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Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of figure holding an American flag and wreath with verse, "Shine stars of the Union, Wave Flag of the Free! The hope of the Nation is centered in thee!" 5 3/8 x 3 1/8.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.    <b>Troy, New York</b>


Oliver Boutwell, Miller, Troy, N.Y., on the obverse. Redeemed At My Office, with the year 1863 on the reverse. Very fine.  


Unused, patriotic envelope with vignette of a male and female slave dancing. Note the exaggerated lips in the illustration. Titled below, "Bress de Lor, we am Contraband." Published by D. Murphy & Son, 63 Fulton & 372 Pearl Street, N.Y. Very desirable slave related cover. Scarce.  


Liberty encircled by stars with the year 1863 on the obverse. Our Army within wreath on the reverse. Near uncirculated condition. Desirable in this high grade.

Shine Stars of the Union

 

1863 Civil War Merchant Token, Oliver Bo

 

Patriotic Cover, Bress de Lor, we am Con

 

1863 Civil War Patriotic Token, Liberty $40.00




Civil War patriotic imprint with full color illustration of a large American shield with the motto, "Our Nation's Shield." Light staining. 5 1/2 x 3 1/8.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Unused, patriotic envelope with full cover illustration of the waterfront of Alexandria, Va. with the Potomac River and vessels in the foreground including a side wheeler, "Young America" at the  bottom right. Published by Chas. Magnus, N.Y. View No. 4 C. Scarce.

 


An Account of His Personal Life, Especially of Its Springs of Action as Revealed and Deepened by the Ordeal of War. By Nathaniel Wright Stephenson. Published by The Bobbs-Merrill Company Publishers, Indianapolis, 1922. Hardcover, 478 pages, index, illustrated. Very fine.  <b>in Tennessee


Saved from hanging by President Lincoln!</b>


2 1/3 pages, 4 1/4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, December 15, 1863


General Orders

No. 396


I..Before a Military Commission, which convened at Clarksville, Tennessee, July 16, 1863, pursuant to Special Orders, No. 174, dated Headquarters, Department of the Cumberland, Nashville, Tennessee, July 4, 1863, and of which Lieutenant Colonel John Gault, 28th Kentucky Volunteers, is President, was arraigned and tried-


Dr. Aaron James


James was brought up on three charges:


1..Being the captain of a band of guerrillas or marauders that were shooting at U.S. soldiers.


2..Being one of a hand of rioters engaged in shooting at and resisting the soldiers of the U.S. when in the performance of their duty.


3..Violating his oath of allegiance to the U.S. Government and bearing arms against the U.S.


The specifications of the case state that Dr. James having taken the oath of allegiance to the U.S., did, at Palmyra, and other places, bear arms against the U.S., and did assist and abet the enemies of the U.S. in rebellion against the government, all this at Dixon County, Tenn.


Dr. James pleaded not guilty to all of the charges, but the military court found him guilty on all three charges and sentenced him to be hanged by the neck until he be dead at such time and place as the General commanding the Department of the Cumberland may direct. However, President Lincoln disapproved of the sentence and directed that the prisoner be released from arrest and confinement.


Signed in print by E.D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant General.


There is a tiny punch hole near the bottom of the document at the extreme left edge. This does not affect any of the content. Otherwise very fine.  Desirable content.

Our Nation's Shield $10.00

 

Patriotic Cover, Bird's Eye View of Alex

 

Lincoln

 

Man Charged With Being the Captain of a




Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of Columbia holding an American flag while standing on a Confederate flag with a sailing ship and Fort Sumter in the background with the motto, "Sumter First- Peace Afterwards." 5 1/2 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a Union soldier brandishing a sword and holding an American flag. The slogan, "Strike Till The Last Armed Foe Expires" is printed below. 5 1/2 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Bust of George Washington within a large star on the obverse. H.M. Lane Lamps, Kerosene, &c. 18 Spring St., N.Y. on the reverse. Very fine. Scarce.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of the emerald green Irish Brigade flag with harp. Verse below, "Erin, O Erin, though long in the shade, Thy Star will shine out when the proudest shall fade." 5 1/2 x 3 1/8. Irish Brigade related material is always desirable!


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

Sumter First, Peace Afterwards

 

Strike Till The Last Armed Foe Expires

 

Civil War Patriotic Merchant Token, H. M.

 

Irish Brigade Flag

Lovely carved RJHorner Sideboard with Rare Cresting Piece

 

Beautifully executedRJ Horner sideboard in quarter sawn oak with very unique cresting piece ofcarved female face, framed by floral and foliate carvings ending in outwardflowing acanthus leaves and scrolled carvings.  Upper portion has carvedcolumns flanking open mirrored back shelves with central bombe beveled glassdoors revealing a mirror back above open serving area with mirrored back. Bottom portion has three drawers, with the center drawer above carvedrelief panel of intricate face of the Northwind, flanked by two bombe cabinets.Large Bottom drawer has two carved pulls.

 

 Dimensions: 94" H x 60" W x 25" D  Classic Welsh OpenShelf Pine Hutch with 3 shelves over base with 3 drawers and lower shelf.

