View Orders Back to AntiqueArts Home Page Come and view all that's new! Come and view all that's new! More than 135 upscale Antiques shops Would you like to sell your antiques here? Have a question or suggestion? A comprehensive guide to antiques resources on the World Wide Web
Antique Arts Showcase
What's New in the Collector's Showcase?
The Most Recent Additions to This Category are First!


 Architectural Antiques
 Art
 Autographs
 Books
 Coins & Currency
 Lamps & Lighting
 Memorabilia
 Militaria
 Paper & Ephemera
 Photographica
 Political

Best described here by our photo illustrations, this attractive Black American motif  tobacco pipe measures approximately 5 inches in length and remains in excellent unused condition while offering good evidence of age and period originality.  An exceptionally nice item in any quality Civil War era personal item grouping.

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 H 32in. X D 12in.  H 30in. x D 7in.  Dating from 1830 to the mid-19th century this <I>blue splatterware</I> spongeware plate measures 7 inches in diameter and remains in excellent condition with no cracks, chips or restoration while offering fine evidence as an early production example. A classic with its blue transfer Federal Eagle with 13 star shield, this plate will fit well in any early Americana environment.

original! earlier to mid-1800s clay TOBA $95.00

 

H 32in. X D 12in. $1250.00

 

H 30in. x D 7in. $0.00

 

earlier 19th century through Civil War $145.00

Best described here by our photos suffice it to say this striking pair of wool felt and bullion tape Corporal of Artillery stripes remain in excellent condition with bright color while offering good evidence of age, period use and originality.

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 This desirable 18th century spoon mold measures 8 inches in length and casts a  7 3/8  inch long pewter spoon with the period telltale, long <I>rat-tailed</I> bowl. Clearly dating from the mid-1750s, this attractive old Revolutionary War era bronze mold remains in fine all original condition sporting a dark natural age patina.  Offered here as found and untouched after decades of New England attic storage, the mold retains its last casting.  Likely left in place in the mold and unused due to a casting flaw, such were generally remelted and recast.  An outstanding piece of early Americana!  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  H 48in. x D 16in.  H 72in. x D 16in.

especially nice - 19th century Artillery $235.00

 

18th century SPOON MOLD & SPOON $200.00

 

H 48in. x D 16in. $2400.00

 

H 72in. x D 16in. $750.00

H 32in. x D 14in.  H 9in. x W 4in. x D 8in.

Sold as a pair.  H 26in. x D 6in.  


3 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by John A. Yeckley. Fully identified with company and regiment.


<u>Camp near Darnstown, Maryland, Oct. 17 [1862]</u>


Dear brother,


It has been some time since I have written to you or heard from you & the reason why is that I did not know where to write for I heard that you had enlisted & that is the reason that I have not written oftener.  I got a letter from mother yesterday & she is in want of some money.  She says she is not allowed a cent this summer & that her feet is bare to the ground.  It is impossible for me to do anything for her at present for I had the misfortune to lose my pocketbook with forty dollars just as I was agoing to send it home the next day.  If you can help her a little at present I can send her twenty dollars in about a month when I get my next pay.  I think you had better go & see her.  If possible move her away for 	I don’t suppose that she is very well used [to] where she is & I think her & Nancy Jane might live together with very little more expense.  You must write to me as soon as you can.  Do anything to relieve her wants.  If not let me know & I will try & get a furlough to come home & see to things.  We are about twenty miles from Washington.  We are in a very good section of country.  The land is what the chestnut oak & prime land is in our state.  We have plenty of spring water.  The weather is pleasant & the nights warmer than they was in the summer.  I have not had anything yet but a fly tent open at both ends, but I never enjoyed better health in my life than since I left Washington.  We have plenty to eat and drink of everything that we want.  We only drill about three hours per day, just enough to give us an appetite.  

Direct your letters to John A. Yeckley, Co. E, 28th Regt. N.Y.S.V., Washington, D.C., care of Col. D. Donelley.


The big guns is firing towards Washington today & they was all day yesterday & they are fighting in the neighborhood of Chain Bridge, but we hear so many reports that we can’t believe anything we hear, but we have had orders to have two days rations in our haversacks & to have our knapsacks packed so as to be ready for a march.

Write as often as you can for a letter never comes amiss to a soldier.


Yours in haste,

John A. Yeckley 


Bold and very neatly written. Excellent fully identified New York infantry soldier's letter..


John A. Leckley, was 24 years old when he enlisted in the Union army as a private, at Canadaigua, New York, on May 14, 1861, and was mustered into Company E, 28th New York Infantry, on May 22nd. He was mustered out of the service on June 2, 1863, at Albany, New York, when the regiment's term of service expired.

H 32in. x D 14in. $1200.00

 

H 9in. x W 4in. x D 8in.
Sold as a pa $800.00

 

H 26in. x D 6in. $0.00

 

28th New York Infantry Letter $125.00




3 1/2 pages, 5 1/8 x 6 1/2, in ink, written by John A. Yeckley.


<u>Winchester, Virginia, March 16th, 1862</u>


Friend Josephine,


I received your letter yesterday & I was glad to hear from you for it was so long since I heard from you that I thought you had forgotten me.  The reason that I did not write before is because I heard that you was not at home & besides that I did not receive any answer to my last letter.  We are once more in Virginia & we expected to have a fine time taking Winchester, but the Rebels all left the night before we got here & never gave us any show for a fight.  We are having very pleasant times.  There [is] about twenty of us in a tent & we play euchre pretty much all the time.  We are encamped about half a mile from the city.  It is a very pleasant place & the weather is delightful.  There is skirmishing going on here every day with the enemy’s pickets.  Our company is going out this afternoon & probably we may have a chance to see some of them.  It is rather tough times here among the citizens.  Salt is worth eight dollars per bushel, potatoes are worth four dollars, coffee is worth two dollars per pound, writing paper is selling for two cents per sheet, postage stamps are not to be had for love nor money.  We have fresh pork, mutton & chickens nearly every meal.  I should like to know if you have seen anything of Walt & if you have tell him that I should like to hear from him.  I can’t say how long we shall stay here, but the probability is we shall remain here some time.  Write as soon as you receive this & give me all the particulars.  Tell me what kind of a time you had at that oyster supper at George Frey’s.  I heard by the way that my uncle was waiting on you.  I would like to know if it is so, but I must bid you good bye this time.


Yours truly,

John


You must excuse bad writing & all other mistakes for the boys are all raising hell & some one of them is running against me almost every word I write.


That letter with the one enclosed for Jim was not received.  Jim says that he should like to hear from Alice very much.


Bold and very neatly written. Light age toning and wear. Newsy letter. Excellent content. 


John A. Leckley, was 24 years old when he enlisted in the Union army as a private, at Canadaigua, New York, on May 14, 1861, and was mustered into Company E, 28th New York Infantry, on May 22nd. He was mustered out of the service on June 2, 1863, at Albany, New York, when the regiment's term of service expired. 

 While this impressive red, white and blue hat cord may be appropriately applied to an Indian Wars slouch hat as <I>war surplus</I> it will be most  appropriately used with a military use Civil War vintage  slouch hat.  Illustrated here with a US quarter for size comparison, this cotton cord is of the less common extra heavy form with large netted acorns and while remaining in nice condition offers good evidence of age and originality.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 H 22in. x D 40in.  H 24in. x D 14in.

Sold as a pair.

28th New York Infantry Soldier Letter $95.00

 

Civil War era patriotic - HAT CORD $175.00

 

H 22in. x D 40in. $0.00

 

H 24in. x D 14in.
Sold as a pair. $2400.00

H 32in. x D 32in.  H 72in. x D 16in.

Sold as a pair.  


<b>Had his arm amputated in the Mexican War


From the personal collection of Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin. Irwin has the distinct honor of being the first recipient of the Medal of Honor in U.S. military history by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


(1818-86) Born in Wilmington, North Carolina, he was known as "Old Blizzards." His early military career saw him in action against the Florida Seminoles. Later he studied law and was elected to the Florida legislature. Commissioned directly in the Regular Army in 1846 as a captain of the newly established Regiment of Mounted Rifles, he earned the brevets of major and lieutenant colonel in the Mexican War,  being seriously wounded at the battle of Chapultepac resulting in the loss of his  arm. Promoted to colonel of his regiment in 1856, he was both then and at the time of his resignation on May 13, 1861, the youngest line colonel in the old U.S. army. He was appointed brigadier general in the Confederate army on May 20, 1861, and major general on February 15, 1862. He clashed violently with General Stonewall Jackson over the conduct of operations in the Romney expedition during the winter of 1861-62 in the Shenandoah Valley. Later assigned to the Army of Mississippi, in December 1862, his division was cut off from the main body of General John C. Pemberton's forces at the battle of Baker's Creek, and thus escaped capture at Vicksburg. From then until the end of the war he commanded a division under General Leonidas Polk, and later in the Army of Tennessee under Generals' Joseph E. Johnston and John Bell Hood participating in the battles of Franklin and Knoxville. Loring was the senior major general on active field duty in the Confederate army when he surrendered with General Joseph E. Johnston in April 1865 in North Carolina. In 1869, he went to Egypt with several other veterans from the War Between the States and was commissioned as a general under the Khedive of Egypt where he achieved much success. He saw action in several campaigns in 1875-76, earning several decorations and the esteemed designation as Pasha. Loring returned to the United States in 1879, and was active in Florida politics and he lectured widely on his military experiences in Egypt. He died in New York City on December 30, 1886, and was initially buried at the Grace Episcopal Church. His remains were later re-interred in Woodlawn Cemetery in St. Augustine, Florida, with much pomp and circumstance.     


