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A classic Civil War personal arm with all matching numbers, this Colt Pocket Model ( serial # 187866) was manufactured in 1861 and remains in pleasing unmolested condition functionally and with  traces of original finish just as it was set aside decades ago.   Best described here by our photo illustrations, this attractive Colt Pocket came to us decades ago when it emanated from <I>hand me down</I> family keepsakes with only a <U>Westminster, Mass.</U> attribution and the applied <B>A. E. DRURY</B> on the bottom flat of the barrel under the loading lever as clues to its long lost history.  We found that Abner E. Drury was a 30 year old resident carpenter of Westminster, Massachusetts when he was mustered in on November 26,1861 as a Corporal of Co. A <B>32nd Mass. Voluntary Infantry</B>.   Reenlisting on January 1, 1864, Drury would be promoted to 1st Sergeant, commissioned 2nd Lieut. on July 20,1864 and finally to 1st Lieut. on April 1865 before mustering out in Washington D.C. on June 29, 1865.  A hard fought regiment, the 32nd Mass. saw considerable action during Drury’s service to include Antietam, Appomattox Court House, Cedar Creek, Chancellorsville, Cold Harbor, Five Forks, Fredericksburg and <B>Gettysburg</B> where the 32d engaged with <U>227 men losing 81, of whom 22 were killed or mortally wounded.</U>   Also included were actions at Jerusalem Plank Road, Mine Run, 2nd Petersburg and the Battle of the Wilderness.   Abner Drury returned to Westminster  after the War where he served as Commander of the Joseph P. Rice G. A. R. Post 69, Dept. of Massachusetts.   With copies of a number of Drury’s period records available on the internet (see: fold3.com) and his image available on the Library of Congress site, this remnant of our years of collecting (see: MaineLegacy.com) dealing and <I>squirreling</I> away will be of special interest to the Gettysburg enthusiast!

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 A bit of a variation in design, this nice <U>Civil War vintage</U> tinned sheet iron mess cup stands 4 11/16  X  4 ½ inches in diameter and will appeal to the <I>deep-dish</I> period tin enthusiast as it features a <U>non-typical recessed base</U>.  Clearly not of the usual design that is seen in later construction, but the skilled application of an earlier design, this period variant is entirely hand crafted with led soldered seems and will add a rare period variation of the more common Civil War era soldier’s mess cup.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 This attractive little Civil War vintage amber apothecary bottle stands approximately 3 ½  inches and remains in fine condition with its original seal and bears the spirits of camphor label of the early Hannibal Missouri <I>BROWN’S DRUG STORE</I>.  (see: Missouri Historical Society collection : 1858-1860 prescription book) A common cure of the period Camphor Spirit was used topically, orally and even vaporized to treat a variety of common physical maladies. (Note: J.B. Brown operated one of Hannibal’s earliest drug stores originally purchased with money brought back from his participation in the California Gold Rush.)  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 This single stirrup remains in original as found condition and is marked <B>B. M. Co. U. S. </B>  Not a big deal but worthy of an appreciative home.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

32nd Mass. Vols. attributed - Colt Pocke

 

especially nice! Civil War era CUP $135.00

 

Civil War era Hannibal Missouri – APOTHE $55.00

 

U. S. marked MILITARY STIRRUP $35.00

A medical / surgical relic from a time when chloroform was administered by hand utilizing a specially designed <I>dripper</I> bottle and a cloth over the nose and mouth.  (In a search of our personal collection / museum site at MaineLegacy.com you will find an account of how Gettysburg Artillerist, Col. Freeman McGilvery was killed by an overdose of chloroform during simple surgery for a wound of the thumb.)  This little dripper stands approximately 4 ¼ inches including the stopper.   Remaining in pleasing condition with no chips or cracks, this seldom seen dripper will make a nice addition to any quality medical / surgical grouping.


<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 Best described here by our photo illustrations, this <B> US PENNA</B> marked Civil War blanket measures 63 X 82 inches and remains in excellent entirely original condition with all the period military issue features knowledgeable collector / historians look for.  Quickly period identifiable, this single panel (no center seam) Kersey weave wool blanket is appropriately hand bound at the fore and aft edges with hand stitched <B>US</B> nomenclature and the Civil War era classic five letter <B>PENNA</B> abbreviation for the state of Pennsylvania.  We’d consider this blanket a <I>rarity of the rare</I> among authentic Civil War military blankets as we have not encountered another so marked example in our fifty plus years of seeking out such things.  Certainly worthy of some additional research as to the likelihood of specific regiment issue, the blanket retains the remains of an unfortunately long since removed stitched on identification.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 


<b>Photo taken in Arlington, Virginia, 1862</b>


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/4 x 4 1/8 card. Excellent view of an octagon house in Arlington, Va., that was used as the headquarters of General Irvin McDowell in the early summer of 1862. Three Union soldiers can be seen standing on the front porch. A ladder can be seen leaning against the cupola at the top of the house which was used as an observation post. Card is trimmed. No back mark, but this is most likely a Mathew Brady view. Sharp image. This view is published in The Image of War; The Guns of '62. Scarce.  


<b>In December 1855, he was severely wounded in a skirmish with Seminole Indians near Fort Drane, Florida, a wound that would  eventually cause his death!</b> 


<b>Severely wounded at the battle of Antietam, Maryland, in September 1862</b>


<b>From the personal collection of Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin. Irwin has the distinct honor of being the first recipient of the Medal of Honor in U.S. military history by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


(1830-74) Born at Tyre, New York, he graduated in the West Point class of 1852, and was assigned to the 4th U.S. Artillery. He served with them first in Texas, and later against the Florida Seminoles, when he was severely wounded in a skirmish near Fort Drane, Florida, in December 1855. This wound eventually caused his death. On the fateful day of September 8, 1860, Hartsuff was extremely lucky when he survived the wreck of the steamer, "Lady Elgin," on Lake Michigan. In 1861, he went with the expedition that secretly re-enforced Fort Pickens, Florida. During the fall and winter of 1861-62, he was chief of staff to General William S. Rosecrans in West Virginia, and on April 15, 1862, was appointed brigadier general. He fought gallantly at the 2nd Battle of Bull Run, and was severely wounded at the battle of Antietam. He was promoted to the rank of major general, November 19, 1862, and was appointed to the commanded of the 23rd Corps, until being incapacitated again by his wounds. In March 1865, he took command of the Bermuda Hundred, Va. front, during the siege of Petersburg. Located between the James and Appomattox rivers, the fall of Petersburg, Va., would signal the fall of Richmond, and ultimately the surrender of the Confederacy. After the evacuation of the Confederates, he commanded the District of Nottaway, with his headquarters in Petersburg. Hartsuff was mustered out of the U.S. Volunteer Service, on August 24, 1865. He then served in the Regular U.S. Army, with rank of lieutenant colonel. George Lucas Hartsuff resigned from the Regular Army on June 29, 1871, because of disability caused by his old war wounds. He retired with the rank of major general, and died on May 16, 1874, in New York. He is buried in the West Point Cemetery, at the United States Military Academy.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 7/8 card. Mount is slightly trimmed. Excellent quality, standing view in uniform, with rank of major general, and holding his hat. Back mark: E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Written in period ink on the front of the card mount is, Maj. Genl. G.H. Hartsuff, U.S.A. Written in period ink in Irwin's hand on the reverse is, Maj. Genl. Geo. Hartsuff, U.S.A. Died, 1874. Genl. B.J.D. Irwin album, No. 92 is written in another hand in pencil at the bottom. Very sharp image. Rare with this provenance literally making this image "one of a kind." 


<h2><b>History of United States Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin</h2></b>


<b>Surgeon & General Irwin was the first United States Medal of Honor Recipient by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


(1830-1917) Born in County Roscommon, Ireland, he immigrated with his parents to the United States in the 1840s. He attended New York University from 1848 to 1849, and then served as a private in the New York Militia. In 1850, he entered Castleton Medical College, and he later transferred to New York Medical College, where he graduated in 1852.


He served as a surgeon and physician at the State Emigrant Hospital on Ward's Island, NYC, until his appointment as assistant surgeon in the U.S. Army in 1856. He was an assistant army surgeon during the Apache Wars, and was the first Medal of Honor recipient chronologically by date of action. His actions on February 13, 1861, at Apache Pass, Arizona, are the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded! The citation on his medal of honor reads; "Voluntarily took command of troops and attacked and defeated hostile Indians he met on the way. Surgeon Irwin volunteered to go to the rescue of 2d Lt. George N. Bascom, 7th U.S. Infantry, who, with 60 men, was trapped by Chiricahua Apaches under Cochise. Irwin and 14 men, not having horses, began the 100-mile march riding mules. After fighting and capturing Indians, recovering stolen horses and cattle, he reached Bascom's column and helped break his siege."


Cochise, the Apache Indian chief, and a group of Apache warriors were accused of kidnapping a boy and a small group of U.S. soldiers in the Arizona Territory after the Army had captured Cochise's brother and nephews. When the Army refused to make a prisoner exchange, Cochise killed his prisoners. Soldiers then killed Cochise's brother and nephews. 2nd Lieutenant George Nicholas Bascom led a group of 60 men from the 7th U.S. Infantry after Cochise but was soon besieged, prompting a rescue mission by the army. In response to the siege of Bascom and his men, Irwin set out on a rescue mission with 14 men of the 1st U.S. Dragoons. He was able to catch up with the Apaches at Apache Pass in present day Arizona. He strategically placed his small unit around Cochise and his men, tricking the Apache leader into thinking that he had a much larger army with him. The Apaches fled and Bascom and his men were saved. Bascom and his men joined Irwin and together they were able to track Cochise into the mountains & rescued the young boy that Cochise had captured.


