of Marianna, he was badly wounded in the left cheek bone and the left arm. He was appointed U.S. Minister to the Argentine Republic and Uruguay in 1866.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view pose. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York. Excellent condition.  <b>and Their Stories</b>


By Ronald S. Coddington, with a Foreword by Michael Fellman. The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, 2008. Hardcover with dust jacket, 288 pages, illustrated, index. Brand new condition. Excellent content.


"The history of the Civil War is the stories of its soldiers," writes Ronald S. Coddington in the preface to Faces of the Confederacy. This book tells the stories of seventy-seven Southern soldiers; young farm boys, wealthy plantation owners, intellectual elites, uneducated poor, who posed for photographic portraits, cartes de visite, to leave with family, friends, and sweethearts before going off to war. 


Coddington, a passionate collector of Civil War era photography, conducted a monumental search for these previously unpublished portrait cards, then unearthed the personal stories of their subjects, putting a human face on a war rife with inhumananity. 


The Civil War took the lives of 22 of every 100 men who served. Coddington follows the exhausted survivors as they return home to occupied cities and towns, ravaged farmlands, a destabilized economy, and a social order in the midst of upheaval. This book is a haunting and moving tribute to those brave men. 


Like its companion volume, Faces of the Civil War; An Album of Union Soldiers and Their Stories, this book offers readers a unique perspective on the war and contributes to a better understanding of the role of the common soldier.

 


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of an eagle clutching an American flag and swooping down on its prey, a buzzard clutching a Confederate flag. Light staining. 5 1/4 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Civil War patriotic imprint with fanciful vignette of a cherub and the motto "Union" within oval. 4 5/8 x 2 5/8.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

CDV General Alexander S. Asboth $65.00

 

Faces of the Confederacy; An Album of So

 

Union Eagle & Confederate Buzzard in Mor

 

Union




Civil War patriotic imprint with the above slogan in large letters across the top. Light staining. 5 1/4 x 3 1/8. Scarce.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of an eagle on an American shield with steamboat and train in the background. Motto below, "The Union Forever." Light staining. 4 5/8 x 2 5/8.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of a globe in the ocean with the motto, "Our Country" emblazoned across it and an American flag flying at the top of the globe. Union! in stars and stripes letters is printed at the top center. 5 3/8 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.    


Civil War patriotic imprint with the above motto spelled out in stars and stripes letters at the top. Vignette below of an Indian with headdress and an American flag. Light staining. Published by Magee, 316 Chestnut St., Phila. 5 1/2 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

The Great Rebellion Of 1862

 

The Union Forever

 

Our Country, Union

 

To The Gallant Dedicated Defenders of Ou

H 8in. x W 7in. x D 12in.  H 7in. x D 15in.  


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"I got a letter from old Andy Ault yesterday.  He is in Tennessee.  He says he is very tired of the war but is not willing to go home until the war is over, and I think according to the accounts in the papers that it will not be long until it will be settled.  There has been some little skirmishing between some of our cavalry and some of the Secesh about 12 miles from here, but they have not done much and I don’t think we will have any fighting in this part of the state."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, to his wife. 


<b><u>Winchester, Va., April 11th, 1863</b></u>


My Dear and loving wife,


After my love to you and the children I will inform you that I recd. your very acceptable letter of the 6th of this month which found me in good health and you better think it done me good to hear from home, although I was sorry to hear that you were no better.  I do hope and wish that your health would improve when the weather gets settled.  If you do not soon get better I wish you would send to the Dutch Doctor at Wheeling and I think he would help you.  Well dear this is the fourth letter I have written to you since I came back and I will try and write at least twice every week for it helps to pass the time away and it does me good to write home and to read letters from home.