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 3/4 card. The mount is slightly trimmed. Back mark: E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York. Vignetted seated view in Confederate uniform clearly showing his empty sleeve from his Mexican War amputation. He is wearing a rectangular belt plate, over the shoulder cross belt, and cradling his sword across his lap. A table with ink well and pen is seen at the left. Period ink inscription on the front mount, Maj. Genl. W.W. Loring, C.S.A, "Loring Pasha." Written in period ink in Irwin's hand on the reverse is, Major Genl. W.W. Loring, C.S., "Loring Pasha."  Died '86. Genl. B.J.D. Irwin album, No. 142 is written in pencil at the bottom.  Minor age toning and wear. Very fine. Rare with this provenance literally making this image "one of a kind." Loring is a very scarce image in his own right as I have not had one in well over 25 years! Very desirable Confederate image!


<u>Trivia</u>: The term "Pasha" was one of the highest ranking titles in the Kingdom of Egypt during the 19th century. 


<b><h2>History of United States Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin</b></h2>


<b>Surgeon & General Irwin was the first United States Medal of Honor Recipient by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


(1830-1917) Born in County Roscommon, Ireland, he immigrated with his parents to the United States in the 1840s. He attended New York University from 1848 to 1849, and then served as a private in the New York Militia. In 1850, he entered Castleton Medical College, and he later transferred to New York Medical College, where he graduated in 1852.


He served as a surgeon and physician at the State Emigrant Hospital on Ward's Island, NYC, until his appointment as assistant surgeon in the U.S. Army in 1856. He was an assistant army surgeon during the Apache Wars, and was the first Medal of Honor recipient chronologically by date of action. His actions on February 13, 1861, at Apache Pass, Arizona, are the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded! The citation on his medal of honor reads; "Voluntarily took command of troops and attacked and defeated hostile Indians he met on the way. Surgeon Irwin volunteered to go to the rescue of 2d Lt. George N. Bascom, 7th U.S. Infantry, who, with 60 men, was trapped by Chiricahua Apaches under Cochise. Irwin and 14 men, not having horses, began the 100-mile march riding mules. After fighting and capturing Indians, recovering stolen horses and cattle, he reached Bascom's column and helped break his siege."


Cochise, the Apache Indian chief, and a group of Apache warriors were accused of kidnapping a boy and a small group of U.S. soldiers in the Arizona Territory after the Army had captured Cochise's brother and nephews. When the Army refused to make a prisoner exchange, Cochise killed his prisoners. Soldiers then killed Cochise's brother and nephews. 2nd Lieutenant George Nicholas Bascom led a group of 60 men from the 7th U.S. Infantry after Cochise but was soon besieged, prompting a rescue mission by the army. In response to the siege of Bascom and his men, Irwin set out on a rescue mission with 14 men of the 1st U.S. Dragoons. He was able to catch up with the Apaches at Apache Pass in present day Arizona. He strategically placed his small unit around Cochise and his men, tricking the Apache leader into thinking that he had a much larger army with him. The Apaches fled and Bascom and his men were saved. Bascom and his men joined Irwin and together they were able to track Cochise into the mountains & rescued the young boy that Cochise had captured.


The Medal of Honor did not exist during the time of the "Bascom Incident," and would not be established until a year later in 1862. However, the actions of Irwin were well remembered, and he was awarded the Medal of Honor just prior to his retirement. Irwin's actions were the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded, predating the outbreak of the American Civil War.


Irwin subsequently served with the Union army during the Civil War, and was promoted to captain in August 1861, and the next year was appointed medical director under Major General William "Bull" Nelson. He improvised one of the first field hospitals used by the U.S. Army at the Battle of Shiloh, on April 7, 1862. He was captured during the Battle of Richmond, Ky., while attempting to save the wounded General Nelson. He was promoted to major in September 1862, and after his release from a Rebel prison he became medical director in the Army of the Southwest. From 1863 to 1865, he was superintendent of the military hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, and in March of 1865, he was brevetted to the rank of colonel. He was a companion of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and the Order of the Indian Wars of the United States. After the Civil War, Irwin served as a senior medical officer at several U.S. army posts, including West Point from 1873 to 1878. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1885, to colonel in August 1890, and to brigadier general in April 1904. He died in Ontario, Canada, on December 15, 1917, and is buried in the West Point Cemetery, at the U.S. Military Academy, New York.


His son George LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1889, and served in World War I, becoming a Major General in the U.S. Army.


His grandson Stafford LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1915, and served in World War II, and became a Lieutenant General in the U.S. Army.


His daughter, Amy Irwin Addams McCormick, was a nurse with the American Red Cross and served during World War I.


General Irwin was an admirer and collector of photographs, and he put together a very large, and superb collection of Union and Confederate images. Interestingly, he collected photographs of both Rebel and Yankee alike. I have owned several famous military photograph albums before and never came across one that collected images from both sides of the rebellion. He numbered each individual image, and wrote a brief historical notation on each one. The collection was split up by another dealer, and by the time I found out about it, I was still very fortunate to be able to acquire about one third of his superb Civil War image collection. Each image is rare because it is "one of a kind" having come from the Irwin collection!


The image of B.J.D. Irwin pictured here is a copy photograph from the "Find a Grave" website and is used here for illustration purposes only.

 An offering from our personal <I>’stuff’</I> as we continue to pare down and seek out an appreciative home for some of our accumulation, this half plate Civil War tintype offers a time worn period label with an ever so lite but discernible identification of the subject as <I><B>’Clarence Noyes 1st Me. Cavalry’</I></B>.  (see a comparative  signed image from our collection on the HDS Civil War database.)  Best described here by our photos as to condition and eye appeal, suffice it to say the image shows considerable evidence of time degradation at the boundaries but remains in decent condition in the main and will display quite nicely when properly matted and framed.  A Portland Maine resident, Clarence Noyes enlisted in Washington D.C. on June I,1863 as a Private of Co. L <B>1st D.C. Cavalry</B> and transferred to Co. B <B>1st Maine Cavalry</B> on September 18, 1864.  With some 20 pages of period military records on Clarence Noyes available on the <I>fold3</I> military database, we find him recorded as <I><B>’missing in action June 28,1864’</I></B>, that he was captured at Reams Station and confined as a <B>prisoner of war</B> in Richmond on July 1, 1864.  Available period records show confinement at <B>Andersonville Prison</B> July 16,1864 where he was admitted to hospital on September 21,1864 and <U>died on the same day</U>.  The cause of his death was recorded as <I>‘scorbutus’</I> a period term for scurvy.

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

H 32in. x D 32in. $2800.00

 

H 72in. x D 16in.
Sold as a pair. $0.00

 

CDV, General William W. Loring $295.00

 

died at Andersonville Prison / 1st Maine




<b>He fought at Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg


One of the Commissioners during the trial of the Lincoln Conspirators, at Washington, D.C., May 9 to June 29, 1865


War Date Document Signed as Inspector of Artillery


Court Martial of Private in the 33rd New York Light Artillery who was sentenced to forfeit his pay, and was assigned to hard labor wearing a ball and chain!</b>


(1818-97) Howe graduated in the West Point class of 1841, and won a brevet for gallantry in the Mexican War during General Winfield Scott's advance upon Mexico City. He was present with his battery at Harper's Ferry after the celebrated raid of John Brown. During the Civil War he commanded an artillery brigade during the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign, an infantry brigade at Antietam, and an infantry division at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg. He served as one of the 12 commissioners during the trial of the Lincoln Conspirators which was held in Washington, D.C., May 9 to June 29, 1865.


<u>War Date Document Signed</u>: 


2 1/2 pages, 8 x 12 1/4, in ink.


Headquarters Inspector of Artillery U.S.A.

Washington, December 19th, 1863


Special Orders

No. 163


Extract


Before a General Court Martial which convened at Camp Barry, D.C., Decbr. 7th, 1863, pursuant to Special Orders No. 159 from these Headquarters, dated Decbr. 4th, 1863, and of which Captain A.M. Wheeler, 33rd N.Y. Battery is President, was tried.


James Hewitt alias Nathaniel Truesdale, private of the 33rd N.Y. Battery, on the following Charges and Specifications.


Charge- Desertion


Specification- In this, that the said James Hewitt, alias Nathaniel Truesdale of the 3rrd N.Y. Battery did leave the camp of said Battery at Elmira, N.Y. on or about the 20th day of July 1863 without leave of his Commanding Officer, and did not return to Camp of 33rd N.Y. Battery, but was arrested in Elmira, N.Y. on or about the 15th day of November 1863.


To which Charge and Specification the accused pleaded as follows:


To the Specification- Guilty

To the Charge- Not Guilty


The Court after mature deliberation on the evidence adduced, finds the accused as follows:


Of the Specification- Guilty

Of the Charge- Guilty


And does therefore sentence him, the said James Hewitt, alias Nathaniel Truesdale, of the 33rd N.Y. Battery, to forfeit to the United States all pay and bounties which are or may become due to him, with the exception of two dollars per month of his monthly pay, and to be confined at hard labor for the remainder of his term of enlistment at such place as the Commanding General may direct. The first year of his confinement to be passed with a ball weighing twelve pounds attached to his right leg by means of a chain eight feet long. 


The proceedings and findings in each of the above cases are approved, as are also the sentences in the case of:


Private James Hewitt, alias Nathaniel Truesdale, of the 33rd N.Y. Battery which sentence will be duly executed.


In the case of James Hewitt, alias Nathaniel Truesdale, Fort Delaware is designated as the place of confinement subject to such change of locality as any higher authority may direct. 


The Commanding Officer of Camp Barry will see that existing Genl. Orders of War Dept. are complied with in this case.


By Command of Brig. Genl. Barry

(Signed) John E. Marshall

Captain & A.A. Genl.


Office Inspector of Artillery

Washington, D.C., June 15th, 1866

Official Copy

A.P. Howe

Major 4th Arty., Bvt. Colonel

Insp. of Artillery


Very neatly written, and in very fine condition. Albion P. Howe is a very desirable Union general's autograph with his battle honors, and association with the President Lincoln conspirators trial.       


