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Unused patriotic envelope featuring a beautiful portrait engraving of the only Confederate president during the War Between the States, Jefferson Davis, printed on nice yellow paper. Includes a large printed facsimile signature below his likeness. Complete cover with full back flap. Superb condition. Very desirable Confederate patriotic envelope.  


<b>"I have not heard from James nor Gilbert since I last wrote to you for it is about sixty five miles from here to Charleston and we donít have to go there since [General Joseph E.] Johnston surrendered. There is a great many Union prisoners here from Rebeldom to go to their homes in the North and some have been prisoners a long time and wonít there be joy for a son and husband when they get home. It is estimated that about fifty thousand have been sent North from here in the last two months and still they are coming in every few days."</b> 


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Abram Bogart to his wife and children. Comes with the original envelope with C.D.S., Port Royal, S.C., May 31/65, with 3 cents rose George Washington postage stamp. Addressed to Mrs. Abram Bogart, Masonville, Delaware Co., N.Y.


<b><u>May 21/1865, Hilton Head, S.C.</b></u>


Dear Wife and Children,


In love and friendship ever would that I could speak to you face to face, but it seems to be other ways ordered at present.  I am not very well today, but am in hopes that life and health will be granted us, to all meet again in our own native land once more for every week seems a month with me now.  Well, I got a letter from you yesterday and was glad to hear that you and yours are well and hope that you will remain well till I get home again all right.  There was some United States troops here yesterday that expected to stay and got all of their things in the yard and then was ordered to Florida and left before night again and when there will be others [to] come we donít know, but am in hopes it will be soon.  There is every sort of rumor here as well as there [is] about our going home soon.  I have not heard from James nor Gilbert since I last wrote to you for it is about sixty five miles from here to Charleston and we donít have to go there since Johnston surrendered.  There is no more soldiers going to their regiments, but go to New York instead of coming from there [to] here, but it is all the other way and I am glad of it for my part so that some can get home if I canít, but our turn will come by & by.  I think for there is a good deal of talk about going and I think we shall come between this and July.  There is some a going on this boat that are unable to do anything here.  I should like to know if there is any chance for you to sell the place at a pretty high price and what you think of living in the South where the winter is not so cold and as for the summer I donít think there is much difference in the heat and the land is richer here too and easier to work and everything will grow here that will grow there and some things that wonít, but you must make your own choice for you must have a mind of your own by this time.  There is a great many Union prisoners here from Rebeldom to go to their homes in the North and some have been prisoners a long time and wonít there be joy for a son and husband when they get home. It is estimated that about fifty thousand have been sent North from here in the last two months and still they are coming in every few days.


Wednesday the 24 and it is warm and pleasant and everything is quiet here this morning and I am as well as usual for me and I must close this letter for the boat goes tomorrow morning and you must be of good cheer for I think it will be all right yet and I am having it very easy now and enough to eat for I live with the hospital nurses and sleep on a good bed with them.


Yours in love,

Abram Bogart    


Light age toning and wear. Typical misspelling. Excellent content describing the war as it is closing down in the Carolina's.


Abram Bogart, was born in 1825 in Catskill, Greene County, New York. He enlisted on August 15, 1862, at Sidney, Delaware County, New York, for a period of three years, and was mustered in to the 144th New York Infantry Regiment, Company I, on September 27, 1862. He was transferred to Company K, on October 16, 1862. He mustered out with his company on June 25, 1865, at Hilton Head, S.C. After the war he returned home where he worked as a farmer with his wife Mary, and their three children.


The 144th New York Infantry recruited in Delaware County, was mustered into the U.S. service on September 27, 1862.


It left New York on October 11th, 956 strong, and was stationed in the defenses of Washington at Upton's Hill, Cloud's Mills and Vienna until April, 1863.


It was then assigned to the Department of Virginia, and assisted in the defense of Suffolk, Va., during Longstreet's siege of that city. In May, it joined the 7th corps at West Point, Va., and shared in the demonstration against Richmond.


In July, it was assigned to the 2nd brigade, 1st Division, of the 11th Corps. This division was detached from its corps on August 7th, and ordered to Charleston harbor, S.C., where during the fall and winter of 1863 the regiment was engaged at Folly and Morris islands, participating with General Quincy A. Gillmore's forces in the siege of Fort Wagner, and the bombardment of Fort Sumter and Charleston.


In February, 1864, the regiment served in the 1st brigade, 10th Corps, and was engaged at Seabrook and John's Islands, S. C. It was then ordered to Florida, where it was chiefly engaged in raiding expeditions, and was active in the action at Camp Finnegan. It returned to Hilton Head in June; was active at John's Island in July, losing 13 killed, wounded and missing. They then served in General Potter's Brigade of the Coast division, and participated in the movements of General Sherman, fighting at Honey Hill, and Deveaux Neck.


Its casualties at Honey Hill were 108 and at Deveaux Neck, 37 killed, wounded and missing. Lieutenant James W. Mack, was killed in action, at Honey Hill. Attached to the 3rd separate brigade, District of Hilton Head, it was heavily engaged at James island, S.C., in February, 1865, losing 44 killed, wounded and missing.


In the fall of 1864, the ranks of the regiment were reduced to between 300 and 400 men through battle and disease, and it was then recruited to normal standard by one year recruits from its home county. The regiment was mustered out at Hilton Head, S.C., June 25, 1865, under command of Colonel Lewis. It lost by death during service 40 officers, and men, killed and mortally wounded; 4 officers and 174 enlisted men died of disease and other causes; for a total of 218.


Source: The Union Army, Vol. 2.

 


<b>"General Sherman has come through here so that the Confederacy is cut in two now and both armyís will be together in a few days for they are only forty five miles apart now and Savannah is between them with all the railroads in our hands and the place must fall soon and then Charleston will come next and Sherman is the man to drive the Rebs to their holes and whip them too before the war will end. There is a report here that Savannah is ours and if it is not it will be in a few days for Sherman is on all sides of it and our men are between there and Charleston with quite a force with them where they are fortified for a fair fight on their own terms or else the Rebs have got to go around them to get away from Sherman and if they do it will be a race for Charleston of sixty miles with united forces."</b> 


8 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Abram Bogart to his wife and children. Comes with the original envelope with C.D.S., Port Royal, S.C., Dec. 26/1864. Stamped Due 6. Addressed to Mrs. Abram Bogart, Masonville, Delaware Co., N.Y., with Soldier's Letter written at the edge.


<b><u>Dec. 21/64, Hilton Head, S.C.</b></u>


Dear Wife and Children,


It is with prospects of hearing from you that I write a few lines to let you know that I have not forgotten you and hope that these few lines will find you in good health and spirits.  My health is very good but my loneliness is quite bad for a few days so that I have to rest for a few days from guard and the rest of the boys are on duty all the time while the regiment are out and how much longer they will stay we do not know.  We like our duty here very much and we have good quarters to stay in.  Our rooms are for eight to stay in where we can have a stove in if we are a mind to buy one and there is good bunks to sleep on and a good cook room to work in. General Sherman has come through here so that the Confederacy is cut in two now and both armyís will be together in a few days for they are only forty five miles apart now and Savannah is between them with all the railroads in our hands and the place must fall soon  and then Charleston will come next and Sherman is the man to drive the Rebs to their holes and whip them too before the war will end.  There is quite a number of Shermanís men here to go home that have been gone over three years from home and I wish that I could go with them.  There is a report here that Savannah is ours and if it is not it will be in a few days for Sherman is on all sides of it and our men are between there and Charleston with quite a force with them where they are fortified for a fair fight on their own terms or else the Rebs have got to go around them to get away from Sherman and if they do it will be a race for Charleston of sixty miles with united forces.  It is quite cold weather here now for the place has frozen ice here for three nights in a row and the wind goes right through a fellow on guard.  I have just got a letter from Charlesí folks and they said that you was all well.  James was here yesterday and he says that he feels better than he has for two years, and I think that he looks better than I have seen him in that time and I went up to the dock with him and in the town and he out walked me all together and would (have) went over to n____r [N word] if I could stand it but I could not so we went into a saloon and had some pancakes and [mo]lasses and came home and today I am in my quarters lamer than ever but I shall get over it in a few days and go at it again on Sunday.  The island is covered with troops from Shermanís men that are waiting to go home and they have brought a lot of Rebel prisoners here with them for us to take care of and some are sick and some are wounded and look hard.  I went down and saw James today and he has got some Rebs to take care of.  This is a new town built since the war began and is a military town and used for that purpose and is fortified with entrenchments and stockade posts ten feet high on the outside and the stockade is six miles long with three gates to pass out and in that are guarded day and night and no one can pass with out a pass and the entrenchments mount about forty guns besides the forts that mount sixty guns more and we do the guard duty in the entrenchments and dock and headquarters guard and then there is forts on the outside and pickets there besides ours some twelve or fifteen miles from here but this is the main boat landing for this department and the whole South and everything is first fetched here and then sent to other posts in the South so it makes a business place of here and we have mail every week here from New York in three days and Rebel news when we can get it and we have to pay ten cents for New York papers and I should like to get a weekly but I am too poor to take one at present and how is it with you.  Do you take a paper.  If not try and get one if you can spare the money for it is company for you these long nights to read and you can tell how the war goes in some places and you can send one to me now and then to while away the hours for papers come when letters donít some times.

  

Sunday evening and I thought that I would send a few lines more to you to let you know what rumor is in camp.  They say that a vessel has sunk loaded with soldiers for this place and all was lost onboard but there is no certainty about it and they say that I am going to be transferred to the Invalid Corps but I donít believe that neither till I see it for I am not fit for duty and have not done much for the last year though my health is tolerably good yet and I guess that I can worry out another year in the same way if they want I should and live but it is hard to stay here when I canít do them any good more than eat rations.  Well today is Monday afternoon and we had a very heavy rain here this morning and it looks like raining more and the weather is cool and refreshing and James is some better today.  I go and see him two and three times a day.  He has very good care now for the army has nourishing food to eat and I think that he will get along if something else donít set in and they donít change doctors and I donít think there is any chance for that. Well there has some more recruits got here this afternoon about 240 in this batch and they think they have some hard times in getting here but they will see what soldiering is.  Now you must certainly write.


This from Abram Bogart   


Light age toning and wear. Typical misspelling. Excellent content about General William T. Sherman's army. Newsy letter.


