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1 1/3 pages, 8 1/4 x 10 1/4, in ink.


"State of South Carolina, Pendleton District, Know all men by these presents that John James in the state and District afore said, in consideration of Two hundred Dollars and Fifty, to me paid by David Durham of the State and place have granted, bargained, sold & released by these presents do grant, bargain, sell and release unto said David Durham, a certain tract of land situated in the District aforesaid on the waters of Brushy Creek waters of Salada River." Much more interesting content detailing this sale of land in the Pendleton District of South Carolina by John James. It is dated, signed and witnessed at the bottom of the document on the "Thirteenth January in Year of our Lord, One Thousand Eight Hundred and Twenty five." 


The reverse of the document has the following content: "State of South Carolina, Pendleton District, Personally came David James before me the subscribing Justice and made oath that he saw John James make his mark acknowledge his seal and deliver the within Deed of conveyance for the within mentioned purpose and that Philip James and William Hammond was subscribing witnesses with himself. Sworn and subscribed to before me this 11th day of May 1826. David James, X his mark." Signed by J. Douthit, Q.U." Light age toning and wear. Boldly written and desirable antebellum South Carolina manuscript.


WBTS Trivia: The seller of the tract of land subscribed to in this deed of conveyance, John James, had two sons that fought in South Carolina units serving the Confederacy during the War Between The States.       


<b>Revolutionary War Newspaper from London, England


Front page report of the American Account of the Battle of Camden, New Jersey</b>


From Thursday, November 16, to Saturday, November 18, 1780. 8 pages, 8 1/2 x 11 1/2. Front page stories of the American Account of the Battle of Camden From the New Jersey Gazette, Sept. 13, and from Philadelphia Sept. 12, Extract of a Letter from General Gates to the President of the Congress, dated Hillsborough, Aug. 20, 1780. A Letter From Colonel Sumpter to General Gates, dated Wateree Ferry, Aug. 5, 1780. Letter from Governor Abner Nash to the Delegates of North Carolina, dated Hillsborough, Aug. 13, 1780. Extract of a Letter From General Gates to the President of Congress, dated Hillsborough, August 30, 1780. Other stories inside of the newspaper include: News from London; Lottery Drawing Numbers; Advertisement for a New Family Bible; America From Rivington's New York Royal Gazette, Charlestown, September 6; Masquerade Intelligence; News From the House of Lords; News From the House of Commons; The Mails from France and Flanders; East India House and much more. Includes red rubber stamp. Very fine to excellent condition. Desirable Colonial period newspaper with battle reports on the American Revolution as printed in the English press.    


<b>United States Congressman from Tennessee


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1833-1903) Born in Maury Co., Tenn., he attended Amherst College, studied law, was admitted to the bar and practiced in Columbia, Tennessee. He was a member of the constitutional convention of Tennessee in 1865; served in the Tennessee State House of Representatives, 1865-66; was a U.S. Congressman, 1866-71, including the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress; served as chairman of the Committee on Expenditures in the Department of State; also served on the Committee on Education and Labor; he was Postmaster of Columbia, Tenn., 1879-84; and superintendent of schools, 1884-86.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 3 3/4, in ink, Samuel M. Arnell, Tenn. Excellent.


 


<b>Union officer during the Civil War


Lieutenant Governor of Ohio


United States Congressman from Ohio


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1819-1902) Born in Knox County, Ohio, he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1840, and commenced practice at Millersburg, Ohio. Judge of the 6th Judicial District of Ohio, 1852-57. Lieutenant Governor of Ohio, 1857-58, serving under Governor Salmon P. Chase. Appointed aide-de-camp, with rank of colonel, to the Governor of Ohio, August 10, 1861. Judge Advocate General of the State of Ohio, 1861. Appointed superintendent of drafting with rank of colonel under Governor Tod, August 15, 1862. Assistant Adjutant General, 1862. Enlisted in the Union Army as a private, in Co. C, 188th Ohio Infantry, and mustered out of service on September 21, 1865. Served as U.S. Congressman, 1865-71, including the 40th U.S. Congress which was the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress. Appointed United States Judge for the northern district of Ohio by President Ulysses S. Grant, in 1873, and served until 1889. 


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 3 1/2, in ink, M. Welker, Wooster, Ohio. Excellent.

1825 Sale of Land in Pendleton District, $35.00

 

The London Chronicle, November 16-18, 17 $100.00

 

Autograph, Samuel M. Arnell $15.00

 

Autograph, Colonel Martin Welker $20.00




<b>Civil War Senator from Nevada


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1827-1909) Born in Wayne County, N.Y., he attended Yale College in 1849-50, moved to San Francisco in 1850 and was engaged in gold mining in Nevada County, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1852, and commenced practice in Nevada City. He served as district attorney in 1852; attorney general of California, 1854; moved to Virginia City, Nevada, in 1860; involved in early mining litigation and in the development of the Comstock lode; was a member of the Territorial council in 1861; member of the state constitutional convention in 1863; upon the admission of Nevada as a State into the Union was elected as a Republican to the U.S. Senate in 1864, serving until 1875; was re-elected in 1887 and served until 1905. Served as chairman of the Committee on Pacific Railroads; and chairman of the Committee on Mines and Mining.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 2, in ink, Wm. M. Stewart, Nevada. Excellent.  


<b>"Tell Bob he ought to have been with us at Corinth.  He thought he heard the cannons roar up in Tennessee, but he did not hear anything to what it was up at Corinth."</b>  


3 pages, 6 1/4 x 8, written in a bold and neat pencil hand by Sergeant B.J. Caldwell, Co. G, 2nd Mississippi Cavalry, to his wife.


<b><u>Camp Near Salem, [Miss.], October the 16th, 1862</b></u>


Dear Wife,


I again take my pencil in hand to drop you a few lines to let you hear from me again. I have no news to write on. Tom [is] well & doing very well.  I was right sick last Saturday night & Sunday.  I had a light chill Saturday night, but I think it was caused by getting wet Friday evening.  We rode in the rain all evening & got very wet.  Bob was sick yesterday but he is up today.  The rest is well.  Sally I received your kind letter sent by the Capt. & was very glad to hear from you & I would love to get another today for I study a good deal about home.  Sally we are camped about 2 miles west of Salem, but I canít tell how long we will stay here nor where we will go to, but if the Yankees get down in our country I would love to come down there.  Sally I wrote you a letter last week & sent it by mail, but it is uncertain whether you got it or not.  I want you to have your corn gathered as soon as you can & if the army comes down there put your fattening hogs up & you must do what you all think best with Beck.  You are all there & know how things is better than I do.  Sally we have heard that the Yankees has got down to Tupelo & if they have I am afraid they will be all over the country & if they are I would like to come down there & help drive them back, but if they do come treat them as well as you can & if you have any meat or anything that they can take hide it out for that is the way the folks has had to do up here.  Sally I am sorry to hear of the Cherry Creek Boys being tore up so bad, but I am in hopes it is not as bad as we heard it was, but I want you to write to me what has become of Ben for I canít hear nothing from him.  Sally tell all of the old folks that I would write them a letter this evening if I had time, but it is time to commence getting supper & Mr. Shettels is going to start home in the morning & I want to send my letter by him.  Tell Bob he ought to have been with us at Corinth.  He thought he heard the cannons roar up in Tennessee, but he did not hear anything to what it was up at Corinth.  Sam Campbell said he never heard the like.  Give my love to all & be certain to write when ever you have the chance of sending a letter, Nothing more only I remain yours until death.


B.J. Caldwell


Written on the back panel is, "Mrs. Sarah B. Caldwell, Cherry Creek, Miss.  By the politeness of Mr. Shettels."


Light age toning and wear with some scattered light staining. Typical misspelling and grammatical errors. Excellent content. Scarce. 


The 2nd Mississippi Cavalry fought in the army corps of Price, Jackson, Van Dorn, Lee and N.B. Forrest, and in the armies of the Department of Mississippi & East Louisiana, Army of Tennessee, Department of the West, Army of Mississippi, and the Department of Alabama, Mississippi & East Louisiana. After skirmishing in Mississippi it saw action at Various conflicts in North Georgia and Alabama. Some of the men were captured in the fight at Selma, and only a remnant surrendered with the Department of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana. The field officers were Colonels Edward Dillon and J.L. McCarty, Lieutenant Colonel James Gordon, and Majors J.L. Harris and John J. Perry.  


       

 


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.</b>


2 pages, 5 x 8, written in ink, by Lieutenant Levi Lupton to his wife.


"been sick and ever since I was at home, and I donít know whether he will ever join the regiment again or not so they have detached Lieut. Mann* from our Company and put him in command of Company A. How long he will stay I donít know, and to help the matter the Capt. and Lieut. Martin** are both under arrest for cowardice in letting the train be captured, and I suppose they will both be discharged. They deserve to be sent clear out of the country for such abominable carelessness, and under these circumstances there is no use for me to try at present until there is some new officers appointed. [he is referring to applying for a furlough to come home to visit his family]. There was one Captain in the 123rd Regt. who was in good health who tendered his resignation, and it was sent back stating that he had to make sickness or disability an excuse as there had [been] 4 that had been discharged out of that Regt. before, but I think there will be a chance for me before long, and then I will pitch in. Well Dear, I got another letter from Lillian Margrave, a wonderful epistle. I will show it to you when I come home. Well, I must bring this scribbling to a close for none but a wife can have patience to read it. I am so nervous today I canít write too much good. I laid awake about 1/2 the night after getting your letter studying about your troubles, and then I dreamed about you the rest of the night, and I thought we talked it all over, but as you said I do not expect you heard me, but when I come we will talk it over, so good by my Dear. May God bless you.  From your still loving and true husband.


Lieut. L. Lupton"


(written at the bottom on the opposite side of the letter sheet is: "it snowed all last night and all day 1 foot deep."


*1st Lieutenant James P. Mann,, served in Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was promoted to captain, June 13, 1863, and was mustered out of service at Richmond, Va., on June 14, 1865.


**Lieutenant Wilson S. Martin,, served in Co. F, 116th Ohio Infantry, from October 27, 1862, to June 14, 1865, when he was mustered out at Richmond, Va. with rank of captain. 


Light age toning and wear. The letter is incomplete as the beginning of the letter is missing. However, it has been signed by Lieutenant Lupton with rank, has some excellent content, and is circa early 1863.  


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.

 


<b>Hero of the War of 1812 and the Mexican War


General-in-Chief of the United States Army


Autograph Letter Signed


Written to the prominent lawyer and civil servant, Samuel L. Gouverneur concerning the presidency of "Old Hickory," Andrew Jackson!</b>


(1786-1866) A year older than the Constitution, the venerable Winfield Scott, hero of the War of 1812 and the Mexican War, became General in chief of the U.S. Army in 1841, a position he still held at the start of the Civil War. A true professional soldier, he was one of the very few men in the country who saw the need to prepare for a major military effort as the impending Civil War grew ever closer. His "Anacondona Plan" proved to be very sound and helped to defeat the Confederacy. Succeeded by General George B. McClellan in November 1861, he retired to write his memoirs, and died at West Point in 1866 where he is buried. A Virginian, he was the only non-West Pointer of Southern origin in the Regular Army to remain loyal to the Union. His service as the Commanding General of the United States Army for twenty years was the longest that any officer ever held  that position.  