<b>Mortally wounded in the battle of Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia in 1864


War Date Endorsement Signed as Colonel 52nd Ohio Infantry</b>


(1834-64) Born in Carrollton, Ohio, he was a member of the famous "Fighting McCook" family of Ohio. He graduated from the University of Alabama in 1858, studied law, passed the bar exam, moved to Kansas and formed a partnership with William T. Sherman, Hugh B. Ewing and Thomas Ewing, Jr., all four of them becoming Union Generals during the Civil War. He served as a captain in a local militia company which became part of the  1st Kansas Infantry. He was the chief of staff of the 1st Division, Army of the Ohio, at the battle of Shiloh, and was appointed colonel of the 52nd Ohio Infantry on July 15, 1862. He served as a brigade commander under his old law partner, General William T. Sherman, in The Army of the Cumberland. General Sherman assigned McCook to lead the assault on Kennesaw Mountain, Ga., on June 27, 1864, and his brigade charged directly into the Confederate works. Just before he led the attack, he calmly recited to his men part of Thomas Macauley's famous poem, "Horatius," "then how may man die better than facing fearful odds?" When McCook reached the Rebel fortifications he was encouraging his men to follow him when he was struck in the right lung by a rifle shot. The wound proved to be fatal and he died on July 21, 1864, the day before his 30th birthday! He is buried in Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio. For the courage he displayed at Kennesaw Mountain, he was promoted to the rank of brevet major general although this promotion was never confirmed by the U.S. Senate.


<u>War Date Endorsement Signed</u>: 8 x 10, imprinted form, filled out in ink. For Joseph J. Kannel, Co. A, 52nd Ohio Infantry. For Services rendered in the Quarter Master Department of the 52nd Regiment O.V.I. as Extra duty man as Regimental Teamster for (85) Eighty five days, at 25 cents per day. From August the 25th until Nov. the 19th. $21.25. 


I certify, that the above account is correct and just; that the services were rendered as stated; and that they were necessary for the public service, and that they were reported from August 25, 1862, September and October up to November 19th, 1862. Approved, Daniel McCook, Col. 52nd Ohio. 


Also signed by J. Fisler, Regimental Quartermaster, 52 O.V.I., and Joseph J. Kannel.


Joseph J. Kannel, was a 22 years old when he enlisted on August 5, 1862, as a private, and mustered into Co. A, 52nd Ohio Infantry. He was mustered out of the Union army on June 3, 1865, at Washington, D.C. 


Autograph Endorsement Signed on the reverse by a Lt. Col. & Chief Q.M.


Some scattered foxing and light wear. 


Very desirable war date signature of one of the "Fighting McCook's" who was killed during the war!   


        


<b>General-in-Chief of all U.S. Armies during the Civil War</b>


(1815-1872) Graduated 3rd in the West Point class of 1839. An assistant professor while still an undergraduate at the Military Academy, he first worked upon the fortifications of New York Harbor, and in 1844 inspected those of France. Upon his return to the U.S., he wrote a Report on the Means of National Defence, which was published by Congress and won him an invitation from the Lowell Institute of Boston to deliver a series of lectures. These were published as Elements of Military Art and Science, a work which enjoyed wide circulation among soldiers for many years. He received a brevet as captain in the Mexican War. At the beginning of the Civil War, General Winfield Scott recommended to Abraham Lincoln that Halleck be appointed major general in the regular service. In November 1861, Halleck relieved General Fremont at St. Louis and in a demonstration of his talents as an administrator quickly brought order out of the chaos in which his predecessor had plunged the Department of the Missouri. A series of successes by his subordinates at Forts Henry & Donelson, Pea Ridge, Island No. 10 and Shiloh, caused Halleck to shine in reflective glory, and his domain enlarged to include Ohio and Kansas. President Lincoln later recalled him to Washington to serve as general in chief of the U.S. Armies. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Excellent half view in uniform with rank of major general. Back mark: E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York, from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery.  


<b>"Kearny the Magnificent"


At the Mexican War battle of Churubusco, his left arm was severely wounded necessitating amputation!


He was killed at Chantilly, Virginia on September 1, 1862!


From the personal collection of Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin. Irwin has the distinct honor of being the first recipient of the Medal of Honor in U.S. military history by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


(1815-62) Born in New York City to a wealthy Irish American family, he attended Columbia College, in NYC, and studied law earning his law degree in 1833. Instead of practicing law however, Kearny yearned for a military career and  decided to make the army his profession. He obtained a commission as a second lieutenant of cavalry, assigned to the 1st U.S. Dragoons, who were commanded by his uncle, Colonel Stephen W. Kearny, and whose adjutant general was future Confederate President Jefferson Davis. The regiment was assigned to the western frontier. Kearny was sent to France in 1839 to study cavalry tactics, first attending school at the famous cavalry school in Saumur. He participated in several combat engagements with the Chasseurs d'Afrique in Algeria, and rode into battle with a sword in his right hand, pistol in his left, and the reins in his teeth, as was the style of the Chasseurs. His fearless character in battle earned him the nickname from his French comrades of "Kearny le Magnifique," or in English, "Kearny the Magnificent." He returned to the United States in the fall of 1840, and prepared a cavalry manual for the Army based on his experiences overseas. Kearny was assigned to the staff of General Winfield Scott, soon becoming his aide-de-camp. During the Mexican War, in 1846, his company served as an escort for commanding General Winfield Scott during the advance on Mexico City, and at Churubusco his left arm was shattered necessitating amputation. For his gallant conduct here he was brevetted major. In 1859, he went abroad again and served in Napoleon III's Imperial Guard during the Italian War. He took part in every cavalry charge at Magenta and Solferino with the reins of his horse clenched in his teeth. When the Civil War broke out he hurried home and was one of the first brigadier generals of volunteers appointed. He was assigned to command the "New Jersey Brigade," part of Gen. William B. Franklin's division. He fought in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign, rising to division command. At the close of the 2nd Bull Run campaign, on September 1, 1862, at Chantilly, Va., he was killed. Respected by officers of both the Union & the Confederacy, his body was sent through the lines under a flag of truce by Confederate General Robert E. Lee. The originator of the "Kearny Patch," the forerunner of the corps badge, he was termed by General Scott as "the bravest man I ever knew, and a perfect soldier." High praise indeed! General Kearny's own motto was, "It is sweet and fitting to die for one's country."


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform. Corners of the mount are very slightly trimmed. Back mark: Charles D. Fredricks & Co., 587 Broadway, New York. Period ink inscription in red ink on the front mount, Major Genl. Philip Kearny, U.S.A.  Written in red period ink in Irwin's hand on the reverse is, Philip Kearny, Major General, U.S. Army, Killed at Chantilly, Va., Sept. 1, 1862. Genl. B.J.D. Irwin album, No. 49 is written in  pencil at the bottom. Irwin used red ink on his written inscriptions for those generals who were killed during the war. Light age toning and wear. Very fine. Rare with this provenance literally making this image "one of a kind."


<b><h2>History of United States Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin</h2></b>


<b>Surgeon & General Irwin was the first United States Medal of Honor Recipient by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


(1830-1917) Born in County Roscommon, Ireland, he immigrated with his parents to the United States in the 1840s. He attended New York University from 1848 to 1849, and then served as a private in the New York Militia. In 1850, he entered Castleton Medical College, and he later transferred to New York Medical College, where he graduated in 1852.


He served as a surgeon and physician at the State Emigrant Hospital on Ward's Island, NYC, until his appointment as assistant surgeon in the U.S. Army in 1856. He was an assistant army surgeon during the Apache Wars, and was the first Medal of Honor recipient chronologically by date of action. His actions on February 13, 1861, at Apache Pass, Arizona, are the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded! The citation on his medal of honor reads; "Voluntarily took command of troops and attacked and defeated hostile Indians he met on the way. Surgeon Irwin volunteered to go to the rescue of 2d Lt. George N. Bascom, 7th U.S. Infantry, who, with 60 men, was trapped by Chiricahua Apaches under Cochise. Irwin and 14 men, not having horses, began the 100-mile march riding mules. After fighting and capturing Indians, recovering stolen horses and cattle, he reached Bascom's column and helped break his siege."


Cochise, the Apache Indian chief, and a group of Apache warriors were accused of kidnapping a boy and a small group of U.S. soldiers in the Arizona Territory after the Army had captured Cochise's brother and nephews. When the Army refused to make a prisoner exchange, Cochise killed his prisoners. Soldiers then killed Cochise's brother and nephews. 2nd Lieutenant George Nicholas Bascom led a group of 60 men from the 7th U.S. Infantry after Cochise but was soon besieged, prompting a rescue mission by the army. In response to the siege of Bascom and his men, Irwin set out on a rescue mission with 14 men of the 1st U.S. Dragoons. He was able to catch up with the Apaches at Apache Pass in present day Arizona. He strategically placed his small unit around Cochise and his men, tricking the Apache leader into thinking that he had a much larger army with him. The Apaches fled and Bascom and his men were saved. Bascom and his men joined Irwin and together they were able to track Cochise into the mountains & rescued the young boy that Cochise had captured.


The Medal of Honor did not exist during the time of the "Bascom Incident," and would not be established until a year later in 1862. However, the actions of Irwin were well remembered, and he was awarded the Medal of Honor just prior to his retirement. Irwin's actions were the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded, predating the outbreak of the American Civil War.


Irwin subsequently served with the Union army during the Civil War, and was promoted to captain in August 1861, and the next year was appointed medical director under Major General William "Bull" Nelson. He improvised one of the first field hospitals used by the U.S. Army at the Battle of Shiloh, on April 7, 1862. He was captured during the Battle of Richmond, Ky., while attempting to save the wounded General Nelson. He was promoted to major in September 1862, and after his release from a Rebel prison he became medical director in the Army of the Southwest. From 1863 to 1865, he was superintendent of the military hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, and in March of 1865, he was brevetted to the rank of colonel. He was a companion of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and the Order of the Indian Wars of the United States. After the Civil War, Irwin served as a senior medical officer at several U.S. army posts, including West Point from 1873 to 1878. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1885, to colonel in August 1890, and to brigadier general in April 1904. He died in Ontario, Canada, on December 15, 1917, and is buried in the West Point Cemetery, at the U.S. Military Academy, New York.