Abram Bogart, was born in 1825 in Catskill, Greene County, New York. He enlisted on August 15, 1862, at Sidney, Delaware County, New York, for a period of three years, and was mustered in to the 144th New York Infantry Regiment, Company I, on September 27, 1862. He was transferred to Company K, on October 16, 1862. He mustered out with his company on June 25, 1865, at Hilton Head, S.C. After the war he returned home where he worked as a farmer with his wife Mary, and their three children.


The 144th New York Infantry recruited in Delaware County, was mustered into the U.S. service on September 27, 1862.


It left New York on October 11th, 956 strong, and was stationed in the defenses of Washington at Upton's Hill, Cloud's Mills and Vienna until April, 1863.


It was then assigned to the Department of Virginia, and assisted in the defense of Suffolk, Va., during Longstreet's siege of that city. In May, it joined the 7th corps at West Point, Va., and shared in the demonstration against Richmond.


In July, it was assigned to the 2nd brigade, 1st Division, of the 11th Corps. This division was detached from its corps on August 7th, and ordered to Charleston harbor, S.C., where during the fall and winter of 1863 the regiment was engaged at Folly and Morris islands, participating with General Quincy A. Gillmore's forces in the siege of Fort Wagner, and the bombardment of Fort Sumter and Charleston.


In February, 1864, the regiment served in the 1st brigade, 10th Corps, and was engaged at Seabrook and John's Islands, S. C. It was then ordered to Florida, where it was chiefly engaged in raiding expeditions, and was active in the action at Camp Finnegan. It returned to Hilton Head in June; was active at John's Island in July, losing 13 killed, wounded and missing. They then served in General Potter's Brigade of the Coast division, and participated in the movements of General Sherman, fighting at Honey Hill, and Deveaux Neck.


Its casualties at Honey Hill were 108 and at Deveaux Neck, 37 killed, wounded and missing. Lieutenant James W. Mack, was killed in action, at Honey Hill. Attached to the 3rd separate brigade, District of Hilton Head, it was heavily engaged at James island, S.C., in February, 1865, losing 44 killed, wounded and missing.


In the fall of 1864, the ranks of the regiment were reduced to between 300 and 400 men through battle and disease, and it was then recruited to normal standard by one year recruits from its home county. The regiment was mustered out at Hilton Head, S.C., June 25, 1865, under command of Colonel Lewis. It lost by death during service 40 officers, and men, killed and mortally wounded; 4 officers and 174 enlisted men died of disease and other causes; for a total of 218.


Source: The Union Army, Vol. 2.

 Acquired as a <I>Wilderness recovery</I> the remains of this attractive relic eagle cartridge box or NCO sword strap caught our interest for its eye appeal and because while it is simply the led filling separated from the brass outer shell it retains intricate detail while showing the clear evidence of heat and melting away around its thin circumference.   A telltale relic with good evidence of the horrible fires experienced, this piece will lay especially well in any  <I>Battle of the Wilderness</I> Civil War grouping. 

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Jefferson Davis Confederate Patriotic Co $95.00

 

144th New York Infantry Letter $85.00

 

144th New York Infantry Letter $175.00

 

Wilderness Recovery Ė Union Eagle Strap $95.00

This original  Mexican War vintage color lithographed sheet music is titled <I> WAUGHíS QUICK STEP</I> and is dedicated to Capt. J. L. Waugh of the 5th Company National Guard and was published in New York by Firth, Hall & Pond in 1847.     Set off by a colorful military lithograph, this piece remains in pleasing condition as is best described here by our illustrations.    Complete in four untrimmed 9 7/8 X 13 ľ  inch sheets demonstrating good evidence of age and originality but without tears or repairs.

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 Another treasure offered here as we downsize our accumulation of nearly 60 years of aggressive collecting this wonderful old Confederate slouch hat was acquired with no particular history beyond its classic character bolstered by an impressive period <U>Richmond, Virginia makerís label</U>.  A true <I> Ďsleeperí</I> fellow collectors will appreciate our delight when once on our desk for close examination, the illustrated period <B><I> J. A. Persinger his hat</I></B> / <B><I> Papaís Army Hat - Robt. Persinger</B></I> notation was discovered under the band. Our research identified Robert Persinger as the son of <U>John Abner Persinger</U> born just after the War and lived into 1940.   J. A. Persinger served in the Civil War as a Sergeant , Co I, <B>28th Virginia Infantry</B> 5/13/1861 to 12/15/1864 when he transferred to the <B>5th Virginia Cavalry</B>. During his Confederate service Sgt. Persinger was wounded at Gaines' Mill, wounded and taken prisoner at Gettysburg,(Pickettís Charge), was hospitalized then paroled, then taken prisoner once again at Point Lookout before taking the Oath of Allegiance June 16 1865.

     As to the hat itself our photo illustrations will do best to communicate its charm and eye appeal except to advise that with good age and untouched originality, it remains sound with no cracks or separations save the obviously period break at the top of the crown.  (A small single hole on each side at the union of the crown and brim would indicate that the wearer used a thong under the chin.)  A <I>íshowstopperí</I> to the Civil War collector and of special interest to the Confederate Headgear enthusiast, is the period paper label proclaiming the piece as <I><B> EXTRA QUALITY </I></B> with the partially discernable <B> RICHARD MOORE</B> above <I><B>MILITARY HATTER & CAP MAKER</I></B> with a period wear obliterated street address but bold <I><B> RICHMOND, VIRGINIA</I></B>. (see: 1856 / 1860 Richmond business directories under hatters for <I> Moore, Richard, Broad St 5th and 6th</I>).   An outstanding item, we are offering this one with some reluctance, but it would fit more appropriately in a strong Confederate collection than with our Maine things.  (See a portion of our collection at www.MaineLegacy.com )

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 


<b>"Try to get along as well as you can this winter for I think the war is almost done, but it will take some time to get around, but the fighting is about done. The deserters that come in now say it is and they come in by the hundreds every day with us, and more in other places. There was over a hundred come from Charleston last week."</b>



4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Abram Bogart to his wife and children. Comes with the original envelope with C.D.S., Port Royal, S.C., Oct. 12/64. Addressed to Mrs. Abram Bogart, Masonville, Delaware Co., N.Y., with 3 cents George Washington postage stamp and bullseye cancellation.


<b><u>Hilton Head, October 8/64</b></u>


Dear Wife and Children,


It is with pleasure that I send a few lines to you to let you know that I am here and am like to stay for what I see, but James and Gilbert are in the First N.Y. Engineers Regiment, and a lot more that enlisted for the 144[th] and I wish that I was there too, and James is gone to the general hospital so I am left alone again and I am glad that they had some good luck in getting out of the regiment for they see enough to convince them to get out if they could and they improved the chance for it was no place for them here. Silas Olmsted is in the hospital and the rest from our place are well for what I know. Franklin Stoddard and Haskin are in the tent with me and the rest from there are in Co. H and B, what are here, and the rest that are left behind have got to go in another regiment so you can see what they get by enlisting for the 144[th]. They have got to go just where they send them. Sunday I have been down to the hospital to see James and he is on the gain I think, and is very contented and thinks he is in a good place now, and has good care and Gilbert was to my tent so I guess that he is well and he thanks his stars that he is out of the reg.[iment] and has nothing to do with the 144[th] Heavy Artillery which they never was nor never will be. Tuesday morning and I have just come off picket and it was rather cold in the night for this place, but I got warm as soon as I heard that there was a letter here for me, and read it, and it was a joy to hear that you was all well at that date, but you didnít say anything about Jamesís folks nor Gilbertís and I guess you had better next time for I want to know what [they] think of being alone this winter and I should like to know which is the loneliness of you all, and how you get along, and tell Jeremiah that he must do the best that he can for the widows that are left to his care. There was a lot more soldiers came here today for our regiment, but they were turned over to the engineers for them to manage. They felt rather bad to be turned off, but I think they will get over it in a few days when they have a chance to see how it is here, and what they have to do, and how they are treated [by] their officers. You must not try to OD too much and get sick yourself for them who would take care of the children must take care of yourself. It is better to have less than not to enjoy the fruits of your labor. Try to get along as well as you can this winter for I think the war is almost done, but it will take some time to get around, but the fighting is about done. The deserters that come in now say it is and they come in by the hundreds every day with us, and more in other places. There was over a hundred come from Charleston last week.


This from your ever loving, 

Abram   


More news, names several of the other soldiers and explains their circumstances with some of them being in the hospital, mentions the 1st New York Engineers, the war is almost over as the deserters are continually coming in, etc. Light age toning and wear. Typical misspelling. Very fine content.


Abram Bogart, was born in 1825 in Catskill, Greene County, New York. He enlisted on August 15, 1862, at Sidney, Delaware County, New York, for a period of three years, and was mustered in to the 144th New York Infantry Regiment, Company I, on September 27, 1862. He was transferred to Company K, on October 16, 1862. He mustered out with his company on June 25, 1865, at Hilton Head, S.C. After the war he returned home where he worked as a farmer with his wife Mary, and their three children.


The 144th New York Infantry recruited in Delaware County, was mustered into the U.S. service on September 27, 1862.


It left New York on October 11th, 956 strong, and was stationed in the defenses of Washington at Upton's Hill, Cloud's Mills and Vienna until April, 1863.


It was then assigned to the Department of Virginia, and assisted in the defense of Suffolk, Va., during Longstreet's siege of that city. In May, it joined the 7th corps at West Point, Va., and shared in the demonstration against Richmond.


In July, it was assigned to the 2nd brigade, 1st Division, of the 11th Corps. This division was detached from its corps on August 7th, and ordered to Charleston harbor, S.C., where during the fall and winter of 1863 the regiment was engaged at Folly and Morris islands, participating with General Quincy A. Gillmore's forces in the siege of Fort Wagner, and the bombardment of Fort Sumter and Charleston.


In February, 1864, the regiment served in the 1st brigade, 10th Corps, and was engaged at Seabrook and John's Islands, S. C. It was then ordered to Florida, where it was chiefly engaged in raiding expeditions, and was active in the action at Camp Finnegan. It returned to Hilton Head in June; was active at John's Island in July, losing 13 killed, wounded and missing. They then served in General Potter's Brigade of the Coast division, and participated in the movements of General Sherman, fighting at Honey Hill, and Deveaux Neck.


Its casualties at Honey Hill were 108 and at Deveaux Neck, 37 killed, wounded and missing. Lieutenant James W. Mack, was killed in action, at Honey Hill. Attached to the 3rd separate brigade, District of Hilton Head, it was heavily engaged at James island, S.C., in February, 1865, losing 44 killed, wounded and missing.


