View Orders Back to AntiqueArts Home Page Come and view all that's new! Come and view all that's new! More than 135 upscale Antiques shops Would you like to sell your antiques here? A guide to more than 40,000 antique shops nationwide Have a question or suggestion? A comprehensive guide to antiques resources on the World Wide Web
Antique Arts Showcase
What's New in the Collector's Showcase?
The Most Recent Additions to This Category are First!


 Architectural Antiques
 Art
 Arts & Crafts Era
 Art Deco
 Autographs
 Bed Bath & Vanity
 Books
 China & Dinnerware
 Clocks & Watches
 Coins & Currency
 Cultures & Ethnicities
 Dolls
 Figurines
 Furniture & Accessories
 Glass
 Jewelry
 Lamps & Lighting
 Memorabilia
 Metalware
 Militaria
 Miscellaneous
 Music Related
 Paper & Ephemera
 Photographica
 Political
 Porcelain & Pottery
 Religious
 Silver
 Textiles
 Toys




By Mary Chestnut. Edited by C. Vann Woodward. Published by Yale University Press, New Haven, Conn., 1981. Hard cover, dust jacket, 886 pages, index, illustrated front piece. Winner of the 1982 Pulitzer Prize in History. Excellent.


The incomparable Civil War diarist Mary Chestnut wrote that she had the luck "always to stumble in on the real show." Married to a high-ranking member of the Confederate government, she was ideally placed to watch and to record the South's headlong plunge to ruin, and she left in her journals an unsurpassed account of the old regime's death throes, its moment of high drama in world history.


In her own circles- aristocratic, patriarchal, slave-holding, Mary Chestnut was a figure of heresy and of paradox. She had a horror of slavery and called herself an abolitionist from early youth. Against male domination she expressed her rebellion in some of the most vehement feminist writing of her time; "There is no slave after all like a wife," she declared. A passionate participant in events, she was also a detached observer of all the strata of her society. The cast of characters that her journals endowed with such vigorous life and reality includes slaves and brown half-brothers, poor whites and sand-hillers, common soldiers and solid yeoman, as well as the elite government, army, and society who thronged her drawing room daily.


In Mary Chestnut's Civil War, C. Vann Woodward provides the first full and reliable edition of the journals, making use of surviving parts of four manuscript versions. He restores significant passages from the original diary of the 1860's, which was written in the heat of the moment and revealed much that the author suppressed in the version intended for publication.


Greatly gifted in intellect, charm, and independence of mind, Mary Chestnut was also a born writer. In this edition, her journals can finally claim their place in American literature as well as American history.  


T-54. Richmond, December 2, 1862. Vignette of Confederate Secretary of State, Judah P. Benjamin. Shows circulation wear, edge chipping and light staining. G.  


<b>The Little Giant!</b>


(1813-1861) An outstanding legislator, and orator, he was one of the founders of the Democratic Party in Illinois. Served as U.S. Senator, 1843-61. He is best known for his debates in 1858 against Abraham Lincoln. He was narrowly defeated for the Democratic nomination for president by Franklin Buchanan in 1856. He did gain the Democratic nomination in 1860, but was defeated for the presidency by his old friend and rival Abraham Lincoln. Upon secession, and the outbreak of the Civil War, he supported Lincoln and his policies. He died of typhoid fever in 1861.


Portrait engraving, full standing view, with printed facsimile autograph below his likeness which was taken from the latest photograph from life. Published by Johnson, Fry & Co., New York, 1862. 7 3/4 x 10 1/2. Light age toning. Very fine.  


Middletown Point, N.J. Keyport & Middletown Point Steamboat Co. Key Point, Nov. 20th, 1862. Vignette of steamboat at left. Crisp uncirculated.

Mary Chestnut's Civil War $35.00

 

1862 Confederate $2 Note $35.00

 

Senator Stephen A. Douglas $15.00

 

1862 Farmers & Merchants Bank, New Jerse $35.00




Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a Union sailor standing on rope ladder and waving his cap with large waving American flag behind him. UNION in stars and stripes letters at top center. Published by Magee, 316 Chestnut St., Phila. Staining at the corners. 5 1/4 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Bust of Indian with headdress and the slogan, United We Stand, and 1863 date on the obverse. One Country, Broas Pie Baker, 131 41st St., N.Y. on the reverse. Very fine.  


<b>Written by Clark S. Edwards, Colonel of the regiment


He commanded the 5th Maine during the battle of Gettysburg!


Promoted to Brevet Brigadier General


"Alexandria is an old looking place. It is deserted now since Col. Ellsworth was killed. His Zouaves are in camp in a few rods of our quarters.  They have built a fort near us. It is a hard looking place. Alexandria is on the river. The grass is all growed up in the street. I passed the house where Ellsworth was killed."</b>  


(1824-1903) Clark S. Edwards was 37 years old when the news of the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter reached the small town of Bethel, Maine.  He was high on a ladder shingling his roof and he immediately climbed down, obtained permission from the appropriate authorities to form a company of volunteers, and set out to gather recruits from Bethel and the surrounding towns.  This group of men became Company I, of the 5th Maine Volunteer Infantry, with Edwards commissioned as their captain on June 24, 1861.  He rose through the ranks and was appointed colonel of the regiment, on January 8, 1863, commanding the 5th Maine Infantry from that date forward. He was promoted to brevet brigadier general, on March 13, 1865, for his gallant and meritorious Civil War service record.


The 5th Regiment Maine Volunteer Infantry was one of the first Maine regiments to be mustered into the Union Army.  They fought in many battles from 1st Bull Run to Petersburg.  During the battle of Rappahannock Station the regiment is credited with capturing 4 Confederate battle flags and 1,200 prisoners.  Known as one of Maine's best fighting regiments, it captured more prisoners than the entire number of men who served in the regiment, and three times the number of battle flags than any other Maine regiment.  After three long years of hard fought service only 193 men were mustered out of the regiment when their term of service expired.  Among their battle honors are written the names of 1st Bull Run, Gaines' Mill, 2nd Bull Run, Crampton's Gap, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Rappahannock Station, Rapidan Crossing, Mine Run, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor and Petersburg.


3 plus pages, 7 3/4 x 9 3/4, in ink. 