8 o’clock at night- Dear I should not have written this tonight but our company is detailed to go on picket tomorrow, and Capt. and myself go with them, so I will not have time to write tomorrow.  It is a hard way of spending Sunday but we cannot help it and so we have to do the best we can and try to be satisfied or at least submit to our duty as best we may.  Well dear I got a letter from old Andy Ault yesterday.  He is in Tennessee.  He says he is very tired of the war but is not willing to go home until the war is over, and I think according to the accounts in the papers that it will not be long until it will be settled.  There has been some little skirmishing between some of our cavalry and some of the Secesh about 12 miles from here, but they have not done much and I don’t think we will have any fighting in this part of the state and to all appearances we will stay here a good while.  Well I think that Friend Nate had better be cautious how he tries fighting everybody that does not please him.  I had heard about their fuss but it was different from what you state for I think it was from some person who wanted to shield Nate.  It was said that Elihu drove along on the sidewalk and Nate wanted him to drive on the other side and after a while Elihu came back and dared Nate out to fight him and that Nate was going to pitch into him but Lidy Eaton got in between them and kept them from fighting but enough of this.  If Miss Frame thinks the letters that came from camp were so soft she may find some things hard enough for her when the boys get back to old Monroe.  She must be pretty hard up if she has to put up with old Moore.  Well I wrote a letter to Jim this afternoon and one to Barnesville to Mr. Stephens.  Well I must tell you what I had for supper this evening.  I bought a quart of milk for 10 cents and had bread and milk for supper.  I bought one pound of butter since I came back and paid 50 cents for it.  I tell you it tastes pretty strong of the green backs and we had to spread it so thin that I think I shall not buy any more soon, in fact everything is very high here, but I expect to try and live as cheap as possible.  Tell Mary that I will try and take care of her boy.  He told me to tell her that he has something like the ague, in fact he has been right poorly for two or three days.  So no more my Dear wife, but I remain your loving husband.


Lt. Lupton      


Light age toning and wear. 


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.      


<b>For Company F, commanded by Captain J. McLeod Turner, a Confederate officer who was wounded at New Bern, N.C., 2nd Manassas, and Fredericksburg, Va., and was wounded and captured while in command of the regiment during Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg!


He was pierced by 11 bullets during the War Between the States and survived to be confined in a Yankee prison!</b> 


7 3/4 x 6, in ink. Provision Return of Captain J. McLeod Turner's Co. F, 7th N.C.T., for 3 days commencing January 29th/62 & ending January 31st/62. Itemized account for the number of men and servants, for rations of fresh beef, pork, flour, beans, rice, rye, sugar, vinegar, candles, soap, salt, molasses and potatoes. J.M. Turner, Captain, Commanding Co. F. The A.C.S. will issue agreeably to the above return. Light age toning and wear. 


John McLeod Turner, was a 21 year old engineer, from Rowan County, N.C., when he enlisted on May 16, 1861, as a captain, and was commissioned into Co. F, 7th North Carolina Infantry. He was wounded on March 14, 1862, at New Bern, N.C.; wounded on Aug. 29, 1862, at 2nd Manassas; wounded on Dec. 13, 1862, at Fredericksburg, Va.; promoted to major, May 3, 1863; wounded and captured on July 3, 1863, at Gettysburg; hospitalized at Gettysburg; hospitalized at Baltimore, Md.; confined at Fort McHenry, Baltimore; transferred to Fort Delaware, Del., Sept. 10, 1864; promoted to lieutenant colonel, Nov. 28, 1864; paroled on May 1, 1865, at Salisbury, N.C. <b><i>During the War Between The States, Captain Turner was pierced by 11 bullets, and was partially paralyzed!</b></i> 


The hard fought 7th North Carolina Infantry took an active part in the fight at New Bern, then moved to Virginia where they became part of the Army of Northern Virginia. After fighting at Hanover Court House, the regiment participated in the various campaigns of the A.N.V. from the Seven Days Battles to Cold Harbor, and were also involved in the siege of Petersburg. They suffered 51 casualties at New Bern, 253 out of the 450 engaged during the Seven Days Battles, 69 at 2nd Manassas, 52 at Sharpsburg, 86 at Fredericksburg, 37 killed and 127 wounded at Chancellorsville, of the 291 engaged at Gettysburg, 31% fell, 5 were killed and 62 wounded in the Wilderness, and 11 were killed and 28 wounded at Spotsylvania. On Feb. 26, 1865, the regiment was sent back to North Carolina where they eventually surrendered with the Army of Tennessee with 13 officers and 139 men. A detachment of the unit had also been left with the A.N.V. and they surrendered with only 1 officer and 18 men left.