In the fall of 1864, the ranks of the regiment were reduced to between 300 and 400 men through battle and disease, and it was then recruited to normal standard by one year recruits from its home county. The regiment was mustered out at Hilton Head, S.C., June 25, 1865, under command of Colonel Lewis. It lost by death during service 40 officers, and men, killed and mortally wounded; 4 officers and 174 enlisted men died of disease and other causes; for a total of 218.


Source: The Union Army, Vol. 2.

 


<b>"hope that your lives may be spared until we all shall get home again to enjoy a season of rest from the tumults and trials of war, and see the star spangled banner wave over rebellious graves and the nation once more in peace with the world and give freedom to them that are in bondage, and liberty to the poor soldier that is worse than slavery in any form for they are treated worse than beasts...the officers won't give a pass unless they are a mind to and that's where they have us so you see that we are worse than slaves."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Abram Bogart. Comes with the original envelope with C.D.S., Port Royal, S.C., Sep. 30/64. Addressed to Mrs. Abram Bogart, Masonville, Delaware Co., N.Y., with 3 cents George Washington postage stamp and bullseye cancellation.


<b><u>Hilton Head, S.C., September 22/64</b></u>


Dear Friends,


It is with madness that I write unto you at this time for I have just heard that James has enlisted to come to the war and leave his aged parents to mourn in their old age for a protector and confidential son when there was no need of his leaving them for there is no draft that can fetch him away at present. I don't see what he can be thinking of to enlist and leave his family and parents alone in these times that they need him the most and he is expected on the next boat, but I hope he ain't coming. I should like to step in your house and see how you get along with out money for it goes hard for me and it must be still harder for you, but we expect our pay soon, and then I will divide with you the money and also the anxiety for your welfare and comfort and hope that your lives may be spared until we all shall get home again to enjoy a season of rest from the tumults and trials of war, and see the star spangled banner wave over rebellious graves and the nation once more in peace with the world and give freedom to them that are in bondage and liberty to the poor soldier that is worse than slavery in any form for they are treated worse than beasts for they are not allowed to go anywhere without a pass or they will punish you, and the officers won't give a pass unless they are a mind to and that's where they have us so you see that we are worse than slaves. Well the mail has come and I will wait and see if I get a letter from you. Well some of the new recruits have got here and James is one of them and Mr. Burch of Masonville and they think they know something of soldiering already, but they have just commenced to know trouble. Well there was another lot come last night, and about 250 others came on another boat and they feel middling.  James brought a letter from you and I got one by mail the day of Sep. 11. I am thankful for the things that you and the children sent me, but the sugar was most melted when it got here, but it was sweet yet. I will pay you if I get home if that will do. Some of the boys haven't got here yet, but are expected here soon. The long storms of winter are coming soon when it will be hard for you to get out to get things to live on. I am about the same, but am rather lame to put up with it, but it can't be helped. So good bye for a day.

    

Abram Bogart


More news, names several of the new recruits, etc. Light age toning and wear. Typical misspelling. Very fine content referring to their officers treating the soldiers like slaves.


Abram Bogart, was born in 1825 in Catskill, Greene County, New York. He enlisted on August 15, 1862, at Sidney, Delaware County, New York, for a period of three years, and was mustered in to the 144th New York Infantry Regiment, Company I, on September 27, 1862. He was transferred to Company K, on October 16, 1862. He mustered out with his company on June 25, 1865, at Hilton Head, S.C. After the war he returned home where he worked as a farmer with his wife Mary, and their three children.


The 144th New York Infantry recruited in Delaware County, was mustered into the U.S. service on September 27, 1862.


It left New York on October 11th, 956 strong, and was stationed in the defenses of Washington at Upton's Hill, Cloud's Mills and Vienna until April, 1863.


It was then assigned to the Department of Virginia, and assisted in the defense of Suffolk, Va., during Longstreet's siege of that city. In May, it joined the 7th corps at West Point, Va., and shared in the demonstration against Richmond.


In July, it was assigned to the 2nd brigade, 1st Division, of the 11th Corps. This division was detached from its corps on August 7th, and ordered to Charleston harbor, S.C., where during the fall and winter of 1863 the regiment was engaged at Folly and Morris islands, participating with General Quincy A. Gillmore's forces in the siege of Fort Wagner, and the bombardment of Fort Sumter and Charleston.


In February, 1864, the regiment served in the 1st brigade, 10th Corps, and was engaged at Seabrook and John's Islands, S. C. It was then ordered to Florida, where it was chiefly engaged in raiding expeditions, and was active in the action at Camp Finnegan. It returned to Hilton Head in June; was active at John's Island in July, losing 13 killed, wounded and missing. They then served in General Potter's Brigade of the Coast division, and participated in the movements of General Sherman, fighting at Honey Hill, and Deveaux Neck.


Its casualties at Honey Hill were 108 and at Deveaux Neck, 37 killed, wounded and missing. Lieutenant James W. Mack, was killed in action, at Honey Hill. Attached to the 3rd separate brigade, District of Hilton Head, it was heavily engaged at James island, S.C., in February, 1865, losing 44 killed, wounded and missing.


In the fall of 1864, the ranks of the regiment were reduced to between 300 and 400 men through battle and disease, and it was then recruited to normal standard by one year recruits from its home county. The regiment was mustered out at Hilton Head, S.C., June 25, 1865, under command of Colonel Lewis. It lost by death during service 40 officers, and men, killed and mortally wounded; 4 officers and 174 enlisted men died of disease and other causes; for a total of 218.


Source: The Union Army, Vol. 2.

Mexican War dated - Military Lithograph $65.00

 

Richmond Maker marked Ė 28th Va. / 5th V $7500.00

 

144th New York Infantry Letter $75.00

 

144th New York Infantry Letter $100.00




<b>"I should like to have you see some of the slaves as they are on the plantations with all their notions for they have been made to believe that the Yankees have horns and tails and are great thieves and robbers and destroy everything where they go, and to see them roll their eyes when they see the Yankee soldiers come around the plantations, and the little ones hide..."</b>


6 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Abram Bogart, to his wife and children. Comes with the original envelope, addressed to [Mrs] Abram Bogart, Masonville, Delaware Co., N.Y., with bulls eye cancellation, and stamped Due 6. The postage stamp at the upper left corner of the cover has been torn off. 


<b><u>Hilton Head, S.C., August 5, 1864</b></u>


Dear Wife and Children,


It is with pleasure that I write to you to let you know that I am in the land of the living, and have tolerable good health at this time, and hope you are the same.  You spoke in your letter that you had got some things to take care of and a garden to hoe, and how do you get along with it and have you any chickens to eat this fall, and that you had rather hear that I was killed in battle than hear that I was under arrest.  Now I had rather serve my time out in some port than be in this aristocratic army for it gets worse every day for we have got to have everything scoured and polished til you can see your [face] in it, and the Rebs can see our guns glisten as far as they can see us, and they know right where to shoot, and we canít see them, only by their smoke, and we canít sight our guns for they glisten so that it hurts our eyes and draws the sun so that we are getting sun struck, and then have to retreat to save ourselves, and [the] sick, there is as many again die here as gets killed in battle. On that account and the reason we get sick of it, the officers put on airs and strut about and find fault with the men, and punish them for nothing, but when it goes to a court martial then they are done for. I am back to the company and nothing found against me after laying off from the 21st June til August, and now I am almost a mind to try them, but the old saying is the more that you stir a turd the worse it stinks, so I think that I shall let them be this time, so you see how it is now and I donít want you to feel bad for I have told you that when the worst comes to worst that I should look out for myself and so I shall never fear. I donít see why my folks donít write to me any more, or have they got ashamed of me. If so just let me know it for I donít want to think that I have got friends when I havenít got any for I hate assumed friends anywhere for that is the great curse in this war, and when we are out of sight they are against us, and I think it is time there was a sifting of the wheat and see who is right and who is wrong, for it is in the army as it is in the country, when they are with you they are friends, and when you are away they will talk about you and find fault with what you do, and it is just so with the generals. One finds fault with the other, and that is the way with this army down here, and then they say that they canít depend on the troops, and the private has it after all. I should like to have you see some of the slaves as they are on the plantations with all their notions for they have been made to believe that the Yankees have horns and tails and are great thieves and robbers and destroy everything where they go, and to see them roll their eyes when they see the Yankee soldiers come around the plantations, and the little ones hide and then come to their Ma and say I donít see any horns and some of them are as pretty as a n____er  [N word] can be, slim and straight and they hanít over black around here, but are very timid and keep us as far as they can.

 

So good by,


Abram Bogart


More content. Light age toning and wear. Typical misspelling. Very fine content with good description of the slaves on a South Carolina plantation.


Abram Bogart, was born in 1825 in Catskill, Greene County, New York. He enlisted on August 15, 1862, at Sidney, Delaware County, New York, for a period of three years, and was mustered in to the 144th New York Infantry Regiment, Company I, on September 27, 1862. He was transferred to Company K, on October 16, 1862. He mustered out with his company on June 25, 1865, at Hilton Head, S.C. After the war he returned home where he worked as a farmer with his wife Mary, and their three children.


The 144th New York Infantry recruited in Delaware County, was mustered into the U.S. service on September 27, 1862.


It left New York on October 11th, 956 strong, and was stationed in the defenses of Washington at Upton's Hill, Cloud's Mills and Vienna until April, 1863.


It was then assigned to the Department of Virginia, and assisted in the defense of Suffolk, Va., during Longstreet's siege of that city. In May, it joined the 7th corps at West Point, Va., and shared in the demonstration against Richmond.


In July, it was assigned to the 2nd brigade, 1st Division, of the 11th Corps. This division was detached from its corps on August 7th, and ordered to Charleston harbor, S.C., where during the fall and winter of 1863 the regiment was engaged at Folly and Morris islands, participating with General Quincy A. Gillmore's forces in the siege of Fort Wagner, and the bombardment of Fort Sumter and Charleston.


In February, 1864, the regiment served in the 1st brigade, 10th Corps, and was engaged at Seabrook and John's Islands, S. C. It was then ordered to Florida, where it was chiefly engaged in raiding expeditions, and was active in the action at Camp Finnegan. It returned to Hilton Head in June; was active at John's Island in July, losing 13 killed, wounded and missing. They then served in General Potter's Brigade of the Coast division, and participated in the movements of General Sherman, fighting at Honey Hill, and Deveaux Neck.