<b><u>Alexandria, [Va.], July 10th, 1861


Aquia Springs, Head Quarters of Co. I, 5[th] Me.</b></u>


Dear wife,


I take this opportunity to write you as perhaps I cannot have a chance again for a week.  We left Meridian Hill yesterday at five o’clock.  We struck our tents on Meridian Hill at two o’clock yesterday morning, then came from Washington to the city of Alexandria in a government boat.  We left Washington at ½ bef. seven o’clock, arrived in the city of Alexandria about nine, left Alexandria for this place at ½ past nine, arrived here at noon, pitched our tents at five last night.  Soon after we got into camp.  There were one of the southern showers came on.  It lasted about one & a half hours, rained as fast as you ever saw it for that length of time.  It is a very beautiful scenery between Washington and Alexandria.  Arlington Heights is on the right or so of the Potomac between Washington & Alexandria.  It is a beautiful country here.  The farmers are harvesting.  I bought apples that were ripe yesterday.  Alexandria is an old looking place.  It is deserted now since Col. Ellsworth was killed.  His Zouaves are in camp in a few rods of our quarters.  They have built a fort near us.  It is a hard looking place. Alexandria is on the river.  The grass is all growed up in the street.  I passed the house where Ellsworth was killed.  I have not received but one letter from you yet, but I shall expect one tonight.  Hope I shall get a long one.  I shall write you as often as two or three times.  You write me all the news you think of.  I shall write you all of the news and give you a history of the country as we pass through it.  We are near the Potomac River.  It is all in sight of our camp.  There are two other Maine Reg. near us, the Maine First is in Washington.  The Mass. 5 is about one mile no.[rth] of us.  I shall go over to see Geo. Thompson in a day or two.  Marshall was in our camp yesterday.  He is in camp near us in the Me. 1st Regt.  It is a great country here.  I just paid twenty five cts. a doz. for eggs, ten cts. a quart for milk, & twelve cts. a quart for blackberries, 38 cts. a lb. for butter.  Everything is very high here & cost almost everything to live, but this is a beautiful country, but the settlement is very sparse, the plantations miles apart.  The people are about all secessionist in this part, but they all appear to show the colors.  One of the men in the company had his arm shot off by accident, but will get well again.  I think we shall go out on a scouting party on Friday.  The Saco Co. is out today.  We shall stay here I think about ten days.  We shall go on to Richmond in a short time.  Shall fight our way through.  Bound to put it along.  The boys are getting along pretty well, some are sick. 

 

Saturday Morning, July 13


You see this letter was commenced three days ago.  I was called upon while writing to go out on a picket guard.  Was out with all of my company and half of the [?] Co. was called in yesterday at two o’clock and left our camp at A.[quia] Springs for this place at four o’clock on some platform cars on the Alexandria R.R.  Came on the road about five or six miles.  We are now within six miles of Fairfax C.[ourt] Hose.  There are now fifteen thousand troops at that place.  I was out about all night last night.  I got but little sleep, only by day.  I have been out the most of these nights past.  I have just been called upon to go to lead two companies on a guard to guard a bridge.  I can not write any more now, but will write as soon as I get in.  I have but little rest of late, but am pretty well.  The boys steal all they can get hold of.  Shot a nice pig yesterday morning.  They get any amount of fowl.  Hard boys I tell you.  I should like to write more but cannot.


Good-by,

C.S. Edwards


Light age toning and wear. Very fine content.    





 


<b>Captured during the Civil War and later escaped!


United States Congressman from North Carolina</b>


(1822-1901) Born in Buncombe County, N.C., he completed preparatory studies and was engaged in the mercantile business. He enlisted in the Union Army in 1863, was captured in east Tennessee while raising a regiment of Union Volunteers and imprisoned. He made his escape on November 14, 1864, again joined the Union forces in Cumberland, Md., and after the war returned to North Carolina. He was a member of the North Carolina State Convention in 1865, and was elected as a Republican to the 39th U.S. Congress, but was unable to take his seat as North Carolina had not yet been readmitted to the Union. He was re-elected and served in the 40th U.S. Congress (1867-68) which was the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress, and he also served in the 41st U.S. Congress (1869-70).


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 3/8 x 3, in ink, A.H. Jones, North Carolina. Very fine.

Union Sailor $8.00

 

1863 Civil War Patriotic Merchant Token,

 

5th Maine Infantry Letter $125.00

 

Autograph, Alexander Hamilton Jones $25.00

Moore Insurance Desk, beautifully executed in walnut and burl with inset panels, full interior complete with cubby holes and incised drawers, with Sliding table, writing surface is gold tool green leather top. 


Moore designed most of his desks to accommodate two workers, one seated, one standing.


"This style contains, as do ALL MOORE DESKS, A SOLID COMFORTABLE SLIDING TABLE. This feature will be appreciated by every business man, and No Desk can be Complete without it"


Manufactured by the Moore Combination Desk Company, 82 East Market Street, Indianapolis, Indiana.


Dimension:

52" H x 48" W x 43" D  closed

52" H x 99" W x 46" D  open  


Bust of George Washington encircled by stars and 1863 date on the obverse, with Wilson's 1 Medal within wreath on the reverse. Very fine.  Lovely carved figural "Atlas" executive desk executed in mahogany.  A "Best of the Best" desk, monumental in size, detail, and quality. This magnificent piece features raised panels, solid bronze hardware, legal size drawers and a gold tooled leather top.


Dimensions:  31"H x 85"W x 48"D  


T-18. Richmond, Va., September 23, 1861. Vignette of large sailing ship at center, sailor at capstan at left. This is a contemporary (NOT A FAKE) counterfeit produced and circulated during the War Between the States to help undermine the C.S.A. currency and their economy. Most were produced from wooden plates by the master counterfeiter S.C. Upham of Philadelphia. Very fine example. (CT18/132B) reference number used in "A Guide Book of Counterfeit Confederate Currency," by George B. Tremmel.

Moore General Insurance Desk -Patented A $35000.00

 

1863 Civil War Patriotic Token, George W

 

Carved 19th C. Mahogany Executive Antiqu $22500.00

 

1861 Confederate Counterfeit $20 Note $150.00






<b>With Louisville, Kentucky imprint</b>


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view, in uniform, with shoulder straps. Backmark: Campbell & Ecker, Photographers, 407 Main Street, Louisville, Kentucky, with 2 cents blue George Washington, U.S. Inter. Rev. tax stamp. Very fine.