H 8in. x W 7in. x D 12in. $0.00

 

H 7in. x D 15in. $0.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $95.00

 

7th North Carolina Infantry Provision Re




<b>U.S. Congressman from New York</b>


(1813-98) A lawyer, he was a devout Democrat and upheld the Southern point of view on most issues. He served as a U.S. Congressman from New York from 1857-61, firmly supporting states rights. A delegate to the Democratic convention of 1860, he believed the North was responsible for Southern discontent. Despite these feelings, when secession became a reality, he supported the Union, and recruited the 65th New York Infantry, and served as their first colonel. He was promoted to brigadier general of U.S. Volunteers on June 11, 1862. In the interim he commanded his regiment at Seven Pines during the Peninsular campaign, and served with General John Newton's division of the 6th Corps at Fredericksburg. Resigning from the army due to ill health, he was soon elected attorney general of New York. The following year he was nominated for vice president, running with John C. Fremont, but the ticket was withdrawn before the election, and Cochrane actively supported Abraham Lincoln for reelection.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 4 1/4 x 1 1/2, in ink, J[o]hn. Cochrane, New York C[i]ty. Light age toning.   


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"Gen. Milroy is sending the Secesh out of town. He has got his wife and family here with him. There was some Secesh women in town who threatened to scold Mrs. Milroy if she came about their houses so the old General just sent them out of the lines and moved into their houses himself."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, to his wife. 


<b><u>Winchester, Va., April 9th/63</b></u>


My Dear and loving wife,


After my love to you and the children I will inform you that I am well at present and hope this letter may find you the same.  I have not heard a word from home since I left which is twelve days and I am very anxious to hear from home for it seems like a long time since I seen you or heard from home, but I think I will get a letter this evening however. I hope I will.  Dear we have had plenty bad weather here since I got back.  We had a big snow on Sunday and there is a good deal of it on the ground yet and the wind blows so strong here that it makes it very chilly to stand on guard.  I was out on Tuesday and Tuesday night.  I was pretty cold but we got along first rate, but I tell you it makes a fellow think of home and wish he was there with my little family and I do hope that it will not be long before I have that privilege.  The present appearances at this time is that we will stay here for some time.  Gen. Milroy is sending the Secesh out of town.  He has got his wife and family here with him.  There was some Secesh women in town who threatened to scold Mrs. Milroy if she came about their houses so the old General just sent them out of the lines and moved into their houses himself.  The old lady and one of their daughters were in camp yesterday.  They are very plain folks.  Mrs. Milroy looks some like old Mrs. Vanhorn.  She is quite gray headed, the daughter is a young woman.  She looks like she might be 17 or 18 years old.  She is not at all handsome and she has the St. Vitus dance or a nervous affliction of the face very much like Magy had a year or two ago.  Her and her mother brought out testimonials and tracts for the soldiers.  They gave testaments to all that had none and tracts to all and hymn books to a great many.  There was a Lieut. of Artillery along with them.  He gave me a handful of tracts for the boys.  I will send you one of them in this.  Well some people have commenced to make gardens out here, but it is so cold that I do not think anything can grow.  There is one man that has cabbage and tomato plants about large enough to set out.  He has them in hot beds with glass over them.  It don’t seem hardly worthwhile for the people to plant anything here for the soldiers will be very apt to pitch in and help themselves as soon as things are fit to eat.  I do not see how the people are to live in this country through next winter for they cannot raise but very little grain here this summer and if the war does not end pretty soon the poorer class must suffer for something to eat.  We ought to be very thankful that we did not live in the states where the war was carried on for it is a most distressing thing to see so much destruction of property of all kinds.  Well dear, I must bring my letter to a close as I have not much that is interesting to tell you at this time.  Hoping to hear from you soon.  Give my love to Father, kiss the little Gen. for me and remember me in your prayers and may the good Lord keep you safe is the prayer of your loving husband.


Lieut. L. Lupton      


Light age toning, staining and wear. 


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.      


10 1/2 x 8 1/2, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


Special Requisition For Quartermaster's Stores for Company I, 1st S.C.V., Stationed in the Field. Itemized account for jackets, pants, shoes, drawers and socks. 


I certify that the above Requisition is correct, and that the articles are absolutely requisite for the public service. Signed by Wallace J. Delph, Lt. Comdg. Co. I, 1st S.C.V.


Capt. R.E.B. Hewetson, A.Q.M., will issue the articles specified in the above Requisition. Signed by A.P. Butler, Maj. Commanding.