Its casualties at Honey Hill were 108 and at Deveaux Neck, 37 killed, wounded and missing. Lieutenant James W. Mack, was killed in action, at Honey Hill. Attached to the 3rd separate brigade, District of Hilton Head, it was heavily engaged at James island, S.C., in February, 1865, losing 44 killed, wounded and missing.


In the fall of 1864, the ranks of the regiment were reduced to between 300 and 400 men through battle and disease, and it was then recruited to normal standard by one year recruits from its home county. The regiment was mustered out at Hilton Head, S.C., June 25, 1865, under command of Colonel Lewis. It lost by death during service 40 officers, and men, killed and mortally wounded; 4 officers and 174 enlisted men died of disease and other causes; for a total of 218.


Source: The Union Army, Vol. 2.

 


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Abram Bogart, to his wife, with the original envelope, C.D.S. Port Royal, SC, Jul. 25/64, with 3 cents George Washington postage stamp, addressed to Mrs. Abram Bogart, Masonville, Delaware Co., N.Y. 


<b><u>July 22/64, Hilton Head, S.C.</b></u>


Dear Wife and Children,


Dear, it is with pleasure that I send a few lines to you to let you know that I am in the land of the living, and in good spirits yet, and hope you are the same though I don't hear from you in some time. There is not much news here at present, but there is talk of another raid in a few days from here, but there is nothing certain about it. There has [been] one died from Co. B that was wounded in the last raid and the rest are on the gain. We have commenced building barracks here now, but I don't think that we shall finish them for I don't think we shall stay so long in one place, but some think that we shall winter here, and I am sure I don't care where we stay for it is the same to me whether on the march or in camp. If I can hear that you are all well at home so you must write as often as you can, and tell [me] what the neighbors are doing if you can for I should like to hear what is going on around there, and tell James to write if he can, or send me a weekly paper instead for they come right through when sent from the North. Today is Monday the 25th of July, and the same monotony in camp as usual is the case. I want you to take good care of the children, and not send Cassie to school when she is not well enough to stand it for you know that they are all in this world and they are entrusted to your care, and comfort now and you must be their guardian while on earth and if they are called by death you will know that it is all right, and also take care of yourself for it is better to live in poverty than in contentions, and the way of the wicked for their paths are strewn with thorns, and a contented mind is a continual feast no matter what our rations are. If it is a cup of water and dry hardtack and raw meat. Well you must excuse me for not write more for I don't know how you will like this for I am bothered with the sun headache, and can't think what to write. Ever yours as true as the sky is blue.


Abram Bogart


Light age toning and wear. Typical misspelling. Very fine content. 


Abram Bogart, was born in 1825 in Catskill, Greene County, New York. He enlisted on August 15, 1862, at Sidney, Delaware County, New York, for a period of three years, and was mustered in to the 144th New York Infantry Regiment, Company I, on September 27, 1862. He was transferred to Company K, on October 16, 1862. He mustered out with his company on June 25, 1865, at Hilton Head, S.C. After the war he returned home where he worked as a farmer with his wife Mary, and their three children.


The 144th New York Infantry recruited in Delaware County, was mustered into the U.S. service on September 27, 1862.


It left New York on October 11th, 956 strong, and was stationed in the defenses of Washington at Upton's Hill, Cloud's Mills and Vienna until April, 1863.


It was then assigned to the Department of Virginia, and assisted in the defense of Suffolk, Va., during Longstreet's siege of that city. In May, it joined the 7th corps at West Point, Va., and shared in the demonstration against Richmond.


In July, it was assigned to the 2nd brigade, 1st Division, of the 11th Corps. This division was detached from its corps on August 7th, and ordered to Charleston harbor, S.C., where during the fall and winter of 1863 the regiment was engaged at Folly and Morris islands, participating with General Quincy A. Gillmore's forces in the siege of Fort Wagner, and the bombardment of Fort Sumter and Charleston.


In February, 1864, the regiment served in the 1st brigade, 10th Corps, and was engaged at Seabrook and John's Islands, S. C. It was then ordered to Florida, where it was chiefly engaged in raiding expeditions, and was active in the action at Camp Finnegan. It returned to Hilton Head in June; was active at John's Island in July, losing 13 killed, wounded and missing. They then served in General Potter's Brigade of the Coast division, and participated in the movements of General Sherman, fighting at Honey Hill, and Deveaux Neck.


Its casualties at Honey Hill were 108 and at Deveaux Neck, 37 killed, wounded and missing. Lieutenant James W. Mack, was killed in action, at Honey Hill. Attached to the 3rd separate brigade, District of Hilton Head, it was heavily engaged at James island, S.C., in February, 1865, losing 44 killed, wounded and missing.


In the fall of 1864, the ranks of the regiment were reduced to between 300 and 400 men through battle and disease, and it was then recruited to normal standard by one year recruits from its home county. The regiment was mustered out at Hilton Head, S.C., June 25, 1865, under command of Colonel Lewis. It lost by death during service 40 officers, and men, killed and mortally wounded; 4 officers and 174 enlisted men died of disease and other causes; for a total of 218.


Source: The Union Army, Vol. 2.


        Desirable for sure and clearly an important Little Round Top, Gettysburg item, this original memorial by lithograph J. Baillie is a bit of an enigma as it is inscribed to <I>Benj. F. Carter of the Fourth <U>Virginia</U></I></B> when in fact Lt. Col. Carter is well known to Confederate collector /historians as the hard fought hero of the 4th <B>Texas</B> infantry who was mortally wounded on July 2nd 1863  as that regiment took on the Union left flank and the <B>20th Maine Infantry</B>.   A <I>head scratcher</I>, our own extensive research effort produced  but a <U>single</U> <I>Lt. Col. Benj. F. Carter</I> serving the Union or Confederacy and a deeper look at the post Round Top wounding offering a plausible scenario with respect to misidentification of Carterís regiment on this memorial. 

      Seriously wounded on July 2, 1863, when struck by shell fragments in the face and legs, Carter was  left behind in Pennsylvania, as his wound was clearly mortal, and to alleviate his further suffering, he was left at a private home where he was captured and taken with other prisoners to Chambersburg, PA.    It was here that one of the Civil Warís more personal nonpartisan  and  heartfelt occurrences took form when the Pastor of a local church, Rev. Dr. Samuel Fisher and his wife Naomi requested that the Colonel be brought to their church for care.  It seems that when Naomiís son by a previous marriage  (Capt. Mark Kerns U.S. Army) had been killed fighting against Lt. Col Carterís 4th troops at 2nd Manassas, Col. Carter who had been so impressed by Kernsí courage that he had his remains buried on the battlefield in Carter's own coat.  Naomi who had been made aware of the Colonelís action toward her son wished to return the kindness by care for him.

      A lengthy and convoluted story but one of touching personal interest worthy of preservation, and an occurrence that offers a plausible reason for the mystery misidentification of the 4th Texas  on this <I>Yankee </I> published lithograph as likely penned by a less than familiar  <I>Yankee</I>  calligrapher.   A likelihood bolstered by our acquisition of the memorial near Chambersburg, Pennsylvania lo those many years ago when such treasures might be <I>picked</I> at on site sales.  It seems most plausible  that as the memorial emanated from a Chambersburg home, it was most likely that of the Rev. Fisher and his wife Naomi who had a personal connection to Carter. 


As serious collector / historians of Maine history for well over fifty years, (see: MaineLegacy.com ) we set side this piece years ago but as time passes and we downsize,  it is time to pass this <I>find</I> on to an appreciative home.  All in pleasing condition save a chip at the lower right corner of its original12 3/8 X 16 3/8/inch mid-19th century frame, this offering will come <U>without glass</U>.



<CENTER>for a more in depth account see:</CENTER>

<CENTER><B>findagrave.com</B></CENTER>


<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>




 


<b>The assassination of President Abraham Lincoln


"I suppose the awful news of the murder of our beloved president created a great excitement in our little town..."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Surgeon Joseph Cottrell, U.S. Navy. Comes with the original envelope addressed to Miss Hallie K. My, Columbia, Lancaster County, Penna., with C.D.S., Old Point Comfort, Va., Apr. 24, postage stamp has been torn off.


<b><u>U.S.S. Mackinaw, James River, Va., April 24th, 1865</b></u>


My Dear Hallie,


As I was absent from my vessel the greater part of last week, and only returned to her on Saturday, I have been obliged to delay my letter which otherwise would have been written a couple of days earlier. I went down to Norfolk on Wednesday last on business and was detained there for three days. Norfolk is in my opinion a miserable place and I always dislike to be sent there. I cannot tell you how anxious I am to get home and if they don't soon let me off I shall be tempted to resign my commission and become once more a private citizen. Situated as I am however, I feel that I can not consistently leave my vessel for more than a day or two at a time as I am the only surgeon on board, and with no medical officer within five or two miles, it would scarcely be right to leave between two and three hundred men exposed to the numerous accidents of a man of war. I still live in hope however that it will not be long until I see you and that the day is not far distant when we shall meet to part no more in this life. <b><i>I suppose the awful news of the murder of our beloved president created a great excitement in our little town as it has done elsewhere, and all are anxious to see those engaged in it brought to justice. With us it was received with sorrow and calmness all feeling anxious for an opportunity to revenge this horrible affair. Oh! that the day may soon come when nations shall know war no more.</b></i> I am anxiously looking for a letter from you as the last I received was written on the 4th inst. ten days ago. which is quite a long time, but I suppose your visit to Philadelphia (which you speak of in your last letter) has kept you from writing. You ask me when I am coming home, and in reply I must ask you to wait two short weeks for an answer as I think again that in time we will know what the ship is going to do. Norwood must look beautiful now and the weather must be delightful for riding or driving. How much we would enjoy it if I were only there. Since our vessel came down to this part of the river, I have not had a single ride on horseback as there are no troops near here. We have pretty good times however sailing around this river which is here some three miles wide. There are also some fine families living on shore near us with whom I am acquainted and occasionally I pay them a visit, but I am so anxious to see you that it always makes me feel homesick to visit young ladies. Some of our officers are now ashore for tea, but although invited I determined to stay on board and write to you. Tomorrow a number of young ladies are to take dinner on board with us. How I wish you were to be one of them. I had intended to fill another sheet, but the mail tug is coming, and I will not detain my letter. So good bye. Accept ever so much love and a good night kiss from your devoted,


Joe


Very bold and neatly written letter from this naval surgeon stationed on the James River, Va., near the end of the war. Came from a larger group of Cottrell correpondence. Excellent letter with very desirable content regarding the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln in April 1865.