Perfect piece to displayChina or collectibles. 

 


Unused, patriotic envelope with vignette of the equestrian statue of General George Washington at Richmond with a slave sitting on top of his shoulders and a Confederate flag flying in the background. This 1861 imprint of J.E. Hayes, of Massachusetts, is titled, "Southern Chivalry, Richmond, Va."    


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.</b>


3 1/4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, to his wife. 


<b><u>Winchester, [Va.], April 1st, 1863</b></u>


My Dear and loving wife,


After my love to you and the children I will inform you that I am well this morning and wish that this may find you the same.  Well dear, Miles Davis [1] overtook me and came on with me here.  We got to Barnesville about 4 o’clock where I found 5 of my paroled men and Sam Stonebraker. [2]  We got our supper and started about 7 o’clock.  We came right through to Martinsburg where we arrived at 11 o’clock.   Yesterday we left there about 1 o’clock for this place.  The road was bad but we got into camp at 10 o’clock last night about as tired a set of fellows as you ever seen, but I got a good night’s rest and feel first rate this morning.  My cold is a heap better than it was when I left home and I think it will be well in a day or two.  Well I found the boys all well.  It snowed considerable night before last and the wind commenced blowing last night and I think it is about as stormy a time as I have ever seen.  The wind is blowing a perfect hurricane.  Every once in awhile it upsets a tents.  It keeps the boys fixing up all the time and I don’t know when it is a going to be any better but hope the weather will be better soon.  Well Dear, we expect to be put to work to fix up the railroad from here to Harpers Ferry and hope it may be so.  If we do that I think we will be sent to Harpers Ferry which will be a little nearer home than we are at present and that is what I would like.  Well I would have been glad to have been at home last night instead of tramping along through the mud and slop and I do hope that it will not be long before I will get home to stay.  I was glad to see the boys as Gib Carlton.  [3]  I would have been willing to have started back from Martinsburg on as stormy as it is this morning.  I would be glad to start for home again if they would let me, but I don’t suppose  they would let me go.  Well dear, I got two letters, one from you and one from Margy, and although I had heard all at home, yet it done me good to read them for it seemed like talking to you.  I want you to write as often as you can.  Well dear, I must bring my letter to a close.  I wish if you have a chance you would send Hallister’s overcoat to Woodfield to Davenport’s as I forgot it when I left.  I can’t think of anything of importance to write so I will conclude with my never dying love to you. I remain your loving husband.


Lieut. L. Lupton      


Light age toning, staining and wear. 


[1] Miles H. Davis, was 19 years old, when he enlisted on April 2, 1863, as a private, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was wounded in action on June 5, 1864, at Piedmont, Va., and died from his wounds on October 12, 1864, at Weavertown, Va. He is buried in the Antietam National Cemetery, Sharpsburg, Md., gravesite #1,454.


[2] Samuel M. Stonebraker, was 24 years old, when he enlisted as a private on August 15, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was captured on June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. Transferred to the 118th Company, Veteran Reserve Corps, 2nd Battalion, on January 1, 1865. Mustered out of the service at Baltimore, Md., on September 18, 1865.


[3] Abner Gibson Carlton, was 24 years old when he enlisted as a private on August 16, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was wounded in action on March 31, 1865, at Petersburg, Va., and was mustered out of the service on June 2, 1865, at Fort Monroe, Va. 


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.

7797 19th century American Oak Sideboard $8950.00

 

7798 Antique Welsh Traditional Pine Hutc $3500.00

 

Patriotic Cover, Southern Chivalry, Rich

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter $75.00




Civil War patriotic imprint with illustration of a boy wearing sailor's uniform with cap and holding an American flag. Published by Magee, 316 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 4 1/2 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a woman waving her kerchief and holding an American flag with the slogan, "True To The Stars & Stripes." 5 3/8 x 3 1/8.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   Published by <I>C. Bohn 568 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington D. C.</I> with <I>Lithograph & Print </I> by  E. Sachse & Co., Baltimore, this original print measures 11 ½ X 16 inches and was <I>entered by act of Congress in the year 1861</I>.  Upon close inspection of the lithograph one notes tiny brown ink penned numbers (1 through 15) scattered about the illustration which are keyed to a finely hand printed identification reference in the bottom margin, right and left.  In addition to other points of interest the key identifies the<I> HORSES & WAGONS OF THE <B>16th MASS. REGT.</B>TENTS OF THE <B>16th MASS., 20th N.Y. REGT. - N. Y. NAVAL BRIGADE – 48th PENN. – 20th IND. </B></I>  All solid and original with some foxing and discoloration could be removed with proper archival technique but we’d leave it as is as evidence of age and originality.  Our photographs will do best to describe condition.  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!



       A bit out of our usual time span but too neat to pass, is this attractive all original toy World War 1 field artillery battery.  Illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison, this made in the period, set is fashioned from sheet tin with the soldiers and horses formed from a cast (pre- plastic) composition generally referred to as Elastolin* (see below). A wonderful display item for the purest who appreciates age, evidence of careful period use and originality, this little grouping offers all of that charm yet remains in pleasing to the eye condition as is and without restoration. An exceptional all original WW I toy set un-touched and as found after decades of attic storage.  