The Medal of Honor did not exist during the time of the "Bascom Incident," and would not be established until a year later in 1862. However, the actions of Irwin were well remembered, and he was awarded the Medal of Honor just prior to his retirement. Irwin's actions were the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded, predating the outbreak of the American Civil War.


Irwin subsequently served with the Union army during the Civil War, and was promoted to captain in August 1861, and the next year was appointed medical director under Major General William "Bull" Nelson. He improvised one of the first field hospitals used by the U.S. Army at the Battle of Shiloh, on April 7, 1862. He was captured during the Battle of Richmond, Ky., while attempting to save the wounded General Nelson. He was promoted to major in September 1862, and after his release from a Rebel prison he became medical director in the Army of the Southwest. From 1863 to 1865, he was superintendent of the military hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, and in March of 1865, he was brevetted to the rank of colonel. He was a companion of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and the Order of the Indian Wars of the United States. After the Civil War, Irwin served as a senior medical officer at several U.S. army posts, including West Point from 1873 to 1878. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1885, to colonel in August 1890, and to brigadier general in April 1904. He died in Ontario, Canada, on December 15, 1917, and is buried in the West Point Cemetery, at the U.S. Military Academy, New York.


His son George LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1889, and served in World War I, becoming a Major General in the U.S. Army.


His grandson Stafford LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1915, and served in World War II, and became a Lieutenant General in the U.S. Army.


His daughter, Amy Irwin Addams McCormick, was a nurse with the American Red Cross and served during World War I.


General Irwin was an admirer and collector of photographs, and he put together a very large, and superb collection of Union and Confederate images. Interestingly, he collected photographs of both Rebel and Yankee alike. I have owned several famous military photograph albums before and never came across one that collected images from both sides of the rebellion. He numbered each individual image, and wrote a brief historical notation on each one. The collection was split up by another dealer, and by the time I found out about it, I was still very fortunate to be able to acquire about one third of his superb Civil War image collection. Each image is rare because it is "one of a kind" having come from the Irwin collection!


The image of B.J.D. Irwin pictured here is a copy photograph from the "Find a Grave" website and is used here for illustration purposes only.

19th century amber Chloroform Dripper $75.00

 

exceptional ! Pennsylvania issue - Ci

 

CDV, Headquarters of General Irvin McDow $100.00

 

CDV, General George L. Hartsuff $200.00




<b>"you have heard all the news about the battle at Winchester. The Rebels lost killed, wounded & prisoner about twelve hundred, & we followed them about thirty miles, all along the road where they left their dead & wounded, nearly every horse was killed with the wounded."</b> 


3 pages, 5 x 7 1/2, in ink, written by John A. Yeckley, Company E, 28th New York Infantry, to his brother.


<u>Camp Near Edinburg, Va., March 8th/62</u>


Dear brother,


I received your letter last night & was glad to hear from you for I had not heard from you in some time. We have not had any pay in nearly four months & money is rather scarce with us. What I had I let to the boys. We are having pretty fair times just now, rather short rations sometimes, but we are bound not to go hungry so long as there is a porker to squeal & a cock to crow. We don't show much mercy to the Secesh. I suppose that you have heard all the news about the battle at Winchester. The Rebels lost killed, wounded & prisoner about twelve hundred & we followed them about thirty miles, all along the road where they left their dead & wounded, nearly every horse was killed with the wounded. They burned all the bridges where they had a chance which hindered us considerably & I think it is the only thing that saved their bacon. I was detailed to work on the bridge over Stony Creek at Edenburg & the Rebels thought they would stop us & they sent some of them around us, but no one was hurt. One ball upset my coffee while I was eating dinner. That is the closest they have come to me. I suppose that we will move again as soon as everything is in order. We received a dispatch at headquarters this morning from Secretary Stanton that Island No. 10 is taken with two thousand prisoners & all their munitions of war, that Gen. Grant has met Beauregard near Corinth & completely routed him. If it is a true report the Rebellion will soon be wiped out. We expect now that we will get home by the fourth of July. We are all well & enjoying ourselves very well. Paper & stamps are rather a scarce article with the soldiers & they are more so with the citizens. Salt is worth twenty dollars per bushel & is not to be had, potatoes, coffee & writing paper in the same proportions. Write as often as you can conveniently for I am always glad to hear from home.


John A. Yeckley


Some light scattered age toning and staining. Bold and neatly written. Very fine.


John A. Leckley, was 24 years old when he enlisted in the Union army as a private, at Canadaigua, New  York, on May 14, 1861, and was mustered into Company E, 28th New York Infantry, on May22nd. He was mustered out of the service on June 2, 1863, at Albany, New York, when the regiment's term of service expired.


<u>Edinburg, Virginia</u>: Located in Shenandoah County, in the lower Shenandoah Valley, (the Shenandoah Valley ran opposite from normal directional description: it went from upper at the south, near Lexington, to lower at the north near Winchester). This small town was incorporated in 1852. During the War Between the States troops from both armies served and skirmished in this vicinity. The important Edinburg Mill, founded in 1848, was located here.        


<b>Wounded at Fort Donelson, Tennessee, and in the Atlanta, Georgia campaign!


General Logan was instrumental in founding Memorial Day to honor our war veterans!


United States Senator and Congressman from Illinois


From the personal collection of Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin. Irwin has the distinct honor of being the first recipient of the Medal of Honor in U.S. military history by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>




(1826-86) Nicknamed "Black Jack," he served in the Mexican War as a lieutenant of Illinois Volunteers; and was perhaps the Union's premier civilian general during the Civil War. Elected to the U.S. Senate in 1858 and 1860, he attended the Democratic National Convention in Charleston, S.C., as a supporter of Senator Stephen A. Douglas. After fighting at the battle of 1st Bull Run, Va., he returned to Illinois to recruit the 31st Illinois Infantry and he was commissioned as their colonel. An instant success as a field commander, he saw action at Belmont, and Fort Donelson where he was wounded. Promoted to rank of brigadier general, March 21, 1862, and major general March 13, 1863, he fought at Corinth, Shiloh, Vicksburg, in the Atlanta campaign where he was wounded again, and in the 1865 Carolina's campaign. After the war he returned to politics and served as U.S. Congressman and Senator from Illinois almost uninterruptedly until his death. He was greatly involved in veteran's affairs and was instrumental in founding Memorial Day.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 7/8 card. The mount has been slightly trimmed. 2/3 seated pose of Logan wearing a double breasted frock coat with rank of major general. Written in period ink on the front of the card mount is, Maj. Genl. John A. Logan, U.S.A. Written in period ink in Irwin's hand on the reverse is, Maj. Genl. Jno. A. Logan, U.S.A. Comdg. 15th Corps d'Arme. Died, 1887. Genl. B.J.D. Irwin album, No. 68 is written in another hand in pencil at the bottom. Sharp image. Rare with this provenance literally making this image "one of a kind." 


<h2><b><u>History of United States Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin</h2></b></u>


<b>Surgeon & General Irwin was the first United States Medal of Honor Recipient by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


(1830-1917) Born in County Roscommon, Ireland, he immigrated with his parents to the United States in the 1840s. He attended New York University from 1848 to 1849, and then served as a private in the New York Militia. In 1850, he entered Castleton Medical College, and he later transferred to New York Medical College, where he graduated in 1852.


He served as a surgeon and physician at the State Emigrant Hospital on Ward's Island, NYC, until his appointment as assistant surgeon in the U.S. Army in 1856. He was an assistant army surgeon during the Apache Wars, and was the first Medal of Honor recipient chronologically by date of action. His actions on February 13, 1861, at Apache Pass, Arizona, are the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded! The citation on his medal of honor reads; "Voluntarily took command of troops and attacked and defeated hostile Indians he met on the way. Surgeon Irwin volunteered to go to the rescue of 2d Lt. George N. Bascom, 7th U.S. Infantry, who, with 60 men, was trapped by Chiricahua Apaches under Cochise. Irwin and 14 men, not having horses, began the 100-mile march riding mules. After fighting and capturing Indians, recovering stolen horses and cattle, he reached Bascom's column and helped break his siege."


Cochise, the Apache Indian chief, and a group of Apache warriors were accused of kidnapping a boy and a small group of U.S. soldiers in the Arizona Territory after the Army had captured Cochise's brother and nephews. When the Army refused to make a prisoner exchange, Cochise killed his prisoners. Soldiers then killed Cochise's brother and nephews. 2nd Lieutenant George Nicholas Bascom led a group of 60 men from the 7th U.S. Infantry after Cochise but was soon besieged, prompting a rescue mission by the army. In response to the siege of Bascom and his men, Irwin set out on a rescue mission with 14 men of the 1st U.S. Dragoons. He was able to catch up with the Apaches at Apache Pass in present day Arizona. He strategically placed his small unit around Cochise and his men, tricking the Apache leader into thinking that he had a much larger army with him. The Apaches fled and Bascom and his men were saved. Bascom and his men joined Irwin and together they were able to track Cochise into the mountains & rescued the young boy that Cochise had captured.