<u>U.S.S. Mackinaw</u>: A 974 ton side wheel steamer of the United States Navy during the Civil War. The Mackinaw first served in the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron on the James River, Va., starting picket duty in May and remaining on the river for most of 1864. She destroyed the steamer Georgiana McCaw on June 5th, and supported Union troops on their advance from Dutch Gap, Va., on August 11th. The U.S.S. Mackinaw also served in the Wilmington, N.C., blockade and participated in other attacks throughout 1865.

144th New York Infantry Letter $125.00

 

144th New York Infantry Letter $85.00

 

Little Round Top Ė KIA - Confederate Lt. $595.00

 

Union Naval Surgeon's Letter from the U. $250.00




Brass, triangular knapsack hook that measures 1 1/4 inches wide, by 1 1/4 inches high. The brass surface shows typical age discoloration and some green patina is visible. The hook is solid and complete. The knapsack hook was located on the knapsack's shoulder straps. This example was once part of the famous Rosensteel collection of Gettysburg relics that formed the core of the Gettysburg National Museum collection. Founded in 1921, by the Rosensteel family, this is one of the most famous collections of Civil War relics that was ever assembled. John Rosensteel, of Gettysburg, was one of the very first relic hunters of the Gettysburg battlefield, accumulating various artifacts as soon as the fighting stopped. John's nephew George continued the legacy, and opened the museum which was located across from the Gettysburg National Cemetery. This hook was recovered from Culp's Hill, one of the most prominent areas of the battlefield. The epic 3 day battle of Gettysburg was fought on July 1st, 2nd and 3rd, 1863. Ex-Horse Soldier of Gettysburg collection. Very desirable Gettysburg relic.       


8 x 8 1/2, in ink, on blue paper. 


"Recd. of J. Adrian Snider three thousand, one hundred and fifty dollars for an undivided half interest in the following slaves viz: one negro man, Ben, of yellow complexion; one negro man, Phillip, of black complexion; one negro man, Henry, of black complexion; one negro woman, Nancy, of black complexion; one negro woman, Martha, of black complexion, and her child, named Susan, aged about two years; & one negro woman, Serena, of black complexion; all of said negroes being a portion of those belonging from this date to the plantation in Bossier Parish, state of Louisiana, called "Adelphi" owned by said J.H. Snider and myself as partners and planters under the firm of T.H. & J.A. Snider. Fillmore, La., Dec. 5th, 1854. Thornton A. Snider." Docket on the reverse, T.A. Snider, to J.A. Snider, Bill of Sale for 7 Negroes, Dec. 5th, 1854. There are 2 small archival tape repairs on the folds on the reverse. Wear in the upper edge margin. Very neatly written manuscript. Overall a very attractive 1854 Louisiana slave bill of sale which will display nicely.  


Civil War patriotic imprint with a beautiful full color vignette of a spread winged eagle perched on top of a mountain top, holding a riband in its mouth with the motto, E. Pluribus Unum, and an American shield. Below the vignette in large letters is U.S.A. made of red, white and blue stars and stripes. Imprint at the bottom, Published by Car Bell, Hartford, Conn., with 25 other styles. Light wear. Very fine.


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.


<u>WBTS Trivia</u>: E. Pluribus Unum is the motto of the United States, and it means, "out of many, one."   


8 x 13, manuscript in ink. 


New Orleans, April 13, 1846. Received from M.B. Sellers, Esq., of Lake Providence, Louisiana, the sum of One Thousand, One hundred & Seventy five Dollars, for two certain negro Boys- to wit- Jim, aged about Sixteen years and priced at $562. 1/2, whose color is Black- and Jim, a dark mulatto, aged about Seventeen years and priced at $612. 1/2- which negroes I warrant Slaves for life. Sound in body and mind, and the title good against all claims whatsoever, and I further guarantee them free from all the vices & maladies prescribed by Law. James A. McHatton.The document also bears the signatures of  two witnesses. Docket on the reverse, Sale of Slaves from James A. McHatton, To M.B. Sellers, April 13, 1846. The paper shows some light age toning with typical folds visible. Bold and neatly written manuscript. An excellent 1846 Louisiana slave bill of sale which is perfect for display as it contains all of the pertinent information you would look for in such a document. Very desirable example.

Knapsack Hook Recovered from Culp's Hill $10.00

 

1854 Louisiana Bill of Sale For 7 Slaves $295.00

 

U. S. A. , Eagle and American Shield $6.00

 

1846 New Orleans, Louisiana Slave Bill o $350.00




8 x 10, manuscript in ink.  Dated January 5th, 1843. Itemized slave bill of sale.


"Know all men by these presents that I, George M. Savage, for and in consideration of the sum of Three thousand seven hundred and twenty five dollars to me in hand paid, the receipt and payment thereof, I hereby acknowledge I have this day bargained and sold and delivered unto Jim Johnson, the following negroes to wit, Jim, 21, Black, $500- Pleasant, 25, Black, $500- Squire, 25, Black, $500- Willis, 16, Brown, $500- Stephen, 15, Black, $412.50- Nelson, 15, Blk., $412.50- Patsy, 22, Brown, $400- Millie, 15, Blk., $400- Total $3725- Making in all the above named sum which negroes are warranted free from all constitutional diseases, defect or disability to the best of my knowledge, and belief, the title of which I will forever defend against the lawful claims of all persons whatsoever unto the said John Johnson, his heirs, assigns forever. In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal the 5th day of Jany. 1843. George M. Savage, with hand drawn seal to the right. [Witnessed] In presence of R.R. Barkery."  Docket on the reverse: Bill of Sale from G.M. Savage. There are also a bunch of accounting numbers also on the reverse. Light age toning, minor staining, and light wear. Tiny tear at the upper left margin not touching any of the content. Excellent content naming each slave by name, age, their selling price, and warranting them for life. Ideal 1843 dated slave bill of sale for display.      


<b>For a father who had 2 sons that would fight in the Confederate Army!</b>


7 1/4 x 7 1/2, manuscript in ink. State of South Carolina, Anderson District. To any lawful Constable of Said District- Complaint being made unto me by Elias Mullinax, plaintiff, that John James, Defendant, of sd.[said] District is indebted unto him the said plaintiff in the sun of seven dollars & fifty cents, interest 21 cents, in a joint note a copy of which is as follows- by the first of October next we or either of us do promise to pay Elias Mullinax or bearer the sum of seven dollars & fifty cents with interest from date June 20th, 1843. John James [signed with his "X" mark] and that the said defendant refuseth to pay the same. These are therefore to require you to summons the said defendant to appear before me or any other Magitrate of said Dist. at my House on Saturday the 18th day of this instant to answer to the above complaint at 12 o'clock. Given under my hand and seal this November 11th, 1843. The document is signed Wm. D. Litton, Magistrate, with his hand drawn seal at the right. Docket on the reverse: Summons in plea of Debt. Elias Mullinax. John James Debt, $7.71, Magistrate fee 37 1/2, Constables Co., 50, [for a total  of] $8.58 1/2. Copy of Summons for Defendant. Light wear, and scattered staining. Bold and very neatly written document from 1843 South Carolina.


<u>WBTS Trivia</u>: John James, the subject of this summons, had two sons, Thomas and John, who both fought for the Confederacy as South Carolina soldiers during the War Between the States.    


7 3/4 x 5 1/4, manuscript in ink. Itemized account by date, and the doctor services provided. Includes medical visits for the negroes, the extraction of teeth for a negro woman, and boy, and mileage charges to visit the negroes. This account was for the slave owner Daniel Crawford, from Doctors Graham & Smith. Signed by the doctor on the reverse, "Recd. payment in full, Jan. 3, 1859, A.D. Graham." There is also a docket that reads, D. Crawford, Acct., $19.00. Light wear and staining. Very desirable slave related medical document.          


<b>Photographed in Lexington, Kentucky</b>


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/4 x 4 card. Seated view of a negro woman holding a white baby on her lap. Backmark: Carpenter & Mullen, Magnolia Gallery, Lexington, Ky. There is a 3 cents green, George Washington, Internal Revenue tax stamp on the reverse. Light age toning, and wear, with minor staining, and  some light surface blemishes. Card shows light corner wear. Very desirable war period negro related content from Kentucky. Scarce.

1843 Bill of Sale For Eight Named Slaves $345.00

 

1843 Summons From Magistrate, Anderson D $15.00

 

1859 Account For Doctor Visits & Medicin $145.00

 

CDV, Negro Woman Holding White Baby $495.00




<b>Union officer and family photographed in 1865 Nashville, Tennessee</b>


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Lovely family portrait featuring a Union artillery officer standing behind his pretty seated wife with his hands resting on her shoulders, while she holds a small child on her lap. Two older children flank their parents, a pretty young girl wearing a patterned dress is standing at the left, and a young boy wearing a cap and a military style jacket stands at the right. The officer sports a goatee beard while wearing a kepi with brass artillery hat insignia clearly visible. His frock coat has shoulders straps on it that appear to indicate that this officer holds the rank of colonel. Backmark: T.M. Schleier, Photographer, Cor. Union and Cherry Sts., and 27 Public Square, Nashville, Tennessee. There is an advertisement below his studio information; "Photographs of all size, in india ink, oil or water colors. Daguerreotypes and other pictures copied to any size. Landscapes, views, camps, &c. taken at short notice." There is a beautiful war date ink inscription on the reverse: "For Sister Maggie with the love of the Happy Family, Knoxville, Tenn., March 30th, 1865." Light age toning and wear with some corner damage, and spotting near the bottom of the view.  Very nice war date content taken in Tennessee of this Union artillery officer and his handsome family. Desirable pose.        


<b>Brother vs brother! His brother George was a General in the Confederate Army!