<u>Autograph Letter Signed</u>: 7 3/4 x 9 3/4, in ink. This is the post script of a folded letter written by Winfield Scott to the prominent lawyer and civil servant, Samuel L. Gouverneur, who was both the nephew, and son-in-law of U.S. President James Monroe. The content is excellent and this post script stands on its own merits as it is both signed and dated by Winfield Scott. Known as a folded letter, this letter sheet was used not only to write the letter on, but it was then folded using a blank panel on the reverse side to address it as an envelope would be. It is entirely addressed in the hand of Winfield Scott: "To Samuel L. Gouverneur, Esqr., Post Master, New York," and it has been free franked, stamped in red, "FREE." 


P.S. The debate on the deposit question was this morning postponed till tomorrow, some five sets of resolutions on the subject having been yesterday referred to a Commissioner & a report made thereon this morning, it became necessary to print the new resolutions. Rely upon it, the removal of the deposits will be strongly condemned by an immense majority. This condemnation, I think cannot [but help] to break the administration phalanx in the U.S.H. of Representatives & induce some thirty or forty Jackson** men to vote for a restoration. Rely also upon the appearance that the President will not dare to veto the Resolution if it passes the two Houses of Congress.


Yrs. truly,

Winfield Scott

Jan. 14, 1834


**General Winfield Scott is referring to President Andrew Jackson, who was serving as the 7th President of the United States when this event happened.


The letter is in very good condition with light age toning and wear and some paper loss at the upper left corner which does not affect any of the content. There is another area of paper loss at the left edge which does cause the loss of 2 words, and there are remnants of the original red wax seal at the right edge which does not affect any of the content. Very desirable.


The recipient of this letter, Samuel L. Gouverneur, was a prominent attorney, civil servant, and both the nephew and son-in-law of the 5th President of the United States James Monroe. Born in 1799 in New York City, his mother was the sister of President Monroe's wife. After his graduation from Columbia in 1817, he served as the private secretary of his uncle President James Monroe. Gouverneur married President Monroe's daughter (his first cousin), Maria Hester Monroe, on March 9, 1820, and it was the first wedding ever held in the White House for a child of a President of the United States. General Thomas Jesup served as groomsman at the wedding. Gouverneur was a member of the New York State Assembly in 1825, and he served as Postmaster of New York City from 1828 to 1836. He  helped former president Monroe press his claims to the U.S. Congress to repay mounting debts, and after Monroe's wife's death in 1830, the former president lived with his nephew/son-in-law until his own death in 1831. Gouverneur was executor of Monroe's estate, which had to be sold off to pay the debts. Monroe was buried in the Gouverneur family vault at the New York City Marble Cemetery, until descendants had the remains moved to the James Monroe Tomb in Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia. Monroe's personal papers were left to Gouverneur, who started work on publishing them, but the project was never finished. The Gouverneur's later moved to Washington, D.C., where he worked in the consular bureau of the U.S. Department of State from 1844 to 1849. After congress agreed to buy the papers of President Monroe, Gouverneur proposed a similar arrangement, which was finally concluded in 1850. After his wife Maria died in 1850, he married Mary D. Lee, granddaughter of Thomas S. Lee, and they retired to the Lee estate called "Needwood," near Frederick, Maryland. The family relations reached a breaking point during the Civil War, as Gouverneur supported President Lincoln and the Federal Government, while his in-laws were deeply rooted in the Confederacy. Samuel L. Gouverneur died on September 29, 1865, living long enough to see the Federal victory, and peace restored to the Union that his uncle President James Monroe helped to create as one of the "Founding Fathers."

Autograph, William M. Stewart $25.00

 

2nd Mississippi Cavalry Letter $350.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $45.00

 

Autograph, General Winfield Scott $450.00




<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.</b>


2 pages, 5 x 8, written in ink, by Lieutenant Levi Lupton to his wife.


<b><u>Camp near [Parkersburg is written and crossed out], 6 0'clock, P.M.</b></u>


Dear,


I had just finished my letter to you when your letter of the 24th was brought to me and you donít know how much good it done me to hear of the improved condition of the health of my little family and I do hope that it may be permanent and that you may be blest with health. Well dear about R. Lawrence I donít know what to say. If you can get some place to suit you and are willing to try it you may grant him the house, but donít clean without you are satisfied. It may be that I will be home by the first of April, but you might promise him the house and if I come home I can make some arrangement with him. As to other matters I think I will be there to tend to matters some time this winter. I must quit as the Captain is telling me to double quick as he is waiting to take my letter to the office, so good by Dear.


Lieut. L. Lupton


Age toning, staining and fold and edge wear. 


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.

 A bit out of our usual fare but a neat piece of Americana is this 23mm die struck <B> HOTEL GLENWOOD BAR</B> merchant token <B> GOOD FOR 12 Ĺ c</B>. (Shown here with a quarter for size comparison.)  Located in Glenwood Spring, Colorado the Hotel Glenwood opened in 1887 as a two story wood structure but was over the years was destined to become an ornate three story attraction of seventy-five rooms accommodating as many as two hundred guests. The Glenwood attracted the elite of the day attracting such well known of the period as gambler, gunfighter, and dentist <B>John <I>Doc</I>Holliday</B>.  After splitting with Wyatt Earp, an ailing Holliday took up residence in Glenwood Springs, Colorado where his health continued to deteriorate.  <I>Doc</I> Holliday died of tuberculosis at the Hotel Glenwood in 1887. A nice piece of Western Americana and a neat companion piece to set in any gambling or <I>Wild West</I> grouping.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  Illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison is an eye appealing, all original, decorated birch bark snuff box.  Dating from the mid-1800s through the later 19th century these little boxes were fashioned of native pine veneered with birch bark then finished with a coat of period <I>bug</I> shellac.  The early examples offer an attractive age patina that comes to the period finish only with time.  Decorated with a moose on the hinged lid and with a geometric design familiar to native American enthusiasts around the sides, this little antique snuff box will be of interest to tobacciana folks and all manner of <I>smalls</I> enthusiasts to include Civil War personals collectors.     please note:   <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!

    

 An outstanding example of vintage Americana, this attractive old, black iron bound, canteen measures roughly 9 inches in diameter by 5 Ĺ inches thick and will fit properly in the  American Colonial and Revolutionary War era through Mexican War into Civil War eras.  Retaining its period iron suspension chain and brass drinking spout adjacent to the larger filler, this all original antique wagon, camp or Co. size canteen remains in solid condition, tight at the staves.  While the decorative star will <I>whistle Dixie</I> to the Confederate or Texas enthusiast, the history of this piece has been lost in time and must be left to speculation.  An exceptional piece of Americana!  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $65.00

 

Hotel Glenwood (Colorado home of Dock Ho

 

Victorian era - Birch Bark Snuff Box $55.00

 

outstanding early DECORATED CANTEEN $495.00

This eye appealing old iron padlock is just as you might expect to unearth at a Civil War camp site (see: Howard Crouchís (Excavated) <I>Civil War Artifacts - A Guide for the Historian</I>) except this one, while it shows good evidence of age and period use, remains in excellent smoothly functioning condition and <U>retains its original key.</U>  Difficult to find in any condition and virtually always missing the key when you do see one, this offering will make a nice addition to any Civil War period grouping and will go especially well with a period chest or lock box. As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !


 


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.</b>


2 pages, 5 x 8, written in ink, by Lieutenant Levi Lupton to his daughter.


<b><u>Romney, Va., March 14th, 1863</b></u>


Laura E. Lupton


Dear Daughter,


I thought I would write to all my dear little children this afternoon for it seems to do me more good than anything else. I can be at Hell sis. I have not much news to tell you at this time as I have put most of the news in Maggyís letter, but still I may say something too. Well I went today to see a Doctor Lupton that lives here. He is  a large, fat man, looks a little like Uncle George. He has some right nice looking children. I saw one little girl about your size, but I did not get much acquainted with them. They are pretty strong Secesh, and so I did not trouble them much. Well sis I want you and Maggy to write to me often for it does me a heap of good to get letters from my children. I want to know how you are getting along at school, if you are learning very fast and how you like your teacher. Well sis I want you to try and be a good girl and do all you can to help your Mother for she has a heap to do and a heap of trouble to bear, but if you dear Children love each other and try to please each other and please your Mother it will help her in her troubles. Good children will do all they can to help their Mother. Whatever broils disturbs the street. There should be peace at home where sisters dwell and brothers meet. Quarrels should never come. Birds in their little nests agree and it is a shameful sight for children of one family to fall out and chide and fight. Jesus who reigns above the skies and keeps the world in awe was once a child, as young as I, and kept his Fatherís law at twelve years old. He talked with men. The Jews all won during stand, but he obliged his Mother then and came at her command. From your loving Pap.


Lieut. L. Lupton


Light wear. There is an ink stain on page one, however all of the words are readable and the letter comes with a complete typed transcript. Although this will be considered a condition flaw by many, it actually humanizes Lieutenant Lupton. We can only imagine the stress and heartache he suffered being away from his wife and children and fighting in the biggest war in American history as he writes this letter to his loving daughter.  


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.

 This attractive old folding wall shelf measures 9 ĺ inches wide with a hinged fold down shelf that is 5 inches deep.  Hand carved from American black walnut with Masonic embellishment, the wall shelf remains in pleasing all original condition, country made with classic handmade wire hinges and despite its flawless condition offers clear evidence of age and originality.  A wonderful backdrop for the display of a favorite Civil War period artifact, our illustrations will offer the best description of this nice old wall shelf.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Offered here complete and as found is the stencil kit of <B>Wm. H. Whitten 21st Ind. L A</B>.  Illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison, Sgt. Whittenís marking stencil is housed in a handmade slide top box, the body of the box being fashioned from a single block of wood chiseled out and <I>channeled</I> to accommodate the sliding lid. In the box is a little period corked bottle with the original  label identifying the content <B><I>STENCIL-INDELIBLE INK</B></I> and offering directions for use in marking cloth.  With these is the original tin stencil brush and a small <I>quill</I> brush for fine hand lettering.  A small walnut straightedge is included to round out this wonderful little marking kit.  All original and as it came from decades of storage, William H. Whittenís stencil kit would have seen use in marking initial issue articles of clothing from his September 9,1862 enlistment and mustering as a Sargent of the <B>21st Indiana Light Artillery</B> and would have remained as part of his person gear through his service until mustering out on June 26 1865 after the close of the Civil War.   He had been promoted to 2nd Lt. on September 18th 1864.  Whittenís 21st  Light Artillery left the state of Indiana for Covington, Kentucky immediately upon mustering as that place was being threatened by invading Confederate forces under Gen. Kirby Smith.  From there the 21st moved to Lexington, Richmond, Danville then Louisville.  The 21st was engaged in action at  Gainesboro and Carthage and participated in the action at Hoover's Gap and the campaign against Chattanooga.  It was in an engagement at Catlett's Gap, the battle of Chickamauga and was part in the storming of Missionary Ridge.  The battery was engaged with Forrest's forces in October then on Hood's advance fell back to Nashville, where it was engaged in the battle there in December.  By mustering out the hard fought <B>21st Indiana Battery of Light Artillery</B> had lost 26 by death.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Original Civil War era ĎPat. Applied For $75.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $95.00

 

19th century carved walnut Ė MASONIC WAL $85.00

 

21st Indiana Light Artillery - Sargentís

This outstanding heavy cast and turned bronze # 8 mortar and pestle set dates to the earlier through mid 1800s and remains in eye appealing condition with good evidence of age and period use while remaining in excellent condition with a nice untouched natural age patina.  The heavy bronze mortar stands approximately 5 3/8 inches high , is 5 3/8 inches in diameter at the mouth and 3 3/8 inches across the base.  The bronze pestle is size number 8 marked as is the mortar and measures about 9 7/8 inches in length.  Not to be confused with more frequently encountered later examples or the common Chinese castings, this rarely found 19th century bronze apothecary mortar & pestle set will make a nice addition to any quality medical grouping or will go well simply as a period decorative piece. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  A nice item for the medical collector this period invalid feeder remains in excellent condition with no chips and a single hairline in the glaze as evidence of age and originality. This piece will go well with medical, nursing or hospital items of the Civil War period. see: Dammannís <I>Collectors Encyclopedia of Civil War Medical Instruments & Equipment</I>. (An example of this desirable boat shaped feeder is included in the Gettysburg Visitors Center museum collection. please note: ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!. As with all direct sales, we are pleased to offer a no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased! Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !    