His son George LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1889, and served in World War I, becoming a Major General in the U.S. Army.


His grandson Stafford LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1915, and served in World War II, and became a Lieutenant General in the U.S. Army.


His daughter, Amy Irwin Addams McCormick, was a nurse with the American Red Cross and served during World War I.


General Irwin was an admirer and collector of photographs, and he put together a very large, and superb collection of Union and Confederate images. Interestingly, he collected photographs of both Rebel and Yankee alike. I have owned several famous military photograph albums before and never came across one that collected images from both sides of the rebellion. He numbered each individual image, and wrote a brief historical notation on each one. The collection was split up by another dealer, and by the time I found out about it, I was still very fortunate to be able to acquire about one third of his superb Civil War image collection. Each image is rare because it is "one of a kind" having come from the Irwin collection!


The image of B.J.D. Irwin pictured here is a copy photograph from the "Find a Grave" website and is used here for illustration purposes only.

Autograph, General Albion P. Howe

 

Autograph, General Daniel McCook $250.00

 

CDV, General Henry W. Halleck

 

CDV, General Philip Kearny $125.00

Best described here by our photo illustrations this die struck tinned sheet iron serving spoon measures just under a foot long and is in the pattern design of Grosjean’s patent of Jan. 28, 1862.  U. S. Pat. No. 34252 advised in part that the object of the design was to <I>impart strength and firmness to the narrow or weak part of the handle</I> (see: US Patent Office Report of 1862) Grosjean’s utilization of  a <I>ribbed</I> design in the die strike not only offered a modicum of decoration but more importantly gave strength while utilizing a lighter material in the die strike. Ultimately used in the manufacture of both spoons and forks, Grosjean’s design saw wide use by the weight vs strength and durability conscious Civil War military. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Once again, reflective of our personal preference for the charm of untouched real history with period use while remaining in pleasing condition, this attractive double sided Federal Eagle with shield and <I> E PLURIBUS UNUM</I> powder flask will make an eye appealing addition when laid in with a Civil War vintage percussion revolver.  Measuring approximately 5 5/8 inches in length including the charger, by 2 ¾ inches wide, this especially hard to find design flask retains nearly all of its original dark finish while offering the assurance of use and period originality.  An especially nice item for the serious  Civil War collector / historian, at age 80 this is only the second of the type we have encountered in our now 60 sum odd years of aggressively seeking out such things.

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 Best described here by our photos as to condition and eye appeal, this c. 1800s silver mounted rosewood piccolo offers good evidence of age, period use and originality, while remaining in pleasing, fully functional condition. A popular, easy to carry personal instrument in the Civil War era this little piccolo measures 10 9/16 inches breaking down to a mere 6 ¾ inches for travel.  A nice period musical instrument for display or use.

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 The Civil War marking stencil of <U>Pvt. William Hyde</U> of Co. D <B>2nd Mass. Infantry</B>.  A 25 year old resident of West Boylston, MA when he enlisted and was mustered in on May 25, 1861, William Hyde’s 2nd Mass Infantry would see extensive combat at such actions as Winchester, Cedar Mountain, <B>Antietam</B> , <B>Chancellorsville</B> and others before the battle of<B>Gettysburg</B> where on July 3rd he would suffer a severe wound of the left shoulder (see: <I> The Medical and Surgical History of the Civil War</I>) when the 2nd Mass. Volunteers  made an attack against the Confederate troops at the base of Culp's Hill, near Spangler Spring.  Pvt. Hyde was discharged for wounds on June 24, 1864 and returned to West Boylston where he died in 1872 at the young age of 35.  He was buried there in Mount Vernon Cemetery.

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Grosjean’s Pat Jan. 28, 1862 - SERVING $55.00

 

especially desirable - Federal Eagle – p $265.00

 

19th century rosewood Piccolo $135.00

 

2nd Mass. Infantry STENCIL – severely wo

Set here with a period quarter for size comparison, this attractive Civil War vintage dipping pen measures 6 inches in length to include its original tapered shank nib.  All original and in fine condition this eye catching ink pen will make a nice addition laid out with a period document, letter, journal or simply displayed with a period ink stand or desk. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  A seen in so many period images this honest old Civil War vintage cup stands approximately 4 3/8 X 3 inches in diameter at its base. Entirely original, this old utility was hand crafted of tinned sheet iron with led soldered seams and remains in exceptional condition while offering desirable evidence of age and originality.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>        Best described here by our photos as to eye appeal and condition, this period 8 X 10 inch <B>Chestnut Hill U. S. Army General Hospital</B> print remains in its period frame with the original notation of Pvt. Lewis E. Gove <B>1st Rohd Island Cavalry</B> / <B>16th Veteran Reserve Corps</B> on the print back.  Of  significance to the Civil War collector / historian will be Lewis Gove’s reference to his brother of the late June 1863 movement of Lee’s Confederate Army and the resulting imposition of martial law in Philadelphia.  Unknown to all at the time would be that such incursion into the area was a precursor to the battle of Gettysburg, Gove pens the following June 30,1863 notation to <I>Brother Clinton</I>:  

           <I> I send you a picture of our Hospital. Thought you would like to see how it looked. Have not rec a letters from you just here. Expect one to morrow. The Rebs are Close in to us.  great excitement in Philadelphia.  We all thought the Rebs Was in the City yesterday.  All Business stopped streets full of Men & Women, to late In the Day.  Philadelphia is under  Marchal Law    Yours Truly Lewis E. Gove </I>


Per <I>’North American Family Histories’</I> New Hampshire born Lewis Edwin Gove (2/13/1825 – 9/29/1899) was for some time a farmer in Rhode Island who enlisted and was mustered in on Sept. 23,1862 as Pvt. Co. I, New Hampshire battalion, <B>1st New England Cavalry</B>.  He transferred to Co. C <B>16th Independent Cavalry</B> Sept. 2,1863.  Ultimately promoted to Corporal, Gove was discharged July6, 1865.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 


<b>From the personal collection of Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin. Irwin has the distinct honor of being the first recipient of the Medal of Honor in U.S. military history by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


(1819-87) Born at "Woodfield," his family's plantation in Powhatan County, Va. Graduated in the West Point class of 1841. From 1846-51 Jones held the position of assistant professor of mathematics and instructor of infantry and artillery tactics at the United States Military Academy. He resigned from the U.S. Army on April 27, 1861, and entered the Confederate Regular Army as a major of artillery. By July of that year he was serving as chief of artillery on the staff of General P.G.T. Beauregard at the battle of 1st Manassas, with rank of colonel. He was promoted to brigadier general to rank from July 21, 1861, and major general from March 19, 1862. He relieved General Braxton Bragg in command at Pensacola, Fla., and later was assigned to command of a division under General Earl Van Dorn at Corinth, Miss. He then commanded the Department of Western Virginia, and the Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. When the Union Navy began shelling Charleston, South Carolina, Jones placed fifty captured Federal officers brought into town under guard. He then advised General John G. Foster to stop the bombardment unless he wanted to risk killing his own men. An irate Foster retaliated by placing captured Confederates, including General M. Jeff Thompson, directly in the line of fire from Jones's guns. General Jones made one of the last stands of the Confederacy at the Battle of Natural Bridge, where he held his position until the surrender at Appomattox, Virginia. He surrendered at Tallahassee, Florida on May 10, 1865. He died in Bedford Springs, Pennsylvania, July 31, 1887, and is buried in Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 3/4 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform with rank of major general. Bottom of the card is trimmed. Period ink ID on the front mount, Maj. Genl. Sam Jones, C.S.A. Back mark: E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York. Written in period ink in Irwin's hand on the reverse is, Maj. Genl. Sam Jones, C.S.A. Genl. B.J.D. Irwin album, No. 152 is written in another hand in pencil at the bottom. Light age toning and wear. Very fine image. Rare with this provenance literally making this image "one of a kind."


<b><h2><u>History of United States Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin</b></h2></u>


<b>Surgeon & General Irwin was the first United States Medal of Honor Recipient by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


(1830-1917) Born in County Roscommon, Ireland, he immigrated with his parents to the United States in the 1840s. He attended New York University from 1848 to 1849, and then served as a private in the New York Militia. In 1850, he entered Castleton Medical College, and he later transferred to New York Medical College, where he graduated in 1852.


He served as a surgeon and physician at the State Emigrant Hospital on Ward's Island, NYC, until his appointment as assistant surgeon in the U.S. Army in 1856. He was an assistant army surgeon during the Apache Wars, and was the first Medal of Honor recipient chronologically by date of action. His actions on February 13, 1861, at Apache Pass, Arizona, are the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded! The citation on his medal of honor reads; "Voluntarily took command of troops and attacked and defeated hostile Indians he met on the way. Surgeon Irwin volunteered to go to the rescue of 2d Lt. George N. Bascom, 7th U.S. Infantry, who, with 60 men, was trapped by Chiricahua Apaches under Cochise. Irwin and 14 men, not having horses, began the 100-mile march riding mules. After fighting and capturing Indians, recovering stolen horses and cattle, he reached Bascom's column and helped break his siege."


Cochise, the Apache Indian chief, and a group of Apache warriors were accused of kidnapping a boy and a small group of U.S. soldiers in the Arizona Territory after the Army had captured Cochise's brother and nephews. When the Army refused to make a prisoner exchange, Cochise killed his prisoners. Soldiers then killed Cochise's brother and nephews. 2nd Lieutenant George Nicholas Bascom led a group of 60 men from the 7th U.S. Infantry after Cochise but was soon besieged, prompting a rescue mission by the army. In response to the siege of Bascom and his men, Irwin set out on a rescue mission with 14 men of the 1st U.S. Dragoons. He was able to catch up with the Apaches at Apache Pass in present day Arizona. He strategically placed his small unit around Cochise and his men, tricking the Apache leader into thinking that he had a much larger army with him. The Apaches fled and Bascom and his men were saved. Bascom and his men joined Irwin and together they were able to track Cochise into the mountains & rescued the young boy that Cochise had captured.