     <B>*</B> <U>Elastolin</U>: A material totally different from the <I>plastic</I> we know today, composition toys were already being made as early as 1850 utilizing a base mixture of animal glue and fine wood sawdust.  The material was pressed into forms utilizing a wire framework to stabilize and strengthen extended parts such as arms and legs.  After drying the figure was removed from the form with surplus composition cut away and final shaping done by hand. This was followed by a detailed painting of the figure. With some variation in the recipe for the composition this basic process continued into the late 1930s. It was in the WW I era that a prominent maker of such figures gave his composition material a name - Elastolin.  The name stuck to the extent that even today collectors of antique composition toys frequently refer to the object of their passion as <I>Elastolin</I> toys.   

     <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

Sailor Boy Holding American Flag

 

True to the Stars & Stripes

 

1861 Camp Hamilton – Fortress Monroe Vir $195.00

 

antique WW I Mounted Artillery Battery – $95.00

Standing approximately 8 ½ inches and just under 3 inches in diameter, this  classic old stoneware bear bottle is marked <I>BUCHAN – PORTOBELLO – EDINBURGH</I>.  With good evidence of age and originality while remaining in pleasing original condition this classic old 1800s bottle will display well.  An attractive period item without spending a lot of money.  Now that is a rarity!  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !   Not mint but in pleasing condition with good evidence of some period use, is this attractive <I>Oak Razor Works, Sheffield England</I> marked straight razor.  Made by cutlerers Joseph Allen & Sons for export to the United States; the finely etched blade panoply features arms and the <U>American flag</U>; this attractive patriotic straight razor sports a deeply embossed national decoration with <B>MILITARY RAZOR</B> set into its fine old natural horn grip.  Founded in 1810 and granted the <I>NON-XLL</I> mark in 1838, the cutlurer started using <I>OAK RAZOR WORKS</I> in 1864.      All remains in pleasing condition with no chips, splits, or other condition issue save some minor strop marks which could be polished out (we’d leave as used) this beautiful old razor will lay in well with any period personal or razor grouping. As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !  Scarce in any case, this personal weapon of the period is generally found in excavation of military camp sites and are fashioned of lead while brass examples when rarely seen are foundry cast.  This example is hand cut of brass and remains in excellent all original non-excavated condition yet offers good evidence of period originality.  (see: <I>Excavated Artifacts from Battlefields & Campsites of the Civil War</I> by Phillips) A rare Civil War era collectable!  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !   


Civil War patriotic imprint with hand pointing at an American flag with the motto, "Stand By It!" 5 1/2 x 3. Light wear.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

19th century STONEWARE BEER BOTTLE $35.00

 

19th century decorated Oak Razor Works -

 

original Civil War era Brass Knuckles $235.00

 

Stand By It




Civil War patriotic imprint with 'UNION" in full color stars and stripes letters at upper right. The borders are trimmed in blue with a white star representing each of the 34 states, each named, of the United States just before the commencement of the Civil War. 5 1/2 x 3. Light staining.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a woman sewing a jacket with an American flag above her and the slogan, "Our Hearts Are With Our Brothers In The Field." 5 1/2 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.  




 


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color illustration of an American flag with the slogan, "America Expects Every American to do His Duty." Published by James Gates, Cincinnati. 4 3/4 x 2 3/4.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


By Edward Steers, Jr. Published by The University Press of Kentucky, 2001. Hardcover, dust jacket, 360 pages, index, illustrated, new condition.


The assassination of Abraham Lincoln dramatically altered the course of American history and forever stripped a young nation of its innocence. More than one million Americans viewed the president's remains as his body made its way from Washington, D.C., to Springfield, Illinois. Seven million more gathered along the miles of track to view the funeral train as it passed. In all, one in four Americans paid their respects to their fallen "Father Abraham," who, as one special choir sang at the funeral ceremonies, "fell in Freedom's cause."


Lincoln's untimely death still haunts the nation and fascinates its people. Theories abound regarding the events surrounding his assassination. Did John Wilkes Booth act alone? Were Dr. Samuel Mudd and Mary E. Surratt innocent victims? Was the body recovered from the burning tobacco barn really Booth? Until now, there has been no comprehensive study, based on primary sources, of Lincoln's assassination and Booth's escape. "Blood on the Moon: The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln" presents the most up to date research into public and private archives and makes clear the important role of Samuel Mudd and members of the Confederate Secret Service in Booth's crime and escape. Edwards Steers Jr. finally puts to rest the many myths and popular misconceptions surrounding these key players and accurately depicts what happened during the days leading up to and immediately after Lincoln's murder.

Union

 

Our Hearts Are With Our Brothers in the

 

America Expects Every American to do His

 

Blood on the Moon, The Assassination of




Unused, patriotic envelope with full cover illustration of Alexandria, Va. with the Potomac River and vessels in the foreground including a side wheeler at the center. Published by Chas. Magnus, N.Y. View No. 3 C. Scarce.  