The Medal of Honor did not exist during the time of the "Bascom Incident," and would not be established until a year later in 1862. However, the actions of Irwin were well remembered, and he was awarded the Medal of Honor just prior to his retirement. Irwin's actions were the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded, predating the outbreak of the American Civil War.


Irwin subsequently served with the Union army during the Civil War, and was promoted to captain in August 1861, and the next year was appointed medical director under Major General William "Bull" Nelson. He improvised one of the first field hospitals used by the U.S. Army at the Battle of Shiloh, on April 7, 1862. He was captured during the Battle of Richmond, Ky., while attempting to save the wounded General Nelson. He was promoted to major in September 1862, and after his release from a Rebel prison he became medical director in the Army of the Southwest. From 1863 to 1865, he was superintendent of the military hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, and in March of 1865, he was brevetted to the rank of colonel. He was a companion of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and the Order of the Indian Wars of the United States. After the Civil War, Irwin served as a senior medical officer at several U.S. army posts, including West Point from 1873 to 1878. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1885, to colonel in August 1890, and to brigadier general in April 1904. He died in Ontario, Canada, on December 15, 1917, and is buried in the West Point Cemetery, at the U.S. Military Academy, New York.


His son George LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1889, and served in World War I, becoming a Major General in the U.S. Army.


His grandson Stafford LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1915, and served in World War II, and became a Lieutenant General in the U.S. Army.


His daughter, Amy Irwin Addams McCormick, was a nurse with the American Red Cross and served during World War I.


General Irwin was an admirer and collector of photographs, and he put together a very large, and superb collection of Union and Confederate images. Interestingly, he collected photographs of both Rebel and Yankee alike. I have owned several famous military photograph albums before and never came across one that collected images from both sides of the rebellion. He numbered each individual image, and wrote a brief historical notation on each one. The collection was split up by another dealer, and by the time I found out about it, I was still very fortunate to be able to acquire about one third of his superb Civil War image collection. Each image is rare because it is "one of a kind" having come from the Irwin collection!


The image of B.J.D. Irwin pictured here is a copy photograph from the "Find a Grave" website and is used here for illustration purposes only.  A nice pair of period of the pattern of 1872 U. S. Cavalry Sgt. stripes.  All original and in ‘minty’ condition after decades of storage, this pair should not be confused with the later issue and outright reproductions that are more frequently seen.  With their sturdy yellow wool and higher quality chain stitch trim, these original issue cavalry stripes will add quality and color to any Indian Wars era or U.S. insignia grouping. A relatively common item only a few years ago, real examples are now difficult to find.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Another offering from our cleanout of decades of seeking out, selling and setting aside, we acquired this attractive pair of buckskin gauntlets years ago when we were fortunate enough to buy the attic content of an early Portland Maine Masonic Lodge.  As was typical of Civil War reconstruction period lodge hall storage, there was a plethora of military surplus equipage representing post war Bannerman, Schuyler, Hartley, & Graham and the like  Civil War surplus acquisition and resale.   Remaining in excellent condition while offering good evidence of age and originality, this attractive pair of gauntlets will make will display well as a complement to any Civil War grouping and will hold special interest for the commissioned officer or cavalry enthusiast. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

28th New York Infantry Letter $185.00

 

CDV, General John A. Logan

 

1872 Pattern Cavalry SERGEANT CHEVRONS $165.00

 

original Civil War era - BUCKSKIN GAUNTL

For the collector who <I>’thinks’</I> they have everything, this antique    ring has an outside diameter of 3 3/8 inches and was fashioned in two pieces fitting together and held by counter sunk screws to form a stout bronze ring.  When clipped to a strong wood shaft a nose ring became a mainstay of handler protection and control a rambunctious bull. This antique example remains untouched and in good honest condition with that natural age patina that comes to bronze with the decades.   Will make a  truly eclectic conversation piece. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

4444


 Backmarked by Civil War photographer D. K. Brownell of Scranton, Pennsylvania, this well got up, armed, Highlander  offers a fine representation of the presents of Scottish militia as the  Union Army possessed several predominantly Scottish regiments between 1861 and 1865.  Mostly based on pre-war militia units as approximately 600,000 Scots migrated to the United States between 1851 and 1861, many continued to represent their ethnic heritage and rich military tradition wearing full Highland uniforms. 

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 The canteen was likely the most varied personal <I>utility</I> of the common Civil War troop with the exception of headgear style and this offering is a prime example of one of the more rarely encountered canteen variations.  Frequently overlooked by collectors as post-Civil War  in that it features the then relatively new application of a screw on cap. (see: Sylvia & O’Donnell <I>Civil War Canteens</I> 2nd Vol. p. 72)  

      Featuring an unmarked early production  Pat. Oct. 27,1857 tin screw cap and measuring 4 ½ inches in diameter X 2 ½ inches thick, this little private purchase canteen offers all the construction features of the period and is remarkably similar, to include the screw cap, to an identified Confederate example that we passed along some time back. (see illustration) 

      Note: Of interest to the general <I>’antiquer’</I> will be that the Oct. 27, 1857 cap was issued to the Consolidated Fruit Jar Co. with the patented <I>screw on </I>design ultimately utilized on the Pat. 1858 Mason Fruit Jar.  Consolidated utilized their patent in the manufacture of tinned sheet iron screw on caps marketing them to tinsmiths who used the caps in the making of all manner of tinned sheet iron liquid containers.    Dating of their caps is aided by their markings with early examples being unmarked or marked with the 1857 patent date as pictured in our reference and  later examples being marked with the 1857 date and the 1878 extension.  

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 


<b>Killed at Pine Mountain, Ga. in June 1864


From the personal collection of Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin. Irwin has the distinct honor of being the first recipient of the Medal of Honor in U.S. military history by date of action, February 13, 1861</b> 


(1806-64) Born in Raleigh, North Carolina, he was known as the "Bishop Militant." Polk graduated in the West Point class of 1827 with an impressive academic record, excelling in rhetoric and moral philosophy. He graduated eighth of 38 cadets, and was appointed a brevet second lieutenant in the artillery. He resigned from the U.S. Army in December 1827, and entered the Episcopal ministry, and later became Missionary Bishop of the Southwest. Polk was the leading founder of the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee, which he envisioned as a national university for the Southern United States. Exchanging his clerical vestments for an army uniform upon the outbreak of the War Between the States, he was appointed major general in the Confederate Army on June 25, 1861, and lieutenant general October 10, 1862. In the early months of the war he commanded the vast territory of Department No. 2, including the Mississippi River defenses from the Red River to Paducah, Kentucky. He also organized the Army of Mississippi. He subsequently served as a corps commander at the Battles of Shiloh, Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, and in the opening operations of the Atlanta campaign. While examining the Federal position in company with Generals' Joseph E. Johnston and William J. Hardee, Polk was instantly killed by a cannon shot at Pine Mountain, Ga., on June 14, 1864. This artillery fire was initiated when General William T. Sherman spotted a cluster of Confederate generals in an exposed area.  Sherman pointed them out to General Oliver O. Howard, commander of the 4th Corps, in Sherman's army, and ordered him to fire upon them, which a battery of the 1st Ohio Light Artillery, commanded by Captain Hubert Dilger, did within minutes. The third shell they fired struck General Polk's left arm, went through his chest, and exited, hitting his right arm, then exploded against a tree; nearly cutting him in half! 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 3/4 card. Card mount has been trimmed. Bust view in uniform with epaulets. Back mark: E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Written in red period ink on the front mount is: Lt. Genl. Leonidas Polk, C.S.A. Red ink was used to indicate that General Polk had been killed during the war. Written in period ink in Irwin's hand on the reverse is, Lt. Genl. Leonidas Polk, C.S.A, [in red ink] Killed, June 14, 1864, Pine Mountain. At 58. Genl. B.J.D. Irwin album, No. 128 is written in another hand in pencil at the bottom. Rare with this provenance literally making this image one of a kind.


<u><h2>History of United States Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin</u></h2>


<b><h2>Surgeon & General Irwin was the first United States Medal of Honor Recipient by date of action, February 13, 1861.

</b></h2>


(1830-1917) Born in County Roscommon, Ireland, he immigrated with his parents to the United States in the 1840s. He attended New York University from 1848 to 1849, and then served as a private in the New York Militia. In 1850, he entered Castleton Medical College, and he later transferred to New York Medical College, where he graduated in 1852.


He served as a surgeon and physician at the State Emigrant Hospital on Ward's Island, NYC, until his appointment as assistant surgeon in the U.S. Army in 1856. He was an assistant army surgeon during the Apache Wars, and was the first Medal of Honor recipient chronologically by date of action. His actions on February 13, 1861, at Apache Pass, Arizona, are the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded! The citation on his medal of honor reads; "Voluntarily took command of troops and attacked and defeated hostile Indians he met on the way. Surgeon Irwin volunteered to go to the rescue of 2d Lt. George N. Bascom, 7th U.S. Infantry, who, with 60 men, was trapped by Chiricahua Apaches under Cochise. Irwin and 14 men, not having horses, began the 100-mile march riding mules. After fighting and capturing Indians, recovering stolen horses and cattle, he reached Bascom's column and helped break his siege."