 Acquired several years ago when we were fortunate enough to purchase several groupings from the personal collections of our longtime friend, Dr. Francis Lord, this piece will come with our letter to preserve its history as emanating from the personal collection of the pioneer Civil War collectables author. Our photos will provide the best description of this all original and untouched piece.  The extra heavy plate would have served equally well as a cross belt or cartridge box plate. As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques  


<b>Served as Provost Marshal at Gettysburg during the 1863 battle


United States Congressman from Pennsylvania


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress 


Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives</b> 


(1828-90) Born in Philadelphia, he attended the University Academy in Philadelphia. Member of the Pennsylvania State Senate, 1858-59. During the Civil War, he served as a member of the First Troop, Philadelphia City Cavalry, in 1861, and again as a captain in 1863, serving as Provost Marshal at Gettysburg during the campaign. He served as United States Congressman, 1863-90, and was the 33rd Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, serving from 1876-81. He was also the powerful chairman of the Committee on Appropriations, 1883-87. Highly regarded, Randall gained national prominence during the Reconstruction period when he exposed scandals in President Ulysses S. Grant's administration. 


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 5 1/4 x 2 1/4, in ink, Sam J. Randall, Philada. Excellent.

Vintage - Bronze APOTHECARY MORTAR & PES $125.00

 

19th century Hospital / Invalid Feeder $55.00

 

Lord collection earlier 19th century thr $175.00

 

Autograph, Samuel J. Randall $35.00




<b>He was stricken with yellow fever and died in 1862!</b>


(1809-1862) Graduated in the West Point class of 1829. In the next 7 years he served as an instructor at the United States Military Academy, studied law, was admitted to the bar, resigned from the army, and became a member of the faculty of Cincinnati College where he taught astronomy, philosophy and mathematics. It was as a dedicated student of astronomy that Mitchel gained his claim to fame. He was largely responsible for establishing the Naval Observatory, the Harvard Observatory, the Cincinnati Observatory, and the Dudley Observatory. On August 9, 1861, President Lincoln appointed him a brigadier general of volunteers and he was assigned as commander of the Department of the Ohio. In March 1862, he seized the Memphis and Charleston Railroad at Huntsville, Alabama, and sent raiding parties into Stevenson and Decatur to secure the tracks for the Union army. He was promoted to major general on April 11, 1862. He then commanded the Department of the South and was stricken with yellow fever and died at Beaufort, S.C., on October 30, 1862. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Seated view in uniform with rank of major general, posing with his arms folded across his chest and wearing his gauntlets. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Pencil inscription on the reverse, "Maj. Gen. Mitchell, deceased." Very sharp image. Scarce view. Very desirable photograph.  


<b>Written by an officer who was captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.!</b>


2 pages, 5 x 8, written in pencil by Lieutenant Levi Lupton to his wife. 


<b><u>Macon, Georgia, Sunday, May 29th, 1864</b></u>


My Dear Wife,


After my love to you and best wishes for your welfare I will inform you that I am in pretty good health at present and so are most of our fellow prisoners, and I do hope that you may be blessed with health and strength to bear up under your trials and afflictions that you have to endure. I have not recd. a letter from you for more than a month. The last I got was dated the 4th of April and in fact I donít know whether we will get letters here at all or not, or whether our letters will be ever sent away, but I think they will, but it will take from 4 to 6 weeks for one to reach you. I had nothing new to write. May the Lord bless and keep you and my Dear children is my humble prayer. Kiss little Levi for me and pray for me. Good by Dear from your loving husband.


Lt. Levi Lupton

 

[To]

Mrs. E.H.  Lupton

Jerusalem, 

Monroe Co., Ohio  

 

Light age toning and wear. Minor paper loss at the lower right corner and left edge. 


Lieutenant Lupton wrote this letter to his wife after being moved from Richmond where he had been held in captivity at Libby Prison since June of 1863, and he was now confined at Macon, Georgia. 


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


WBTS Trivia: Macon, the county seat of Bibb County, is located near the center of the state of Georgia, approximately 85 miles south of Atlanta, and it thus earned the nickname, "The Heart of Georgia." During the War Between The States, Macon, served as the official arsenal of the Confederacy. Camp Oglethorpe, in Macon, was first used as a prison for captured Union officers and enlisted men. Later it held officers only, with up to 2,300 at one time. The camp was evacuated in 1864. Macon City Hall, which served as the temporary state capitol in 1864, was converted into a hospital for wounded Confederate soldiers. Union General William Tecumseh Sherman spared Macon on his infamous "March to the Sea." His troops had sacked the nearby state capital of Milledgeville, and so the city prepared for an imminent attack, however Sherman passed by without entering Macon. The city was later captured by Union forces led by General James H, Wilson during his raid on April 20, 1865.  


<b>Written by an officer who was captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.!</b>


2 pages, 5 x 8, in neatly written pencil hand by Lieutenant Levi Lupton to his wife. 


<b><u>Macon, Georgia, May 19th, 1864</b></u>


My Dear Wife,


After my love to you and the children and earnest prayers for your welfare, I will inform you that I am in pretty good health though not very stout and still a prisoner. On last Friday week I was paroled and started for home, but after getting about thirty miles we were ordered back and on the next morning left Richmond for Danville [Virginia] where we staid till last Thursday when we were sent on here. We have about two acres of ground to walk about in which is a great comfort to us, and pretty good quarters besides, but I do hope to get home soon, but Dear for fear I should not think you had better go to Columbus and draw some of my wages for I think you must need some money pretty bad by this time. Hunter or some of the men would give you instructions how to get it or maybe get it for you. My greatest trouble is for fear of your troubles and suffering of both body and mind, but put your trust in God and pray for husband and may the good Lord keep you safe until we meet again is the prayer of your ever loving husband.  


Lt. Levi Lupton


[to] Mrs. E.H. Lupton, Jerusalem, Monroe Co., Ohio


Light age toning and wear. 


Lieutenant Lupton wrote this letter to his wife after being moved from Richmond where he had been held in captivity at Libby Prison since June of 1863. One can only imagine the distress and utter disappointment and helplessness that Lieutenant Lupton suffered when at first he thought he was going home from Richmond, only to have the order countermanded and the Union prisoners he was with turned around and sent even further south into Georgia!  


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


WBTS Trivia: Macon, the county seat of Bibb County, is located near the center of the state of Georgia, approximately 85 miles south of Atlanta, and it thus earned the nickname, "The Heart of Georgia." During the War Between The States, Macon, served as the official arsenal of the Confederacy. Camp Oglethorpe, in Macon, was first used as a prison for captured Union officers and enlisted men. Later it held officers only, with up to 2,300 at one time. The camp was evacuated in 1864. Macon City Hall, which served as the temporary state capitol in 1864, was converted into a hospital for wounded Confederate soldiers. Union General William Tecumseh Sherman spared Macon on his infamous "March to the Sea." His troops had sacked the nearby state capital of Milledgeville, and so the city prepared for an imminent attack, however Sherman passed by without entering Macon. The city was later captured by Union forces led by General James H, Wilson during his raid on April 20, 1865.  


<b>United States Congressman from Maryland


Governor of Maryland</b>


(1810-81) Born near Farmville, Prince Edward County, Va., he attended Hampden-Sidney College and the University of Virginia at Charlottesville in 1830 and 1831; studied law at Yale College; was admitted to the bar in 1833 and practiced in Baltimore, 1835-1853 and in other places in Maryland. He served as a member of the Maryland State House of Delegates in 1843. Was a U.S. Congressman, 1845-1849. Served as the Governor of Maryland, 1854-1858. 


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 6 x 1 1/8, in ink, T.W. Ligon, Ellicott, Md. Cut closely at the top edge.

CDV, General Ormsby M. Mitchel $125.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $125.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $150.00

 

Autograph, Thomas W. Ligon $15.00

We have three of these rare black iron door nails recovered from a museum deaccession and are offering them here individually priced for the collector who would like one.  Hand forged with a broad decorative head the <I>door nail</I> served to protect the heavy oak primary entrance doors of the time from damage and forced entry.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!




 


Multi-color lithograph done by Kurz & Allison, 76-78 Wabash Ave., Chicago.

Copyright 1893. Titled, "Fall Of Petersburg." Overall size is approximately 23 3/4 x 18. This is a reprint of the original Kurz & Allison 1893 edition done on heavy paper stock with vivid colors. There are wide 1 plus inch white borders on all sides. Circa 1960. It is my understanding that these were printed around the time of the Civil War Centennial celebrations using the original plates to print these. There were other reprints done much later (1979) of these Kurz & Allison Civil War battle scenes which are much smaller in size (about 12 x 15). Light edge wear in the border area that does not affect the content of the print in anyway, and which can easily be matted out. Very fine battle scene lithograph featuring the action between the Union forces commanded by General U.S. Grant, and the Confederate forces commanded by General R.E. Lee, on April 2, 1865. This would look great framed.


WBTS Trivia: Confederate Lieutenant General A.P. Hill was killed in action during the fall of Petersburg, Va. The loss of this strategic rail center, just north of Richmond, was the death knell of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia.  General Robert E. Lee surrendered his forces 7 days later at Appomattox Court House, Va.   


<b>United States Congressman from Maryland


Member of the 1861 Peace Conference that tried to avert the Civil War!</b>


(1806-97) Born near Chestertown, Kent County, Md., he was educated at Washington College, Chestertown, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1830, and commenced practice in Princess Anne, Somerset County. He served as a member of the Maryland State House of Representatives in 1836. He was a member of the U.S. Congress, 1847-49. He was a delegate to the Maryland State constitutional convention in 1850; and served as a member of the 1861 peace conference held in Washington, D.C., whose goal was to try and prevent the impending Civil War. He returned to the U.S. Congress in 1861 serving until 1863. He was a delegate to the Union National Convention at Philadelphia in 1866. He located and founded the town of Crisfield, Somerset County, Md., in 1866; was instrumental in building the Eastern Shore Railroad and served as its president.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 6 1/4 x 1 1/4, in ink, J.W. Crisfield, Princess Anne, Maryland.  


<b>Unites States Congressman from Massachusetts</b>


(1795-1881) Born in Marlboro, Middlesex County, Mass., he fought in the War of 1812. He studied theology, was ordained as a Universalist minister in 1819, and was the author of religious textbooks and sacred memoirs. He served as a member of the Massachusetts State House of Representatives, 1828-33; served in the Massachusetts State Senate, 1833-39; and was a member of the Massachusetts State Board of Education, 1837-45. He served as a U.S. Congressman, 1841-49. He was a naval officer for the port of Boston from 1849-53. He edited the Boston Daily Atlas; and was an assessor of internal revenue from 1864-68.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 6 x 1 1/2, in ink, Charles Hudson, Westminster, Mass.