Unused, Civil War patriotic envelope with vignette of a man at the center holding a sheet of paper titled "Southern Bonds" in one hand and a paper in the other hand with the imprint, "Jeff Davis, $20,000." Two men stand in the background, one with the sign "Loans Taken" above him. Verse below, "Those bonds will never do, my friend, For Johnny Bull has said it. Go home and mediate your end, Your thieving friends have d__ d your credit." Published by Brown & Ryan, N.Y.  


Authentic, original Civil War patriotic envelope with full color vignette titled, "1776." Slogan printed below, "The Old Continentals In ragged regimentals Faltered not." This cover was repurposed and used during the 200th Anniversary of the United States in 1976. Stamped in black, Federation Day, Interphil '76 Station, May 30, 1976, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101, with vignettes of the Liberty Bell and Independence Hall. Includes a 13 cents U.S.A. Interphil postage stamp, honoring the International Philatelic Exhibition in Philadelphia, Pa., May 29-June 6. Very fine multi-purpose philatelic collectible.  


Vignette of a man carrying a pole over his shoulder with large sack attached and coins coming out from the bottom. A bucket is on the ground in front of him. Banner above his head reads, "Go Buttons." Slogan around the top edge, "Money Makes The Mare Go." Dated 1863 at the bottom. Reverse has a spread winged eagle with the motto, "United States Copper." Very fine.

Bird's Eye View of Alexandria, Virginia

 

Patriotic Cover, Southern Bonds

 

Patriotic Cover, 1776

 

1863 Civil War Patriotic Merchant Token




Unused, patriotic envelope with full cover illustration of Alexandria, Va. with numerous tents and a fort in the background. Published by Chas. Magnus, N.Y. View No. 2 A. Scarce.  


Civil War imprint with a vignette of flowers and a butterfly with verse below "In native white and red The rose and lily stand, And, free from pride, their beauties spread, To show God's skillful hand. Consider the lilies of the field.- Matt. vi. 28." This is the front panel of an envelope with the back flap still attached. Imprint on the reverse, Tract House, 929 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, with illustration of a flower basket below." 5 3/8 x 3. Uncommon.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.  


Civil War imprint with illustration of a wreath with "I was dumb with silence. Ps. xxxix. 2." printed within. This is the front panel of an envelope with the back flap still attached. Imprint on the reverse, Tract House, 929 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, with illustration of  fireplace, and the following imprint below it, "While I was musing, the fire burned; then spake I. Ps. 30:3." 5 3/8 x 3. Uncommon.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Civil War imprint with vignette of eagle feeding her young in a nest. Verse below, "An eagle stirreth up her nest, flutterth over her young, spreadeth abroad her wings. Deut. 32:11. And as the bird each fond endearment tries To tempth her new-fledged offspring to the skies; Employ each art; reprove each dull delay; Allure to brighter worlds, and lead the way." This is the front panel of an envelope with the back flap still attached. Imprint on the reverse, Tract House, 929 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, with illustration of a hand with a pen and the word, "Soon" printed below it. 5 3/8 x 3. Uncommon.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

Patriotic Cover, Bird's Eye View of Alex

 

Consider the Lilies of the Field

 

I Was Dumb With Silence

 

An Eagle Stirreth Up Her Nest




Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a woman wearing a kepi, zouave style jacket with stars on it, knapsack, cartridge box, American flag dress, and posing with musket with fixed bayonet. Published by J.R. Hawley, Cincinnati, Ohio. 5 3/8 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Unused, patriotic envelope with full cover illustration of Alexandria, Va. with the Potomac River and sailing vessels in the foreground. Published by Chas. Magnus, N.Y. View No. 1 C. Scarce.  


Civil War imprint with a vignette of a crown with quote below, "There is laid up for me a crown- 2 Tim. IV 8." This is the front panel of an envelope with the back flap still attached. Imprint on the reverse, Tract House, 929 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, with illustration of a wreath with quote within, "Let no man take thy crown. Rev. iii. II" 5 3/8 x 3. Uncommon. 


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Civil War imprint with a vignette of a carpetbag with a hand grasping the handle with verse below, "I'm but a traveler here, Heaven is my home, Earth is a desert drear, Heaven is my home; Danger and sorrow stand Round me on ev'ry hand, Heaven is my Fatherland, Heaven is my home." This is the front panel of an envelope with the back flap still attached. Imprint on the reverse, Tract House, 929 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, with an illustration of a man standing under an umbrella in the rain with the slogan, "Rain or shine, Ever thine." 5 3/8 x 3. Uncommon. 


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

Home Guard

 

Patriotic Cover, Bird's Eye View of Alex

 

There is Laid up for me a Crown

 

I'm But a Traveler Here, Heaven is my Ho




Civil War patriotic imprint with full color slogan as above. Light wear and age toning. 5 1/2 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.    