His son was killed with Lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer, at the battle of the Little Big Horn, in 1876</b>


(1819-93) Born in Russellville, Kentucky, he was the son of United States Senator, and Governor of Kentucky John J. Crittenden, brother of Confederate General George B. Crittenden, and first cousin of Union General Thomas T. Crittenden. His son, John J. Crittenden III, served in the U.S. Army, and died with Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer, and members of the 7th U.S. Cavalry, at the Battle of Little Bighorn, in 1876. At the outbreak of the Mexican War, he enlisted and served as an aide to General Zachary Taylor, the father-in-law of Confederate President Jefferson Davis, and as colonel of the 3rd Kentucky Infantry, 1847-48. He commanded the Kentucky state forces and held rank of major general at the outbreak of the Civil War. Kentucky was a state that declared its neutrality, and had men fighting for the North and the South. Thomas L. Crittenden, and his father remained loyal to the Union, while his brother George joined the Confederate Army, a common occurrence in the border states, thus was born the nickname, the war of brother vs brother! Commissioned a brigadier general in September 1861, he led a division of General Buell's army at the 1862 battle of Shiloh. He was promoted to major general on July 17, 1862, and commanded the II Corps in the Army of the Ohio during the Perryville, Ky. campaign. As one of General Rosecrans' principal commanders in the Army of the Cumberland, he was heavily engaged at the Battle of Stones River, and at the battles of Tullahoma, Tenn., and Chickamauga, Ga. In 1864, he saw action in the eastern theater at the battle of Spotsylvania and the battle of Cold Harbor, Va. After the war ended, Crittenden served as the State Treasurer of Kentucky, and was appointed as a colonel, and then brigadier general in the regular army before retiring in 1881. He was elected as a member of the Maryland Society of the Cincinnati in 1883. He was also a veteran companion of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. He died in Staten Island, New York, in 1893, and is buried in Frankfort, Kentucky.  


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. 3/4 standing view wearing a double breasted frock coat with shoulder bars and rank of major general. He poses with one arm on a studio column while wearing a pair of leather gloves. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. There is a 2 cents George Washington, Internal Revenue tax stamp on the reverse. Light age toning and wear. Scarce.  


<b>Wounded at Fort Donelson, Tenn., and in the Atlanta, Ga. campaign!


General Logan was instrumental in founding Memorial Day to honor our war veterans!


United States Senator and Congressman from Illinois</b>




(1826-86) Nicknamed "Black Jack," he served in the Mexican War as a lieutenant of Illinois Volunteers; and was perhaps the Union's premier civilian general during the Civil War. Elected to the U.S. Senate in 1858 and 1860, he attended the Democratic National Convention in Charleston, S.C., as a supporter of Senator Stephen A. Douglas. After fighting at the battle of 1st Bull Run, Va., he returned to Illinois to recruit the 31st Illinois Infantry and he was commissioned as their colonel. An instant success as a field commander, he saw action at Belmont, and Fort Donelson where he was wounded. Promoted to rank of brigadier general, March 21, 1862, and major general March 13, 1863, he fought at Corinth, Shiloh, Vicksburg, in the Atlanta campaign where he was wounded again, and in the 1865 Carolina's campaign. After the war he returned to politics and served as U.S. Congressman and Senator from Illinois almost uninterruptedly until his death. He was greatly involved in veteran's affairs and was instrumental in founding Memorial Day.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/4 x 4 card. Half view wearing double breasted frock coat with shoulder straps and rank of major general. Backmark: Bogardus Photographer, 363 Broadway, Cor. Franklin St., New York. Light age toning and wear. Very fine. Desirable Union General. 

 


<b>Commander in Chief of the Union Army


Lost the 1864 Presidential election to President Abraham Lincoln


Governor of New Jersey</b>


(1826-85) Graduated in the West Point class of 1846, and fought in the Mexican War. Hailed at the beginning of the Civil War as the "Young Napoleon," he proved to be a brilliant military organizer, administrator, and trainer of men, but an officer totally lacking in the essential qualities of successful command of large forces in battle.  He saw action at Rich Mountain, West Virginia, in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign, and at the battle of Antietam, the bloodiest single day in American history.  He was defeated for the presidency of the United States in 1864 by President Abraham Lincoln. Served as Governor of New Jersey, 1878-81.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. 3/4 standing view, profile pose of "Little Mac" wearing his kepi, frock coat with rank of major general, and holding a pair of binoculars with leather strap. Backmark: C.D. Fredricks & Co., N.Y., Paris & Habana. There is a 2 cents George Washington, U.S. Internal Revenue tax stamp, with stamped Aug. 29, 1864 date on it, on the reverse. Excellent, very desirable pose!

CDV, Union Artillery Officer & Family $175.00

 

CDV, General Thomas L. Crittenden $185.00

 

CDV, General John A. Logan $150.00

 

CDV, General George B. McClellan $185.00




<b>United States Congressman from Georgia


Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives


Governor of Georgia


United States Secretary of the Treasury


Very strong candidate for president of the Confederacy!


Presiding officer at the 1861 Montgomery, Alabama Confederate secession convention  


President of the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States


Confederate battlefield general</b> 


(1815-68) One of the most prominent figures in Confederate history! Born in Jefferson County, Ga., he graduated from the University of Georgia in 1834, and was admitted to the bar two years later. He served in the U.S. Congress from 1843 to 1851, and was Speaker of the House from 1849 to 1851, when he was overwhelmingly elected governor of Georgia. He returned to Congress in 1855, and was appointed Secretary of the Treasury by President James Buchanan in 1857. Upon the election of Abraham Lincoln as President of the United States in 1860, Howell Cobb advocated immediate secession.  He was probably best known as one of the founders of the Confederacy being a leader of the secession movement. Delegates of the Southern states declared that they had seceded from the United States and created the Confederate States of America. He was a strong candidate for president of the Confederacy, and was the presiding officer at the Montgomery, Alabama secession convention held on February 4, 1861. He served as President of the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States, and when the war erupted he took to  the field as a soldier, being appointed Colonel of the 16th Georgia Infantry. On February 12, 1862, he was commissioned brigadier general and was assigned command of a brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia. During the months of February through June of 1862, he represented the Confederate authorities in their negotiations with Federal authorities trying to reach an agreement for the exchange of prisoners of war.  General Cobb saw action in the 1862 Virginia Peninsula campaign and in the Seven Days battles.  His brigade played a key role in the fighting during the battle of South Mountain, Maryland, especially at Crampton's Gap. Cobbís brigade arrived at a critical moment and were able to delay the Union armyís advance through the gap which came at a very bloody cost. His men also fought in the single bloodiest day in American military history at the Battle of Sharpsburg, [Antietam] Md., on September 17, 1862. He was promoted to major general on September 9, 1863, and placed in command of the District of Georgia and Florida. He suggested the construction of a prisoner of war camp in southern Georgia, a location thought to be safe from Union invaders, and thus the notorious Andersonville prison, known as the "Hell Hole" was created. When Union General William Tecumseh Sherman's armies entered Georgia during the 1864 Atlanta campaign, and its subsequent March to the Sea, Cobb commanded the Georgia Reserve Corps. General Shermanís army camped one night near Cobb's plantation. When Sherman discovered that the house he planned to stay in for the night belonged to Cobb, whom Sherman described as "one of the leading rebels of the South, then a general in the Southern army," he dined in Cobb's slave quarters, confiscated Cobb's property and burned the plantation, instructing his subordinates to "spare nothing."  In the spring of 1865, with the Confederacy clearly on their last breath, General Howell Cobb and his troops were sent to Columbus to help in the opposition of General James Wilson's raid, and he led the hopeless Confederate resistance in the battle of Columbus, Georgia, on Easter Sunday, April 16, 1865. General Cobb surrendered 4 days later at Macon, Georgia. After the war he returned home and resumed his law practice. Despite pressure from his former constituents and soldiers, he refused to make any public statements about President Andrew Johnsonís Reconstruction policy until he received a full presidential pardon. He received his pardon in early 1868, and then began vigorously opposing the "Reconstruction Acts," and made a series of speeches that bitterly denounced its policies. On October 9, 1868, at the age    of 53, while vacationing in New York City, he died of a heart attack. His body was returned to Athens, Georgia, and was buried in Oconee Hill Cemetery. 


<u>Signature with Place</u>: 3 1/2 x 1 3/4, in ink, "Howell Cobb, Athens, Georgia." Circa 1859-1861. Scattered staining, some age toning, and light wear. Large bold autograph. Very desirable Confederate historical figure.



<u>Cobb Family Trivia</u>: 


The Cobb family included many prominent Georgians from before and after the War Between the States. 


Cobb's uncle and namesake, also Howell Cobb, was a United States Congressman from 1807Ė1812, and served as an officer in the War of 1812.


Cobb's younger brother, Thomas R.R. Cobb, was a politician and soldier. He served as a Confederate General and was killed in the battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia on December 13, 1862.


Thomas Willis Cobb, a member of the United States Congress and namesake of Georgia's Cobb County, was his cousin.


His niece Mildred Lewis, "Miss Millie" Rutherford, was a prominent educator and leader in the United Daughters of the Confederacy. 


Howell Cobb's daughter, Mrs. Alexander S. (Mary Ann Lamar Cobb) Erwin, was responsible for creating the United Daughters of the Confederacy's Southern Cross of Honor in 1899, which was awarded to Confederate Veterans.  


<b>Image Taken in Boston, Massachusetts</b>


Imperial, cabinet card photograph, on thick 6 x 10 card mount, with gold lettering imprint, Elmer Chickering, 21 West St., Boston on the front mount. Very handsome, half view portrait of a Massachusetts Militia officer sporting a thick moustache curled up at the ends. He is wearing a double breasted frock coat, with brass shoulder scales, Massachusetts State Militia uniform buttons, rectangular U.S. Eagle belt plate, with ornate officer's belt, braided, gilded, auguillette adornments, ending in gold metal tagged points. These are worn by officers to distinguish special and senior appointments. His sword hilt is clearly visible at the right side of the view. Backmark: Elmer Chickering, The Leading Photographer, 21 West Street, Boston, Proprietor of The Royal. There is a very small area of minor surface tape lift off at the upper center on the reverse of the card mount that does not really affect it much. Excellent image of this armed, Massachusetts Militia officer. Circa 1880's to 1890's. Very desirable pose!       


<b>Commanded the 2nd Corps, Army of the Potomac at Gettysburg where he was seriously wounded repulsing Pickett's Charge!