Pencil identification on the reverse: 1st Lt. John W. Gilman, Q.M., 31st Iowa. This image came from a 31st Iowa Infantry cdv album and comes with the original album page (torn) (front of page only) with identification below the image, "John Gilman, A.A. Q.M., Co. B."


John W. Gilman, was a 25 year old resident of Cedar Falls, Iowa, when he enlisted as a private, on August 6, 1862, and was mustered into Co. B, 31st Iowa Infantry. He was promoted to commissary sergeant, January 9, 1863; 2nd lieutenant, March 31, 1863; 1st lieutenant, June 9, 1863; quartermaster, July 11, 1863; and was mustered out of the service with the 31st Iowa Infantry, at Louisville, Ky., on June 27, 1865.


The 31st Iowa Infantry Regiment received much praise for its noteworthy conduct seeing much action during the Civil War. Among its battle honors were Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, Roswell, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Savannah and the 1865 Carolina's campaign.  


A. Killeen, No. 1 & 16 Ferry St., Greenpoint on one side, and Good For 1 Cent on the opposite. I believe this may have been a ferry company that ran boats from Brooklyn to Manhattan. Circa 1863. Very fine.   <b>in the Department of the Cumberland</b>


4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, November 10, 1863


General Orders

No. 362


1. Brevet Lieutenant Colonel J.L. Donaldson, Quartermaster, is announced as Senior and Supervising Quartermaster of the Department of the Cumberland. He will be obeyed and respected accordingly. His headquarters will be at Nashville, and to him all reports required to be made to the Supervising Quartermaster, by General Orders, will be made. He will have general control of the permanent Depots of the Department, and will provide for their necessary supplies. He will make monthly estimates for funds upon the office of the Quartermaster General, at Washington.


2. The Chief Quartermaster of the Army of the Cumberland, in the field, will call upon him for supplies of money and material, and will transmit the usual monthly reports to his office, to be forwarded to the Quartermaster General's Office, at Washington.


3. Lieutenant Colonel Henry C. Hodges is assigned to duty as Depot Quartermaster at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.  He will turn over to Lieutenant Colonel Donaldson the public funds in his hands, and will proceed, without delay, to that post and enter upon his duties.


4. Major Langdon C. Easton, Quartermaster U.S. Army, is assigned to duty as Acting Chief Quartermaster of the Army of the Cumberland in the field. He will immediately turn over his public property to the ranking officer of the Quartermaster's Department of Fort Leavenworth, who will act until relieved by Lieutenant Colonel Hodges. Major Easton will report, without delay, to the Headquarters of the Army of the Cumberland, and report for duty to Major General Thomas Commanding.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning.  


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. The faded faces of 5 Confederates stare into the camera forever documenting their likenesses for history. Four of the men are wearing Confederate uniforms while the man seated at the far left is dressed in civilian attire. The card shows some age toning, staining (on reverse), wear and there is a surface abrasion in the print at the lower right. Backmark: Joslyn, Smith & Co., Washington Gallery, Vicksburg, Miss. There is an old period pencil inscription on the reverse: E.A. Jackson, Yazoo City, Miss. 1. Hal West_[?], Adjt. Jno. H. Morgan. 2. Jack Trigg, Louisville. There is also a notation on the bottom, Who are the others[?]. Interesting Confederate image. 


In researching the image I found an Edward A. Jackson, who was a resident of Yazoo City, Miss., who served as a private in Co. K, 10th Mississippi Infantry. 


I also found a J.W. Trigg, who served in Co. A, 7th Kentucky Cavalry. The 7th Ky. Cav. did serve in General John Hunt Morgan's command. One of these guys is ID as being an adjutant of General Morgan.


I am not sure if these are the same soldiers in this photograph, but that was all I was able to come up with.

CDV, Lieutenant John W. Gilman, 31st Iow $100.00

 

Civil War Merchant Token, A. Killeen, Gr

 

1863 Orders Regarding Quartermaster Assi $10.00

 

Group of Confederate Soldiers Taken in V $195.00




Large coat size button, Albert LA. 24a, monogram two piece button with interlaced PG initials. 20mm, with backmark of T.W. & W., Paris, complete with shank with anchor and bomb. This button came from a coat found in Houston in the early 1970's from which Alphaeus H. Albert obtained the buttons and used to illustrate in his excellent reference book. It comes with a note [copy] by Albert written in 1975 expressing his gratitude in obtaining several of these buttons. The Pelican Guards were Company B, organized on October 26th, 1861, [Orleans] and they served aboard the floating battery New Orleans at Columbus, Kentucky, and at Island #10, Tennessee, where they were captured, on April 8th, 1862. Very desirable.  


Bust of General George B. McClellan in uniform on the obverse with his name above and the year 1863 below, with Army & Navy within wreath on the reverse and crossed sabers at the bottom. Very fine.  The twelve-sided blue transferware plate presented measures 9 3/4 inches.  The scene is Asiatic Views, a design made in the pottery of Podmore Walker and Company.  The years of operation for this firm:  1834 - 1859.


It is in great shape, free of all chips and cracks. There has been no restoration.  


Colors for this plate are in the mid-blue range.  It is marked with the pattern name in a cartouche and an imprinted pottery mark.  


City of Richmond, April 14th, 1862. Printed on the back of old bonds. Fine.

Confederate Louisiana Pelican Guard Butt $125.00

 

1863 Civil War Patriotic Token, General

 

Romantic Blue Transferware 9 3 / 4" P $125.00

 

1862 City of Richmond, Virginia 75 Cents $35.00




<b>With Louisville, Kentucky imprint</b>


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view, in uniform, with shoulder straps. Backmark: Albert S. Cooper's Photographic & Fine Art Gallery, No. 231 Main Street, 3 doors above 3d, Louisville, Kentucky. Very fine.


Pencil identification on the reverse: 1st Lt. Andrew McPeak, 31st Iowa. This image came from a 31st Iowa Infantry cdv album and comes with the original album page (front of page only) with identification below the image, "Andy McPeak."


Andrew J. McPeak, was a 23 year old resident of Maquoketa, Iowa, when he enlisted as a 4th corporal, on August 13, 1862, and was mustered into Co. F, 31st Iowa Infantry. He was promoted to 1st sergeant, May 1, 1863; 2nd lieutenant, July 16, 1863; 1st lieutenant, September 23, 1864; and was mustered out of the service with the 31st Iowa Infantry, at Louisville, Ky., on June 27, 1865.