Cochise, the Apache Indian chief, and a group of Apache warriors were accused of kidnapping a boy and a small group of U.S. soldiers in the Arizona Territory after the Army had captured Cochise's brother and nephews. When the Army refused to make a prisoner exchange, Cochise killed his prisoners. Soldiers then killed Cochise's brother and nephews. 2nd Lieutenant George Nicholas Bascom led a group of 60 men from the 7th U.S. Infantry after Cochise but was soon besieged, prompting a rescue mission by the army. In response to the siege of Bascom and his men, Irwin set out on a rescue mission with 14 men of the 1st U.S. Dragoons. He was able to catch up with the Apaches at Apache Pass in present day Arizona. He strategically placed his small unit around Cochise and his men, tricking the Apache leader into thinking that he had a much larger army with him. The Apaches fled and Bascom and his men were saved. Bascom and his men joined Irwin and together they were able to track Cochise into the mountains & rescued the young boy that Cochise had captured.


The Medal of Honor did not exist during the time of the "Bascom Incident," and would not be established until a year later in 1862. However, the actions of Irwin were well remembered, and he was awarded the Medal of Honor just prior to his retirement. Irwin's actions were the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded, predating the outbreak of the American Civil War.


Irwin subsequently served with the Union army during the Civil War, and was promoted to captain in August 1861, and the next year was appointed medical director under Major General William "Bull" Nelson. He improvised one of the first field hospitals used by the U.S. Army at the Battle of Shiloh, on April 7, 1862. He was captured during the Battle of Richmond, Ky., while attempting to save the wounded General Nelson. He was promoted to major in September 1862, and after his release from a Rebel prison he became medical director in the Army of the Southwest. From 1863 to 1865, he was superintendent of the military hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, and in March of 1865, he was brevetted to the rank of colonel. He was a companion of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and the Order of the Indian Wars of the United States. After the Civil War, Irwin served as a senior medical officer at several U.S. army posts, including West Point from 1873 to 1878. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1885, to colonel in August 1890, and to brigadier general in April 1904. He died in Ontario, Canada, on December 15, 1917, and is buried in the West Point Cemetery, at the U.S. Military Academy, New York.


His son George LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1889, and served in World War I, becoming a Major General in the U.S. Army.


His grandson Stafford LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1915, and served in World War II, and became a Lieutenant General in the U.S. Army.


His daughter, Amy Irwin Addams McCormick, was a nurse with the American Red Cross and served during World War I.


General Irwin was an admirer and collector of photographs, and he put together a very large, and superb collection of Union and Confederate images. Interestingly, he collected photographs of both Rebel and Yankee alike. I have owned several famous military photograph albums before and never came across one that collected images from both sides of the rebellion. He numbered each individual image, and wrote a brief historical notation on each one. The collection was split up by another dealer, and by the time I found out about it, I was still very fortunate to be able to acquire about one third of his superb Civil War image collection. Each image is rare because it is "one of a kind" having come from the Irwin collection!


The image of B.J.D. Irwin pictured here is a copy photograph from the "Find a Grave" website and is used here for illustration purposes only.

antique bronze – Bull NOSE RING $48.00

 

Civil War vintage Pennsylvania - Highlan $165.00

 

Civil War era Pat. 1857 screw cap - DRU

 

CDV, General Leonidas Polk $175.00




<b>He was seriously wounded during the 1862 Shenandoah Valley Campaign


Johnson led General Stonewall Jackson's old division at Gettysburg, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania


He was captured at Spotsylvania while defending the Bloody Angle in May 1864


Johnson was captured at the battle of Nashville, Tennessee in December 1864


From the personal collection of Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin. Irwin has the distinct honor of being the first recipient of the Medal of Honor in U.S. military history by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


(1816-73) Known as "Old Allegheny," he was born in Chesterfield County, Virginia, and graduated in the West Point class of 1838, and was assigned to the 6th U.S. Infantry. He served in the Seminole Indian War, and the Mexican War. In the latter he distinguished himself for gallantry at Veracruz, Cerro Gordo, Churubusco, Molino del Rey, and Chapultepec receiving two brevet promotions, to captain and major. He also was awarded a ceremonial sword by the state of Virginia for his bravery. After the war with Mexico concluded, Johnson served on the western frontier, in the Dakota Territory, California, Kansas, and in the Utah Expedition. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he was appointed colonel of the 12th Georgia Infantry, and was promoted to brigadier general, on December 13, 1861, and major general, on February 28, 1863. He fought with distinction in the 1862 Shenandoah Valley campaign, where he was seriously wounded at the Battle of McDowell, with a bullet wound to the ankle, which took a long time to heal. He led General Stonewall Jackson's old division at Gettysburg, the Wilderness and Spotsylvania. In the fall of 1863, Johnson played a prominent role in the Mine Run Campaign. He was captured at Spotsylvania on May 12, 1864, while defending the "Bloody Angle." After his exchange from prison he led a division in the Tennessee campaign and was captured at the battle of Nashville, on December 16, 1864. He again spent months in a Union prisoner of war camp at Johnson's Island, in Lake Erie, and at the end of the war, General Johnson was moved to the Old Capitol Prison in Washington, D.C., where he was accused of being somehow complicit in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. Nothing came of the accusation and he was paroled on July 22, 1865. After the war he was a farmer in Virginia, and also active in Confederate veterans affairs, including early efforts to construct a monument to General Robert E. Lee in Richmond. He died in Richmond on February 2, 1873, and his body lay in state in the Virginia State Capital building until his burial at Hollywood Cemetery, in Richmond. 


Wet plate, albumen, carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 3/4 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform with rank of major general. Back mark: E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York. The card mount is trimmed. Light age toning and wear. Very fine. This is the only known wartime view of General Edward Johnson in uniform. It was taken sometime after his promotion to major general on February 28, 1862. Written in period ink on the front of the card mount is, Maj. Genl. Ed Johnson, C.S.A. Written in period ink in Irwin's hand on the reverse is, Maj. Genl. Edward Johnson, C.S., Died, 1872. At 57. Genl. B.J.D. Irwin album, No. 96 is written in another hand in pencil at the bottom. Rare with this provenance literally making this image one of a kind.


<u>History of United States Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin</u>


<b>Surgeon & General Irwin was the first United States Medal of Honor Recipient by date of action, February 13, 1861.

</b>


(1830-1917) Born in County Roscommon, Ireland, he immigrated with his parents to the United States in the 1840s. He attended New York University from 1848 to 1849, and then served as a private in the New York Militia. In 1850, he entered Castleton Medical College, and he later transferred to New York Medical College, where he graduated in 1852.


He served as a surgeon and physician at the State Emigrant Hospital on Ward's Island, NYC, until his appointment as assistant surgeon in the U.S. Army in 1856. He was an assistant army surgeon during the Apache Wars, and was the first Medal of Honor recipient chronologically by date of action. His actions on February 13, 1861, at Apache Pass, Arizona, are the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded! The citation on his medal of honor reads; "Voluntarily took command of troops and attacked and defeated hostile Indians he met on the way. Surgeon Irwin volunteered to go to the rescue of 2d Lt. George N. Bascom, 7th U.S. Infantry, who, with 60 men, was trapped by Chiricahua Apaches under Cochise. Irwin and 14 men, not having horses, began the 100-mile march riding mules. After fighting and capturing Indians, recovering stolen horses and cattle, he reached Bascom's column and helped break his siege."


Cochise, the Apache Indian chief, and a group of Apache warriors were accused of kidnapping a boy and a small group of U.S. soldiers in the Arizona Territory after the Army had captured Cochise's brother and nephews. When the Army refused to make a prisoner exchange, Cochise killed his prisoners. Soldiers then killed Cochise's brother and nephews. 2nd Lieutenant George Nicholas Bascom led a group of 60 men from the 7th U.S. Infantry after Cochise but was soon besieged, prompting a rescue mission by the army. In response to the siege of Bascom and his men, Irwin set out on a rescue mission with 14 men of the 1st U.S. Dragoons. He was able to catch up with the Apaches at Apache Pass in present day Arizona. He strategically placed his small unit around Cochise and his men, tricking the Apache leader into thinking that he had a much larger army with him. The Apaches fled and Bascom and his men were saved. Bascom and his men joined Irwin and together they were able to track Cochise into the mountains & rescued the young boy that Cochise had captured.


The Medal of Honor did not exist during the time of the "Bascom Incident," and would not be established until a year later in 1862. However, the actions of Irwin were well remembered, and he was awarded the Medal of Honor just prior to his retirement. Irwin's actions were the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded, predating the outbreak of the American Civil War.


Irwin subsequently served with the Union army during the Civil War, and was promoted to captain in August 1861, and the next year was appointed medical director under Major General William "Bull" Nelson. He improvised one of the first field hospitals used by the U.S. Army at the Battle of Shiloh, on April 7, 1862. He was captured during the Battle of Richmond, Ky., while attempting to save the wounded General Nelson. He was promoted to major in September 1862, and after his release from a Rebel prison he became medical director in the Army of the Southwest. From 1863 to 1865, he was superintendent of the military hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, and in March of 1865, he was brevetted to the rank of colonel. He was a companion of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and the Order of the Indian Wars of the United States. After the Civil War, Irwin served as a senior medical officer at several U.S. army posts, including West Point from 1873 to 1878. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1885, to colonel in August 1890, and to brigadier general in April 1904. He died in Ontario, Canada, on December 15, 1917, and is buried in the West Point Cemetery, at the U.S. Military Academy, New York.


His son George LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1889, and served in World War I, becoming a Major General in the U.S. Army.


His grandson Stafford LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1915, and served in World War II, and became a Lieutenant General in the U.S. Army.