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a large star with an American shield within, and the motto, True To The Union, First Regiment Pennsylvania Reserve Corps, Company F. Published by Magee, 316 Chestnut St., Phila. 5 1/2 x 3. Scarce.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Civil War patriotic imprint with illustration of an American flag with the slogan "The Man for the Times- Ben F. Butler" printed below. Wear at the corners. 5 3/8 x 2 7/8.


The Ben F. Butler referred to on this cover was the controversial Union General Benjamin F. Butler, known as "The Beast" in New Orleans, La., a derogatory nickname he earned during the Union occupation of the city in 1862.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


 


Unused, Civil War patriotic envelope with full color vignette of Liberty seated with American flags, American shield with the motto, "Union" and a spread winged eagle. "Our Country" is printed below the illustration. Very fine.

To The Gallant Dedicated Defenders Of Ou

 

True To The Union, First Regiment Pennsy

 

The Man For The Times- Ben F. Butler

 

Patriotic Cover, Our Country




Unused, Civil War patriotic envelope with vignette of Justice holding scales and sword with "Justice" printed below. Published by Harbach & Brother, 36 North Eighth St., Philadelphia, with their imprint on the back flap. Very fine.  


Vignette of a man with long beard and encircling stars with the year 1863 on the obverse. Gustavus Lindenmueller, New York, with beer mug encircled by wreath at the center, on the reverse. Large quarter size token. Very fine.  


Unused, patriotic envelope with full cover illustration of Alexandria, Va. Published by Chas. Magnus, N.Y. View No. 1 B. Scarce.  


Unused, patriotic envelope with full cover illustration of the famous Washington, D.C. landmark. Scarce.

Patriotic Cover, Justice

 

1863 Civil War Merchant Token, Gustavus

 

Patriotic Cover, Bird's Eye View of Alex

 

Patriotic Cover, Smithsonian Institute,

The large  and early brown transferware platter presented measures 18 by 15 inches.  The pattern is Canova, a design featuring a prominent urn.  I particularly love the zigzag boundary separating the central scene from the surround.  Note the scalloped edge which not only provides a distinctive shape but also delineates the subject matter on the surround, an alternation of floral areas and scenes with urns. 


There is a reason for all these urns.  This design was originally done as a tribute to an Italian artist, Canova, who had passed away and has been cremated. 


 Several potters made this pattern including Thomas Mayer, c. 1826 - 35, and G. Phillips, c. 1834 - 48. This one does not bear the pottery name though it does have an illegible imprint that a person with better eyes than mine might read. 


Condition is excellent - no chips cracks or restoration though there is crazing. It bears the pottery's backstamp with pattern name but no pottery initials.

 


<b>Written by an officer captured at Winchester, Va., and who died as a P.O.W.


On very rare imprinted company letter sheet!</b>


3 pages, 7 1/2 x 9 3/4, in ink, written by Lieutenant Levi Lupton, to his wife. The fourth page of this letter sheet is an imprint of the roster of Co. C, 116TH OHIO VOLUNTEERS. 


<b><u>Fort Ackenoe, Winchester, Va., March 1st, 1863</b></u>


Mrs. E.H. Lupton,


My Dear and loving wife,


After my love to you and the children I will inform you that I recd. your kind and loving letter by the hand of [the] Capt. last night.  It found me in very good health and I was truly glad to hear that you were all as well as usual and I was rejoiced to get your likeness for although I often see you in my dreams I can now look at you when I am awake.  I put it in my shirt pocket and slept with it on my heart last night, but how much rather would I have slept with the original, but I shall have to wait awhile yet, but I hope it will not be long before I enjoy that privilege.  Well Dear I don’t think that I shall join the friends very soon but nevertheless I am very tired of the war and if I could put an end to the war by joining the [?] I would soon do it or anything else that was not absolutely wicked to obtain that end.  I was glad to hear of your pleasant visit to Mr. Clark’s and hope that you will go out to see your friends as often as you can as it will help you to pass the time and perhaps benefit your health for you have had to stay at home so much since I left you, and have had so much to do and I think a little running about would be the best thing that you could do.  Well Dear, I would have been glad to have been at home on last Sunday to have went to meeting with you for N.D. Powell said that you had a very good meeting.  I went to Methodist meeting in town but it is so strange it don’t seem half so good as our own.  Well dear if you can get the children’s likenesses taken I would like to have them to look at.  Dear you don’t know how I feel at times when I am in town and see so many little girls about the age of our Dear little Irena.  Evening before last I was in town waiting for the Capt. when two girls about like Margy and Laura came along the pavement with one about the size of Irena and that looked a heap like her.  The little child wanted an orange, but the girls was trying to coax her along, but she would not go but left them and went into Halister’s grocery.  I went in and got her an orange and then asked her to kiss me which she did so much like my own dear little girl that I could not keep [from] crying which to some may [have] looked very strange.  Well dear you spoke about J.J. Harris resigning.  He has sent in his resignation on the plea of failing health.  He looked very bad for a while but he looks better now, and it is uncertain whether it will be accepted or not but more of this another time.  I don’t know how soon I will try it but just as soon as I can do so with any prospect of success.  You will find our muster roll of the whole company in this letter which is gotten up expressly for our own Company.  We have also got printed memorials of our Company.  They are a very nice thing and I will send you some of them the first time I have an opportunity.  I may send a few for you to sell if there is more than our men want.  They will be worth from 1.25 to 1.50 each.  I expect that George Matchett [1] will go home this week and if he does I will send them by him or if he does not go I will send them by mail.  I am very thankful for those stamps that you sent me and I am very much obliged to Father for paying that man though you did not tell me his name, but I suppose it was Frederick Snyder, a son-in-law of Isa Windland’s.  Well dear I must bring my letter to a close as it is getting rather long and will tire you to read it.  Oh Dear, I thought I would just tell you that we have a lodge of free masons here and I have been there two or three times.  They meet 3 or 4 times a week.  I expect dear you will be angry with me for doing as I have, but I hope not and if you will say that you do not like it I will not go any more.  So good by my Dear wife.  May the Lord bless you is my prayer.  Hoping to hear from you soon, I remain your loving husband.