The 31st Iowa Infantry Regiment received much praise for its noteworthy conduct seeing much action during the Civil War. Among its battle honors were Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, Roswell, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Savannah and the 1865 Carolina's campaign.  


<b>United States Congressman from Indiana</b>


(1825-1908) Born in Indianapolis, Coburn was a graduate of Wabash College in 1846. A lawyer, member of the Indiana State House of Representatives, and judge, he was appointed colonel of the 33rd Indiana Infantry, September 16, 1861. He commanded the 27th Brigade, 7th Division, from February to October, 1862, the 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, Army of Kentucky, the 1st Brigade of Baird's Division, Army of Kentucky, and Coburn's Brigade, in the battle of Murfreesboro. He was promoted to rank of brevet brigadier general for gallant and meritorious services during the war. He served as a U.S. Congressman 1867-75. Was Chairman, of the Committee on Public Expenditures. Was appointed a justice of the supreme court of the Territory of Montana on February 19, 1884.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 3, in ink, John Coburn, Indianapolis, Indiana. Very fine.  


<b>Chaplain of the 53rd & 30th Regiments Massachusetts Infantry during the Civil War


United States Congressman from South Carolina</b>


(1824-94) Born in Malden, Middlesex County, Mass., he attended the public schools of Worcester, received an academic education at Amherst, studied theology and became a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church of the New England Conference in 1859. He enlisted on December 1, 1862, and was appointed chaplain of the 53rd Massachusetts Infantry, and on November 25, 1863, he was appointed the chaplain of the 30th Massachusetts Infantry. He was mustered out of the service on July 5, 1866, at Charleston, South Carolina. After the war he settled in Darlington, S.C., where he became a delegate to the South Carolina State Convention in 1867, and  was also elected president of the Republican State executive board. He served as a member of the South Carolina State Senate in 1868, and was also a delegate to the Republican National Convention of that same year. Upon the readmission of South Carolina to representation in the U.S. Congress, he was elected as a Republican U.S. Congressman, serving 1868-70, when he resigned, pending the investigation of his conduct in connection with certain appointments to the United States Military and Naval Academies. He was later censured by the U.S. House of Representatives. He served again as a member of the South Carolina State Senate in 1877.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 2 1/4, in ink, R.F. Whittemore, S.C. Very fine.  


Vignette of Indian wearing headdress with the year 1863 and encircling stars on the obverse, and American flags, drum and crossed cannons on the reverse. Very fine.

CDV, Lieutenant Andrew J. McPeak, 31st I $100.00

 

Autograph, General John Coburn $35.00

 

Autograph, Benjamin Franklin Whittemore

 

1863 Civil War Patriotic Token, American




<b>Lieutenant Colonel of the 7th Ohio Infantry during the Civil War


Wounded in the battle of Winchester, Virginia


United States Congressman from Missouri</b>


(1822-72) Born in Adams County, Pennsylvania, he moved to Ohio with his parents in 1827. He attended the public schools and the local college in Warren, Ohio, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1844, and commenced practice in Warren, Ohio. He was justice of the peace, in 1846, prosecuting attorney of Geauga County in 1847, and delegate to the Buffalo Free Soil Convention in 1848. He also became a newspaperman publishing the Western Reserve Chronicle, and the Chardon Democrat. At the outbreak of the Civil War he raised a company and was commissioned captain of Co. H, 7th Ohio Infantry, on June 3, 1861. He was wounded in the Battle of Winchester, Va., was promoted to lieutenant colonel on May 20, 1862, and was mustered out of the service in 1863 because of his wounds. He settled in Chillicothe, Livingston County, Missouri, in 1864, and resumed the practice of law. He founded the Spectator in 1866, was a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1868, and served as a U.S. Congressman, 1869-71. 


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 2, in ink, J.F. Asper, Chillicothe, Missouri. Very fine.   


<b>Fought in the Civil War


The hero of the Battle of Santiago de Cuba in the Spanish American War</b>


(1839-1911) Born at Frederick, Maryland, he graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1860. At the outbreak of the Civil War he held the rank of master, and was assigned to the "U.S.S. Potomac" of the Western Gulf Squadron until 1862. He then served on the gunboat "U.S.S. Winona" of that Squadron, and later on the sloops "U.S.S. Monongahela" and "U.S.S. Richmond," and participated in all the engagements that led to the capture of Port Hudson, Louisiana, on the Mississippi River in 1863, having been promoted to lieutenant on July 16, 1862. He commanded "Schley's Flying Squadron" with the "U.S.S. Brooklyn" serving as his flagship during the Spanish American War, and was the hero of the Battle of Santiago de Cuba.


<u>Signature With Rank</u>: 4 7/8 x 2, in ink, W.S. Schley, Rear Admiral, U.S.N. Very fine.  <b>Commission to the Secretary of War, 1893-1904</b>


Government Printing Office, Washington, 1905. Red cloth, hard covers, profusely illustrated with many scarce full page  photographs. The pages are unnumbered but there are a few hundred pages in this superb 1905 reference book on the Gettysburg National Military Park. Light wear. Very desirable.  


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


"we were sent out on picket again on Tuesday and did not get in again until about 10 o’clock on yesterday and I had not slept a wink all night and so I did not feel much like writing.  We have great times at night trying to keep the boys awake for we often get orders to not let any of the guards sleep during the night and it is pretty hard to keep them awake when they are off duty, but still we have to do the best we can but when we have to go on duty every third day or sometime every other day it keeps a fellow busy to keep up in the sleeping line."</b>