17th early 18th century forged iron DOOR $30.00

 

The Fall of Petersburg, Virginia $75.00

 

Autograph, John W. Crisfield $25.00

 

Autograph, Charles Hudson $10.00

Fresh seasoning was a premium to the pallet in Colonial America through the Civil War and into the later 19th century.   By that time improved refrigeration and food preservation reduced the common use of seasoning to something more pleasurable than masking the taint of <I>gone buy</I> food.  Salt and pepper were the most commonly used seasonings with the heavy use of salt as a drying agent and preservative the most familiar.  Next in line, not as a preservative but as a masking agent was the nutmeg.  So prized  was the nutmeg in the 18th century that the walnut size woody seed  was commonly used as tender for trade and bartering.  This traveling grater with itsí lidded storage compartment  for the pungent little nut falls in the waining days of the time when the nutmeg was so well thought of that fakes were carved from dark hardwood for trade.  A neat piece of Americana of the Civil War period, this example retains much of itsí original <I>japanning</I> lacquer finish. (illustrated here with a U.S. quarter for size comparison)  A neat <I>common item</I> seldom considered worthy of preservation original period examples are seldom encountered in this condition.  A neat little personal item for the Civil War haversack without spending a lot of money.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!


      Measuring approximately 9 ĺ X 13 inches this Petersburg, Virginia slave merchant broadside is in delicate condition with some tattering of its thin southern pulp paper but remains entirely original.  Emanating years ago from an attic clean out here in coastal Maine, we simply shrink wrapped it on acid free board and have maintained it in our collection as you see it.   A nice size for display and restorible though it may be, weíd leave this piece as is except for proper mounting.   The broadside was issued by Benjamin F. Childrey who, per his announcement, maintains an office at <B>No. 30 Bollingdrook St., ONE DOOR BELOW MESS[ERS] BOISSEAU & HARRISON</B>.  The Petersburg merchant advises:  <B>NEGROES WANTED</B> <I>, that he has received an order to buy <B>Fifty Likely YOUNG NEGROES <U>For the State of Tennessee</U></B> and that <B>THE HIGHEST CASH PRICES</B>  The broadside bears a penciled date (1859) notation of unknown origin which appears to be supported by a partial date (59) still discernable along the tattered bottom edge.  The <I>F. Childrey </I> and partial <I>burg</I> appearing at the right of this edge is research identifiable as <B>B. F. CHILDERY</B> of <B>Petersburg, Va. </B>   Our <I>Boisseau & Harrison </I> photo insert is from the period and verifies their location in Petersburg, Va. as per the broadside.  Our own rudimentary research placed B. F. Childery as a period Petersburg merchant of varying purpose from grocer to estate sale merchant with a number of partnerships over time.  By the 1870 he appears to have become associated with city government at one point holding position as Petersburgís <I>Water Commissioner</I> and later serving as <I>Justice of the Mayorís Court</I> where he heard and handed down <I>justice</I> in all manner of cases from public intoxication to criminal.  Our photos will do best with respect to condition and details of the content of this striking piece of just pre Civil War Americana.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques  This attractive bronze collar bell measures approximately 4 7/8 inches across the mouth and stands about 4 1/4 inches high.  The bell sports an attractive cast in panoply of American Eagles with shield, banner and star bursts. ( Examples of these bells, with an account of their origin, may be seen in the U. S. Army Quartermaster Museum collection at Fort Lee Virginia.)   These bells were cast under contract to the U. S. Army during the Pierce and Buchanan administrations for use by experimental Army camel pack trains moving from Texas to the West Coast.  (Camels were trained to follow the lead or <I>Bell Camel</I> during long marches from Texas to the West coast).   Bells remaining in arsenal storage are said to have been pressed into use by the Union Army later in the Civil War with collectors of that era referring to the artifacts as <I>Union Cavalry Bells</I> referencing Dr. Francis Lordís <I>Civil War Collectors Encyclopedia</I>.  Rarely seen in any size, these bells were cast in three sizes, this example being the intermediate of the three.  Sand cast and machined to a smooth surface at the mouth, this bell has a period blacksmith forged iron clapper and strap loop.  An attractive piece of Americana, this Army issue bell will go well with frontier West through Civil War era collectables.  (<B>NOTE: </B> Collectors are cautioned that modern cast reproductions of this bell are showing up.  Like most cast reproductions however, they are generally easily discernible to the experienced eye.) As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !


 Our photos will likely do best to describe this extra nice Sons of Union Veterans hat device.  All original and period, this G. A. R. auxiliary hat device is of gold wash, finely die struck brass in the <I>extra rich</I> false bullion style.  All complete and original with safety clasp pin and silvered <B>SUV</I> with Post # <B>46</B>.  (The numbers are easily removed but we would leave this fine condition piece as is.)  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

antique traveling NUTMEG GRATER $45.00

 

c. 1859 - Petersburg, Virginia Ė SLAVE BR $1895.00

 

Civil War & earlier U. S. ARMY BELL $245.00

 

period - Sons of Union Veterans - HAT DE $50.00

A great size for display, this 15 ľ X 5 1/8 inch sheet brass marking stencil is for the <B>RULOFSON & De GARMOíS  IMPROVED  STRAIGHT DRAFT PLOW  PATENTED MARCH 12, 1861</B>.  The stencil sports a rich natural patina with good evidence of age, originality and period use.  It bears the marking of the stencil cutter <I>H. J. HOGGSON  NEW HAVEN Ct.</I>; fore-runner to the later <I>J. J. Hoggson & Pettis Manufacturing Co.</I>, New Haven makers of stamps and marking devices. (see: spring 1861 <I>RURAL NEW YORKER</I> for particulars on this Pat. 1861 plow)  An eye-catching Civil War vintage agricultural, rural Americana item. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 This attractive 19th century drover whip measures just under 9 feet in length and retains the original <B>Weaver & Bardall / Drover Whip</B> copper plate on the butt.  The whip remains in pleasing condition, flexible with especially nice display eye appeal.  With good age and evidence of originality, our illustrations will do best to describe this piece  except to offer a word about the makers. Longtime local Allegheny, Pennsylvania whip manufacturer  Charles A. Weaver became the moving force in the firm of Weaver & Bardall, when it set up shop in Moundsville, West Virginia in 1877.  Here the firm had secured a contract with the <B>West Virginia State Penitentiary</B> to <U> operate within the prison walls utilizing convict labor.</U>  An interesting article on  West Virginiaís use of Penitentiary labor, management conditions and inmates in the April 18, 1886 <I>Wheeling Register</I> article <I>Tales of Lawless Life Told by Life Prisoners</I> Etc.  by Special Correspondence of the Sunday Register. An outstanding piece of 19th century Americana.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  Boldly marked on one side for vertical display this colorful U. C. V. banner measures 12 inches wide at the top and is 22 inches in total length.   Stencil printed on cotton in the fashion common to the turn of the century the banner remains solid with some tattering yet bright in color and appears never to have been exposed to the weather or bright sun while offering good evidence of age and originality. Just rediscovered as we rummage through our long ago tucked away <I>stuff</I>, this old banner was recovered as part of a small grouping from, of all places, the attic remains of a long ago defunct <I>Yankee</I> G. A. R. hall. (Those were the days!) How the banner came to Maine Civil War veteran hall storage can only be left to the imagination though it seems more than likely that the piece was a souvenir of a trip South for one of the joint G. A. R. Ė U. C. V. reunions common in the waning years of first generation Civil War veterans.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  


(1815-1872) Graduated 3rd in the West Point class of 1839. An assistant professor while still an undergraduate at the Military Academy, he first worked upon the fortifications of New York Harbor, and in 1844 inspected those of France. Upon his return to the U.S., he wrote a Report on the Means of National Defence, which was published by Congress and won him an invitation from the Lowell Institute of Boston to deliver a series of lectures. These were published as Elements of Military Art and Science, a work which enjoyed wide circulation among soldiers for many years. He received a brevet as captain in the Mexican War. At the beginning of the Civil War, General Winfield Scott recommended to Abraham Lincoln that Halleck be appointed major general in the regular service. In November 1861, Halleck relieved General Fremont at St. Louis and in a demonstration of his talents as an administrator quickly brought order out of the chaos in which his predecessor had plunged the Department of the Missouri. A series of successes by his subordinates at Forts Henry & Donelson, Pea Ridge, Island No. 10 and Shiloh, caused Halleck to shine in reflective glory, and his domain enlarged to include Ohio and Kansas. President Lincoln later recalled him to Washington to serve as general in chief of the U.S. Armies. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Standing view of Halleck in uniform with rank of major general striking a Napoleonic pose. Backmark: D. Appleton & Co., 443 & 445 Broadway, N.Y., A.A. Turner, Photographer. "Genl. Halleck" is written in period script on the reverse. Very fine view of the Union general nicknamed "Old Brains."

Large period agricultural stencil Ė Pate $225.00

 

19th century - West Virginia Penitentiar $345.00

 

Late 1880s / early 1900s UNITED CONFEDER $195.00

 

CDV, General Henry W. Halleck $95.00




<b>Front page articles on the death of General George Armstrong Custer at the battle of the Little Big Horn & the death of Mexican General and President Antonio Lopez De Santa Anna who led the Mexican Army at the battle of The Alamo!</b>


Bellefonte, Pa., July 14, 1876. Just below the ornate masthead is the slogan, "State Rights And Federal Union." The front page of the newspaper includes lengthy stories about the death of General George A. Custer, the famous Civil War general who was killed in the great Indian battle fought at the Little Big Horn, in Montana Territory; the death of General Antonio Lopez De Santa Anna the famous Mexican general and president who led the Mexican Army at the historic battle at The Alamo. Santa Anna was later captured by General Sam Houston at the battle of San Jacinto. Another front page story is about Judge David Davis, an intimate friend of President Abraham Lincoln, and the politics that Davis is involved in at this time. There is also an interesting story about Fred Grant, the son of President U.S. Grant that says, "Fred Grant never saw a single day of actual service since he entered the army and does nothing but loaf around Washington, yet the President has sent his name to the Senate for promotion over the heads of distinguished soldiers and Indian fighters. Was it for this that the gallant CUSTER and his brave men died? O, Shame! where is thy blush?" Another front page story is about The Kansas Land and Immigrant Association; another is titled, A Correct Idea of the Radical Platform, and there is much more. The interior pages also have some very interesting and lengthy articles about Governor Samuel J. Tilden; Governor Thomas A. Hendricks of Indiana; and Remarks of the Honorable Edward McPherson. There is another excellent lengthy story about General Custer inside of the newspaper with the headlines, CUSTER'S DEATH. Full Particulars of the Terrible Catastrophe. Five Companies of Cavalry Annihilated. The Guard Dies But Never Surrenders. Custer's Body Found Surrounded by a Dozen Dead Defenders. Much more news. Very fine and desirable item from America's Centennial anniversary year!       


Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1996. 10 1/4 x 10 1/4, hardcover with dust jacket, 168 pages, illustrated, index. New condition.


This book is by and of the soldiers and civilians who experienced the Atlanta campaign. Through their words and images you can relive the emotions, the terrifying rush of events, the horrors- and even the human comedy- of one of the Civil War's major campaigns. Thus, you hold in your hands an album of personal recollections from letters, diaries, photographs, sketches and artifacts.