Lieut. L. Lupton


Comp.[any] C, 116th Regt. O.[hio] V.[olunteer] I.[nfantry]      


Light age toning, staining and wear. There are also a couple of small fold breaks.


The imprint on this letter sheet lists the commanding officer of Company C, Capt. Fred'k H. Ackenoe, [whose name you will see in Lupton's dateline; Fort Ackenoe], in large print at the top, and it is followed by the names of Lieutenants: James P. Mann, 1st, and Levi Lupton, 2d. It then continues on to name the sergeants, corporals, musicians and privates, and as Lieutenant Lupton states in the letter this was especially printed for his company. Regimental letter sheets are always very desirable. It is very rare to find one imprinted specifically for an individual company. This was probably printed in the field and done at their own expense. With the average company during the Civil War numbering about 100 men, when it is at full strength, there probably weren't too many of these printed, and even fewer that survived until today. Very desirable.   


[1] George Matchett, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on August 12, 1862, as a private, and was mustered into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry. He was captured on June 14, 1863, at the battle of Winchester, Va., and was exchanged on October 2, 1863. He was killed in action on August 26, 1864, at Halltown, Va.  


Levi Lupton, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862, at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was captured the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, Va. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., and at Macon, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., where he died on September 12, 1864.


Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio.      


<b>General George B. McClellan</b>


Bust view of General George B. McClellan in uniform within a wreath at the center, with stars above, and the year 1863 and "Little Mack" below, on the obverse. McClellan Medal For One Cent on the reverse. Very fine.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with full color illustration of a Zouave holding his musket. Motto printed at left, "Death or an Honorable Life," with 2d Battalion B.[oston] L.[ight] I.[nfantry] below. Published by J.E. Tilton & Co., Boston. Light wear. 5 1/2 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.

The large and early brown transferware $325.00

 

116th Ohio Infantry Letter

 

1863 Civil War Patriotic Token, Little M

 

2nd Battalion, Boston Light Infantry




Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of a tree with numerous American flags in its branches. "The Union Tree" in large red letters to the right, and a verse below the tree reads, "Traitor! spare that Tree, Cleave not a single bough, In youth it shelter'd me, And I'll protect it now." Published by Wells. 5 1/2 x 3. Worn at the corners.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.    


Civil War patriotic imprint with large illustration of a Zouave in full regalia including cape and holding his musket at his front. Titled, "The Zouave Defender." 5 1/2 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   


Civil War patriotic imprint with vignette of young lady wearing a flag dress and military style coat. She is pouring liquid into a cup from a small wooden barrel. "Daughter of the Regiment" printed above. Published by J.R. Hawley, Cincinnati, Ohio. Some light staining and wear. 5 1/4 x 3.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.   <b>at the Mouth of the Mississippi River


"a steamer hove in sight with a secession flag at her peak, and on discovering us, hauled down the secession and hoisted the English flag...we immediately went in pursuit of her, and when we were about a mile and a half astern of her, fired a shot to heave her to, but she paid no attention to it. We then gave her a 10 inch shell (from our pivot Gun) which burst directly over her, and had the desired effect."</b>


2 pages, 7 3/4 x 10, in ink, written by Surgeon Steward George A. Tittle, to his sister.


<b><u>U.S. Ship "Brooklyn," Passe a l'outre, Miss'pi River, June 8th, 1861</b></u>


Dear Sister,


We left our station (off Fort Pickens) on the evening of the 25th ult. and arrived here at noon on the following day, and here I presume we will be stationed until the war will be ended. 