<b><u>Winchester, Va., [March] 16th, 1863</b></u>


My Dear and beloved wife,


After my love to you and the children I will inform you that I am in very good health at present and hope these few lines may find you enjoying the same blessing.  I sent a letter to the children by John Sill which I wrote on Monday evening and would have written to you yesterday but we were sent out on picket again on Tuesday and did not get in again until about 10 o’clock on yesterday and I had not slept a wink all night and so I did not feel much like writing.  We have great times at night trying to keep the boys awake for we often get orders to not let any of the guards sleep during the night and it is pretty hard to keep them awake when they are off duty, but still we have to do the best we can but when we have to go on duty every third day or sometime every other day it keeps a fellow busy to keep up in the sleeping line.  Well it commenced raining about 3 o’clock yesterday morning and it rained until in the night.  Last night it was about as bad a time as I have seen lately and it still looks like raining although it may clear up today.  I do hope it will for I don’t like wet weather out here, in fact I don’t like it in good weather.  I did wish that I was at home to help make garden for the last week seemed very much like spring.  Things begin to look very much like spring here.  The trees are beginning to put forth their buds and the grass is starting beautifully but the prospect of a spring crop here looks slim and I don’t know how people are going to stand it much longer here.  If the war lasts much longer the poor people must suffer for something to eat, but they will have to put up with it, but I do hope that the thing will be done with pretty soon for I am getting awful tired of this business and would be mighty glad to get home to stay with my dear little family once more for amidst all the life and bustle that surrounds me here there is still that aching void, that lonesome feeling that nothing here can cure.  I don’t know how long we shall stay here.  Sometimes we hear that we are to go to Harpers Ferry, sometimes we are to go to Washington, and at other times somewhere else, but the fact is we don’t know anything about it and I think it is as likely we will stay here this summer as to go anywhere else.  If I find out that we will stay for certain and the weather gets pleasant I want you to come out and see me for I don’t know when I will get home.  I expect the Captain will get leave to come home in a few days and then Lieut. Mann wants to come, and I will have to wait till they come back and then I think that I will get off, then that is if the war is not over before that time.  Well dear I must bring my letter to a close for I have not much more to say, only for you to write to me as often as you can.  I have not recd. but one letter from you since I left home and you don’t know how anxiously I watch for the mail.  I think I will get a letter today.  I hope so however.  Well dear I wish you would mend my dress coat and send it to me the first time you have a chance, so good by my dear wife.  May the Lord bless you and keep you safe is the prayer of your loving husband.


Lieut. L. Lupton


Light staining and wear. 


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.

Autograph, Joel F. Asper $20.00

 

Autograph, Rear Admiral Winfield Scott S $35.00

 

Annual Reports of the Gettysburg Nationa

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $85.00




(1808-75) Congressman, Senator and Governor of Tennessee. He was nominated and elected vice president on the Union Republican ticket in 1864. Upon Abraham Lincoln's assassination in April 1865, he became our 17th president and resolved to follow Lincoln's plans for reconstruction without bitterness or malice. His reconstruction plan clashed drastically with that of the Radical Republicans in congress, and Johnson's term was one humiliation after another, culminating on Feb. 24, 1868 with a resolution of impeachment against him. This failed by one vote to pass, and he served out his term.


Portrait engraving, full seated view, 8 x 10 1/2, with printed facsimile autograph. Painted by Alonzo Chappel. Likeness from a recent Photograph from life. Published by Johnson, Fry & Co., New York, 1864. Light age toning in the border area. Very fine.  


Vignette of Liberty wearing liberty cap with encircling stars and "1863" on the obverse, and "Army & Navy" within a wreath on the reverse with crossed sabers. Very fine.  Walnut American Renaissance Revival Mirror with Foliate and Carved Grape Clusters, Elaborate Cartouche cresting piece with gilt detailed carved fruit and foliate clusters flanked by carved scrolling vines.  Mirror is flanked on each side by center cartouche with incised details and fruit and foliate carved details.  A very important piece, in beautiful condition. 

 Ornate and highly detailed Rococo Gilt wood overmantel mirror with Fruit, foliate, and floral carvings amidst scrolling vines. 


Dimensions:  67"H x 57"W

President Andrew Johnson $20.00

 

1863 Civil War Patriotic Token, Liberty,

 

Antique 19th Century Carved Renaissance $18000.00

 

Antique French Rococo Gilt Wood 19th C. $15000.00

Intricately detailed English Wall or Over mirror.   Imposing Cresting piece with two carved winged Griffins flanking center medallion, and frame has inset foliate carved details and carved rosettes.  

 Beautiful antique gilt gold framed mirror. This mirror is on consignment from Steven Segal.


Dimensions:  51" H x 66.5" W x 2" D  


Carland's, 95 Bowery, Cor. Hester St., N.Y. Fine Ale Drawn From Wood. Very fine. Circa 1863. Rare.  <b>to Death by Musketry</b>


4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, November 20, 1863


General Orders

No. 372


I..Before a General Court Martial, which convened at Charlestown, Virginia, April 21, 1863, pursuant to Special Orders, No. 54, dated Headquarters, District of Kanawha, Charlestown, Virginia, April 6, 1863, and of which Lieutenant Colonel F.E. Franklin, 34th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, is President, was arraigned and tried-


Private John Carter, 3d Virginia Cavalry


Charge I- "Attempting to desert to the enemy."


Specification- "In this; that, on or about the 9th day of March, 1863, the said John Carter, did attempt to desert his Company, with the intention of joining the enemy. This at Ceredo, Virginia on or about the 9th day of March, 1863."


Charge II- "Enlisting in the army of the United States for the purpose of obtaining arms, equipment, and ammunition, and gaining information and then deserting to the enemy."


Specification- "In this; that, on or about the 1st day of March, 1863, said John Carter, did join Lieutenant Witcher's Company, 3d Virginia Cavalry, and upon being suspected by Lieutenant J.S. Witcher of being a spy, did attempt to desert to the enemy, taking with him one horse and two revolvers belonging to the Government of the United States. This at Ceredo, Virginia, on or about the 1st March 1863."


To which charges and specifications the accused, Private John Carter, 3d Virginia Cavalry, pleaded, "Not Guilty."


Finding


The Court, having maturely considered the evidence adduced, finds the accused, Private John Carter, 3d Virginia Cavalry, as follows:


Charge I


Of the Specification, "Guilty."

Of the Charge, "Guilty."



Charge II


Of the Specification, "Guilty."

Of the Charge, "Guilty."


Sentence


And the Court does therefore sentence him, Private John Carter, 3d Virginia Cavalry, "To be shot to death with musketry, at such time and place as the Coming General may direct: two-thirds of the members of the Court concurring therein."


II..The proceedings of the Court in the case of Private John Carter, 3d Virginia Cavalry, have been approved by the proper commanders, and forwarded for the action of the President of the United States, who approves the sentence, and directs that it be carried into execution, at such time and place as the Commanding General of the Department of West Virginia may designate.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:


E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning.