The reverse panel on this special requisition indicates that it was for the 2nd quarter of 1864. At this time the 1st South Carolina Infantry were stationed in Virginia.


Light age toning and wear with some archival tape repair on the folds on the reverse. Fine Confederate document from a very desirable regiment. Printed on brown "necessity paper." 


The hard fought 1st South Carolina Infantry Regiment fought with the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days' Battles to Cold Harbor, and in the Petersburg and Appomattox campaigns. The regiment lost 20 killed, and 133 wounded during the Seven Days' battles; had 53% disabled of the 283 engaged at 2nd Manassas and Ox Hill; it had 4 killed and 30 wounded at Sharpsburg; it sustained 73 casualties at Fredericksburg; and 104 at Chancellorsville; then lost 34% of the 328 engaged at Gettysburg; they had 16 killed and 114 wounded at the Wilderness; 19 killed and 51 wounded at Spotsylvania; and they surrendered on April 9, 1865, at Appomattox Court House with 18 officers and 101 men.


Source: Units of the Confederate States Army

 


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of a spread winged eagle, American shield and ships in the background. "Victory" in stars and stripes letters at the upper right. Light staining. 5 3/8 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

Autograph, General John Cochrane $35.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $115.00

 

1st South Carolina Infantry Special Requ $65.00

 

Victory




<b>Created the Atlantic Telegraph Company and laid the first telegraph cable across the Atlantic Ocean


1863 letter written to James T. Ames, head of the famous Ames Mfg. Co.</b>


(1819-92) Born in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, he was a famous American businessman and financier who created the Atlantic Telegraph Company and laid the first telegraph cable across the Atlantic Ocean in 1858.


7 1/2 x 9 3/4, in ink, Civil War date letter signed. Written to James T. Ames, head of the famous Ames Mfg. Co. regarding the Williams bullet!


<b><u>New York, Jany. 6, 1863</b></u>


My dear Sir,


Your letter of 2nd ultimo was received by me just as I was leaving London for home. 


The interest in the Williams Bullet which I offered to you, and which you declined, was purchased by other parties, but when I see them will ascertain whether they will sell any portion.


It will give me pleasure to se you when in New York.


I remain,

Very truly your friend,


Cyrus W. Field


[to] James T. Ames, Esq.

Chicopee, Mass.


Light age toning and wear. Very minor paper loss at lower left corner of the letter which does not affect any of the content.


Very interesting war date letter from Cyrus W. Field to James T. Ames regarding the Williams bullet which was used during the Civil War.


James T. Ames (1810-83) was the head of the Ames Manufacturing Company from 1847-1874. Their historic sword and armament factory was located at 5-7 Springfield Street, Chicopee, Mass. 


* Comes with a complete issue of Harper's Weekly (16 pages) dated August 21, 1858, with a beautiful front page illustration of Cyrus W. Field. There are also some other illustrations and related stories regarding Mr. Field in this newspaper.


** Also comes with a newspaper clipping from the Chester Times, Chester, Pa., dated Wednesday, July 13, 1892, announcing the death of Cyrus W. Field. The article also includes an illustration of Mr. Field.


  


Civil War patriotic imprint with ornate full color vignette of an American eagle, shield and flags. Light staining. 5 1/2 x 3 1/4.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


By Roy Meredith. Published by The Fairfax Press, New York, 1981. Hardcover with dust jacket, 144 pages, with 125 illustrations. Very fine to excellent.


Robert E. Lee must be regarded as one of the most photogenic of great men, but in the early and clumsy days of the photographic process he was a most reluctant subject. Making a plate was a slow and tedious business, and Lee did not like to pose for his picture. He equally disliked sitting for a painter of portraits. In consequence it had been supposed that the authentic pictorial record of him was very meager. On the contrary, more than a year of research has disclosed an impressive amount of material. Roy Meredith presents the existing daguerreotypes, photographs, and paintings made from life, and many of the lithographs, engravings and sculptures. There are some likenesses that to the general public have been little known or quite unknown. Originally published in 1947, "The Face of Robert E. Lee" has now been revised with a new foreword and a new section of striking illustrations.  