The Medal of Honor did not exist during the time of the "Bascom Incident," and would not be established until a year later in 1862. However, the actions of Irwin were well remembered, and he was awarded the Medal of Honor just prior to his retirement. Irwin's actions were the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded, predating the outbreak of the American Civil War.


Irwin subsequently served with the Union army during the Civil War, and was promoted to captain in August 1861, and the next year was appointed medical director under Major General William "Bull" Nelson. He improvised one of the first field hospitals used by the U.S. Army at the Battle of Shiloh, on April 7, 1862. He was captured during the Battle of Richmond, Ky., while attempting to save the wounded General Nelson. He was promoted to major in September 1862, and after his release from a Rebel prison he became medical director in the Army of the Southwest. From 1863 to 1865, he was superintendent of the military hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, and in March of 1865, he was brevetted to the rank of colonel. He was a companion of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and the Order of the Indian Wars of the United States. After the Civil War, Irwin served as a senior medical officer at several U.S. army posts, including West Point from 1873 to 1878. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1885, to colonel in August 1890, and to brigadier general in April 1904. He died in Ontario, Canada, on December 15, 1917, and is buried in the West Point Cemetery, at the U.S. Military Academy, New York.


His son George LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1889, and served in World War I, becoming a Major General in the U.S. Army.


His grandson Stafford LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1915, and served in World War II, and became a Lieutenant General in the U.S. Army.


His daughter, Amy Irwin Addams McCormick, was a nurse with the American Red Cross and served during World War I.


General Irwin was an admirer and collector of photographs, and he put together a very large, and superb collection of Union and Confederate images. Interestingly, he collected photographs of both Rebel and Yankee alike. I have owned several famous military photograph albums before and never came across one that collected images from both sides of the rebellion. He numbered each individual image, and wrote a brief historical notation on each one. The collection was split up by another dealer, and by the time I found out about it, I was still very fortunate to be able to acquire about one third of his superb Civil War image collection. Each image is rare because it is "one of a kind" having come from the Irwin collection!


The image of B.J.D. Irwin pictured here is a copy photograph from the "Find a Grave" website and is used here for illustration purposes only.

Civil War era mother of pearl – Dipping

 

Civil War era TIN CUP $65.00

 

1st RI Cavalry troop - Chestnut Hill Arm

 

CDV, General Samuel Jones $250.00




<b>Signed carte de visite photograph with Richmond, Va. backmark


Eldest son of General Robert E. Lee


Captured at Sayler's Creek, Va., in 1865

</b>


(1832-1913) Born on September 16, 1832, at Fortress Monroe, Va., he was the eldest son of General Robert E. Lee, and  graduated #1 in the West Point class of 1854. As a captain of engineers in the Confederate army, he engaged in the construction of the fortifications around Richmond and later served on the personal staff of C.S.A. President Jefferson Davis with rank of colonel. He was promoted to Brigadier General, on June 25, 1863, and Major General on October 20, 1864. "Custis," as he was known to his family and friends, was entrusted with numerous important missions by President Davis, and was captured at Sayler's Creek, Va., on April 6, 1865. He was named president of Washington University (later Washington & Lee University) in Lexington, Va., in 1870, upon his father's death, and served in this position for over 25 years. After he resigned, "Custis" Lee lived at "Ravensworth," his family's ancestral home near Alexandria, Va. He died on February 18, 1913, and was buried in the Lee family crypt in the chapel at Washington & Lee University, Lexington, Va. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform. This image was taken at the time Lee was a colonel, and aide to Confederate President Jeff Davis. Back mark: Vannerson & Levy, Photographers, No. 737 Main Street, (Two doors above Spotswood Hotel) Richmond, Va. Large, bold, beautiful ink signature on the front of the albumen print, "G.W.C. Lee." Light age toning and wear. Very desirable autographed Confederate image!    


<b>Confederate Lieutenant General


Governor of Kentucky


T. Lilenthal, New Orleans, La. backmark</b>


(1823-1914) He  was born at Glen Lily, his family's estate near Munfordville, Kentucky. His closest friend in Munfordville was Thomas J. Wood, who would become a Union Army general opposing Buckner at the Battles of Perryville, Ky., and at Chickamauga, Ga. during the Civil War. He graduated from West Point in the class of 1844, and later returned to the Military Academy to serve as an assistant professor of geography, history, and ethics. He was wounded and brevetted for gallantry in the Mexican War Battle of Churubusco, and was again cited for gallant conduct at the Battle of Molino del Rey, and was appointed a brevet captain. He fought in the Battle of Chapultepec, the Battle of Belen Gate, and the storming of Mexico City. At the conclusion of the war, American soldiers served as an army of occupation, and Buckner was accorded the honor of lowering the American flag over Mexico City for the last time during the occupation. Appointed adjutant general of Kentucky by Governor Beriah Magoffin in 1861, he tried to enforce Kentucky's neutrality policy in the early days of the Civil War, but when the state's neutrality was breached, Buckner accepted a commission in the Confederate Army. When his C.S.A. commission was approved, Union officials indicted him for treason, and seized his property. He was appointed a brigadier general on September 14, 1861, and saw action at Fort Donelson, Tenn. where he was forced to surrender the fort to his old friend and West Point classmate, General Ulysses S. Grant who demanded an  "unconditional surrender."  He was confined at Fort Warren prison in Boston for 5 months. After his release, he led a division in General Braxton Bragg's Kentucky campaign, and a corps at the battle of Chickamauga. He later received promotion to lieutenant general to rank from September 20, 1864. Near the end of the war he became chief of staff to General Edmund Kirby Smith in the Trans-Mississippi Department, and he later traveled to New Orleans, and arranged terms of surrender on May 26, 1865. The terms of Buckner's parole in Shreveport, Louisiana, on June 9, 1865, prevented his return to Kentucky for three years. He remained in New Orleans, worked on the staff of the Daily Crescent newspaper, engaged in a business venture, and served on the board of directors of a fire insurance company, of which he became president in 1867. Buckner returned to Kentucky when he was eligible in 1868, and became editor of the Louisville Courier newspaper. Like most former Confederate officers, he petitioned the United States Congress for the restoration of his civil rights as stipulated by the 14th Amendment. He recovered most of his property through lawsuits and regained much of his wealth through shrewd business deals. Buckner had a keen interest in politics and friends had been urging him to run for governor of Kentucky for years. Delegates to the 1887 state Democratic convention nominated Buckner unanimously for the office of governor, and he won the general election against his opponent William O. Bradley, and was appointed the 30th Governor of Kentucky, serving from 1887-1891. On a visit to the White House in 1904, Buckner asked President Theodore Roosevelt to appoint his only son as a cadet at West Point, and Roosevelt quickly agreed. His son Simon Bolivar Buckner Jr. would later serve in the U.S. Army as a Lieutenant General, and was killed at the Battle of Okinawa, making him the highest-ranking American to have been killed by enemy fire during World War II. Buckner became the last surviving Confederate soldier with the rank of lieutenant general. He died on January 8, 1914, and was buried in Frankfort Cemetery in Frankfort, Kentucky. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform. Buckner is wearing a pleated blouse with tie and his 3 star insignia is clearly visible embroidered on his collar. Backmark: T. Lilienthal, Photographic Establishment, 102 Poydras St., New Orleans, [La.] with vignette of their gallery. Light age toning. Rare and desirable image!     


<b>Fought in General Armistead's Brigade during Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg where the regiment was badly cut to pieces!


Private Burwell was wounded in action at the battle of Drewery's Bluff, Virginia</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Private Armistead Burwell, Co. E, 14th Virginia Infantry, to his brother.


<b>Hermitage Camp of Instruction, Near Richmond, Va., May 21, 1861</b>


Dear Brother,


I wrote to you yesterday, a week ago, but not having heard from you yet, I will write again as this is perhaps the best opportunity I shall for some time to come. 


One not acquainted with the privations and hardships of that hardest of all lives, the soldier's, can have no adequate conception of the longing desire, the anxiety with which a missive from home is looked for, and the thrill of joy with which the reception animates the forlorn bosom of the poor soldier- banished as he is from the familiar and endeared scenes of the home of his childhood, a stranger amid strangers, & oft times with no place to lay his weary limbs but the broad and generous bosom of old mother Earth, and no covering save the illimitable expanse of the azure canopy of Heaven. Weary and worn with fatigue he sinks to rest upon his humble couch. Borne of the soft wings of Morpheus to the visionary land of dreams with lightning swiftness he speeds his way to the dear, the cherished, the alluring scenes of home, where once more around the happy fireside he is greeted by the smiling faces of dear and loved friends, but alas! The relentless roll of the inexorable drum arouses him from sweet slumber's pleasing illusions to stern reality, and he is again amid the toils, the bustle, and noise of camp life.


I was on guard from eight o'clock yesterday until ten o'clock this morning, and had to sleep what little I did sleep in the open air and on the naked ground, which wasn't like sleeping on a feather bed. The guard duty here is different from what it was in Clarksville; instead of standing two hours in twenty four, we have to stand every other two hours, which makes the duty much more onerous. We do everything here at the tap of the drum- get up in the morning at the tap of the drum- assemble for roll call at the tap of the drum- drill at the tap of the drum,- march down to breakfast at the tap of the drum- eat dinner at the tap of the drum- eat supper at the tap of the drum- put out lights and go to bed, if I may use the expression at the tap of the drum- etc., ad infinitum at the tap of the drum.