The "Powhatan" is stationed at the S.W. Pass; the south pass is blocked with sunken vessels, consequently the entrance to the Mississippi River is completely blockaded. On the 28th ult. we captured the Barque "H.E. Spearing," and sent her to Key West in charge of a prize crew; on the 31st a steamer hove in sight with a secession flag at her peak, and on discovering us, hauled down the secession and hoisted the English flag, and stood off to the S.W.; we immediately went in pursuit of her, and when we were about a mile and a half astern of her, fired a shot to heave her to, but she paid no attention to it. We then gave her a 10 inch shell (from our pivot Gun) which burst directly over her, and had the desired effect; she proved to be the "Gen. Miramon" (formerly a Mexican Man of War) bound from Havana to New Orleans- as our Captain had some doubts as to her being a legal prize, he sent her in charge of a prize crew to the captain of the U.S. Str. "Niagra," off Mobile, who left her at Havana a short time ago, for him to decide if she is a prize or not. The Str. Parkersburg is now alongside discharging provisions, among which is a large quantity of fresh beef packed in ice, and a lot of live Hogs & Sheep so you will perceive that "Uncle Sam" does not intend to let us starve; the P.[arkersburg] arrived here yesterday from New York, she having broken her shaft off Key West, was towed here by the U.S. Str. "Mount Vernon"- the M.[ount] V.[ernon] will leave this morning for Key West and by her I send this. A Schooner arrived yesterday with a cargo of coal for us, just in time to save us the trouble of either going without coal or going to Key West for it. Since we captured the "Gen'l M.[iramon]" we have taken one Barque and two Brigs, but whether they will be considered or not I cannot say. I have not time to write any more as the letter bag will close in a few minutes. Give my regards to all as usual.


Yours &c,

Geo. A. Tittle


P.S. I think when you write to me it would be best for you to direct Via Key West instead of Havana as I requested in a previous letter.


George


Excellent, neatly written letter. Civil War naval letters are much scarcer then army letters because there were so many fewer written. Great letter from the famous Union warship Brooklyn describing the capture of Confederate blockade runners at the mouth of the Mississippi River. Rare content to find!


George A. Tittle enlisted in the U.S. Navy on January 11, 1859, and was discharged on December 2, 1864. During his time in the U.S. Navy, he served onboard the U.S.S. Brooklyn and the U.S.S. Kearasarge, and was with the latter ship when she sank the famous Rebel raider, the C.S.S. Alabama, commanded by Captain Raphael Semmes, off Cherbourg, France, on June 19, 1864.




Report of Commander Poor, U.S. Navy, commanding U.S.S. Brooklyn, of the capture by that vessel of barkentine H.E. Spearing and of the inefficiency of the blockade.


U.S. Steam Sloop, Brooklyn,

Off Pass a l' Outre, May 29, 1861


Sir: I have the honor to report that I captured as a prize the barkentine, H.E. Spearing, of and for New Orleans, with a cargo of coffee from Rio de Janeiro. I have placed a prize crew on board in charge of Midshipman Mauley and Boatswain Bartlett, with orders to proceed to Key West for adjudication.


I hope the Department will find it convenient to send additional men and officers to this ship, as her efficiency will be much affected by reducing her compliment of either, especially the former.


I arrived off the Pass a l'Outre on the 26th instant and sent in a notification of a rigid blockade, allowing fifteen days to neutrals to depart, with or without cargo. In this I followed the precedent established at Pensacola. Under the head of neutrals I class the vessels of all nationalities at peace with the United States. I found several American vessels on the bar; all of them had loaded and cleared before the proclamation of blockade was issued, but having no instructions or precedent to except American vessels so circumstanced, I have given them the usual warning not to leave. They appear to be bona fide United States vessels and their cargoes are mostly, if not entirely, foreign property.


If thy are compelled to remain they may fall into the hands of the enemy, and if I capture them for violating the blockade there is a great doubt of their condemnation, and I shall have to weaken my ship by placing prize crews on board, with officers to take charge of them. In either case I think the United States will suffer more than the other party. I should like to have more definite instructions with reference to such cases. It has happened also that emigrant vessels have arrived short of provisions and water. To turn them off without supplying them with provisions is not only inhuman, but might subject them, among who are women and children, to starvation. I can not well spare provisions from this ship, and it is impossible for them to procure them at New Orleans. I should like to know what course I am to pursue in such cases, especially when the vessels only contain passengers.


Several captures have been made by private armed steamers under the secession flag. Since my arrival they keep well up the river out of my reach. There is not water enough for this vessel to cross the bar, and if there was I could not take her through the intricate channel of the river without a pilot.


Without other vessels the blockade, I fear will not be considered a legal one, as there are three or four entrances to watch. I can only guard the principal one (Pass a l'Outre), the only one at this time accessible to large vessels. Light-draft, swift steamers, with a gun or two of long range, are much needed, and I think it would require at least four vessels to effectually blockade the mouths of the Mississippi and New Orleans. The Powhatan is off Mobile.


It will soon be necessary to supply this ship with coal.


Vessels are often detained on the bar, waiting for a rise to get over, for several weeks. One English ship remains fast in the mud, with a cargo she took on board two months or more since. Do vessels under such circumstances come under the strict rule of blockade?


Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C.H. Poor,

Commander


[to] Hon. Gideon Welles,

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D.C.




Report of Lieutenant Adams, U.S. Navy, regarding the detention of the steamer General Miramon.