His daughter, Amy Irwin Addams McCormick, was a nurse with the American Red Cross and served during World War I.


General Irwin was an admirer and collector of photographs, and he put together a very large, and superb collection of Union and Confederate images. Interestingly, he collected photographs of both Rebel and Yankee alike. I have owned several famous military photograph albums before and never came across one that collected images from both sides of the rebellion. He numbered each individual image, and wrote a brief historical notation on each one. The collection was split up by another dealer, and by the time I found out about it, I was still very fortunate to be able to acquire about one third of his superb Civil War image collection. Each image is rare because it is "one of a kind" having come from the Irwin collection!


The image of B.J.D. Irwin pictured here is a copy photograph from the "Find a Grave" website and is used here for illustration purposes only.   


<b>Captured at the fall of Fort Donelson, Tennessee in February 1862


Kentucky Cavalry Commander under General Nathan Bedford Forrest


He escaped from capture at Red Hill, Alabama in January 1865, by his quick thinking and daring action and shooting a Yankee sergeant</b>


(1836-1907) He was born in what is now Lyon County, Kentucky, to a wealthy plantation family, and was the grandson of Congressman Matthew Lyon. He graduated in the West Point class of 1856, and was assigned to the 2nd U.S. Artillery Regiment on duty at Fort Myers during the Third Seminole War. After hostilities with the Seminoles ended, Lyon was transferred to the 3rd U.S. Artillery and sent to Fort Yuma in California. The following year he was ordered to the Washington Territory, where he took part in two battles with local Indian tribes. When the War Between the States erupted in April 1861, Lyon resigned his commission in the U.S. Army, and threw his lot in with the Confederacy. He soon after raised Company F, of the 3rd Kentucky Infantry, which later became part of the 1st Kentucky Artillery. Lyon equipped the unit, which initially was known as "Lyon's Battery," later "Cobb's Battery." In January 1862, he was promoted to lieutenant colonel of the 8th Kentucky Infantry, and his regiment was part of the garrison at Fort Donelson, Tennessee. After fighting off three attacks by the Union Army, the fort finally surrendered to General Ulysses S. Grant, and Lyon was among those captured. He was sent as a prisoner of war, first to Camp Morton at Indianapolis, and then to Camp Chase, Ohio. He and other captured officers were later sent to Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor, where he was finally exchanged in September, 1862. His regiment was reorganized and now re-enlisted for three years, with Lyon appointed as its colonel. He fought in the forces of General Earl Van Dorn, and then General John C. Pemberton during the Vicksburg Campaign. He and 250 of his men managed to avoid surrendering to General Grant, and he led them to Jackson, Mississippi, where they joined the Confederate forces there. Later, General Braxton Bragg appointed him as commander of two cavalry regiments under General Joseph Wheeler, and he later served under General James Longstreet during the Siege of Knoxville. Following the Battle of Chattanooga, Lyon was placed in charge of General Bragg's artillery, saving them from capture during his subsequent retreat. He returned to commanding cavalry in 1864, this time in Mississippi as a brigadier general under General Nathan Bedford Forrest. In December 1864, he led 800 Kentucky cavalrymen on a raid into Tennessee and western Kentucky both to enforce Confederate draft laws, and to draw Union troops away from General John Bell Hood's Nashville campaign. His men burned seven county courthouses that were being used to house Union troops, including those at Princeton, Marion and Hopkinsville. He retreated south after the Confederate defeat at the Battle of Nashville to rejoin General Forrest in Mississippi. In January 1865, General Lyon was surprised while sleeping in a private home in Red Hill, Alabama, by a detachment of the 15th Pennsylvania Cavalry. After he was captured, he shot and killed the Union sergeant who captured him, Arthur Lyon, by asking to retrieve his clothes and grabbing a hidden pistol, he escaped in his nightgown. When the war ended, Lyon refused to surrender and he accompanied Tennessee Governor Isham G. Harris into Mexico with the intention of joining up with the forces of Emperor Maximilian.  He was a civil engineer in Mexico for nearly a year before finally returning to his home in Eddyville, Kentucky, where he resumed farming and opened a prosperous mercantile business. He also served as state prison commissioner, primarily responsible for what is now the Kentucky State Penitentiary located in his hometown of Eddyville. His initials are still inscribed over the Kentucky State Penitentiary's front gate. Lyon died on April 25, 1907, at his home in Lyon County, Kentucky.


<u>Card Signature With Rank</u>: Superb card signature in ink, H.B. Lyon, Brigadier General, Comdg. Kentucky Brigade, Forrest Cavalry, C.S.A. This 3 3/4 x 2 1/2 card is tipped to a larger card that measures, 4 1/2 x 3 1/4. Light wrinkle at center. Bold and neatly written autograph. Extremely desirable and very scarce in this format.        


<b>Written on a beautiful full color Union patriotic letter sheet


"I hope this [war] will soon come to an end and have peace again in our country."</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Benjamin Frey, to George H. Yeckley, on a beautiful full color patriotic letter sheet featuring Columbia holding a sword and the American flag. Very fine condition. Desirable patriotic stationary used in 1862. 


Gorham, (Maine), February the 5th, 1862


Mr. George H. Yeckley,


Dear Sir,


My friend I must once more take the opportunity to write to you for I shall be glad to hear from an old friend again. Well George, there has been a great change in Gorham since you left here. Now I will tell you some of the changes that happened here with me. For one thing I have only enjoyed married life a little over a year. It was a happy one too, but the Lord seen fit to part us again in our happiness. I suppose you heard who I married. It was Dear Lovine E., but she is gone now. We shall never see her again in this world. She died the 9 of Dec. 1861. My little boy died 4 of Nov. 1861. When Lovine died she left me with a little girl, only two weeks old. I have given up keeping house, and July has took my baby home to her Father. It is well and a gaining. The rest of my Father-in-Laws folks are all well and I am well at present. I hope these few lines may find you the same George. This is a lonesome winter for me, but I must submit to my lot. There may be sunshine again for me now. George, I will tell you that I have been out west and what parts. I left home the 2nd of Jan. 1860. I went to Ohio. I stayed there until spring. From there I went to Ind.[iana] & on through to Wisconsin. I stayed there through the summer. In the fall I made my return home again. I seen a great deal of the western country while I was gone, and got pretty well satisfied too of it for one route. When I got home I found some changes myself, but no matter I soon brought the changes all right. The shame was that me & Lovine had a little boy to see to now so we got married the 8th of Oct. 1860 & lived happily together as ever a married couple did in this world. We lived right across the road from my father in a house that my father bought of the Dunn Boys, and moved there, and I worked for my father in the copper shop. Me & Lovine had everything arranged very comfortably for new beginners, but now all hopes is blasted, but I hope to meet her in Heaven where there will be no more parting, but the ever lasting joy. Lovine spoke about you a great many times and of the old times we used to all have together. She had your likeness so me & her could see you. It recalled us back to the old times we use to all have together, but now she is gone & left me & you and all of us we will never hear her voice again. About your brother enlisting (he is referring to John A. Yeckley, who served in Co. E, 28th New York Infantry) I guess you know as much about them as I do. Your folks are all well as far as I know. The news is nothing but we are now a daze. I guess it is the same where you are, but I hope this will soon come to an end and have peace again in our country. [he is referring to the Civil War now almost ready to start its second year]. George we have now got a brass band of music in our great city of Bethel. There is nine in the band. I will bring my letter to a close for this time. I shall be greatly pleased to hear from you soon. Write as soon as you get this letter. My best respects and wishes to you from your old friend.


Benjamin Frey


I hope to see you soon. I thought you would have made us a visit before this time. Good bye. 


Very bold and neatly written letter with some heart breaking content regarding the loss of his wife and child, and his desire for the war to end and have peace restored in the country.    


<b>United States Congressman & Senator from Missouri


He was instrumental in preventing Missouri from joining the Confederacy in 1861


The Blair family were close friends of President Abraham Lincoln</b>


(1821-75) Born in Lexington, Kentucky, he was the son of an advisor to presidents, and the brother of Montgomery Blair, President Abraham Lincoln's first postmaster general. From secession to reconstruction, Francis P. Blair, Jr. made a series of major contributions to the Union cause. No man did more to block Missouri's joining the Confederacy in 1861 than Blair, Jr. As a U.S. Congressman he battled for Lincoln's early war programs; he was a distinguished divisional and corps commander in the Vicksburg and Atlanta campaigns; and as a post war senator battled the Radical Republicans in an attempt to bring reconstruction to a shattered nation. After the Mexican War started he joined the expedition of General Stephen W. Kearny in Santa Fe, who then appointed Blair as attorney general for the New Mexico Territory after it was secured. Blair was instrumental in appointing Nathaniel Lyon as the new military commander of the Western Department of the U.S. Army. He assisted Lyon in securing help of the St. Louis Home Guard in moving over 20,000 rifles and muskets from the St. Louis Arsenal to Illinois. The Blair family were unwavering supporters of Abraham Lincoln during his rise to the presidency, and during his years in office, and in return they enjoyed his political patronage. In December 1863, President Lincoln said, "The Blair's have to an unusual degree the spirit of clan. Their family is a close corporation. Frank, Jr. is their hope and pride. They have a way of going with a rush for anything they undertake, and especially have Montgomery and the Old Gentleman." Blair was appointed a colonel of Missouri volunteers in July 1862, and was promoted to rank of brigadier general of volunteers in August 1862, and major general in November. He subsequently commanded a division in the Vicksburg campaign, and in the fighting about Chattanooga. He also saw action during the Yazoo expedition, in Sherman's March to the Sea, and in the 1865 Carolina's campaign. Both Generals' Grant and Sherman who were highly critical of most "political generals" rated Blair as one of the most competent military leaders of the Civil War. He was one of General Sherman's top corps commanders in the final campaigns in Georgia and the Carolina's. He died on July 8, 1875, from serious head injuries that he received after a fall. He is interred in Bellefontaine Cemetery, in St. Louis, Mo. After hearing about Blair's death, General William T. Sherman said, "I always regarded him as one of the truest patriots, most honest and honorable men, and one of the most courageous soldiers this country ever produced." General Ulysses S. Grant wrote about Frank Blair, Jr. in his memoirs that, "There was no man braver than he, nor was there any who obeyed all orders of his superiors in rank with more unquestioning alacrity. He was one man as a soldier, another as a politician."