Troops are leaving here as fast as they can be drilled while their places are filled by the daily arrival of new companies. Since the news of the occupation of Alexandria by Lincoln's minions, military affairs have assumed increased activity, and we drill every day, Sunday not exempted. The 1st and 3rd regiments consisting of nearly 2,000 men left here Thursday last, and the 2nd leaves today. Our company has been transferred from the 5th to the 4th regiment being better drilled than most of the other companies belonging to the former, and we will very probably receive orders to march in a few days to the immediate scene of action. When we do go you may expect to hear from us in the immediate scene of action. When we do go you may expect to hear from us in the day of battle, and woe betide the Yankees that meet us. A dispatch reached here last night by telegraph that troops from Fortress Monroe had attacked Hampton, but were repulsed by the Virginians with a loss of 700 men while we only lost seven. How true it may be I am not prepared to say. The Townesville company with the regiment to which it belongs reached Richmond on Thursday last, and are encamped near the city. Cousin Wm. Townes came up to see us the next day. We have not been to their encampment yet as it is a good ways off, and we cannot get a furlough for a longer time then from 12 to 3 1/2 o'clock, and even this with difficulty. Cousin Robt. Sturdivant paid us a short visit Saturday on his way to Ashland. There is some probability of his being appointed Surgeon of out regiment. 


I met with Mr. Mason in the capital last Friday and he seemed very glad to see us. (Chas. & self). He had recently returned from Texas where he has been living since he left us. As my paper is about to run out I will close with much love to all. Tell Lizzie to write to us, and write yourself as often as you can.


As ever, Your affectionate brother,

A. Burwell


Light age toning and wear with some scattered ink stains. Very neatly, and well written letter. The writer, Armistead Burwell, is highly educated as he writes very eloquently. Excellent content and one of the best written Confederate letters that I've had the pleasure to offer! Extremely desirable Virginia regiment!


Private Armistead Burwell, was a 21 year old farmer according to the Virginia records when he enlisted on May 12, 1861, only 15 days before penning this missive to his brother. He was wounded in action on May 16, 1864, at the battle of Drewry's Bluff, Virginia, and was paroled at Richmond, Virginia, on May 15, 1865.


The 14th Virginia Infantry served in the Divisions of Generals' McLaws, Anderson and Pickett, in the Department of the Peninsular, and the Army of Northern Virginia.


They saw action at Malvern Hill, Winchester, Williamsburg, Seven Pines, Port Republic, Gaines' Mill, 2nd Manassas, Crampton's Gap, Sharpsburg, Kelly's Ford, Gettysburg (48 killed, 114 wounded, 170 captured), Spotsylvania, Chester Station, Yellow Tavern, Drewry's Bluff (13 killed, 74 wounded), Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Five Forks (3 wounded, 149 captured), Farmville, Sailor's Creek and Appomattox, to name but a few of their battle honors. Their colonels were James G. Hodges and William White.     


  


  We have a small number of old hand crafted buttons each fashioned from a U. S. <I>buffalo</I> nickel and are offering them here <U>priced as a set of 5</U> with the option of purchasing additional examples individually at $12.50 each if more are needed to fill a special need.  Each original button was struck to form a slight crown, then polished with a lead solder copper staple applied to the back.   Really nice looking with that classic Native American profile, these buttons show good evidence of age and handcrafting.  A nice item for the general button collector and suitable for use.

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

CDV, General George Washington Custis Le $1495.00

 

CDV, General Simon B. Buckner $950.00

 

14th Virginia Infantry Soldier Letter

 

set of 5 - hand crafted NICKEL BUTTONS $75.00

A desirable find for sure, this early traveling inkwell with writing quill holder measures approximately 7 3/8  inches in length and was hand fashioned in copper with a lidded inkwell and attached quill carrier.  Offered here untouched and completely period original with a deep natural age patina, the inkwell still holds its period filling of once ink soaked cotton.  (Note that ink soaked cotton as opposed to totally fluid ink was utilized in such sets to minimize spillage in travel.)  With good evidence of period construction, age and period use while remaining in pleasing condition, this rarely seen 18th early 19th century writing set will make a special addition to any quality period collection.

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 This impressive Civil War era netted acorn hat cord is of the less common ‘extra heavy’ form and is finely woven of black silk and gold bullion thread.  With good evidence of age, originality and size, (the acorns are a full 1 ½" long with caps of ¾" diameter) this cord will go well on any period slouch hat or will display well with period military headgear or insignia.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Best described here by our photo illustrations, this Marine Corps uniform jacket remains in pleasing condition while showing good evidence of age and originality.  A configuration that we have been unable to reference in text or by example, this wool uniform jacket sports  eight HORSTMAN PHILADELPHIA back marked Marine Corps two piece buttons (c.1875-1902).  The right shoulder sleeve lining  bears the period stamping ‘V. H., N. Y. / Style (120)  Size (38)  Stock (34)’over <B>QUARTERMASTERS DEPT. / U. S. Marine Corps / 1887-1888 </B> markings.  The padded lining offers a period identification to  ‘J. McManus’.  Worthy of additional research, we have been unable to pinpoint the ‘V. H., N. Y.’ marking and wonder if the link to New York over the Marine QM marking is a link to ultimate transfer of this little used even unissued design uniform jacket from U. S. Marine Corps stores to the then newly created New York Naval Militia which encompassed the <B>1st Marine Corps Reserve Company </B> ?   The New York Naval Militia (NYNM) was first created in 1889 and was formally mustered into state service as the First Battalion, Naval Reserve, on 23 June 1891. Following the sinking of the USS Maine in February 1898, the Navy Department called up Naval Militia volunteers for duty in the Federal Auxiliary Naval Force.  The NYNM sent five divisions of its 1st Battalion to fight in the Spanish-American War.  With clear speculation as to the origin and specific history of this jacket, it was unquestionably included in U. S. Marine Corps Quartermasters stores in the late 19th century and the scarcity of reference by text or by form can only attest to its rarity.  A desirable companion to any Marine Corps or general  U. S. military uniform collection.

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Best described here by our photo illustration this rarely encountered <I>Indian War Veterans</I> encampment ribbon remains in pleasing condition, solid and intact with no weak spots or separations, while offering good evidence of age and originality.  Measuring 9 by 2 inches wide, the ribbons nomenclature is <B> Indian War Veterans  - North Pacific Coast – ANNUAL RUNION JUNE 18, 1907</B>.  A controversial organization even in the period of its existence, the area war period from the early 1840’s to 1879 was filled with danger and death from the warring tribes and is replete with the struggles and blame for hostilities did not always rest with the Indians. An extensive article from the <I>Oregon Historical Quarterly</I> entitled <I>Pioneer Problems / ‘Wanton Murder’, Indian War Veterans, and Oregon’s Violent History</I>  Issued in limited quantity in the period of the organization, these ribbons are seldom encountered today.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

18th early 19th century traveling INKWEL

 

Civil War era HAT CORD $175.00

 

ultra rare! c. 1888 U. S. MARINE Corps. $650.00

 

North Pacific Coast INDIAN WAR VETERANS $95.00

While a classic personal item of the earlier through 18th century and into the mid to later 1800s, the hand crafted bovine shoe horn as found in nearly every period sock drawer of travel valise, was in time replaced and cast away with few period examples of the <I>everyday</I> utility surviving.  Not a big deal but worthy of preservation, this original, period example will lay nicely in any earlier through Civil War era personal grouping.

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 Best described here by our photograph illustrations, this Civil War era CDV features a view of Abraham Lincoln with Mary and their two sons  Robert  Tod and Tad Lincoln.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Reflective of our personal preference for the charm of untouched real history, period used and pleasing condition over period unused relics this little (4 ½ in length including the charger by 2 inches wide at the base)  pistol flask with it’s federal eagle motif, crossed pistols and especially desirable <B>COLT’S PATENT   E PLURIBUS UNUM</B> nomenclature will rest well in any quality Civil War grouping.  An untouched natural patina combined with it’s period used but not abused originality will fit exceptionally well beside any Colt Root or Civil War, Colt’s Pat. 1849, .31 caliber Pocket Revolver and will make a welcome addition to a cased revolver.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Since the beginning of organized firefighting, it became obvious that command communication was needed to assist those fighting fires, salvaging goods and preventing the extension of fires. As such the speaking trumpet was in use for many years as a communication tool and after becoming obsolete, its image is still used as a universal identifier of firefighting with rarely existing  original trumpets considered as key firefighting collectable.  This example measures 16 3/4 inches in length, is 6 ¼ inches across the mouth and sports a bold <I>hook & ladder</I> fire department logo.   Remaining in excellent original condition, nicely burnished with good internal evidence of age and later 1800s, early 1900s manufacturing methods, this speaking trumpet will show well in any firefighting grouping.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

antique hand crafted - SHOE HORN $60.00

 

Civil War era Abraham Lincoln & family C $55.00

 

COLT’S PATENT marked - Root or 49 Pocket $295.00

 

Fireman Speaking Trumpet $345.00




<b>Wounded 3 times during the War Between the States


Commanded the "Laurel Brigade"


From the personal collection of Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin. Irwin has the distinct honor of being the first recipient of the Medal of Honor in U.S. military history by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