 


Civil War patriotic imprint with the motto as above in stars and stripes letters. Published by Magee, 316 Chestnut St., Phila. Light staining at the corners. 5 3/8 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

Autograph, Cyrus W. Field $495.00

 

Eagle, American Shield & Flags

 

The Face of Robert E. Lee In Life and Le $35.00

 

The Government & Flag Must & Shall Be Su




Imprinted envelope with vignette of horse drawn stage coach with imprint above, Pacific Stage & Express Co. and Paid below. Excellent condition.  H 42in.. x W 14in. x W 6in.  H 43in. x D 7in

4 AVAILABLE

PRICE FOR EACH ITEM  H 34in. x D 25in

VERY COOL AND OLD

Imprinted Cover, Pacific Stage & Express $35.00

 

H 42in. . x W 14in. x W 6in. $0.00

 

CHROME PENDANT EDISON BULB $350.00

 

ARTS AND CRAFTS HANGING LIGHT $2500.00

H 64in. x D 8in.

CIRCA 1920

PRICE PER PAIR  H 38in. x D 14in.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of a female blowing a horn while riding on the back of an eagle with a riband in its mouth with the slogan, "Freedmen To The Rescue." Published by James Gates, Cincinnati. 5 3/8 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.    


Bust view of General McClellan in uniform on the obverse with his name, Geo. B. McClellan above, and the year 1863 below. Army & Navy within wreath design with crossed sabers and anchor on the reverse. The token retains much of its original luster. Rare to find this nice.

MONUMENTAL PENDANT LIGHTS $12500.00

 

H 38in. x D 14in. $0.00

 

Freedmen to the Rescue

 

1863 Civil War Patriotic Token, General $150.00




Excellent vignette of the monitor flying the American flag with stars above and the year 1863 below, on the obverse. "Our Navy" within wreath on the reverse. Very high grade condition.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignettes of an American flag, an Indian wearing headdress, etc. 5 1/2 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with illustration of General Joseph K.F. Mansfield. Published by Magee, 316 Chestnut St., Phila. Light staining and wear at the corners. 5 1/4 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.


WBTS Trivia: General Mansfield commanded the 12th Corps at the battle of Antietam, and led his command into action to support Hooker's 1st Corps. Seeing his raw recruits waver, he rode into the fray where the action was the hottest. Mansfield was shot down and died from his wounds the next day, September 18, 1862.

  


  


(1805-1871) Graduated in the West Point class of 1825. He participated in the Black Hawk, Florida and Mexican Wars and was twice brevetted for gallantry. In November 1860, he was ordered to Charleston Harbor to command the three United States forts there; Castle Pickney, Fort Moultrie, and Fort Sumter, in the face of South Carolina's imminent secession. Anderson refused a formal demand for his surrender and in the early morning hours of April 12, 1861, Fort Sumter was bombarded, and the Civil War began. His small garrison withstood 36 hours under fire before being compelled to surrender. Anderson became a national hero for his gallant actions. He personally raised the U.S. flag over Fort Sumter on April 14, 1865, exactly four years after he had hauled it down.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Standing view in uniform, wearing overcoat, and holding bummer's kepi at his waist. Backmark: E. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative from Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Sharp image. Desirable pose.

1863 Civil War Patriotic Token, Monitor

 

Union, Liberty, One Flag, One Country $15.00

 

General Joseph K. F. Mansfield $10.00

 