7638 English Wall Mirror with Carved Win $2200.00

 

33. 7446 Beautiful Antique Gilt Gold Fram $2500.00

 

Civil War Merchant Token, Carland's Fine

 

Private of 3rd Virginia Cavalry is Sente




<b>With Louisville, Kentucky imprint</b>


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view, oval format, in uniform, with shoulder straps. Backmark: Campbell & Ecker, Photographers, 407 Main Street, Between 4th & 5th, Louisville, Ky., with 2 cents blue George Washington U.S. Inter. Rev. tax stamp. Very fine.


Pencil identification on the reverse: 1st Lt. Michael Maloney, 31st Iowa. This image came from a 31st Iowa Infantry cdv album and comes with the original album page (front of page only) with identification below the image, "Michael Maloney."


Michael Maloney, was a 21 year old resident of Bellvue, Iowa, when he enlisted as a 2nd sergeant, on August 5, 1862, and was mustered into Co. K, 31st Iowa Infantry. He was promoted to sergeant major, July 18, 1863; 1st lieutenant, May 15, 1864; and was mustered out of the service with the 31st Iowa Infantry, at Louisville, Ky., on June 27, 1865.


In the report of Colonel William Smyth, 31st Iowa Infantry, dated June 6, 1864, at Acworth, Ga., describing the actions of the 31st Iowa Infantry from May 23rd to June 6, 1864, during the Atlanta campaign, he mentions Michael Maloney by name. "Just before dark, on the evening of 31st of May, the enemy succeeded in bringing a piece or two of artillery into the edge of the woods in front of the Ninth and Twenty-fifth Iowa, and commenced throwing shot and shell into the pits we had just abandoned and those which we then occupied, as well as the woods occupied by our skirmishers. The traverses in our works covered us so effectually that not a man was injured, although the enemy had fair range of us. One shell fell in our works, but did not explode. Sergeant Major Maloney, now acting as lieutenant of Company K, pending his recommendation for promotion to lieutenant of that company, picked it up and threw it over the breastworks."


The 31st Iowa Infantry Regiment received much praise for its noteworthy conduct seeing much action during the Civil War. Among its battle honors were Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, Roswell, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Savannah and the 1865 Carolina's campaign.  


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 7/8 card. The dark skinned boy Isaac White  and the light skinned girl Rosa Huger stand arm in arm. Isaac is holding a hat in one hand. Imprint on front mount: Isaac and Rosa, Emancipated Slave Children. From the Free Schools of Louisiana. Photographed by Kimball, 477 Broadway, N.Y. Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1863 by Geo. H. Hanks, in the Clerk's Office of the U.S. for the Sou. Dist. of N.Y. Imprint on reverse: The nett proceeds from the sale of these Photographs will be devoted exclusively to the education of colored people in the Department of the Gulf, now under the command of Maj. Gen. Banks. Staining around the edges. Card is slightly trimmed. A rare and most difficult view to find.


  


Vignette of crossed American flags with the motto, "Union" above and the year "1863" below and encircling stars on the obverse. Large 6 pointed star within wreath on the reverse. Very fine.  


<b>U.S. Secretary of State in the President Abraham Lincoln Administration</b>


(1801-72) Lawyer and Whig politician. Governor of New York 1839-42. He later served in the Senate, vigorously opposed slavery and joined the Republican party in 1856. Twice passed over for president (1856 and 1860) he became Abraham Lincoln's very able Secretary of State. He was savagely attacked in his bed on the night of the Lincoln assassination by fellow conspirator Lewis Payne. He recovered from his wounds and served in the same post under President Andrew Johnson. Perhaps his most important act was the purchase of Alaksa, then called "Seward's Folly," in 1867 from Russia.


Portrait engraving, 8 x 10 3/4. Full view seated at a desk with printed facsimile autograph below. Likeness from the latest photograph from life. Published by Johnson, Fry & Co., New York, 1862. Age toning in the border areas.

CDV, Lieutenant Michael Maloney, 31st Io $135.00

 

CDV, Emancipated Slave Children, Isaac &

 

1863 Civil War Patriotic Token, Flags Fo

 

William H. Seward $15.00




Middletown Point, N.J. Keyport & Middletown Point Steamboat Co. Key Point, Nov. 20th, 1862. Vignette of steamboat at left. Crisp uncirculated.   


Civil War patriotic imprint with illustration of Union General George B. McClellan in uniform with his nickname printed below, "Little Mack." Light staining. 5 1/2 x 2 7/8.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.  


5 x 8, in ink.


List of Stores required of Brigade Commissary Totson for use of Regimental Bakery of the 20th Regiment Mass. Vols.


17 lbs. Candles @25, [$]4.25.

68 lbs. Desiccated Potatoes @4, [$]2.72. [Total] [$] 6.97.


I certify that the above stores are absolutely necessary for the use of Regimental Bakery, 20th Mass. Vols.


Camp Benton

Jany. 1st, 1862


Light age toning and wear.


WBTS Trivia: The hard fought 20th Massachusetts Infantry saw action at Ball's Bluff, in the 7 Days Battles, at Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Bristoe Station, the Mine Run Campaign, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, and Petersburg, to name a few of their battle honors.


Camp Benton was located near Poolesville, Maryland.  


Vignette of Liberty wearing liberty cap with encircling stars with "Liberty" and "1863" on the obverse, and "Our Army" within a wreath on the reverse. Very fine.

1862 Farmers & Merchants Bank, New Jerse

 

General George B. McClellan $8.00

 

List of Commissary Stores for 20th Massa $25.00

 

1863 Civil War Patriotic Token, Liberty

19th Century American Renaissance Revival doré bronze mounted library table by Pottier & Stymus. Table top is covered in gold tooled leather and accented by doré bronze detailing, including figural maiden heads. Set on a base with four feet supporting doré bronze anthemion supports and an extensive 'X' stretcher base joined at the center by figural doré bronze wolf heads.


Dimensions:  31"H x 73"W x 34"D  


8 1/4 x 3 1/2, imprinted form, filled out in ink. Nov. 23rd, 1861. Mrs. S. Triplett, To the N.[ew] O.[rleans], Jackson and Great Northern R.R. Co., Dr. For Freight on 32 Sacks Salt. $2.24. Paid. Light age toning, staining at edges and wear.   


Montgomery, January 1, 1863. Vignette of tree and map at center. 50 Cts in blue overprint on the obverse. Crisp uncirculated condition.  