(1836-1910) Born on a farm called "Catalpa Hill," in Campbell County, Virginia. Appointed to West Point in 1856, at that time a 5 year course, his roommate was John Pelham. Rosser resigned on April 22, 1861, two weeks before he would have graduated. He was appointed a 1st lieutenant in the Regular Confederate army, and assigned as instructor to the Washington Artillery at New Orleans, La. He commanded a company of this regiment at the Battle of 1st Manassas, Va., in July 1861. After being severely wounded at Mechanicsville, Va., he was made colonel of the 5th Virginia Cavalry, at the request of General J.E.B. Stuart. He commanded the advance of Stuart's cavalry expedition to Catlett's Station, and was notable in the Second Battle of Manassas. During the fighting at Crampton's Gap, at the Battle of South Mountain, Md., his cavalry delayed the advance of General William B. Franklin's 6th Corps with help from Major John Pelham's artillery. At Sharpsburg, his men screened the left flank of General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. He was seriously wounded at Kelly's Ford, Va., where his West Point roommate, "the gallant Pelham" was killed. Rosser was disabled until the Gettysburg Campaign, where he commanded his regiment in the fighting at Hanover, and the East Cavalry Field at Gettysburg. He continued to lead the 5th Virginia Cavalry with brilliant success until he was promoted brigadier general September 28, 1863. Rosser succeeded General Beverly Robertson in command of the "Laurel Brigade," and continued to win honors in the Overland Campaign of 1864 driving back a large force of Union cavalry and artillery at the Battle of the Wilderness. Rosser was again wounded at Trevilian Station, Va., where his brigade captured a number of prisoners from his former West Point classmate and close personal friend General George Armstrong Custer. His brigade later gallantly fought against General Philip H. Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley, and he efficiently commanded General Fitzhugh Lee's division at Cedar Creek. A rare defeat occurred when General Custer overran Rosser's troops at the Battle of Tom's Brook, which allowed Custer to repay Rosser for Trevilian Station. For no tactical reason, Custer chased Rosser's troops for over 10 miles and the action became known as the great "Woodstock Races." Custer had also captured Rosser's private wardrobe wagon at Tom's Brook, and Rosser immediately messaged him: 


Dear Fanny,


You may have made me take a few steps back today, but I will be even with you tomorrow. Please accept my good wishes and this little gift—a pair of your draws captured at Trevillian Station.


Tex


Custer shipped Rosser's gold-laced Confederate grey coat with this reply:


Dear friend,


Thanks for setting me up in so many new things, but would you please direct your tailor to make the coat tails of your next uniform a trifle shorter.


Best regards, G.A.C. [George Armstrong Custer].


General Rosser became known in the Southern press as the "Saviour of the Valley," and was promoted to major general in November 1864. He conducted a successful raid on New Creek, West Virginia, taking hundreds of prisoners and seizing much needed quantities of supplies. In January 1865, he took 300 men, crossed the mountains in deep snow and bitter cold, and surprised and captured two infantry regiments in their works at Beverly, West Virginia, takng almost 600 prisoners. Rosser commanded a cavalry division during the Siege of Petersburg in the spring of 1865, fighting near Five Forks, Va. It was here that Rosser hosted the "infamous" shad bake 2 miles north of the battle lines preceding and during the primary Federal assault. Guests at this small affair included Generals' George E. Pickett, and Fitzhugh Lee. It is said that Pickett only made it back to his division after over half his troops had been shot or captured, and Lee never forgave Pickett for his absence from his post when the Federals broke the Confederate lines and carried the day at Five Forks. Rosser was conspicuous during the Appomattox Campaign, capturing a Union general, John Irvin Gregg, and rescuing a wagon train near Farmville. He led a daring early morning charge at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865, and escaped with his command as Lee surrendered the bulk of the Army of Northern Virginia to General Ulysses S. Grant. Under orders from the Secretary of War, he began reorganizing the scattered remnants of Lee's army in a vain attempt to join General Joseph E. Johnston's army in North Carolina. However, he surrendered at Staunton, Virginia, on May 4th and was paroled shortly afterwards. In 1886, he bought a plantation near Charlottesville, Va., and became a gentleman farmer. On June 10, 1898, President William McKinley appointed Rosser a brigadier general of United States volunteers during the Spanish–American War. His first task was training young cavalry recruits in a camp near the old Civil War battlefield of Chickamauga in northern Georgia. He was honorably discharged on October 31, 1898, and returned home. He died on March 29, 1910, at Charlottesville, and is buried at Riverview Cemetery, in Charlottesville.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 3/4 card. The mount has been trimmed. Bust view in Confederate uniform with rank of brigadier general. It is thought this photograph was taken some time between September 1863, and November 1864. Period ink inscription on the front mount, Maj. Genl. Thos. L. Rosser, C.S.A. Back mark: E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York. Written in period ink in Irwin's hand on the reverse is, Maj. Genl. T.F. Rosser, C.S.A., Cavalry Commander. Genl. B.J.D. Irwin album, No. 56 is written in another hand in pencil at the bottom. Very fine image. Rare with this provenance literally making this image "one of a kind."


<h2><u>History of United States Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin</h2></u>


<b>Surgeon & General Irwin was the first United States Medal of Honor Recipient by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


(1830-1917) Born in County Roscommon, Ireland, he immigrated with his parents to the United States in the 1840s. He attended New York University from 1848 to 1849, and then served as a private in the New York Militia. In 1850, he entered Castleton Medical College, and he later transferred to New York Medical College, where he graduated in 1852.


He served as a surgeon and physician at the State Emigrant Hospital on Ward's Island, NYC, until his appointment as assistant surgeon in the U.S. Army in 1856. He was an assistant army surgeon during the Apache Wars, and was the first Medal of Honor recipient chronologically by date of action. His actions on February 13, 1861, at Apache Pass, Arizona, are the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded! The citation on his medal of honor reads; "Voluntarily took command of troops and attacked and defeated hostile Indians he met on the way. Surgeon Irwin volunteered to go to the rescue of 2d Lt. George N. Bascom, 7th U.S. Infantry, who, with 60 men, was trapped by Chiricahua Apaches under Cochise. Irwin and 14 men, not having horses, began the 100-mile march riding mules. After fighting and capturing Indians, recovering stolen horses and cattle, he reached Bascom's column and helped break his siege."


Cochise, the Apache Indian chief, and a group of Apache warriors were accused of kidnapping a boy and a small group of U.S. soldiers in the Arizona Territory after the Army had captured Cochise's brother and nephews. When the Army refused to make a prisoner exchange, Cochise killed his prisoners. Soldiers then killed Cochise's brother and nephews. 2nd Lieutenant George Nicholas Bascom led a group of 60 men from the 7th U.S. Infantry after Cochise but was soon besieged, prompting a rescue mission by the army. In response to the siege of Bascom and his men, Irwin set out on a rescue mission with 14 men of the 1st U.S. Dragoons. He was able to catch up with the Apaches at Apache Pass in present day Arizona. He strategically placed his small unit around Cochise and his men, tricking the Apache leader into thinking that he had a much larger army with him. The Apaches fled and Bascom and his men were saved. Bascom and his men joined Irwin and together they were able to track Cochise into the mountains & rescued the young boy that Cochise had captured.


The Medal of Honor did not exist during the time of the "Bascom Incident," and would not be established until a year later in 1862. However, the actions of Irwin were well remembered, and he was awarded the Medal of Honor just prior to his retirement. Irwin's actions were the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded, predating the outbreak of the American Civil War.


Irwin subsequently served with the Union army during the Civil War, and was promoted to captain in August 1861, and the next year was appointed medical director under Major General William "Bull" Nelson. He improvised one of the first field hospitals used by the U.S. Army at the Battle of Shiloh, on April 7, 1862. He was captured during the Battle of Richmond, Ky., while attempting to save the wounded General Nelson. He was promoted to major in September 1862, and after his release from a Rebel prison he became medical director in the Army of the Southwest. From 1863 to 1865, he was superintendent of the military hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, and in March of 1865, he was brevetted to the rank of colonel. He was a companion of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and the Order of the Indian Wars of the United States. After the Civil War, Irwin served as a senior medical officer at several U.S. army posts, including West Point from 1873 to 1878. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1885, to colonel in August 1890, and to brigadier general in April 1904. He died in Ontario, Canada, on December 15, 1917, and is buried in the West Point Cemetery, at the U.S. Military Academy, New York.


His son George LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1889, and served in World War I, becoming a Major General in the U.S. Army.


His grandson Stafford LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1915, and served in World War II, and became a Lieutenant General in the U.S. Army.


His daughter, Amy Irwin Addams McCormick, was a nurse with the American Red Cross and served during World War I.


General Irwin was an admirer and collector of photographs, and he put together a very large, and superb collection of Union and Confederate images. Interestingly, he collected photographs of both Rebel and Yankee alike. I have owned several famous military photograph albums before and never came across one that collected images from both sides of the rebellion. He numbered each individual image, and wrote a brief historical notation on each one. The collection was split up by another dealer, and by the time I found out about it, I was still very fortunate to be able to acquire about one third of his superb Civil War image collection. Each image is rare because it is "one of a kind" having come from the Irwin collection!


The image of B.J.D. Irwin pictured here is a copy photograph from the "Find a Grave" website and is used here for illustration purposes only.  