To compile this special volume, we combed hundreds of sources, both published and unpublished.  We were able to assemble a dramatic narrative told from many perspectives; manuscript letters and journals- some previously unpublished- regimental histories, privately printed memoirs, articles in little known historical society publications, and more. Then, we set about the painstaking task of locating photographs of the soldiers and townsfolk to accompany their personal accounts. 


That so many firsthand accounts survived is due to a few accidents of history. Soldiers could mail a letter home for only three cents. And the mail system set up by the opposing armies were amazingly reliable. Mail packets were even exchanged across enemy lines. A surprising number of recruits could write, and write vividly. Sam Watkins of the 1st Tennessee Infantry described the beginning of the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, "It seemed that the arch-angel of Death stood and looked on with outstretched wings, while all the earth was silent, when all at once a hundred guns from the Federal line opened upon us, and for more than an hour they poured their solid shot, grape and shrapnel right upon this salient point, defended by our regiment alone..."


Field sketches abound, too. Before photoengraving was developed to reproduce photographs in newspapers and magazines, periodicals such as Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper and Harper's Weekly employed artists who traveled with the army to depict events for readers. These correspondents, or "specials," drew virtually everything of possible interest; pitched battles, lounging soldiers, the odd piece of military equipment. Sketches dashed off in a few moments during a battle- often at great personal peril- were taken by courier to the publication, where they were transformed into woodblock engravings suitable for printing.


Another element that adds to the unique texture of this album is the photographs. Technical innovations during the 1850's brought the fledgling craft into its own, and the Civil War was the first in history to be extensively recorded by the camera. In the blockaded South, photographers lacked supplies and equipment and rarely covered the action. The North's activities, by contrast, are extensively chronicled, thanks to the efforts of men who endured great hardship. Travel was tedious with cumbersome equipment and portable darkrooms mounted on wagon beds. But photographers like Mathew Brady and his assistants spent months following the army, etching with light the brave faces of the soldiers, as well as the bodies stiffened on the field. When Brady's stark photographs of the dead were first exhibited in New York City in 1862, the public thought, albeit briefly, that such horrific images could actually bring the war to an end.


So you hold in your hands living testimony from the battlefields that led to the fall of the South's Gate City. As you look into the eyes of these husbands and wives, sons and daughters, as you read the words of soldiers and civilians dazed by the violence around them or the grief that follows the fighting, perhaps it will be possible to perceive more clearly the shattering experience that was the Atlanta campaign.


Front cover illustration: A scene at the intersection of Peachtree Street and the Georgia Railroad tracks shows some of the damage that was wrought in Atlanta after Sherman's troops ravaged the business district in mid November 1864.        


Authentic, original woodcut engraving that has been hand tinted in color and was published in the June 13, 1863 issue of Harper's Weekly. Caption: A Group of Union Prisoners Escorted Through A Rebel Town. 15 x 11. Drawn by the famous illustrator Thomas Nast with his signature printed at the lower right corner of the print. Harper's Weekly and date are printed in the margin.  


<b>4th Regiment Mississippi Infantry Volunteers


Signed by their gallant Colonel Joseph Drake commanding the regiment, who was captured at the fall of Fort Donelson!</b>


7 1/4 x 12, imprinted Confederate form on blue paper, filled out and signed in ink.


Form No. 3. Officers' Pay Account. The Confederate States to Lt. A.M. Reasons. For pay as a Lt. from 24th Aug. to 1st Dec., 1861. Co. F, 4th Regt. Miss. Vols. For 3 months and 8 days. Pay Per Month, 80.00. Amount 261.33. Stationed at Fort Henry with the account dated Dec. 22nd, 1861. There is a large imprinted paragraph at the center of the document certifying the accuracy of this account, etc.....It continues, "that I am not in arrears with the Confederate States on any account whatsoever; and that the last payment I received was from Paymaster was mustered into Service and to the 24 day of Aug. 1861. I at the same time acknowledge that I have received of H.T. Massengale Paymaster, this 24 day of Dec., 1861, the sum of Two Hundred Sixty One, 261, and 33 cents, being the amount in full of said account.


The document has a large A.E.S. as follows, "Approved, Joseph Drake, Col. 4th Regmt. Miss. Vols."


Signed very nicely at the bottom of the form by the officer whose pay account this is as, "A.M. Reasons, 3rd Lieut., 4th Reg. Miss. Vols."


Content on the reverse:


No. 382

Form No.3.

Officers' Pay Account.

A.M. Reasons

2 Lt.

From 24 Aug/61

To 1 Dec/61

261.33


Ornate Confederate imprinted form in excellent condition. Rare document from Fort Henry, Tennessee only about 6 weeks before the fort was captured by the Federal forces commanded by General Ulysses S. Grant. This was the first important Union victory in the western theater and it was the start of General Grant's star rising in the Northern press and among its citizenry. Very desirable Confederate document.


<u>Joseph Drake</u>: (1806-78) He was a lawyer, judge, and plantation owner, Confederate Colonel during the War Between the States, who led a brigade in two important battles, and served as a member of the Mississippi State Legislature before and during the war. His grandfather, Joseph Drake, was one of Daniel Boone's Kentucky "Long Hunters" who was killed by Indians near Boonesborough, Kentucky, in August of 1778. He attended Washington College in Lexington, Virginia in 1825-26, studied law, and was sworn in as an attorney in Carroll County, Mississippi in 1834. In 1835, Drake served as district attorney of the Circuit Court of the county, and he represented Carroll County in the Mississippi State House of Representatives from 1838Ė39, and served as probate Judge of Carroll County, from 1855-61. Drake was elected Captain of Company H, "Carroll County Rebels," which mustered into the  Mississippi State service at Carrollton, on August 24, 1861, and was organized at Grenada, Mississippi, as the 4th Regiment Mississippi Infantry, in the Second Brigade, Army of Mississippi, and they were enlisted for twelve months. He was elected Colonel of the regiment on September 11, 1861, in a camp near Trenton, Tennessee. The 4th Mississippi Infantry was then put under General Earl Van Dorn's command. After being promoted to major general on September 19, 1861, Van Dorn was transferred to Virginia under General Joseph E. Johnston. The 4th Mississippi infantry, which had been detached from Van Dorn's division was one of the two regiments at Fort Henry which were experienced in war, and the men conducted themselves as veterans. Colonel Joseph Drake sent two companies of Mississippians to meet the first advance of the enemy on February 4th, who held the rifle-pits alone until reinforced. During the bombardment of the 6th, which resulted in the surrender of Fort Henry, Colonel Drake commanded General Tilghman's 2nd Brigade. After the naval attack compelled the surrender of Fort Henry, Drake retreated to Fort Donelson, where he commanded General Bushrod Johnson's 3rd brigade. The 4th Mississippi was under fire in the trenches at Donelson during February 13th and 14th, and participated in the assault which was made on the 15th for the purpose of opening a line of retreat. General Johnson reported that Drake's Brigade, under its very gallant, steady and efficient commander, moved in admirable precision, almost constantly under fire, driving the enemy slowly from hill to hill until about 1 p.m., when he was instructed to return to the rifle pits. This left Drake's Brigade unsupported for a time, until Colonel Nathan Bedford Forrest went to Drake's support and advised him to fall back, which he did without disorder. Colonel Smith's brigade advanced a short distance up the hill, repeatedly rushing and then falling to the ground in the prone position, all the while listening to taunts from Drake's Confederate Brigade opposing them. The surrender of Fort Donelson followed on the 16th. It is said that Colonel Drake broke his sword and threw it in the river when told of the surrender. Colonel Drake went on a monumental journey after his capture initially being imprisoned at Johnson's Island; he was then admitted to the Prison Hospital, at Camp Douglas, Chicago, Illinois, on February 21, 1862; then transferred to Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio, on March 1st; transferred again on March 6th, to Fort Warren, Boston Harbor; and was released on parole on April 7, 1862, for the purpose of being exchanged for Union Colonel Milton Cogswell, of the 42nd New York Volunteers. He retired from the Confederate army after he was exchanged on August 27, 1862, considered to be too old for active service at 56 years of age. Colonel Joseph Drake then returned to his plantation and served as a member the Mississippi State Senate from Carroll County in 1864. He had a son, John Breckenridge Drake, (1840Ė1922) who served in Company K, of the 30th Mississippi Infantry, and who  surrendered on April 26, 1865, at Durham Station, North Carolina.


A.M. Reasons, enlisted on August 1, 1861, as a 2nd lieutenant, and was commissioned into Co. F, 4th Mississippi Infantry. He resigned on June 17, 1862. On September 1, 1862, he was commissioned captain in Co. F, 2nd Mississippi Partisan Rangers Cavalry. His date of discharge is not known.

The Democratic Watchman, July 14, 1876

 

Voices of the Civil War, Atlanta $35.00

 

A Group of Union Prisoners Escorted Thro

 

Confederate Officer's Pay Account From F $250.00

This attractive little hand lamp was constructed from lead soldered, tinned sheet iron with a broad die truck base and classic long brass burner tube for use with camphene.  All original and untouched just as it was set aside decades ago. Most popularly in use in the 1840s & 1850s, camphene lighting fuel from, highly refined turpentine produced a bright clean light. Largely replaced in lighting by coal oil in the 1860s, camphene was extremely volatile necessitating the small diameter wick and longer burner tubes than were used with whale oil lighting fuel.  The longer burner tube, with a broad base were all common safety features of these  camphene finger lamps.  A nice all original little lamp illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison.   <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best.  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !


 Our illustrations will do best to describe this grouping of seven original Indian Wars era <I>general service</I> uniform coat buttons except to advise that they are all back marked by <I>HORSTMAN</I>.  A nice grouping at a reasonable price. <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!  


<b>Written by an officer who was captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.!</b>


1 plus pages, 5 x 8, in bold pencil hand, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, to his wife. 


<b><u>Danville, [Virginia] May 9th, 1864</b></u>


Dear wife,


After my love to you I will inform you that I recd. a letter from you date the 4th of April which found me in pretty good health. I was very sorry to hear that the children was sick for it does seem that you have trouble on all sides. I will now tell you of my troubles. On last Friday they paroled a lot of us and started us to the North and I felt sure of getting home. We got about 40 miles when from some cause the order was to turn back and back they brought us to Richmond and on Saturday they sent us to this place, but I do hope it won't be long before I get home. May God uphold you is the prayer of your loving husband.  


Lt. Levi Lupton


Written on the reverse side is: 


Dear wife,


Direct to Lt. L. Lupton, Prisoner of War, Danville, Va.


From Lt. Levi Lupton to Mrs. E.H. Lupton, Jerusalem, Monroe Co., Ohio


Light wear, tiny paper chip at left edge of the stationary, and age toning. This looks to be the first letter that Lieutenant Lupton wrote to his wife after being transferred from Richmond where he had been held in captivity at Libby Prison since June of 1863. One can only imagine the distress and utter disappointment and helplessness that Lieutenant Lupton suffered when at first he thought he was going home having travelled some 40 miles from Richmond, only to have the order countermanded and the Union prisoners he was with turned around and sent even further south!  


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.




Brief history of Danville, Virginia during the War Between the States:


During the four years of war, the town was transformed into a strategic center of Confederate activity. Local planter and industrialist William T. Sutherlin was named quartermaster of its depot, the rail center being critical for supplying Confederate forces, and a hospital station was established there for Confederate wounded. A network of batteries, breastworks, redoubts and rifle pits defended the town.