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Splendid half view portrait of a seated Blair  wearing jacket, vest and bow tie. Imprint on the front mount, "Gen. Frank P. Blair." Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1867, by J. Gurney & Son, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Southern District of New York. J. Gurney & Son, Photo, N.Y. Back mark: J. Gurney & Son, 707 Broadway, N.Y. Corners of the card mount are very slightly trimmed. Very sharp image. Nice photograph.

CDV, General Edward Johnson $200.00

 

Autograph, General Hylan B. Lyon $350.00

 

1862 Letter From Gorham, Maine $65.00

 

CDV, General Frank P. Blair $75.00




<b>Chief Engineer of the defenses of Washington, D.C., in 1861 


Photograph taken by Alexander Gardner, Washington, D.C.</b>


(1819-78) Born in Nicholas County, Kentucky, he graduated #7 in the West Point class of 1842, and was commissioned into the elite U.S. Engineers Corps. He served in the Mexican War, as an engineer officer building fortifications to protect the  supply lines of the U.S. Army during their advance upon Mexico City. After the war, he was stationed in Washington, D.C., where he served as architect for the Scott Building of the U.S. Soldiers' Home, now known as the Armed Forces Retirement Home. The building was named for General Winfield Scott, and he took over the completion of the Smithsonian Institution building after the first architect was dismissed. Alexander worked on several fortification projects along the East Coast of the United States, including Forts Pulaski, Jackson, and the defenses of New York City. Afterwards he traveled to New England, where he supervised the rebuilding of the Minot's Ledge Lighthouse, a project widely considered to be one of the most difficult to be attempted by the U.S. Government up to that time. On September 28, 1861, he was commissioned lieutenant colonel and he served as an advisor to the Engineering Brigade of the Army of the Potomac, and became Chief Engineer of the defenses of Washington, D.C. Alexander put his skills to military use for the first time since the Mexican War, when on May 24, 1861, he was among several hundred engineers who marched into Virginia to begin building fortifications to protect Washington, D.C. In July 1861, the force that had marched into northern Virginia on May 24th found itself opposed by a large Confederate Army force that had marched up from the south. In the haste to meet the Confederates in battle, Alexander found himself serving as an infantry officer and was assigned to the 1st Division of the Army of Northeastern Virginia, under the command of General Daniel Tyler. It was a situation common to the young Union Army soldier, which found itself short of experienced officers. Many engineer officers building defenses south of Washington were assigned to a regiment or division during the First Battle of Bull Run. Alexander received a brevet to major in the regular army for his service during the battle. He was cited for gallantry and meritorious service at 1st Bull Run, and Yorktown, and was promoted to brevet brigadier general, on March 13, 1865. He later served as chief engineer of the Military Division of the Pacific, making him the head engineer for every military construction project on the West Coast. In later years, he persuaded the U.S. government to acquire Pearl Harbor from the Kingdom of Hawaii and supervised numerous irrigation and land reclamation projects in California's central valley. He died on December 15, 1878, in San Francisco, California. He is buried in San Francisco National Cemetery.  


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 3/4 card. Bust view in uniform with shoulder strap visible. Back mark: Alex. Gardner Galleries, Photographer to the Army of the Potomac, 511 Seventh Street and 332 Pennsylvania Av., Washington, D.C., with vignette of the U.S. Capitol, and a 3 cents green Internal Revenue Proprietary tax stamp with stamped date Aug. 28 on the reverse. Card mount is trimmed. Scarce.  


<b>From the personal collection of Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin. Irwin has the distinct honor of being the first recipient of the Medal of Honor in U.S. military history by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


(1807-71) Known as "Prince John," a resplendently uniformed man with a theatrical manner, he attained a reputation for his social grace and etiquette. Born at Port Royal, Virginia, he graduated in the West Point class of 1830. He fought gallantry during the Mexican War, while an artillery officer, and at the Battle of Palo Alto, on April 18, 1847, Magruder served with "zeal and ability," in General Winfield Scott's expedition, under heavy fire and turned Mexican artillery against them at Cerro Gordo, for which he was praised by his superiors and was promoted to the rank of brevet major. In the Battle of Mexico City, he was wounded, and ordered the first shots to be fired, and began a heavy pursuit, despite superior Mexican numbers, to capture the Anzures, Veronica, and Belen intersection, a crucial crossroads that would block efforts by General Santa Anna to relieve the palace. From the conflict in Mexico, Magruder learned the value of deceiving and flanking forces outnumbering his own. He also saw the war as a way to demonstrate that the science of artillery was continually advancing, and submitted a detailed plan for separating the light artillery from ordnance, field, and sea coast artillery, resulting in an enlightened division of labor" and specialization. Magruder resigned from the U.S. Army on April 20, 1861, and was appointed brigadier general in the Provisional Confederate Army on June 17, 1861, and major general on October 7, 1861. He won the Battle of Big Bethel, Va., the first land battle of the war, and distinguished himself in the early part of the 1862 Virginia Peninsula campaign, completely deceiving General George B. McClellan as to the size of his forces at Yorktown. He was less successful during the Seven Days battles, and was later assigned to command the District of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. Here he was successful in the recapture of Galveston, Texas and the dispersal of the Federal blockading fleet. After surrendering the Trans-Mississippi Department in June 1865, General Magruder fled to Mexico refusing to be formally paroled and then joined Emperor Maximilian's Imperial forces with the rank of major general. He did not return to the United States until 1867. John B. Magruder died in Houston, Texas, on February 18, 1871, and is buried at the Episcopal Cemetery, in Galveston.  


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 7/8 card. Full standing view of the flamboyant Magruder wearing a double breasted frock coat with epaulets, over the shoulder belt, aiguillete, sash, gauntlets, and holding his sword in one hand and a chapeau hat with plume, and eagle hat plate in the other. Back mark: Charles D. Fredricks & Co., 587 Broadway, New York. The card mount has been slightly trimmed. Written in period ink on the front of the card mount is, Maj. Genl. J.B. Magruder, C.S.A. Written in period ink in Irwin's hand on the reverse is, Maj. Genl. J.B. Magruder, C.S.A., Died Feb. 19, 1871. Age 64. Genl. B.J.D. Irwin album, No. 185 is written in another hand in pencil at the bottom. Splendid pose of Magruder wearing a uniform of his own design! Very desirable image. Rare with the provenance.


<u>History of United States Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin</u>


<b>Surgeon & General Irwin was the first United States Medal of Honor Recipient by date of action, February 13, 1861.</b>


(1830-1917) Born in County Roscommon, Ireland, he immigrated with his parents to the United States in the 1840s. He attended New York University from 1848 to 1849, and then served as a private in the New York Militia. In 1850, he entered Castleton Medical College, and he later transferred to New York Medical College, where he graduated in 1852.


He served as a surgeon and physician at the State Emigrant Hospital on Ward's Island, NYC, until his appointment as assistant surgeon in the U.S. Army in 1856. He was an assistant army surgeon during the Apache Wars, and was the first Medal of Honor recipient chronologically by date of action. His actions on February 13, 1861, at Apache Pass, Arizona, are the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded! The citation on his medal of honor reads; "Voluntarily took command of troops and attacked and defeated hostile Indians he met on the way. Surgeon Irwin volunteered to go to the rescue of 2d Lt. George N. Bascom, 7th U.S. Infantry, who, with 60 men, was trapped by Chiricahua Apaches under Cochise. Irwin and 14 men, not having horses, began the 100-mile march riding mules. After fighting and capturing Indians, recovering stolen horses and cattle, he reached Bascom's column and helped break his siege."


Cochise, the Apache Indian chief, and a group of Apache warriors were accused of kidnapping a boy and a small group of U.S. soldiers in the Arizona Territory after the Army had captured Cochise's brother and nephews. When the Army refused to make a prisoner exchange, Cochise killed his prisoners. Soldiers then killed Cochise's brother and nephews. 2nd Lieutenant George Nicholas Bascom led a group of 60 men from the 7th U.S. Infantry after Cochise but was soon besieged, prompting a rescue mission by the army. In response to the siege of Bascom and his men, Irwin set out on a rescue mission with 14 men of the 1st U.S. Dragoons. He was able to catch up with the Apaches at Apache Pass in present day Arizona. He strategically placed his small unit around Cochise and his men, tricking the Apache leader into thinking that he had a much larger army with him. The Apaches fled and Bascom and his men were saved. Bascom and his men joined Irwin and together they were able to track Cochise into the mountains & rescued the young boy that Cochise had captured.