 




 


<b>Colonel of the 3rd Pennsylvania Cavalry


From the personal collection of Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin. Irwin has the distinct honor of being the first recipient of the Medal of Honor in U.S. military history by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


(1832-1900) Born in Cameron, New York, he graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1855. His pre-war army career included garrison duty at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., a tour at the Cavalry School in Carlisle, Pa., and two years of rugged service fighting the western Indians, during which time he was severely wounded and put out of action from 1859 until the outbreak of the Civil War. He took part in the 1st battle of Bull Run, Va., and was commissioned colonel of the 3rd Pennsylvania Cavalry. He fought in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign, the Seven Days Battles, at Kelly's Ford, Va., Antietam,  Fredericksburg, and various skirmishes of the mounted branch of the Army of the Potomac. President Abraham Lincoln appointed Averell a brigadier general of volunteers on September 26, 1862. His 2nd Cavalry Division earned much respect at Kelly's Ford, Va., in March 1863, an action said to have been the turning point of cavalry fighting in the eastern theater. Averell took part in the famous, but ill fated 1863 Richmond raid during the Chancellorsville campaign, and he was employed in numerous skirmishes in western Virginia and in General Philip H. Sheridan; 1864 Shenandoah Valley campaign. In the summer of 1864, when Confederate General Jubal A. Early had invaded Maryland, and defeated a series of Union commanders, Averell proved to be the only Union commander to achieve victory against the Confederates in the Shenandoah Valley before the arrival of General Sheridan. He routed Confederate General Stephen D. Ramseur at the Battle of Rutherford's (Carter's) Farm on July 20, 1864, inflicting 400 casualties and capturing a four-gun battery, in spite of Averell's being significantly outnumbered. When General John McCausland burned Chambersburg, Pa., to the ground on July 30, 1864, General Averell tracked him down near Moorefield, West Virginia. Using scouts disguised as Confederates in his vanguard, Averell routed McCausland in a sunrise attack upon the Confederate camp, capturing hundreds of prisoners and another four-gun battery in the Battle of Moorefield. On July 17, 1866, President Andrew Johnson nominated Averell for appointment to the grades of brevet brigadier general and brevet major general in the Regular Army, to rank from March 13, 1865 which the U.S. Senate confirmed. The latter appointment was in recognition of Averell's actions at the Battle of Kelly's Ford. Following the Civil War, President Johnson appointed Averell as U.S. consul general to British North America; he served from 1866 to 1869, through the rest of that administration. In 1888, during Grover Cleveland's presidency, Averell was appointed as Assistant Inspector General of Soldiers Homes, serving from 1888-98.  Averell was among career officers who wrote memoirs and histories of military units: he wrote "Ten Years in the Saddle," and co-authored "History of the Third Pennsylvania Cavalry, 60th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers." General Averell died in Bath, New York, on February 3, 1900, and is buried there. General Averell was one of the first class of ten inductees into the Steuben County, New York, Hall of Fame.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Period ink inscription on the front mount, Major Genl. W.W. Averell, U.S.A. Written in period ink in Irwin's hand on the reverse is, Maj. Genl. W.W. Averell, U.S.A., Cavalry Army Potomac. Genl. B.J.D. Irwin album, No. 136 is written in another hand in pencil at the bottom. Bottom of the card mount is bumped. Very fine image. Rare with this provenance literally making this image "one of a kind."


<b><h2>History of United States Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin</h2></b>



<b>Surgeon & General Irwin was the first United States Medal of Honor Recipient by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


(1830-1917) Born in County Roscommon, Ireland, he immigrated with his parents to the United States in the 1840s. He attended New York University from 1848 to 1849, and then served as a private in the New York Militia. In 1850, he entered Castleton Medical College, and he later transferred to New York Medical College, where he graduated in 1852.


He served as a surgeon and physician at the State Emigrant Hospital on Ward's Island, NYC, until his appointment as assistant surgeon in the U.S. Army in 1856. He was an assistant army surgeon during the Apache Wars, and was the first Medal of Honor recipient chronologically by date of action. His actions on February 13, 1861, at Apache Pass, Arizona, are the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded! The citation on his medal of honor reads; "Voluntarily took command of troops and attacked and defeated hostile Indians he met on the way. Surgeon Irwin volunteered to go to the rescue of 2d Lt. George N. Bascom, 7th U.S. Infantry, who, with 60 men, was trapped by Chiricahua Apaches under Cochise. Irwin and 14 men, not having horses, began the 100-mile march riding mules. After fighting and capturing Indians, recovering stolen horses and cattle, he reached Bascom's column and helped break his siege."


Cochise, the Apache Indian chief, and a group of Apache warriors were accused of kidnapping a boy and a small group of U.S. soldiers in the Arizona Territory after the Army had captured Cochise's brother and nephews. When the Army refused to make a prisoner exchange, Cochise killed his prisoners. Soldiers then killed Cochise's brother and nephews. 2nd Lieutenant George Nicholas Bascom led a group of 60 men from the 7th U.S. Infantry after Cochise but was soon besieged, prompting a rescue mission by the army. In response to the siege of Bascom and his men, Irwin set out on a rescue mission with 14 men of the 1st U.S. Dragoons. He was able to catch up with the Apaches at Apache Pass in present day Arizona. He strategically placed his small unit around Cochise and his men, tricking the Apache leader into thinking that he had a much larger army with him. The Apaches fled and Bascom and his men were saved. Bascom and his men joined Irwin and together they were able to track Cochise into the mountains & rescued the young boy that Cochise had captured.


The Medal of Honor did not exist during the time of the "Bascom Incident," and would not be established until a year later in 1862. However, the actions of Irwin were well remembered, and he was awarded the Medal of Honor just prior to his retirement. Irwin's actions were the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded, predating the outbreak of the American Civil War.


Irwin subsequently served with the Union army during the Civil War, and was promoted to captain in August 1861, and the next year was appointed medical director under Major General William "Bull" Nelson. He improvised one of the first field hospitals used by the U.S. Army at the Battle of Shiloh, on April 7, 1862. He was captured during the Battle of Richmond, Ky., while attempting to save the wounded General Nelson. He was promoted to major in September 1862, and after his release from a Rebel prison he became medical director in the Army of the Southwest. From 1863 to 1865, he was superintendent of the military hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, and in March of 1865, he was brevetted to the rank of colonel. He was a companion of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and the Order of the Indian Wars of the United States. After the Civil War, Irwin served as a senior medical officer at several U.S. army posts, including West Point from 1873 to 1878. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1885, to colonel in August 1890, and to brigadier general in April 1904. He died in Ontario, Canada, on December 15, 1917, and is buried in the West Point Cemetery, at the U.S. Military Academy, New York.


His son George LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1889, and served in World War I, becoming a Major General in the U.S. Army.


His grandson Stafford LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1915, and served in World War II, and became a Lieutenant General in the U.S. Army.


His daughter, Amy Irwin Addams McCormick, was a nurse with the American Red Cross and served during World War I.


General Irwin was an admirer and collector of photographs, and he put together a very large, and superb collection of Union and Confederate images. Interestingly, he collected photographs of both Rebel and Yankee alike. I have owned several famous military photograph albums before and never came across one that collected images from both sides of the rebellion. He numbered each individual image, and wrote a brief historical notation on each one. The collection was split up by another dealer, and by the time I found out about it, I was still very fortunate to be able to acquire about one third of his superb Civil War image collection. Each image is rare because it is "one of a kind" having come from the Irwin collection!


The image of B.J.D. Irwin pictured here is a copy photograph from the "Find a Grave" website and is used here for illustration purposes only. 

    Best described here by our photos this relic bit was acquired by us years ago at the old 1978 Eisenhower Hotel & Conference Ctr., Gettysburg Civil War show where it was  picked from a local digger’s box of relics (Those were the days! 135 tables of real Civil War artifacts with something in <U>everyone’s</U> price range from thousands all the way down to a few dollars.).   The bit still retained a previous owner’s  descriptive string tag:    <I>Horse Bit – found at Gettysburg, Pa. 1938 by Edw. McGin  - Pickett’s Charge / Bought 6-1-76</I>  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Best described here by our illustrations, this Civil War vintage grooming brush measures approximately 9 x 4 ½ inches and while remaining in excellent original condition, good evidence of age and originality.  Appropriate as a companion with any Civil War period grouping, this horse grooming brush will be of particular interest to the Civil War Cavalry or Mounted Artillery enthusiast.     .  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

CDV, General Thomas L. Rosser $250.00

 

CDV, General William W. Averell $150.00

 

1938 battlefield recovery - Pickett’s Ch $145.00

 

Civil War vintage equine decorated Groom $95.00

This attractive all cast brass American eagle  flagstaff finial stands approximately 5 inches and measures about 4 3/4 inches in width.   A classic design seen on many a Civil War vintage flag, this example remains in pleasing, eye appealing condition with good evidence of age and untouched originality .

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Direct from decades of period attic storage, we have acquired a small lot of earlier through mid-19th century natural cotton sewing floss and are offering  single skeins here for period display or restoration use.  All in as new, off the shelf condition while clearly period, a single twisted skein (illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison) will make a nice addition in any Civil War soldier’s <I>housewife</I> sewing kit, period lady’s sewing basket or will bring period correctness to button application or a textile restoration project.  One of those every day, period <I>must have</I> items seldom surviving to reach todays collector / historian. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Most frequently carried by ununiformed persons as a symbol of some notoriety, the late 1700s early to mid-1800s swager stick was created in limited quantity with use most popular among the socially elite. Limited in number even in the period, surviving examples are seldom encountered today outside of major museums and private collections.  In addition to its presence as a symbol of status or authority, this all original and period example offered the carrier the security of self-defense as it concealed a menacing 9 3/4  inch long dagger.   Measuring approximately 20 ¼ inches in total, this especially desirable  <I>sword swager stick</I> is fitted with a bovine horn tip to its 7/8 inch diameter tapered wood shaft, a bone ring at the junction to the grip.  The attractively formed grip is hand carved from horn with bone embellishment.  All original and pleasing with no condition,<I>issues</I>, this  attractive swager sick with its concealed triangular blade.

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 H 70in. x D 70in.

antique American Eagle – FLAGSTAFF FINIA

 

earlier through mid-1800s Cotton SEWIN $35.00

 

rare mid 18th early 19th century - Swo $325.00

 

H 70in. x D 70in. $12000.00

H 34in. x D 14in.  H 44in. x D 18in.  H 14in. x D 12in.  H 20in. x D 10in.


Sold as a pair.

H 34in. x D 14in. $1500.00

 

H 44in. x D 18in. $1500.00

 

H 14in. x D 12in. $750.00

 

H 20in. x D 10in.

Sold as a pair. $1400.00

H 38in. x D 10in.  H 28in. x D 9in.  H 32in. x D 11in.  H 16in. x W 10in. x D 13in.


Sold as a Pair.

H 38in. x D 10in. $850.00

 

H 28in. x D 9in. $650.00

 

H 32in. x D 11in. $2400.00

 

H 16in. x W 10in. x D 13in.

Sold $1200.00




< prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 next >

AntiqueArts.com home page! How to use this page! How to advertise here How we manage your personal information Terms of use TIAS home page