CDV General Robert Anderson $100.00




Civil War patriotic imprint with illustration of the commander of the U.S.S. Monitor, John L. Worden. Imprint below the illustration, Lieut. Worden of the Monitor. Light staining and wear. 5 3/8 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   An exceptional example of Clewell’s Pat. May 3, 1876 ice cream dipper.  Remaining in nearly as new condition with the exception of pleasing evidence of age and originality, this antique ice cream scoop will set in nicely in any early country store grouping, with period kitchen things or offers a treat to the antique tin collector.  When George William Clewell of Philadelphia invented this first device that would dispense ice cream using a single utensil, he joined with local tinsmith Valentine Clad, to manufactured this dipper.  The old <I>hot dip</I> tinning method reduced the CLEWELL'S PAT MAY 3 1876 - V. CLAD MAKER  marking embossed on the handle illegible but faintly identifiable to the experienced collector.  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 A classic all original pair just as they were carried in the period and just as they have remained together for the decades since they were laid away in domed leather trunk storage, the new owner may wish to polish the original silvered brass frames and spruce up the surface of the old iron case but we are offering this wonderful pair of 18th century tinted spectacles and case just as they came out of attic storage, age patina untouched, as found and except for a gentle swipe with a damp cotton cloth would leave all as is.  A rare opportunity for the collector / historian who appreciates the preservation of pure 18th century personal items, this set will serve as a wonderful accent laid in with Revolutionary War era relics, on a period book or desk top. (Illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison.) <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !   Shown here with a quarter for size comparison, we have the advantage of being able to unquestionably date the period of this pair of antique, hand cut, bone dice by virtue of the <U>faint but discernable*</U> <B>CROWN</B>&</B> G. R.</B> marking on each of the two gaming pieces.  (These marks were required by British export law during the American Civil War era to record and enforce payment of export tax on gaming devices sent to the American market.)  A staple of the Civil War camp or period saloon this original period pair remain in excellent condition and yet demonstrate all the characteristics of period hand cut bone gaming pieces.  Clearly hand cut with dots that are somewhat irregular, these dice will be quickly recognized for what they are in your collection display.  [*Please note that the original CROWN & GR tariff marks were small and were impressed into the bone with red pigment rubbed into the light impression.  With time and use most if not all of the original red pigment has been worn away in most cases leaving the faintest trace of the original CROWN & GR.  We have taken care to illustrate well, the markings here as you will find them upon examination of the originals. ] 

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

Lieutenant John L. Worden, Commander of $10.00

 

c. 1870s antique ICE CREAM DIPPER

 

18th century TINTED SPECTACLES in their $245.00

 

Tariff Marked – American Civil War vinta $75.00

A wonderful period political / patriotic item, this attractive old single horse harness rosette sports the image of Abraham Lincoln sealed under heavy glass.  Illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison this offering displays good evidence of age and period use yet remains in eye appealing condition.  A scarce item for the Lincoln collector, this piece will fit well in any Civil War, Political or Americana grouping.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  


<CENTER><FONT COLOR=#800000>If you have an interest in neat Civil War period things or Maine in the time, you may enjoy our museum site at:</FONT COLOR=#800000></CENTER>

<CENTER><B><I>MaineLegacy.com</I></B></CENTER>

 Our photographs will likely do best to describe this rare old Confederate percussion revolver holster. (We have laid a revolver on the holster in one of our photographs for size comparison.) Crafted from dark brown saddle leather in the classic military fashion of the period, this offering sports the hand stitched belt loop and <U>lead closure finial</U> that collectors of Confederate material like to see.  With good evidence of age, originality and period use, (stitching at the main seam has separated and there is some flaking at the flap fold, the holster remains in pleasing condition with good eye appeal. (The stitching could be easily restored and the leather remains solid and pliable throughout.)  A tough item to find, this classic old Confederate accoutrement will make a desirable addition to any quality Civil War grouping.   

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !


<CENTER><FONT COLOR=#800000>If you have an interest in neat Civil War period things or Maine in the time, you may enjoy our museum site at:</FONT COLOR=#800000></CENTER>

<CENTER><B><I>MaineLegacy.com</I></B></CENTER>

 


Brass token with vignette of Liberty encircled by stars with the year 1849 on the obverse. The reverse has vignette of a miner panning for gold with his tools visible, a tree in the background, and California at the top and the year 1849 at the bottom. 7/8 inches in diameter. Very fine. Desirable California gold rush related token.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with UNION! in huge striped letters with shadow effect across the top. 5 3/8 x 3. Scarce.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

period Abraham Lincoln – HARNESS ROSETTE $195.00

 

Civil War CONFEDERATE HOLSTER $850.00

 

1849 California Gold Rush Token $95.00

 

Union




Civil War patriotic imprint with illustrations of Union Generals' John Pope, Albin F. Schoepf and Charles F. Smith. Published by Chas. Magnus, 12 Frankfort St., N.Y. Light staining at the corners. 5 1/2 x 3. Scarce.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with illustrations of Union Generals' Samuel D. Sturgis, James Shields and Jesse L. Reno. Published by Chas. Magnus, 12 Frankfort St., N.Y. Light staining. Tiny tear at left edge has been repaired on the reverse with archival document tape.  5 1/4 x 3. Scarce.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.  