The Medal of Honor did not exist during the time of the "Bascom Incident," and would not be established until a year later in 1862. However, the actions of Irwin were well remembered, and he was awarded the Medal of Honor just prior to his retirement. Irwin's actions were the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded, predating the outbreak of the American Civil War.


Irwin subsequently served with the Union army during the Civil War, and was promoted to captain in August 1861, and the next year was appointed medical director under Major General William "Bull" Nelson. He improvised one of the first field hospitals used by the U.S. Army at the Battle of Shiloh, on April 7, 1862. He was captured during the Battle of Richmond, Ky., while attempting to save the wounded General Nelson. He was promoted to major in September 1862, and after his release from a Rebel prison he became medical director in the Army of the Southwest. From 1863 to 1865, he was superintendent of the military hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, and in March of 1865, he was brevetted to the rank of colonel. He was a companion of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and the Order of the Indian Wars of the United States. After the Civil War, Irwin served as a senior medical officer at several U.S. army posts, including West Point from 1873 to 1878. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1885, to colonel in August 1890, and to brigadier general in April 1904. He died in Ontario, Canada, on December 15, 1917, and is buried in the West Point Cemetery, at the U.S. Military Academy, New York.


His son George LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1889, and served in World War I, becoming a Major General in the U.S. Army.


His grandson Stafford LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1915, and served in World War II, and became a Lieutenant General in the U.S. Army.


His daughter, Amy Irwin Addams McCormick, was a nurse with the American Red Cross and served during World War I.


General Irwin was an admirer and collector of photographs, and he put together a very large, and superb collection of Union and Confederate images. Interestingly, he collected photographs of both Rebel and Yankee alike. I have owned several famous military photograph albums before and never came across one that collected images from both sides of the rebellion. He numbered each individual image, and wrote a brief historical notation on each one. The collection was split up by another dealer, and by the time I found out about it, I was still very fortunate to be able to acquire about one third of his superb Civil War image collection. Each image is rare because it is "one of a kind" having come from the Irwin collection!


The image of B.J.D. Irwin pictured here is a copy photograph from the "Find a Grave" website and is used here for illustration purposes only.  


  


<b>Nicknamed "Little Poison," the defensive great patrolled center field for the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 1920's and 1930's</b>


(1906-82) Born in  Harrah, Oklahoma, along with his older brother, Paul Waner, known as "Big Poison," he anchored the Pittsburgh Pirates outfield throughout the 1920s and 1930s. The younger Waner started his professional baseball career in 1925 with the San Francisco Seals of the Pacific Coast League. Waner broke into the major leagues with the Pirates in 1927, and quickly built his reputation as a slap hitter with an astute sense of plate discipline. In his rookie campaign, he batted .355 with 223 hits while only striking out 23 times (the highest strikeout total of his career). As the lead off hitter of the powerful Pittsburgh offense, he led the National League with 133 runs scored which set set a MLB rookie record. The Pirates won the 1927 National League pennant with Waner batting .400 in his only World Series, but they lost to the powerful New York Yankees, the team led by Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig known as "Murder's Row," in four straight games. He continued to bat well and earned a record-setting 678 hits over his first three seasons (1927–1929), and  finished in the top ten in MVP voting in 1927 and 1929. He finished his career in September 1945. Waner led the NL in putouts four times, using his excellent speed to cover the spacious Forbes Field outfield. He recorded a career .983 fielding percentage at that position. He (2,459) and his older brother Paul (3,152) hold the career record for hits by brothers (5,611), outpacing the three Alou brothers, and the three DiMaggio brothers, among others. Lloyd Waner was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1967. His career batting average was .316, and he is also a member of the Pittsburgh Pirates Hall of Fame.


3 x 5 index card signature, beautifully signed in ink, Lloyd Waner, "Little Poison." Excellent condition. Very desirable with the addition by Waner of his nickname! Comes with a 7 x 9 photograph of him in uniform taken from a book.


     


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Full standing view of an officer wearing a double breasted frock coat with rank of brigadier general, epaulets, sash, eagle belt plate, sword attached to his belt, and holding his chapeau with a cloth U.S. infantry hat insignia in the front, and pinned up on the side with a Hardee hat plate. Studio pose with column, railing and drapes in the background. No back mark. Light age toning. Excellent content. Very fine Civil War image of an unidentified United States officer.

CDV, Lieutenant Colonel, Barton S. Alexa $95.00

 

CDV, General John B. Magruder $185.00

 

Autograph, Lloyd Waner, Baseball Hall of $50.00

 

CDV, Armed United States Civil War Offic $75.00




<b>Colonel 13th New Hampshire Infantry


Wounded at the Battle of Cold Harbor, Va., and the Capture of Fort Harrison, Va.


United States Congressman from New Hampshire 


Autographed carte de visite with rank & regiment</b>


(1819-87) Born in Derry, N.H., he was a lawyer by occupation, and served as a member of the New Hampshire State House of Representatives in 1845. He was a delegate to the Whig National Convention in 1852, and served as solicitor of Hillsborough County, 1856-1861. At the outbreak of the Civil War he enlisted on April 29, 1861, as major, and was commissioned into the 1st New Hampshire Infantry, a 90 days unit, mustering out at the expiration of their term of service, on August 9, 1861. On September 23, 1862, he was commissioned colonel of the 13th New Hampshire Infantry. He was wounded in action on June 1, 1864, in the battle of Cold Harbor, Va., and was wounded again on September 29, 1864, in the capture of Fort Harrison, Va. Promoted to brevet brigadier general, December 8, 1864, and mustered out of service on June 21, 1865. Served as U.S. Congressman, 1867-71, and was a member of the New Hampshire State House of Representatives, 1876-84.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of full colonel. Nicely autographed in ink on the reverse with sentiment, rank and regiment, Your Fr.[iend] & Servt., A.F. Stevens, Col. 13th N.H.V. No back mark. Light age toning. Very fine. Scarce.  


<b>Autograph Letter Signed written to General Winfield S. Hancock


Sickles murdered Philip Barton Key II across the street from the White House!


Severely wounded at Gettysburg resulting in the amputation of his leg


Medal of Honor Recipient for heroism at the Battle of Gettysburg


United States Congressman & New York State Senator</b>


(1819-1914) Born in New York City, he was a controversial New York State senator and congressman. He first achieved national notoriety in 1859 when he shot down, in the shadows of the White House, his young wife's lover, Philip Barton Key, II, who was the son of the author of our national anthem, "The Star Spangled Banner," Francis Scott Key. Sickles lawyer during the lurid trial was none other than Edwin M. Stanton, Abraham Lincoln's future Secretary of War, who got him off. Sickles was acquitted after using "temporary insanity" as a legal defense for the first time in United States history. During the Civil War, Sickles served as a brigade, division, and corps commander, and fought in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign, at Antietam, and Fredericksburg. At the Battle of Gettysburg, he commanded the 3rd Corps, of the Army of the Potomac, and was severely wounded on July 2, 1863, from cannon fire, the result being the amputation of his right leg. He was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his actions in the battle of Gettysburg. He saw no further field service as a result of his amputation. After the war, Sickles was appointed as a commander for military districts in the South during the Reconstruction period. He also served as U.S. Minister to Spain, 1869-74, under President Ulysses S. Grant. He was very instrumental in forming the Gettysburg National Military Park, and preserving the battlefield for posterity. Sickles political career was that of a New York State Senator, 1856-57; U.S. Congressman, 1857-61; and U.S. Congressman, 1893-95. He died on May 3, 1914, in New York City, at the age of 94. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.


<u>Autograph Letter Signed</u>: 2 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written to General Winfield S. Hancock.


14 Fifth Ave.

Tuesday


Dear General,


Col. F. [?] did not see my note soon enough after the receipt of yours to call upon you on Monday. The Vicomte de Bondy is also here and has a letter to you from an old comrade the Duc de Chatres- now as you know is Colonel Commanding a regiment of cavalry. If you will afford an hour to me now to receive these polite men they will call together and pay their respects to you. 


Sincerely,

D.E. Sickles


To Maj. Genl. W.S. Hancock, U.S. Army


There is a docket written on the reverse in ink in another hand as follows:


14 5th Av.

Sept. 14, 1880


Genl. D. Sickles


Relative to his call with Col. Faverol [?] & the Viscomte de Bondy-


Typical fold wear. Boldly written. Very fine letter written between two Gettysburg generals who were both very severely wounded in the Battle of Gettysburg, July 2nd & 3rd, 1863.


<u>Trivia</u>: The word "Comte" is French for the title "Count."  