A prison camp was established here, by converting several tobacco warehouses, including one owned by Sutherlin, for use to hold Yankee prisoners of war. At one time they held more than 5,000 captured Federal soldiers. Starvation and dysentery, plus a smallpox epidemic in 1864, caused the death of 1,314 of these prisoners. Their remains have been interred in the Danville National Cemetery.


The Richmond and Danville Railroad was the main supply route into Petersburg, where General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia was holding the defensive line to protect Richmond. The Danville supply trains ran until General George Stoneman's Yankee cavalry tore up the railroad tracks. This event was immortalized in the song, "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down."


Danville became the last headquarters of the Confederate States of America. President Jefferson Davis stayed at the Sutherlin mansion from April 3rd to the 10th, of 1865. It was here that he wrote and issued his last Presidential Proclamation. 


The final Confederate Cabinet meeting was held at the Benedict House in Danville. Davis and members of his cabinet left Danville when they learned of General Lee's surrender at Appomattox, and moved to Greensboro, North Carolina. On the day they left, Virginia Governor William Smith arrived there from Lynchburg to establish his headquarters.  


<b>Written on "Union" patriotic letter sheet


"We see in almost every paper that [General Stonewall] Jackson is coming on to us with a very large force, but we ainít scared much. Wilson, you had better think that cannon balls make a loud noise. I seen one strike near a man. He walked along a few steps when another struck in a few feet of him then he ran, the thought, it was time to get away. When a shell strikes the ground it makes the dirt fly in every direction."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, on patriotic letter sheet, with an illustration of Columbia seated next to an American shield with a sword on the ground, and the motto "UNION" printed below the vignette. Written by Private William R. Tittle, to his brother, future Union private, Samuel Wilson Tittle. Comes with the rare imprinted regimental envelope. Addressed to Mr. Samuel W. Tittle, Melmore, Seneca Co., Ohio, C.D.S., Winchester, Va., Jul. 2, with 3 cents rose George Washington postage stamp Scott #64]. Imprinted regimental imprint at the top of the cover, "From 55th Regiment O.V., U.S.A. Docket written at the bottom of the envelope indicating the place and date of the letter, "Cedar Creek, Va., June 30/62." 


<b><u>Camp on Cedar Creek, [Virginia], June 30th, 1862</b></u>


Dear Brother,


I received Allenís letter 28 and was glad to hear that Sarah was getting better and hope that she is well before this time and hope these few lines may find you all well.  I was surprised to hear that you had not heard from me from the 21st of May.  It is sure I had never wrote home from [when] we left Franklin till we came back to Mt. Jackson.  There I wrote home.  This was the first chance I had to write.  We couldnít get paper and we didnít have time.  When we did stop we was all so tired that we didnít care much about writing, but at the same time we are always glad to hear from our friends at all times tired or rested.  Then I wrote a week ago yesterday from Strasburg.  I give an account of our fight as near as I could and marching.  We made some hard days marches since we left Franklin.  I have got all my letters that was sent to me lately.  We didnít get any mail for one week after we left Petersburg and since then we have got it middling regular.  I have never got a letter from Benjamin and I would like to know what is the reason  he donít write.  Wilson, I would like to know whether any of you has any notion of enlisting.  If you should mind, and consider all things, for there is a great many that didnít and you may easily know how such ones like it by this time.  It is not playing war here like it was at Camp McClellan.  I have got the first time to fall out of the ranks yet, but the 2 day of June we stopped at one oíclock and there was only 12 to stack arms in Co. H and another Co. was about the same and I couldnít of went 1 mile further.  Now I would like to know what officers gain in running men so fast, but I am satisfied to do all I can.  Our train came yesterday about 1 oíclock with our tents and cooking utensils and knapsacks.  We soon had our tents up and sleeped in them last night.  Very soon after we had them up it commenced to rain.  It appears like living again, but it is not likely that we will stay here long.  We see in almost every paper that [General Stonewall] Jackson is coming on to us with a very large force, but we ainít scared much.  Wilson, you had better think that cannon balls make a loud noise.  I seen one strike near a man.  He walked along a few steps when another struck in a few feet of him then he ran, the thought, it was time to get away.  When a shell strikes the ground it makes the dirt fly in every direction.  This is a fine valley.  There is a large crop of wheat standing here and I think the most of it will not be cut for there is not men enough here to cut it and there is a large crop of corn, but very little of it is worked any.  There isnít one acre out of ten that is cultivated.  Our clothing has got through to the poor house.  They have lost a good deal more than they ought to have done.  They made a mistake at New Creek about the weight.  The whole thing cost somewhere about 3 dollars and Clay Holtz [1] the other fellow they sent along is likely taken prisoner.  He was left at Franklin and that is the last we have heard of him.  There was some of the boys that was left there taken.  There is a good many officers belonging to the 55th Regt. resigning on account of poor health.  The officers belonging to Co. H is all right yet.  Mr. Tallman [2] and Riker [3] and several others didnít come here.  They was sent on to the post hospital 12 miles from Cumberland.  Ed Holmes [4] and Lewis Perkley [5] have been quite poorly.  They was overheated by marching.  All that Ralph has to do is to stop and get their things at Folkners.  I will pay my part here.  I must close for this time and hope these few lines may find you all well.


From your Brother,

 

Wm. R. Tittle to S.W. Tittle


Light staining. Misspelled words. Very fine patriotic letter sheet. Excellent content. Rare imprinted regimental cover. Bold and neatly written.


The hard fought 55th Ohio Infantry saw action at McDowell, Va., Franklin, Va., Luray, Va., Cedar Mountain, Va., 2nd Bull Run, Va., Chancellorsville, Va., Gettysburg, Pa., Aldie, Va., Bristoe Station, Va., Missionary Ridge, Tenn., Resaca, Ga., New Hope Church, Ga., Kennesaw Mountain, Ga., Marietta, Ga., Peach Tree Creek, Ga., Atlanta, Ga., Savannah, Ga., Averysboro, N.C., Bentonville, N.C., and Goldsboro, N.C.


At 2nd Bull the regiment lost 18 killed, 36 wounded, and 2 were captured; at Chancellorsville, they lost 19 killed, 63 wounded and had 37 men captured; at Gettysburg, they lost 7 killed, 18 wounded and 10 were captured; at Resaca, Ga., they lost 19 killed, and 29 wounded; at Averysboro, N.C., they lost 4 killed and 13 wounded; and at Bentonville, N.C., they had 2 killed, 16 wounded and 1 captured.  


William R. Tittle, the letter writer, was 25 years old when he enlisted on December 30, 1861, as a private, and was mustered into Co. H, 55th Ohio Infantry. He was promoted to corporal on October 3, 1862, and sergeant on August 1, 1863. He was mustered out of the service on December 29, 1864.


Samuel Wilson Tittle, the recipient of this letter, was 19 years old when he enlisted on May 2, 1864, as a private, and was mustered into Co. B, 164th Ohio Infantry. He was mustered out of the service on August 27, 1864, at Cleveland, Ohio. 


[1] Clay Holtz was 19 years old when he enlisted on October 5, 1861, as a private, and was mustered into Co. H, 55th Ohio Infantry. He was captured on May 27, 1862, at Franklin, Va. He was mustered out of the service on October 23, 1864.


[2] Edward Tallman was 42 years old when he enlisted on September 25, 1861, as a private, and was mustered into Co. H, 55th Ohio Infantry. He was discharged disability on August 29, 1862, at Cumberland, Maryland.


[3] Jeremiah Riker was 39 years old when he enlisted on September 17, 1861, as a private, and was mustered into Co. H, 55th Ohio Infantry. He was discharged for disability on October 19, 1862, at Fairfax Seminary Hospital, Va.


[4] Edwin Holmes was 26 years old when he enlisted on September 16, 1863, as a private, and was mustered into Co. H, 55th Ohio Infantry. He was discharged for disability on October 19, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio.


[5] Lewis Perkley was 19 years old when he enlisted on September 28, 1861, as a private, and mustered into Co. H, 55th Ohio Infantry. He was promoted to corporal on May 1, 1863, and was killed in action on May 15, 1864, at the battle of Resaca, Georgia, during the Atlanta campaign.

c. 1840 / 1850 tin HAND LAMP $135.00

 

lot of 7 Indian War era Horstman EAGLE B $55.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $125.00

 

55th Ohio Infantry Letter with Imprinted




(1815-83) He was born in Cooperstown, N.Y., his maternal grandfather was a general during the Revolutionary War, and his father was a major general in the N.Y. State Militia, and at the time of his death was chief justice of the Michigan State Supreme Court. Morell graduated #1 in the West Point class of 1835. In the early part of 1861, he served as colonel and quartermaster on the staff of the major general commanding the New York militia, organizing and forwarding regiments to the seat of war. He then served in the Washington defenses and on August 9, 1861, was commissioned brigadier general of volunteers. He commanded a brigade of General Fitz John Porter's division of the 5th Corps during the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign, and rose to division command when Porter took over the corps. He fought gallantly and skillfully in the Seven Days battles, at 2nd Bull Run and Antietam, and was promoted to major general to rank from July 4, 1862. However, the court martial of Fitz John Porter destroyed Morell's career. It has been said that Porter was ruined because of his devotion to McClellan. It could equally be said that Morell was ruined because of his devotion to Porter. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 3/4 card. Chest up view in uniform with rank of colonel. Backmark: Larcombe, Photographist, No. 25 Public Square, (S.W. Corner), Nashville, Tenn. The card has been trimmed and there is a horizontal crease which goes through the face of the subject. There is a small area of loss to the albumen paper at the upper right corner of the card which does not affect the subject. If this card were in excellent condition it would easily be priced somewhere between $150.00 and $250.00.  


Authentic, original woodcut engravings that were hand tinted in color and published in the July 20, 1861 issue of Harper's Weekly. Titled, "The Eleventh Indiana Regiment Of Zouaves, Colonel L. Wallace." Includes five individual illustrations: #1- Camp Recreations From Tattoo Till Taps. #2- Camp Recreations- Just After Dress Parade. #3- Deployed as Skirmishers- From a Photograph. #4- Rallying By Fours- From a Photograph. #5- Formed in Hollow Square- From a Photograph. 10 1/2 x 15 1/4. Harper's Weekly and date are printed in the margin. Desirable regiment.   


<b>Written by Major Clark S. Edwards, future Colonel of the regiment


He commanded the 5th Maine Infantry during the battle of Gettysburg!


Promoted to Brevet Brigadier General for gallant conduct during the Civil War!


1862 eight page letter with original cover signed twice by Major Edwards with excellent content defending the Army of the Potomac and citing some of their recent battles!


"we had one hundred & fifty thousand men, the finest army the world ever saw, but where is it now.  The remnants are here, but the largest half is gone, their bones are now whitening in every county, town and village on the Peninsula, and thousands of them are left at So. Mt., Crampton Pass, and Antietam."</b>


(1824-1903) Edwards was 37 years old when the news of the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter reached the small town of Bethel, Maine.  He was high on a ladder shingling his roof and he immediately climbed down, obtained permission from the appropriate authorities to form a company of volunteers, and set out to gather recruits from Bethel and the surrounding towns.  This group of men became Company I, of the 5th Maine Volunteer Infantry, with Edwards commissioned as their captain on June 24, 1861.  He rose through the ranks and was appointed colonel of the regiment, on January 8, 1863, commanding the 5th Maine Infantry from that date forward. He was promoted to brevet brigadier general, on March 13, 1865, for his gallant and meritorious Civil War service record.