WBTS Trivia: General Reno was mortally wounded while leading his men into Fox's Gap in South Mountain on September 14, 1862, during the Antietam campaign.

 


Brass store token with an excellent vignette of a building and Boy's Clothing, Shirts, Fine Trunks, Umbrellas, &c. on one side, and Robt. Pitkin, Clothing And Furnishing Goods, 15 Camp St., New Orleans on the opposite side. Uncirculated with some luster. Circa 1850-1860. Scarce Antebellum New Orleans merchant token.   


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a spread winged eagle and American shield. Camp Cadwalader, Beverly, N.J. is printed in blue at upper edge. Published by Magee, 316 Chestnut St., Phila. 5 3/8 x 3. Light staining.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

Generals' Pope, Schoepf & C. F. Smith

 

Generals' Sturgis, Shields & Reno

 

Merchant Token, Robert Pitkin, New Orlea

 

Camp Cadwalader, Beverly, N. J. $15.00




Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a Union sailor holding an American flag with maiden sitting at his feet, anchor and masthead in the background with the slogan, "Don't give up the Ship!" Light staining. 5 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.  


Indian with headdress and Frederick Rollwagen, Jr. and the year 1863 on the obverse. 587 Third Avenue And 20 & 21 Centre Market, N.Y. on the reverse. Fine. Scarce.  H 36in. x D 12in.

QUANTITY AVAILABLE....1 OF 9  H 19in. x W 12in. x D 24in.

GOOSENECKS AVAILABLE IN QUANTITY WITH VARIOUS SHADES

Don't Give Up The Ship

 

1863 Civil War Merchant Token, Frederick $45.00

 

VINTAGE HANGING LIGHT $650.00

 

INDUSTRIAL WALL LIGHT $450.00

H 8in. x w 8in. x D 14in.


pivot connector at shade....shade is mint  H 30in. x D 12in.  <b>as Soldiers of the U.S. Army</b>


8 pages, 4 1/4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, October 13, 1863


General Orders

No. 336


I..Before a Military Commission, which convened in the city of Washington, D.C., September 7, 1863, pursuant to Special Orders, No. 390, dated August 31, 1863, and No. 399, dated September 5, 1863, War Department, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, and of which Major General C.C. Augur, U.S. Volunteers, is President, were arraigned and tried-


1. Thomas Kane, a civilian


2. William McNellis, a civilian


The document gives the full details of the charges, specifications, findings, and sentences of these two men.


Both men were charged with "procuring the payment of fraudulent claims by the United States" by falsifying documents for soldiers in the 3rd U.S. Infantry in order to receive payments from the U.S. Government.


Both men were found guilty on all of the charges and were sentenced "to be imprisoned for five years in the Penitentiary at Albany, New York, or in such other place as may be designated by the proper authority."


"The proceedings, findings, and sentences in the above cases are approved, and the sentences will be carried into execution. 


The Military Governor of the District of Columbia will send the prisoners, Thomas Kane and William McNellis, under proper guard, to Albany, N.Y., and deliver them to the Warden of the Penitentiary."


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:


E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


There are two very tiny punch holes at the left edge, and some minor edge chipping, none of which affect the content. 


 


  


  H 6in. x W 15in. x D 6in

PRICED PER ITEM...2 AVAILABLE

FROM SAKS 5TH AVENUE STORE

industrial wall light $350.00

 

VINTAGE FACTORY LIGHT $450.00

 

Charges Brought Against 2 Civilians For

 

OVERHEAD WALL SCONCES $600.00

H 28in. x D 16in.

GREAT QUALITY IN OLD BRASS AND ART GLASS PETALS

REWIRED AND READY TO GO

A REAL JEM  H 11in. x W 8in. x D 12in.

READY TO GO....COOL

PRICE PER PAIR  H 11in. x W 5in. x D 7in.

ORIGINAL RED INDUSTRIAL LENS  H 10in. x W 13in. x D 6in.

QUANTITY AVAILABLE

VINTAGE FLOWERED LIGHT $1850.00

 

SET OF INDUSTRIAL SCONCES $475.00

 

INDUSTRIAL WALL LIGHT $700.00

 

INDUSTRIAL WALL LIGHT $250.00




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