<b>Lieutenant 81st Illinois Infantry, 1862-64


United States Congressman from Arkansas</b>


(1841-93) Born near Tamaroa, Perry County, Illinois, he graduated from the Illinois State Normal University in 1862. He assisted in recruiting the 81st Illinois Infantry, and was commissioned 1st lieutenant, August 26, 1862. He was discharged for promotion on May 28, 1864, and was commissioned captain, U.S. Commissary Department. He was promoted to brevet major and lieutenant colonel, in 1865, and was mustered out of the service on May 31, 1866. After the Civil War he settled in Arkansas where he was engaged in planting and trading. Upon the readmission of Arkansas to the Union, he was elected as a Republican U.S. Congressman, serving 1867-71. After his political career ended, he served as president of the First National Bank of Little Rock, Arkansas, until his death.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 5 1/4, in ink. Logan H. Roots, De Valls Bluff, Arkansas. Very fine. 


WBTS Trivia: The 81st Illinois Infantry fought at Raymond, Champion Hill and Vicksburg, Miss. during Lieutenant Roots service in the regiment.

Renaissance Revival Doré Bronze Mounted $17500.00

 

1861 Confederate Louisiana Railroad Rece $20.00

 

1863 State of Alabama 50 Cents Note $45.00

 

Autograph, Logan H. Roots $25.00




<b>Was wounded 3 times and had 11 horses shot out from under him during the Civil War</b>


(1824-1902) Born in Wellsburg, Va. (now W.V.) and after attending the local schools, he joined an elder brother in conducting a trading post at Fort Smith, Arkansas. He became a traveler, hunter and trapper in the Rocky Mountains, Mexico, Central and South America and California. In 1846-47, he was secretary of the commissioners sent out by President Polk to make treaties with the Indians living on the borders of Texas and New Mexico. He led the first expedition which crossed the plains from Texas to California in 1849 during the gold rush; was in the Narcisco Lopez insurrection in Cuba in 1851, barely escaping execution, and then returned to Wellsburg where he ran a mercantile business, remaining there until the outbreak of the Civil War. On June 1, 1861, he was commissioned major of the 1st (West) Virginia Infantry, and on September 19, 1862, he was commissioned colonel of the 9th West Virginia Infantry. Duval spent a great deal of time in the West Virginia mountains chasing bushwackers, but he also was engaged in more than 30 battles and skirmishes, was wounded 3 times, and had 11 horses shot out from under him. At the battle of Cloyd's Mountain, W.V., in May 1864, he led his regiment in a desperate charge uphill against the Confederate breastworks, breaking their line, but suffering 30% casualties in the process. He was promoted to brigadier general, September 24, 1864. He participated in General Philip Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley campaign, in the Army of West Virginia under General George Crook. He entered the political arena after the war and served as a member of the West Virginia State Senate, 1867-69; was Adjutant General of West Virginia, 1867-69; served as U.S. Congressman, 1869-71; U.S. assessor of Internal Revenue, 1871-72; collector of Internal Revenue, 1872-74; and member of the West Virginia State House of Delegates, 1887-89. 


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 3 1/4, in ink, I.H. Duval, West Va. Very fine.      


<b>The Little Giant!</b>


(1813-1861) An outstanding legislator, and orator, he was one of the founders of the Democratic Party in Illinois. Served as U.S. Senator, 1843-61. He is best known for his debates in 1858 against Abraham Lincoln. He was narrowly defeated for the Democratic nomination for president by Franklin Buchanan in 1856. He did gain the Democratic nomination in 1860, but was defeated for the presidency by his old friend and rival Abraham Lincoln. Upon secession, and the outbreak of the Civil War, he supported Lincoln and his policies. He died of typhoid fever in 1861.


Engraved portrait with printed facsimile signature below. 5 1/2 x 9. Engraved by A.B. Walter, Philadelphia. Light age toning in the border area.

 


<b>84th Ohio Infantry


United States Congressman from Ohio


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1819-99) Born in Mount Pleasant, Ohio, he graduated from Franklin College, New Athens, Ohio in 1838, and from the Cincinnati Law School in 1840. He was admitted to the bar in 1840, and practiced in Zanesville, McConnelsville and Bellefontaine, Ohio. He was the editor of the Logan Gazette, 1845-47; served as a member of the Ohio State House of Representatives, 1846-47; and the Ohio State Senate, 1849-51 and 1854; he was judge of the court of common pleas, 1857-64; and editor of the Western Law Monthly, 1859-62. He served as colonel of the 84th Ohio Infantry in 1862. Was a United States Congressman from Ohio, 1865-71, including the 40th U.S. Congress, which was known as the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress, and he also served from 1873-77. He was the chairman of the Committee on War Claims. He served as the first Comptroller of the U.S. Treasury, 1880-85.


<u>Signature With Place and Date</u>: 5 1/4 x 3, in ink, Autograph of Wm. Lawrence, Bellefontaine, Ohio, 24 March 1869. Very fine.  


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Full standing view wearing a fine dress. Imprint on the front mount: A Virginia Slave Child in 1863. Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1863, by T.C. Fanning, in the Clerk's office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern District of New York. Backmark: Van Dorn, Photograph Artist, 285 Fulton St., Brooklyn. Light age toning. Very fine. Desirable image.


"Fannie;" Virginia Casseopia Lawrence, a redeemed slave child, was discovered sore and tattered and unclean by a nurse tending to Union soldiers in Fairfax, Virginia. The nurse, Catharine S. Lawrence, adopted Fannie as her own and had her baptized by the Reverend Henry Ward Beecher in Plymouth Church in Brooklyn, N.Y., in May 1863. Fannie was an "octoroon" being only 1/8 black and her image was sold to raise funds for the further redemption of other similar slave children.

Autograph, General Isaac H. Duval $50.00

 

Senator Stephen A. Douglas $15.00

 

Autograph, Colonel William Lawrence $25.00

 

CDV, A Virginia Slave Child in 1863 $200.00




Richmond, Oct. 21, 1862. Vignette of milkmaid and ship at center and Governor John Letcher at left. "1" and "ONE" in red overprint. VG.  


<b>"Our Protection"</b>


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 3/4 card. Imprint on the front mount, Our Protection. Rosa, Charley, Rebecca. Card is trimmed cutting off the bottom part of the names. Backmark: No. 9. Entered according to act of Congress in the year 1864, by S. Tackaberry, in the Clerk's Office of the U.S. for the Southern District of New York. The net proceeds from the sale of these Photographs will be devoted to the education of colored people in the department of the Gulf, now under the command of Maj. Gen. Banks. Chas. Paxson, Photographer, N.Y. Light age toning and wear. Very fine. Desirable view.