The 5th Regiment Maine Volunteer Infantry was one of the first Maine regiments to be mustered into the Union Army.  They fought in many battles from 1st Bull Run to Petersburg.  During the battle of Rappahannock Station the regiment is credited with capturing 4 Confederate battleflags and 1,200 prisoners.  Known as one of Maine's best fighting regiments, it captured more prisoners than the entire number of men who served in the regiment, and three times the number of battle flags than any other Maine regiment.  After three long years of hard fought service only 193 men were mustered out of the regiment when their term of service expired.  Among their battle honors are written the names of 1st Bull Run, Gaines' Mill, 2nd Bull Run, Crampton's Gap, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Rappahannock Station, Rapidan Crossing, Mine Run, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor and Petersburg.


8 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Major Clark S. Edwards, to his wife. Comes with the original envelope which has been signed twice by Edwards, once with rank. Addressed in the hand of Major Edwards to his wife, "Mrs. C.S. Edwards, Bethel, Maine." Edwards has franked the envelope at the upper right corner, "Soldiers Letter, C.S. Edwards, Maj. 5th Me. Vo[l]." Manuscript "due" is written below his signature for postage due on the letter. Docketed at the upper left edge as the letter was in route to Maine, "Keedysville, Md., Oct. 31st." The docket at the left edge of the envelope, "Oct. 30th/62" was written by Mrs. Edwards. It was her habit to write the dates on the envelopes that her husband's letters were written on. This made it easier for her if she was looking for a letter from a certain date or time period.   

 

<b><u>Thursday Afternoon, Near Bakersville, Md., Oct. 30, 1862</b></u>


We are still on the old camp, but left it yesterday and went on picket at dawn [at] No. 4, but was relieved in the night by one of the Mass. Regts. and got into camp about midnight and I found a letter from you dated Oct. 21st, so you see it takes a full week for a letter to reach us.  Our mail matters is very bad or irregular of late.  I am very glad to hear the little ones are better.  I am glad you have become reconciled to my staying a time longer or at least are willing.  I should do what I thought for the best.  I am sorry to hear you are breaking down or getting worn out.  The little boys are old enough to do considerable in the way of chores.  I am sorry to hear of Dr. Luceís  troubles, but itís different from what it would have been if he had been killed in battle and left on here with our unknown as thousands are.  In regard to his good wishes towards me I am thankful of them, but in regard to my next promotion I know nothing about it or no more than you do and I presume not as much.  I am glad to hear that Mary is getting along well.  What is her opinion about having babies now, not so very bad after all.  Tell her she has got her hand in and she must keep it up.  You think I judged wrong in regard to the Bethel folks feeling bad because no more is killed.  I did not mean Bethel in particular, all the North.  <b>We of the Potomac Army are now called the stand still army by these Northern croakers.  Is it not enough to raise the indignation of any people after going through what we have since the first of Apl. [April] last, than we had one hundred & fifty thousand men, the finest army the world ever saw, but where is it now.  The remnants are here, but the largest half is gone, their bones are now whitening in every county, town and village on the [Virginia] Peninsula and thousands of them are left at So.[South] Mt. [Mountain], Crampton Pass, and Antietam, more than sixty thousand are left.  We have marched and countermarched for thousands of miles and fought the greatest battles this country ever have, and still because the great object is not obtained, that is the taking of Richmond, why the Potomac Army has done nothing in the mind of those that is all the time finding fault.  If Richmond had been taken in the first part of the season what then, why their army that has been opposing us would have been somewhere else to fight us where there would have been as much or more at stake.  The Rebels loss in Va. & Md. the past season cannot amount to less than one hundred & twenty thousand.  If Richmond was in our possession, what then?  Why that is one place out of ten thousand.  We hold more now than we can take care of.  A large part of Tenn. & Kentucky we have lost within the past year, but I will say no more on the subject as I may say too much.</b>  In regard to the New York ladies I think they will not compare with the Maine women.  I would not fear to have you come here and if we go into camp near the R.R. I will send for you.


Thursday Evening


As I have a few leisure moments I will close this.  It is now seven oíclock and I am in my tent alone as the Dr. is out.  We have orders to move in the morning at five oíclock, but I cannot tell you anything about where we go, but by the order about our baggage we are going on one of our long marches again, perhaps before this reaches you we will see more fighting, but the sooner it comes the sooner [its] over.  Our camp is all alive as the boys are fixing up to leave at an early hour, but we little know what we are going into.  I think we shall go into winter quarters within two or three weeks if the fallís rains come on as early as usual, then as I have always write you.  I will try to go home.  I think you must be glad that I did not go at the time I first talked of.  If I had gone then I should not been in the two last fights and you know it is an honor to anyone to be in a fight.  You can see that by the way the 7th [Maine Infantry] was received in Portland.   We are in a beautiful camp here and I do not like the idea of moving, but we go as we are bid to go.  Our camp is in a beautiful grove and just outside the army tents is the grave of some poor soldier.  I did not notice it till after I put up my [tent] and as it was hardly finished I had it fixed up and a stone put at the head & foot.  It is within twenty feet of my [?].  I do not know the history of the poor fellow but as [the] Fourth Division was in camp on this ground I presumed it was one of them, perhaps one of that immortal 7th.  We think but little of camping down with the dead.  I find its any different from what I expected that is in myself in regard to these things, but after a man has been in the army a year & a half he can do most anything.  I must close this soon as I have got some packing up to do so to leave early.  I wish it was towards Maine and the whole Regt. was to go, but I do not know when that will be.  I will write you again as soon as we get to a place so I can.  I do not know how I will get along tomorrow as Mc [Mac] is lame and Findley, about every horse in the Regt. is at this time.  It is a sort of a disease among the horses, something like the scratches only a good deal worse.  You may say to [?] that I think they can have the sutlership of the Regt.  I will write them as soon as I get time.  I know they can make more money out of it, but it wants two to carry it on, one to buy & haul in, the other to sell.  If they think of coming it must be done soon as we shall have a sutler as soon as we go into winter quarters.  My love to all the little ones and regards to all.


Clark


Very fine 8 page letter. Excellent content with references to the recently fought  battles that the Army of the Potomac and the 5th Maine Infantry had participated in, and much more interesting news! Comes with the original cover bearing 2 signatures of Major Clark S. Edwards, one with rank. The cover shows edge wear from when it was originally opened and some edge chipping.  


Authentic, original woodcut engraving hand tinted in color that was published in the April 19, 1862 issue of Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper. Caption: The War On The Mississippi- The U.S. Transport Terry Pushing Her Way Through The Swamps And Bayous, Back Of Island No. 10, To The Assistance Of Gen. Pope At New Madrid. From a Sketch by Our Special Artist. 10 3/4 x 15 3/4. Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper and date are printed in the margin.

CDV General George W. Morell $10.00

 

The Eleventh Indiana Regiment of Zouaves

 

5th Maine Infantry Letter $250.00

 

The U. S. Transport Terry Pushing Through

This attractive hand made antique checker board measures approximately 8 5/8 X 11 7/8 and was fashioned from a white pine board with the inscribed and milk painted game board on its face.  The game board retains a full compliment of hand crafted checkers in board matching colors.  Some period dings and wear along with a pleasing natural age patina front and back, offer good evidence of age, originality and period use.  A neat companion piece with any Civil War era personal grouping, no harm would come to this old game board if put to originally intended use. please note:   <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!



 This attractive 8 Ĺ inch pewter mess plate remains in honest, untouched condition with that deep gray patina that comes to pewter only with the decades.  Faint but discernable on the back is the once bold block letter <I>LONDON</I> in banner mark as seen on import pewter by Thomas Swanson, of that city.  (Swanson began exporting his wares to Boston in 1732.)  A nice honest piece just the proper size for the Revolutionary War haversack, this handsome old pewter plate will go well in any  Colonial era grouping.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>





 Tender with some tattering as  good evidence of age and originality, yet nicely displayable with lots of eye appeal, this approximately 10 X 13 inch, July 16, 1864 weekly issue of <I>The Scientific American</I> is complete and contains an account of George Custerís U. S. Patent <I>improved</I> horse shoe design.  An appealing design line drawing is presented over the bold heading <B>CUSTERíS HORSE-SHOE</B> with an accompanying description of the design and intended <I>improvement</I> over the old standard design.  The little known <B>George Armstrong Custer</B> effort in the patent arena has been largely forgotten and lost in time with what may have been a <I>nail in the coffin</I> with respect to historical credit being a subsequent transcription error from period hand written 1870 U. S. Census records.  Very simply the name of George <B>A.</B> Custer was mistakenly transcribed in a research reference as <I>George <B>C</B> Custer</I>.  This simple transcription inaccuracy from the original record led to a conclusion published in Mike OíKeefeís <I>Custer, the Seventh Cavalry & the Little Big Horn</I> that the subject patent was not issued by George A. Custer but another George Custer.  A look at renderings of original hand written census records will show that George A. Custer <U>was the only George Custer with a Monroe, Michigan</U> address as provided in official U. S. Patent documents.  (This offering will come with <U>convincing</U> research notes with respect to the above.)  Framed up or simply laid out with Civil War or Western Indian War material, this piece will add  A neat piece of Americana!   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 A nice Civil War vintage telescoping pewter cup, all original and in excellent condition with its japanned tin carrying case.  Un-polished and as found, the pewter displays a wonderful original luster and the base of the cup is marked <B>H. J. WOODMAN</B>.  The tin pocket case retains a substantial amount of its the original japanned lacquer finish. Though somewhat fragile, these soft pewter traveling cups were a popular item in the soldiers collection of personal items. Period examples are popular with collectors and are hard to find in this condition. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

hand crafted - antique CHECKER BOARD & C $135.00

 

18th Century Pewter Mess Plate $85.00

 

July 16 1864 Scientific American - C $95.00

 

Extra nice! Civil War vintage cased TEL $95.00




Authentic, original woodcut engraving that was published in Harper's Weekly. Caption: Major Knipe Winging a Secessionist. Sketched by Our Special Artist. 10 1/2 x 7 1/8. Although undated, I know that this illustration was originally published in the July 20, 1861 issue of Harper's Weekly.  


<b>25th North Carolina Infantry


Later commanded Confederate Cavalry


He was endeavoring to raise negro troops for the Confederacy in 1865!


Colonel Dearing personally wrote to President Andrew Johnson in 1865 seeking executive clemency!</b>


Born in Georgia in 1833, St. Clair Dearing was commissioned lieutenant in the 4th U.S. Infantry on June 7, 1855. He was transferred to the 2nd U.S. Artillery on March 17, 1858, and resigned his commission on February 7, 1861, shortly after his native state of Georgia seceded from the Union. He was commissioned lieutenant colonel of the 25th North Carolina Infantry, on August 15, 1861. Being a professional soldier, Dearing was given the task of training and drilling the raw North Carolina recruits of the 25th regiment, and he skillfully taught them how to function as a cohesive fighting unit. He declined re-election in April 1862, with what he later called "petulance," but he was known as a hard drinker and he decided to resign his commission on April 29, 1862. However, Dearing's Civil War military career was far from over. He served as a Confederate staff officer during the 1863 Charleston, S.C. campaign, and is mentioned several times in battle reports. He later commanded Confederate cavalry and was endeavoring to raise colored troops in Georgia in 1865. He signed an oath of allegiance to the United States in Clark County, Georgia, on August 22, 1865. He also wrote a personal letter to President Andrew Johnson seeking executive clemency. In his letter he mentions that he served for seven years in the U.S. Army and although he had formed friendships and ties that were difficult to sever, he resigned his commission at the invitation of his native state of Georgia. "I served the greater portion of four years in the Confederate Armies, and I trust did my duty in accordance with the principles I had adopted and what I deemed duty to the State in which I was born." He goes on to say that he recognizes the existing state of affairs and desires "once again to be admitted to the rights and privileges of an American citizen. I have an aged Mother ruined by the events of the war, now dependent on my exertions for support, and for her sake, rather than my own, I trust you may not think it inconsistent with the public good to admit this my petition for Executive Clemency and by restoring the ability to engage in some honest pursuit to enable me to become a useful citizen rather than remain a drone in the great [?] of the Commonwealth."