Imprint of W.H. Tipton, Gettysburg, Pa.</b>


(1824-1886) Graduated in the West Point class of 1844. He earned a brevet for gallantry in the Mexican War. Played a gallant role in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign, and in the 1862 Maryland campaign which climaxed into the bloody battle of Antietam. He greatly distinguished himself in the battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. During the battle of Gettysburg, Hancock commanded the 2nd Corps, Army of the Potomac. His decisive actions on July 1, 1863 helped to save the strategic Culp's Hill for General Meade's army. On July 3rd, his corps became the focal point for the celebrated Pickett's Charge in which he was seriously wounded, but refused to leave the battlefield until the victory was secured. After his recovery, he went on to fight in the battles of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania and Cold Harbor, Va., and earned the sobriquet "Hancock The Superb." In 1880, he was the Democratic nominee for the Presidency of the United States. He was narrowly defeated by another ex Civil War General, the soon to be assassinated president, James A. Garfield.


Boudoir cabinet card photograph, on thick 5 1/2 x 8 1/2 card mount, with gold lettering on the front of the mount, W.H. Tipton, Gettysburg, Pa. Period ink inscription on the reverse of the card, "1901- Gen. W.S. Hancock." This classic, seated war time view shows Hancock in a Napoleonic style pose with one hand inside of his double breasted frock coat with shoulder straps, with the rank of major general. There is a tiny chip to the card mount at the upper right corner. Only the outer black paper portion of the mount is chipped. The corner itself is still there. Light wear, some scattered foxing and surface blemishes, and age toning. This image was produced by W.H. Tipton, in Gettysburg, circa 1880's. The ID on the reverse refers to the year the owner of the photograph wrote the inscription. Very popular General Hancock image with Gettysburg photographer's imprint. 


William H. Tipton was well known as the "Gettysburg Battlefield Photographer." He produced numerous views of the battlefield, as well as portraits, and is probably the most popular of all the Gettysburg photographers. Tipton served on the Gettysburg town council, and was a member of the Pennsylvania State House of Representatives. He is interred in Evergreen Cemetery in Gettysburg.           

 


<b>Fought as a captain in the War of 1812


United States Congressman and Senator from Kentucky


Governor of Kentucky


Also includes a bonus autograph</b>


(1780-1855) He was born in Fauquier County, Va., and moved with his parents to Fayette County, Ky. where he attended the common schools, and learned the mason's trade. He fought in the second war against England, the War of 1812, and held rank of captain. He was a member of the Kentucky State House of Representatives from 1812-1816. Served as a U.S. Congressman, from 1812-1816, and 1819-1828. He served as the chairman, of the Committee on Indian Affairs, and also served on the Committee on Militia. Metcalfe was Governor of Kentucky, from 1828-1832. Returning to the Kentucky State House, he served as senator, from 1834-1838. Served as U.S. Senator, 1848-1849. After his death in 1855, he was interred in the family burial ground at Forest Retreat, in Nicholas County, Ky.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 6 x 1 3/4, ink, Thomas Metcalfe, Forest Retreat, Ky. Some scattered light staining.


<u>Bonus signature</u>: There is another signature on the reverse of this slip of paper, that of John B. Thompson, a U.S. Congressman and Senator, who also served as the Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky. Born near Harrodsburg, Ky., in 1810, he completed his preparatory studies, studied law, was admitted to the bar, and practiced in Harrodsburg, becoming the Commonwealth's Attorney. He was a Kentucky State Senator, from 1829-1833; a Kentucky State Congressman from 1835-1837; a United States Congressman, from 1840-1843, and 1847-1851. He served as the 15th Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, from 1851-1853; and United States Senator, of the Know-Nothing Party, from 1853-1859. He was the chairman of the U.S. House Committee on the Militia, from 1847-1851. Thompson died in Harrodsburg, and was interred in Spring Hill Cemetery.


<u>Signature With Place</u>: 6 x 1 3/4, ink, J.B. Thompson, Harrodsburg, Ky. Some scattered light staining.

Autograph, General Howell Cobb $65.00

 

Photograph, Armed Massachusetts Militia $75.00

 

Photograph, General Winfield S. Hancock $150.00

 

Autograph, Thomas Metcalfe $25.00




<b>Union commander who defeated General Robert E. Lee at Gettysburg</b>


(1815-1872) He was born in CŠdiz, Spain, to a wealthy merchant and banking family from Philadelphia. He graduated in the West Point class of 1835, and fought with distinction in the Second Seminole War, and the Mexican War where he earned a brevet for gallantry in the battles at Monterey. He served in the United States Army Corps of Topographical Engineers, and led construction of lighthouses in Florida and New Jersey from 1851 to 1856, and the United States Lake Survey from 1857 to 1861. He fought in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign, and in the Seven Days battles in Virginia where he was very severely wounded leading his brigade at Glendale. He recovered in time to fight at 2nd Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. Elevated to the command of the Army of the Potomac on the eve of the Gettysburg campaign, he defeated Confederate General Robert E. Lee, Commander of the famed Army of Northern Virginia, in the epic 3 day battle at Gettysburg, and went on to fight in all of their battles culminating in the surrender of General Lee at Appomattox Court House, Va., on April 9, 1865. He was well known for his notoriously short temper and disdain for the press, and earned the nickname of the "snapping turtle." After the war, he commanded the Military Division of the Atlantic from 1865 to 1866, the Department of the East from 1866 to 1868 and the Military Division of the Atlantic again from 1869 to 1872. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view in uniform with rank of major general. His kepi is just visible at the lower left. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. The corners of the mount are very slightly trimmed. Very minor age toning and wear. Sharp image. Very desirable pose of the victorious Union commander at the battle of Gettysburg!  


<b>Assassin of President Abraham Lincoln</b>


(1838-65) The famous Shakespearean actor who was the son of Junius Brutus Booth, and the brother of Edwin Booth, and was part of the iconic Booth acting family. In 1859, he joined the Virginia militia regiment that assisted in the capture and execution of John Brown at Harpers Ferry. For six months he led a group of conspirators that planned to abduct President Abraham Lincoln and take him to Richmond, but the plot failed when Lincoln failed to show up where Booth and his men lay in wait. On April 14, 1865, he shot President Lincoln who was attending the evening performance of "Our American Cousin," starring Laura Keene, at Ford's Theatre, in Washington, D.C. Lincoln died early the next morning. In the meantime, Booth had escaped by horseback over the Potomac River, and was later caught in a barn near Bowling Green, Va. on April 26th, after a riveting man hunt for the assassin. The barn he was hiding in was set on fire, and Booth was shot to death by Sergeant Boston Corbett through one of the cracks in the structure. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. 2/3 standing view of Booth wearing his heavy overcoat with attached cape and astrakhan collar while his gloved hand is grabbing the lapel of his coat. Period ink inscription on the front, "J. Wilkes Booth." [this is not Booth's autograph]. Very minor age toning and wear. Although this particular card has no backmark, it is an 1862 view which was originally taken by C.D. Fredricks & Co. Sharp image, very desirable pose of the man who killed Lincoln and changed the course of American history! Reference: Gutman #20, from the book, "John Wilkes Booth Himself," by Richard and Kellie Gutman.   

 Well illustrated in 89 page, this reference is titled <I><B>Union & Confederate Civil War Headgear and related militaria</I></B> and features the Kenneth J. Budny collection.   Difficult to find in any condition  today, this original as new reference was published in limited number in 2005 as Vol. I of the MANUAL OF ARMS DISTINCTIVE COLLECTIONS SERIES.  Another offering as we downsize our fifty plus year accumulation of treasures, our photo illustrations will best speak for this appealing patriotically decorated tambourine accept to advise that it measures approximately 9 5/8 inches in diameter and while it offers good evidence of age and originality via appealing period wear and natural age patina, remains in excellent original condition.  A popular musical instrument in the Civil War military camp, this example offers a somewhat worn from use but still very discernable period ink penned eagle decoration.  All set off by brass tacks still holding its natural skin head taught, this neat old tambourine will display exceptionally well in any period musical grouping or simply set in with Civil War personal things.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

CDV, General George G. Meade $250.00

 

CDV, John Wilkes Booth $295.00

 

Union & Confederate Civil War Headgear Ė $35.00

 

UNION FOREVER Ė decorated Civil War vint

Measuring 1 Ĺ inches square, this good sizer private purchase <B>5th Army Corps</B> badge is a step above in size, construction and eye appeal in that it is fashioned from brass with a decoratively hand engraved face set off by nickel plating and fitted with a still intact period classic <I>T-back</I> fastening pin.  A desirable period piece that will set well in any quality Civil War collection.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 


<b>United States Senator from New Jersey</b>


(1800-62) Born in German Valley, Morris County, New Jersey, he studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1823, and practiced in Morristown, N.J. He was elected to the New Jersey State General Assembly in 1832, and served in the State Council from 1838-40. Miller was elected as a Whig to the United States Senate in 1840; was reelected in 1846 and served from 1841-53. Served as the  Chairman, of the Committee on the District of Columbia. He died in Morristown, N.J., on September 30, 1862, and was buried in the St. Peter's Parish Churchyard.


<u>Signature With State</u>: 6 x 1 1/2, in ink, J.W. Miller, with New Jersey written above his signature.  H 24in. x D 18in.  H 35in. x D 11in.


Original stencilled design

Original! Civil War 5th Corps badge $250.00

 

Autograph, Jacob W. Miller $15.00

 

Ceiling pendant ca. 1920 $850.00

 

Old Deco hanging light ca. 1930 $1400.00

H 8in. x D 12in.  H 12in. x W 18in. x D 12in.


2 pair available in original finish and rewired.