This is one of a series of images taken of the Slave Children of New Orleans; Charles Taylor, Rebecca Huger and Rosina Downs. This view, titled "Our Protection," shows the children wrapped up in a large American flag.    


Vignette of the first U.S. ironclad gunboat, the U.S.S. Monitor with slogan, "Our Little Monitor" on the obverse, and the year 1863 within wreath with anchor above and crossed cannons below. Very fine. One of the most popular Civil War patriotic tokens.


WBTS Trivia: The "Monitor," built by John Ericcson, fought in history's first battle between ironclad warships. This occurred at Hampton Roads, Va., Mar. 9, 1862, when the "Monitor" fought the Confederate ironclad, "Merrimac." Known as "Ericcson's Folly," the Monitor was 172 feet long and resembled a cheese box on a raft according to viewers as her 140 ton revolving turret which housed two 11 inch Dahlgren smoothbores lay on a raft like deck. The "Monitor" was lost in a gale off Cape Hatteras on Dec. 31, 1862.  <b>in U.S. General Hospitals


Important order outlining the rules for appointing female nurses during the Civil War</b>


4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, October 29, 1863


General Orders

No. 351


The employment of women nurses in the U.S. General Hospitals will in future be strictly governed by the following rules:


1. Persons approved by Miss Dix, or her authorized agents, will receive from her, or them, "certificates of approval," which must be countersigned by Medical Directors upon their assignment to duty as nurses within their Department.


2. Assignments of "women nurses" to duty in General Hospitals will only be made upon application by the Surgeons in charge, through Medical Directors, to Miss Dix or her agents, for the number they require, not exceeding one to every thirty beds.


3. No females, except Hospital Matrons, will be employed in General Hospitals, or, after December 31, 1863, borne upon the Muster and Pay Rolls, without such certificate of approval and regular assignment, unless specially appointed by the Surgeon General.


4. Women nurses, while on duty in General Hospitals, are under the exclusive control of the senior medical officer, who will direct their several duties, and may be discharged by him when considered supernumerary, or for incompetency, insubordination, or violation of his orders. Such discharge, with the reasons therefor, being endorsed upon the certificate, will be at once returned to Miss Dix.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:

E.D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning. Desirable Civil War medical related imprint.


WBTS Trivia: Dorothea L. Dix served as Superintendent of Army Nurses during the Civil War.

1862 Commonwealth of Virginia $1 Treasur $25.00

 

CDV, The Slave Children of New Orleans $175.00

 

1863 Civil War Patriotic Token, Our Litt

 

Orders Regarding the Employment of Women $75.00

Not a big deal I suppose but then if you enjoy Civil War vintage<I>smalls</I> and personal items of everyday use, this little antique baking crock with its <U>original lid</U> is a treasure.  Standing a mere 3 ¾ inches and approximately 2 ¾ inches across its base, this little <I>single serving</I> pot offers good evidence of age and originality with its naturally age crackled glaze and coloration yet remains in fine apparently unused condition.  With no cracks or chips and with its rarely seen original lid, this little remnant of the past will set in well with any period country grouping. 

   Of particular popularity here in New England where baked beans were a favorite, a hand full of dried beans, and, if one were fortunate enough, a bit if molasses or brown sugar, a dash of dry mustard, a piece of onion and a sliver of <I>fat-back</I> all filled to the brim with a bit of water and set in hot coals  for a slow cook, such a little pot could offer up comforting memories to a troop far from home and the fragrance of mother’s simmering bean pot.    <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  



 This attractive early turned and hand cut rock maple chess set is complete and in nice condition untouched and as found with good evidence of age and originality.  The set remains housed in a wonderful 5 ¼ x 2 7/16 x 2 1/4 inch, beveled corner slide top box.   A desirable offering to suit a wide variety of collector interest to include antique games and Civil War personal items.  Note: After we acquired this we found one of the game pieced had a small chip (see photo).  Accordingly we have priced the set to move it along.  A nice set all the same.

As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 Our photographs will provide the best description on this offering except to advise that it stands approximately 9 ¼  inches and remains in excellent condition save a single small dent as pointed out in our illustration. (Could be pressed out but we’d leave it as found.)  These Portland pewter pots are most frequently marked <I>Patent 1862</I> leaving little doubt that this <B><I>Patent Applied For</I></B> example just pre-dates or is very early Civil War vintage.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  


<CENTER><FONT COLOR=#800000>If you have an interest in neat Civil War period things or Maine in the time, you may enjoy our museum site at:</FONT COLOR=#800000></CENTER>

<CENTER><B><I>MaineLegacy.com</I></B></CENTER>


 An original c.1843 publication titled <B>MERCHANT’S & SHIPMASTER’S GUIDE</B><I>in relation to their Rights, Duties, & Liabilities</I> authored by Frederic W. Sawyer, 3rd edition, published in Boston by S. Thaxter & Son in 1843.  The original calfskin binding is tight with good evidence of age and period use yet remaining in pleasing condition.  The books 400 pages are complete tight and without condition issues save natural age with some foxing. (The name <I>C. K. Peeling</I> is penned on the inside cover.)  A striking sailing vessel fold out remains.  All complete with no rips, tears, folds or repairs, this 7 11/16 X 5 inch seaman manual offers reference on such material as: Ship Registry & Name, necessary Documents; Foreign & Domestic Trade regulations, Ship Owner liability, Ship Master authority, Ship Seaman- domestic & foreign laws, provisions & water, medical advice, wages, duty in case of disaster; High Sea Crimes, piracy, Insurance, Harbor Regulations, Port Laws, Marine Hospitals, Shares, Legal Forms and more.  A nice addition to any nautical antique grouping.

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !


<CENTER><FONT COLOR=#800000>If you have an interest in neat Civil War period things or Maine in the time, you may enjoy our museum site at:</FONT COLOR=#800000></CENTER>

<CENTER><B><I>MaineLegacy.com</I></B></CENTER>

scarce personal size antique crockery CO $95.00

 

antique CHESS SET $125.00

 

mid 1800s - W. B. & Co. - Portland Pewter $145.00

 

c. 1843 Merchant & SHIPMASTER’S GUIDE $145.00




< prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 next >

AntiqueArts.com home page! How to use this page! How to advertise here How we manage your personal information Terms of use TIAS home page