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 1/2 x 4 1/8 card. Spectacular full standing view of the 5 foot, 11 inch Colonel St. Clair Dearing, wearing a shell jacket with gold tinted collar rank and buttons, belt with two piece buckle and holster attached, gauntlets, and knee high leather boots. He poses next to a studio column and painted background holding his kepi with quatrefoil, but one of the most remarkable details of this photograph is that Colonel Dearing is holding a Scottish basket hilt rapier sword. No imprint. Corners of the card are very slightly trimmed. Magnificent Confederate image! Very rare!!


An original 1850's daguerreotype of Lieutenant St. Clair Dearing in his U.S. Army dress uniform is in the collection of Duke University. They also have an original, handmade deck of playing cards made by Colonel Dearing in 1864.  <b>Commander of the famed "Sussex Light Dragoons" of Virginia</b>


7 1/4 x 9 3/4, in ink, written to Captain Belsches on imprinted letter sheet, and signed by Washington Lafayette Riddick, who was the Assistant Adjutant General of General Albert G. Blanchard at this time.


Head Quarters Military Division. The words "Military Division" have been crossed out with slanted pen strokes, and written in above is "3d Brigade." The imprint continues Portsmouth, Va., with the month and day written in ink, "Sept. 16th" and the year 1861 imprinted on the letter sheet. 


The content of the letter is as follows:


Capt. B.W. Belsches

Sussex Cavalry


Sir:


In answer to your communication of this date, asking extension of leave of absence on account of your health, I am directed to say that the request is granted, and until such time as the condition of your health will prevent you to return to active duty.


You will however make weekly reports of your condition to these Head Quarters, accompanied by the certificate of your attending physician. 


Respty. Yr. Obt. Sevt.

W.L. Riddick

A. Adjt. Genl.


Sent by mail to Waverly Station [Virginia]


Light staining along the left edge of the paper, and some minor overall wear. Bold and neatly written. Very desirable and scarce document regarding the elite "Sussex Light Dragoons" of Virginia, and its commander Captain Benjamin W. Belsches. 


WBTS Trivia: During The War Between the States, Sussex Country, Virginia was the site of much military activity. The "Sussex Light Dragoons" adopted their name from an American Revolutionary War unit that also hailed from Sussex County, Virginia. The "Sussex Light Dragoons" were known as a wealthy organization and it is said that each member of the company had his own servant with him.   


The "Sussex Light Dragoons" wore a most distinctive uniform, their kepi being of such a height as to almost qualify it as a "shako," made of blue cloth with yellow braid, it bore a brass badge of the letters "S.L.D." over crossed sabres. Officers wore a variation of the regulation frock coat, but considerably longer than usual. Other ranks wore shirts with "plastron" style front panels, which may have been reversible to show a yellow panel for full dress. They were also known as bib-fronted battle shirts. Trousers for all ranks were dark blue. They were armed with the usual weapons of the sabre and revolver. [Source: Mine Creek Battlefield; American Uniforms].


Benjamin W. Belsches, was 43 years old when he enlisted on April 24, 1861, at Waverly, Virginia, as a captain. He was the commander of the famed "Sussex Light Dragoons." He also had service in Co. C, 5th Virginia Cavalry, and either the 13th Virginia Cavalry [see page 364 of Units of the Confederate States Army] or 15th Virginia Cavalry [see The Historical Data Systems, Inc.]. He was promoted to major on June 26, 1862. His date and method of discharge are unknown. He did however survive the war and died on October 13, 1872, and is buried in the Family Cemetery, in Sussex County, Virginia.


Washington Lafayette Riddick, was a 36 year old resident of Suffolk, Va., when he enlisted on June 24, 1861, at Suffolk, as a 2nd lieutenant, and was commissioned into Co. G, 5th Virginia Cavalry. On August 15, 1861, he was commissioned as a Confederate States Staff Officer, and assigned to the headquarters staff of General Albert G. Blanchard, as 1st lieutenant and adjutant. He was promoted to the rank of captain in the Provisional Army of the Confederate States of America, on October 5, 1861. He was wounded on June 1, 1862, at the battle of Seven Pines, Va.; he was assigned to Camp Lee, Richmond, Va., as Captain and Assistant Adjutant General, on August 15, 1863; assigned to the staff of General James L. Kemper as Assistant Adjutant General, on January 15, 1865; assigned to R.H. Anderson's Artillery, as Assistant Adjutant General, on January 28, 1865; and was paroled on May 2, 1865, at Richmond, Va. He died on February 3, 1871, in New Orleans, Louisiana.  

    


<b>United States Congressman from Maryland</b>


(1798-1856) Born in La Plata, Md., he graduated from Yale in 1817, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1819 and commenced practice at Port Tobacco, Charles County, Md. He served as a member of the Maryland State House of Delegates from 1824-1832, and from 1843-1844, serving as speaker 1826-29, and again in 1844. Was a member of the Maryland State Senate, 1832-36, serving as president of that body from 1833-1836. He also served in the Maryland State Militia. He ran unsuccessfully for governor of Maryland in 1844. Served as a United States Congressman, from 1845-49, and was the chairman of the Committee on the District of Columbia. Afterwards he resumed his law practice in Port Tobacco, and was the president of the State constitutional convention in 1851.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 5 1/4 x 1, in ink, J.G. Chapman, Maryland.

Major Knipe Winging a Secessionist

 

CDV, Colonel St. Clair Dearing $600.00

 

1861 Letter Written to Captain Benjamin $150.00

 

Autograph, John Grant Chapman $15.00




<b>On a very rare patriotic letter sheet with Union gunboats and a quote from the Rebel newspaper, The Richmond Dispatch</b>


2 pages, 4 3/4 x 7 1/2, in ink, and signed with regimental identification.


There is a battle scene at the top of the letter sheet with Union ironclad gunboats bombarding a Confederate fort. Includes the following imprint: "There is no disaster of the present war which it is so difficult to bear with any degree of patience or philosophy, as the almost uniform success of the enemy's gunboats on our land batteries. It is a thing absolutely unprecedented in the history of warfare! Richmond Dispatch, Feb. 21, 1862."


<b><u>Franklin, Pendleton Co., Va.

May the 24th A.D., 1862</b></u>


Dear Sister,


I am well at present hoping these few words will find you enjoying the same blessing.  I received a letter from mother the other day and I was very glad to hear from home once more.  I wrote a letter to William yesterday tho[ugh] I thought I would write another today.  I get very lonesome without doing something.  We had a fight on the 8 day of May [1] and we are exempt 30 days from duty and we have nothing to do for 30 days.  It is very warm weather here now.  I have wrote several letters since we came here to Franklin.  It is the county seat of Pendleton County.  It is a nice little place.  I will send Emma a nice present, a little breast pin, and Sis and Dennis a few cents to buy candy for themselves.  I believe I must come to a close.  I have nothing more to write at this time so write soon.  Good to all; mother, sisters and brothers.  When you write to me Direct your letters to Franklin, Pendleton County, Virginia, 32 Regiment. Company F, in care Captain Potts, [2] O.[hio] V.[olunteers], U.S.A.


The letter is signed with a single initial.  I believe it is either an "L" or an "S." [3] 


I have to send the letters without paying postage on them.  There is no post stamps to get here.


Very neatly written letter by a soldier of Company F, 32nd Ohio Infantry, on a very rare illustrated gunboat patriotic letter sheet with quote from the Richmond Dispatch.


[1] On May 8, 1862, the date referred to in this letter, the 32nd Ohio Infantry participated in the battle of McDowell, Virginia, part of the celebrated 1862 Shenandoah Valley campaign. In the regiment's history compiled in "The Union Army, Vol. 2," it states that "at the battle of McDowell the 32nd [Ohio] lost 6 killed and 53 wounded, some mortally, being the last regiment to leave the field."


[2] Benjamin Franklin Potts, was a 32 year old lawyer when he enlisted on September 4, 1861, as a captain, and was commissioned into Company F, 32nd Ohio Infantry. He was captured on September 15, 1862, at Harper's Ferry, during the Antietam campaign.  Promoted to lieutenant colonel, November 21, 1862; colonel, December 25, 1862; brigadier general, January 16, 1865; and brevet major general, March 13, 1865. He was mustered out of the service on January 16, 1866. He served as the Governor of Montana, 1870-82. He died on June 17, 1887 in Helena, Montana.


[3] It was not uncommon for Civil War soldiers to sign a letter written home to a family member with initials or their first name only, or even their family title or possibly a nickname since the recipients knew who the author of the letter was. If the original envelope had come with this letter that would have given us another way to fully identify him, but unfortunately the letter did not come with an envelope. What we do know for certain is that the letter writer served in Co. F, 32nd Ohio Infantry, but his name is lost to history. In my opinion the very rare patriotic gunboat letter sheet more than make up for that fact. Maybe someone else out there has other letters written by this same soldier and can shed some light as to his identification.   

   


Civil War patriotic imprint with a full color vignette of General George Washington holding his sword aloft while holding an American flag in his opposite hand. Motto at the left edge, "Success To Our Volunteers." Slogan at the top, "Never Surrender." Imprint with lines to write in the name of the recipient, as well as the Regt., Co., Capt., State Volunteers, Col. Com'ding and Camp. Staining and light edge wear. 


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.  

 


T-66. Richmond, Feb. 17, 1864. Bust view of Confederate President Jefferson Davis. Fancy blue reverse. Very tiny chip at bottom center edge. With red Treasury Seal stamped on obverse and reverse corners. Crisp note that is in about uncirculated condition. 

 


Used Civil War envelope that has been addressed to Mrs. Mary Varnam, Lawrence, Mass., with bold stamped "Due 3." At the top of the cover is written, "Soldier Letter, A.P. Browne, Adjt. 40th Mass." Light wear from being opened. 


Able Parker Browne, who mailed this envelope was a 26 year old clerk from Salem, Mass., when he enlisted on May 26, 1862, as a 1st sergeant, and was mustered into the Salem Cadets Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. On May 25, 1862, Union Secretary of War, Edwin M. Stanton, sent out an alarm for militia troops from various states to be sent to Washington, D.C. immediately because of the route of the forces of General Nathaniel P. Banks by Confederate General Stonewall Jackson stating that the enemy were in large force and advancing on Washington. The Salem Cadets were one of the organizations called upon in this emergency. Browne was discharged for promotion on August 25, 1862, and on September 5, 1862, he was commissioned into the field and staff of the 40th Massachusetts Infantry serving as 1st Lieutenant and Adjutant of the regiment. He was promoted to major on August 26, 1863, and resigned his commission on March 5, 1864. After the war he was a member of G.A.R. Post #113, the Edward W. Kinsely Post, in Boston, Mass.

Letter Written by a Soldier in the 32nd $125.00

 

Success To Our Volunteers, Never Surrend $5.00

 

1864 Confederate $50 Note $75.00

 

Cover Sent by Adjutant of the 40th Massa $15.00




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