U.S.S. Niagra,

Off Mobile, June 2, 1861


Sir: On the morning of the 31st of May the steamer General Miramon appeared off the mouth of the Mississippi River, flying English colors, steering for Pass a l'Outre. On seeing the U.S.S. Brooklyn she altered her course and steered for the South Pass. While endeavoring to enter this Pass, before the guns of the Brooklyn could reach her, she ran ashore. The Brooklyn, on coming within range, fired a shot at her and afterwards, seeing her propeller still moving, fired a second one (a shell). The General Miramon then got off the shoal and came alongside of the Brooklyn. She was boarded by Lieutenant Mitchell, who reported her as having papers all correct, except the register, which was a provisional one given by the English consul at New Orleans; also that the vessel had but one day's coal, water, and provisions on board, and that she had thirty-one passengers, among them five ladies and three children. Captain Poor then ordered me to take a boat's crew and bring the vessel here and report her case to you, as the Brooklyn could not conveniently furnish her with sufficient coal and proper provisions, and Captain Poor did not feel authorized to let the steamer pass it.


Her cargo consisted of cigars and fruit. Her passengers were chiefly foreigners.


Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H.A. Adams, Jr.

Lieutenant, U.S. Navy


[to] Captain William W. McKean

U.S.S. Niagra


P.S. Four of the ladies were quite ill, and one of them so much so that I think she would have died if she had made another sea voyage. This lady being the mother of the three children, their suffering was also very great. On my arrival here the General Miramon had but five hours coal on board; the last of her provisions was being cooked, and she had only sufficient water for the day. She leaked very badly through her stern stuffing box, as the bolts were working out.


H.A.A., Jr.



Petition of master of British steamship General Miramon to senior officer present in Gulf of Mexico for release of that vessel.


On Board The British Steamship General Miramon,

June 1, 1861


Sir: On the 28th ultimo I left Havana for New Orleans with twenty eight passengers, and cargo composed of a few thousand cigars, with sufficient coal and provisions and water to last me for the voyage. I left Havana in perfect ignorance of the blockade, not had the British consul had any information thereof.


In perfect good faith, therefore, my vessel was ordered back and prize crew put on board to carry her to Mobile and confer with the senior officer, and as such I address you to take my case under your serious consideration, and either allow me to proceed to Mobile or New Orleans. I have no coal, provisions, or water to carry me a longer voyage. My crew are shipped from New Orleans. If sent back to Havana when my owner is not there, how am I to procure the necessaries of life, pay my crew, and perhaps have to sustain litigation? Whereas if sent to Mobile I could communicate with my owner and make arrangements accordingly.


The circumstances are very distressing and certainly admit some extension of courtesy to a neutral vessel carrying on a lawful trade.


I am, sir, your most obedient servant,

D. Golding,

Master of Steamship General Miramon


[to] Captain W.W. McKean, U.S. Navy


Enclosure:


I, Daniel Golding, hereby pledge myself that the steamer General Miramon, under my command, if allowed to enter the port of Mobile to land my passengers, will as soon as possible come out of that port without cargo, and will depart off the southern coast of the United States.


Witness my hand this 1st day of June, 1861, off Mobile.

D. Golding


Witness:

John Guest

First Lieutenant, Navy Aid

The Union Tree

 

The Zouave Defender

 

Daughter of the Regiment

 

Rare Letter Written From the U. S. S. Broo




Pair of 1865 dated Union patriotic envelopes published by Charles Magnus. Both covers are a deep lavender color with a gilded imprint, one in silver and one in gold. Each have an eagle vignette with the caption "U.S. Armies Operating against Richmond, Va." with places to write in the Company, Regiment, Brigade, Division and Army Corps. The silver printed cover is quite attractive, the gold imprinted cover has oxidized  somewhat. Both have the 1865 Magnus, New York imprint at the bottom. These are quite rare to find!       Measuring 3 ½ X 2 3/8 inches and remaining in excellent condition with no scratches or other issues, our photo illustrations will likely speak best for this tintype as our subject stands for his portrait in full uniform with the classic Army spiked helmet, enlisted rectangular U. S. waist belt plate and issue U. S. embossed Mckeever  cartridge box. <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best.   Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

 

 A neat all original and period tumbler to use with your favorite beverage or to set out for display is this heavy 3 ¾ inch high tumbler fashioned from an iron pontiled <I>blob top</I> bottle circa 1850s early 1860s.  Boldly embossed <B>J. SIMONDS – BOSTON – MINERAL WATER</B> this relic of the Civil War era, pressed into service from a damaged or discharged bottle, offers an attractive example of the typical <I>make-do</I> attitude of the period.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !   All in excellent condition with bright original ribbons (no splits or weak spots), this attractive Civil War veteran GAR National Encampment Representative medal is dated 1926 and was issued to veteran representatives attending the 60th  National Encampment in Des Moines, Iowa.  The medal carries the figure of GAR National Commander <B>John B. Inman </B>.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

Patriotic Covers, U. S. Armies Operating $75.00

 

Indian Wars vintage U. S. Infantryman TI $145.00

 

Civil War vintage MAKE DO TUMBLER $60.00

 

1926 Des Moines G. A. R. National Encamp $185.00




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