Priced and sold per pair  H 26in. x D 18in.  Best described here by our photo illustrations, this 2 3/8 x 4 inch card remains in excellent original condition with no bends, stains, or creases and while not a big deal, is worthy of interest as it touts <B><I>B. M. Newcombís ASSAY OFFICE Ė Breckenridge, Colorado</B></I> offering gold and silver specimen assay prices as well as mine examination.    A New Englander by birth. though  Bethuel Merritt Newcomb lost his father at but four years of age accredited and teaching winter term in coastal New Gloucester, Maine at age nineteen.  Though he would later have management positions in local

grocer, coal and grain dealer business, early in 1878 the ambitious Newcomb removed to Colorado, took a course in assaying and opened a public assay office. He later became a moving force in Colorado mining as he held superintendent of operation and development positions in mining operations near Rosita, Silver Cliff and Breckenridge, Colorado.  In 1884 Newcomb was operating a mine in Sonora, Mexico. and in 1887 was proprietor of B. & M. Newcombís Assay office.  A lot to say about the advertising card of a New Englander come Colorado gold and silver mine operator.    <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Flush ceiling fixture ca. 1920 $1200.00

 

Arts & Crafts lights signed Bradley& Hu $4800.00

 

Neo-Classic pendant light $3800.00

 

late 19th century Ė Colorado - Gold & S $45.00

This attractive California gold rush dated <I>counter token</I> will best be described as to condition by our photo illustrations (we have included a quarter for size comparison) except to advise that it is untouched with minimal wear with a natural age patina and is attractive as it looks.  With a Liberty head, 13 stars and 1849 date on the obverse this counter or gaming token offers the figure of a kneeling prospector with sack, pick, shovel and <I>CALIFORNIA</I> with the date 1849 on the reverse all with a crisp <I>reed</I> edge.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  This original Gold Rush sheet music is titled <I><B> The California Gold Diggers</I></B> and is copyrighted by S. W. Marsh & Co in 1849 with words and music by Jesse Hutchinson Jr. & Nathan Barker.  A classic of the <I>49ers</I> American Gold Rush this  piece remains in pleasing condition as is best described here by our illustrations and is complete in three untrimmed 13 1/2 x 10 1/2   inch sheets each demonstrating good evidence of age and originality but without tears or repairs.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Captured by a process dating in the 1880s, this silver gelatin photograph a British Columbia gold miner pours water in his sluice box, pick and shovel at hand.  Best described here as to condition buy our illustration, this large format 7 x 9 inch silver gelatin photograph is on a 10 x 12 inch board mount with a summary of washing gold in Vancouver, British Columbia on the back.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Illustrated here with a US quarter for size comparison, these Civil War era surgical forceps, while much the same in design as modern examples, are fashioned of unplaited iron as opposed to the plaited variety of the later 1800s or even more modern <I>surgical steel</I> instruments used by todays surgeons.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

nice original - 1849 California Gold Min $165.00

 

Original! 1849 Gold Rush Ė ĎTHE CALIFORN $145.00

 

Washing Gold - Vancouver, British Columb $65.00

 

19th century iron Bullet Forceps $65.00

Published in 1867 just a year following the Civil War, this scarce complete and original 450 page 9X 11 volume is titled <B>Memories of Rhode Island Officers</B> and offers the researcher / collector a valuable record of the Civil War service of Rhode Island officers from high ranking generals such as Gen. Ambrose Burnside to colonels and down through the lieutenant grades to include 34 engraved portraits all on heavy rag paper stock.  Archivally stitch rebound in leather and deacidified by a professional conservator, save the title and preface pages which are solid but fragmented at the edges, (see photos) all remains in excellent and complete with no condition issues.  An indispensable volume for the Rhode Island Civil War collector or a researcher.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  


<b>United States Congressman from Kentucky</b>


(1800-1875) Born in Louisville, Ky., he was known by his middle name of "Garnett" Duncan. He graduated from Yale College in 1821, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1822, and commenced practice in Louisville. He served as a U.S. Congressman, from 1847-1849, and was a member of the Committee on Naval Affairs, and supported an act to extend time limitations on satisfying claims made during the War of 1812 involving bounty lands for military services. He moved to Louisiana and settled in New Orleans in 1850, where he continued his law practice. He later moved back to Louisville, where he lived until his death, on May 25, 1875, and was interred in Cave Hill Cemetery, Louisville.


4 1/4 x 1 1/2, in ink, Garnett Duncan of Kentucky.


   


<b>United States Congressman from Pennsylvania</b>


(1798-1850) Born in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, he attended Wilkes-Barre Academy, and later graduated from Princeton College in 1817. He studied law at Litchfield Law School, and was admitted to the bar in 1820. Butler was a member of the Pennsylvania State House of Representatives in 1832, 1838, 1839, and 1843. He served as a U.S. Congressman, from 1847-50, and died on October 5, 1850, at Philadelphia, while still a member of congress, and he was buried in Wilkes-Barre, Pa.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 1/4 x 1/2, in ink, Chester Butler.    


<b>United States Senator from New Jersey


The first Republican ever nominated as the Vice Presidential Candidate of the United States!


Attorney General of New Jersey


Appointed by President Lincoln as U.S. Minister to France during the Civil War</b>


(1807-1864) Born in Basking Ridge, New Jersey. He graduated from the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) in 1825, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1830, and became an attorney in Freehold. In 1838, he was appointed an associate judge of the New Jersey Supreme Court. Served as a Whig U.S. Senator, from 1842-1851. Dayton was selected by the newly formed Republican Party as their first nominee for Vice President of the United States over Abraham Lincoln at the Philadelphia Convention. He and his running mate, John C. Fremont, lost to the Democratic ticket of James Buchanan and John C. Breckenridge. He then served as New Jersey Attorney General from 1857-1861, when President Lincoln appointed him to the important position of Minister to France. He served from May 1861 until his death in December 1864. While serving in France, Dayton was the leader of a successful team that prevented the French government of Napoleon III from recognizing the independence of the Confederate States of America, or allowing the Confederacy to use any French ports. He died in 1864, while at his post in Paris, and was buried in Riverview Cemetery, Trenton, New Jersey.


<u>Signature</u>: 5 1/2 x 1, in ink, Wm. L. Dayton. Very nice, large bold autograph. Desirable American politician.

Civil War - Memories of Rhode Island Off $135.00

 

Autograph, W. Garnett Duncan

 

Autograph, Chester Butler

 

Autograph, William L. Dayton $35.00

      This earlier to mid-1800ís bottle stands approximately 7 3/4 inches high and remains in excellent shape with no chips, cracks or other condition issues.  A nice example of a period bottle with applied top and nice <I>bubbly</I> aqua colored glass. One of a very small number acquired years ago when such treasures popped up from time to time, the face of this attractive pharmaceutical bottle sports the period label of <B>G. W.   AIMAR</B>/<B>CHARLESTOWN, S. C.</B> identifying the bottleís content as ĎOXALIC ACIDí.  Used in solution for cauterization to stop bleeding, this strong oxidant had many applications applicable to the Civil War era hospital ward to include a 6% solution in sugar syrup as an insecticide.  Of special note is the fact that  during the Civil War<U> George W. Aimarís apothecary housed the <B>Confederate dispensary</B> in Charleston and on the second floor, provided space for a hospital.</U> Like so many others of all walks of life, Druggist G. W. Aimar stepped forward in a military way serving as senior 2nd Lieutenant, Kanapaux's Battery, Lafayette's Artillery, South Carolina Volunteers.  A really nice Medical / Apothecary item with Confederate association.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>



 A classic design of the earlier 1800s with popular use through the Civil War era, this pot is maker marked <B> R. DUNHAM</B who operated in Maine between 1820 and 1830.  Standing approximately 9 1/4 inches, this classic early to mid-19th century pot remains in desirable <I>as found</I> condition after decades of attic storage, un cleaned and un polished with a natural age patina, good evidence of age and period use with no condition issues. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 H 24in. x D 16in.  H 32in. x D 14in.

EXTRA LARGE PERIOD GLASS

Confederate Hospital & Dispensary site - $225.00

 

c. 1820 / 1830 Pewter Coffee Pot $135.00

 

DECO LIGHT FIXTURE 1930 $2800.00

 

MILK GLASS PENDANT LIGHTS. . . OLD GLASS $2400.00

H 44in. x D 10in.  H 11in. x W 8in. x D 8in.


SOLD AS A PAIR  H 22in. x D 16in.  H 28in. x D 20in.

VINTAGE PENDANT LIGHT $1500.00

 

ELECTRIFIED GAS STYLE LIGHTS. . . OLD GLASS $1400.00

 

VINTAGE LIGHT FIXTURE . . ORIGINAL GLASS $750.00

 

VINTAGE LIGHT FIXTURE WITH ORIGINAL GLAS $750.00

H30in. x D20in.  Best described here by our photo illustrations, this circa 1700s / 1800s ball mold  (see: <I>Excavated Artifacts from Battlefields & Campsites of the Civil War</I> by Phillips & <I>COLLECTOR'S ILLUSTRATED ENCYCLOPEDIA of the AMERICAN REVOLUTION</I> by Newmann & Kravic ) measures approximately 4 3/8 inches in length and remains in pleasing condition with an attractive natural age patina.  The mold is size marked with the number <I>160</I> referring to the period gauge or caliber reference of 160 balls per pound.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Not a big deal but still a neat companion to lay with an early black iron fire striker or to include in any colonial tinder box fire starter kit, we have a selection of native obsidian fragments gathered here in Washington state.  Priced here by the piece for those who would appreciate an example, let us know if you want a piece appropriate for a tinder box or one of the heavier pieces for a striker and we will select what will go best.    Commonly utilized by Native Americans of the great north west, collectors of American Indian material will be familiar with the use of obsidian in the making of arrowheads, hide scrapers and cutting tools.

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 Another offering from the downsizing of our 50 + year accumulation from seeking out such treasures, (see: a small representation of our personal accumulation at Ė MaineLegacy.com ) this friendly old gator measures just over 4 feet in total length and remains in solid condition with good evidence of age.  Off white patches on the head appear to be old milk paint, could be removed but as they are period and part of the relicís history we would leave all as is.  Acquired some years ago from a family cleanout which included long time attic stored remnants from the defunct <I> S. K. Oakes G A R Post #121</I> in Oldtown, Maine.    The alligator is period marked <I><B>Bedell Plantation Ė Franklin Parish - 1863 </I></B>.  This Civil War relic is linked by association (attic family lineage)  to one <U> Justin R. Atkins </U> who our research found had served as Pvt. Co. A <B> 22nd Maine Infantry</B> 10/10/1862 Ė 8/14/1863 and lived in Old Town, Maine until his passing in 1921.  Further that the 22nd Maine served in the area of the <U>Jotham Hulbert Bedell</U> (1807Ė1859) home in - Franklin Parish during their nine month tenure in the military.  (Bedell owned and operated a sugar plantation and a sugar mill on the property which was subsequently acquired by  Alice and John Calder and in later times became known as the Alice C. Plantation.)  As the alligator had been grouped in storage with things from the Oldtown Post we can reasonably deduct that like so many Vets Justin Atkins had placed his Civil War <I>trophy</I> on loan to his home G.A.R. Post, in this instance the S. K. Oakes Post #121.  The gator will come with our letter preserving the above lineage. 

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

4 ARM PAN LIGHT $550.00

 

early . 30 / . 32 caliber ball Ė Bullet Mo $50.00

 

American North West - Volcanic Obsidian $22.00

 

Civil War relic alligator Ė Franklin Par $495.00




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