 


<b>The gallant Union commander of Fort Sumter, South Carolina who withstood a 36 hour bombardment before surrendering the fort</b>


(1805-1871) Born at "Soldier's Retreat," the Anderson family estate near Louisville, Kentucky. He graduated in the West Point class of 1825, and participated in the Black Hawk Indian War, in Florida. In the Mexican War, he fought in the Siege of Vera Cruz, the Battle of Cerro Gordo, the Skirmish of Amazoque, and the Battle of Molino del Rey where he was severely wounded while assaulting the Mexican fortifications, for which he received a brevet promotion to major. In November 1860, he was ordered to Charleston Harbor to take command of the three United States forts there; Castle Pickney, Fort Moultrie, and Fort Sumter, and all troops in the area, in the face of South Carolina's imminent secession. Major Anderson refused a formal demand for his surrender and in the early morning hours of April 12, 1861, Fort Sumter was bombarded by Rebel cannons, and the Civil War began. His small garrison withstood 36 hours under heavy fire before being compelled to surrender. Robert Anderson became a national hero in the North for his heroic stand. Ironically, the Confederate artillery attack was commanded by General P.G.T. Beauregard, who had been Anderson's student at West Point. He was promoted to brigadier general in the Regular U.S. Army, effective May 15, 1861. Anderson took the Fort Sumter's 33 star American flag with him to New York City, where he participated in a huge patriotic rally at Union Square that was the largest public gathering in North America until then. General Anderson then went on a highly successful recruiting tour of the North, with his next assignment placing him in another sensitive political position as commander of the Department of Kentucky, subsequently renamed the Department of the Cumberland, in a border state that had officially declared neutrality between the Union and the Confederacy. Anderson's last military assignment was a brief period as commanding officer of Fort Adams in Newport, Rhode Island, in August 1863. Anderson officially retired from the Army on October 27, 1863 "for disability resulting from long and faithful service, and wounds and disease contracted in the line of duty," but he continued to serve on the staff of the general commanding the Eastern Department, headquartered in New York City, from October 27, 1863, to January 22, 1869. On February 3, 1865, Anderson was brevetted to the rank of major general for "gallantry and meritorious service" in the defense of Fort Sumter. General Robert Anderson personally raised that same United States flag over Fort Sumter on April 14, 1865, exactly four years after he had hauled it down. Hours after the joyous ceremony of April 14, 1865, the country went into deep mourning as John Wilkes Booth assassinated President Abraham Lincoln. General Anderson died in Nice, France, on October 26, 1871, as he had been there seeking a medical cure for his ailments. He was 66 years old at the time of his death, and was buried at the United States Military Academy, at West Point, New York.   


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Standing view wearing a double breasted frock coat probably as major, and Anderson is also sporting his overcoat on top of his uniform coat, and he is holding his bummer's kepi with hat insignia at his waist. Back mark: E. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. There is a photographic sticker affixed on the reverse from McAllister & Brother, 128 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. This is most likely the M.B. Brady agent who sold this photograph. Sharp image. Desirable pose. Excellent condition.  


<b>General-in-Chief of the U.S. Armies during the Civil War, 1861-62


Democratic Presidential Candidate that was defeated by President Abraham Lincoln in 1864


Governor of New Jersey</b>


(1826-85) Hailed as the "Young Napoleon," McClellan was thought to have of the greatest military minds of his generation. He was born in Philadelphia, the son of a prominent surgeon, Dr. George McClellan, the founder of Jefferson Medical College. One of McClellan's great-grandfathers was General Samuel McClellan of Woodstock, Connecticut, a brigadier general who fought in the Revolutionary War. George Brinton McClellan graduated 2nd in his class of 59 cadets at West Point in 1846, where he was an energetic and ambitious cadet, deeply interested in strategic principles.  He was commissioned a brevet second lieutenant in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. His closest friends at the Academy were southerners George Pickett, Dabney Maury, Cadmus Wilcox, and A.P. Hill. After graduation, he served with distinction in the Mexican War, as an engineering officer who was frequently subject to enemy fire, and was appointed a brevet first lieutenant for his services at Contreras, and Churubusco, and to captain for his service at Chapultepec. He performed reconnaissance missions for General Winfield Scott, a close friend of McClellan's father. McClellan's experiences in the Mexican War would shape his military and political life. He learned that flanking movements that were used by General Scott at Cerro Gordo are often better than frontal assaults, and the value of siege operations against Veracruz was another well learned lesson. He witnessed Scott's success in balancing political with military affairs, and his good relations with the civil population as he invaded, enforcing strict discipline on his soldiers to minimize damage to civilian property. In the fall of 1852, McClellan published a manual on bayonet tactics that he had translated from the original French. He also received an assignment to the Department of Texas, with orders to perform a survey of Texas rivers and harbors. In 1853, he participated in the Pacific Railroad surveys, ordered by Secretary of War Jefferson Davis, to select an appropriate route for the planned transcontinental railroad. Because of his political connections and his mastery of French, McClellan received the assignment to be an official observer of the European armies in the Crimean War in 1855, as part of the Delafield Commission, led by Richard Delafield. Traveling widely, and interacting with the highest military commands and royal families, McClellan observed the siege of Sevastopol. Upon his return to the United States in 1856, he requested an assignment in Philadelphia to prepare his report, which contained a critical analysis of the siege and a lengthy description of the organization of the European armies. He also wrote a manual on cavalry tactics that was based on Russian cavalry regulations. Capitalizing on his experience with railroad assessment, he became chief engineer and vice president of the Illinois Central Railroad, and then president of the Ohio and Mississippi Railroad in 1860. At the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, McClellan was appointed major general, and he played an important role in raising the Army of the Potomac, and proved to be a brilliant military organizer, administrator, and trainer of men, but as the war developed he proved to be an officer totally lacking in the essential skills and qualities of successful command of large forces in battle. He served as the Commanding General of the United States Army, 1861-62. General McClellan organized, and led the Union Army in the 1862 Virginia Peninsula campaign in southeastern Virginia which was the first large-scale offensive in the Eastern Theater of the war with the capture of the Confederate capital of Richmond, Va., as their objective.  McClellan was somewhat successful against Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston, but the emergence of General Robert E. Lee to command the Army of Northern Virginia turned the subsequent Seven Days Battles into a Union defeat, but Lee failed to destroy McClellan's Army of the Potomac, and suffered a bloody repulse at Malvern Hill, Va. General McClellan and President Abraham Lincoln developed a mutual distrust for each other, and McClellan was privately derisive of Lincoln. Lincoln on the other hand accused McClellan of being too cautious in the field and once asked "Little Mac" if he was not going to use his army if he (Lincoln could borrow it). Lincoln removed him from command in November 1862, in the aftermath of the bloody battle of Antietam, Md., fought on September 17, 1862, which was the single bloodiest day in U.S. military history. A contributing factor in this decision was McClellan's failure to pursue Lee's army following the tactically inconclusive, but strategic Union victory at the Battle of Antietam outside of little town of Sharpsburg, Maryland. McClellan went on to become the Democratic Party's nominee in the 1864 presidential election against the incumbent Republican President Lincoln. The effectiveness of his campaign was damaged when General McClellan repudiated his party's platform, which promised an end to the war, and negotiations with the Confederacy. Consequently he was beaten by Lincoln. He later served as the Governor of New Jersey from 1878-81. The concluding chapter of his political career was his strong support in 1884 for President Grover Cleveland. He was interested in the position of Secretary of War in Cleveland's cabinet, but did not get it.  McClellan devoted his final years to traveling and writing; producing his memoirs, 'McClellan's Own Story," in which he stridently defended his conduct during the war. He died unexpectedly of a heart attack at the age of 58 at Orange, New Jersey. He was buried at Riverview Cemetery in Trenton.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Seated view in uniform with rank of major general. Artistic pose of "Little Mac" seated with his back to the camera in a profile pose. Back mark: Silsbee, Case & Co., Photographic Artists, 299 1/2 Washington Street, Boston. Case & Getchell, Dec. 3, 1862. Light age toning. Small stains. McClellan was a peacock when it came to the camera, but this view of him is a rather uncommon one.

CDV, Colonel Aaron F. Stevens

 

Autograph, General Daniel E. Sickles

 

CDV, General Robert Anderson $125.00

 

CDV, General George B. McClellan $125.00




<b>Mortally wounded at the battle of Antietam, Maryland, in September 1862</b>


(1803-1862) Born in New Haven, Connecticut, he graduated #2 in the West Point class of 1822. He served as chief engineer under General Zachary Taylor in the Mexican War fighting gallantly at Fort Brown, Monterey and Buena Vista, and earned promotion to the ranks of brevet major, lieutenant colonel and colonel in the Regular U.S. Army. On May 18, 1861, he was appointed Brigadier General in the regular army and assigned to the command of Washington and its environs by President Lincoln. He later commanded the 12th Corps at the battle of Antietam, and led his command into action to support General Joseph Hooker's 1st Corps. Seeing his raw recruits waver, he rode into the fray where the action was the hottest. General Mansfield was shot down and died from his wounds the next day, September 18, 1862. In 1880, the U.S. Treasury Department honored this fallen Civil War general by featuring his portrait on a $500 bill. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Superb full standing view wearing double breasted frock coat with epaulets, an eagle belt plate, sash, and gauntlets. He poses resting his hands on the hilt of his sword at his front. His cap with a U.S. hat wreath insignia sits on the studio column at his side. Back mark: E. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Very sharp image. Excellent condition. Very desirable.  

 


<b>Founder and lead guitarist of "The Blue Moon Boys," the original backing band of Elvis Presley</b>


(1931-2016) Born in Gadsden, Tennessee. Scotty was in the United States Navy from 1948-1952, lying and entering the service under age! He served in China and Korea. He was the lead guitarist for Elvis Presley from 1954-1968, working with "The King" in the recording studio, movie sound tracks (even appearing on camera in some of the early films), and in his touring band. Scotty was part of the original Sun Studio recordings in 1954 in Memphis, Tennessee. The first song they ever recorded was the Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup tune, "That's All Right (Mamma)" which was the start of the iconic career of Elvis Presley! (I actually was privileged to hold the original microphone Elvis used in those early recordings on one of my visits to Memphis. I was fortunate to be friends with several members of the Presley band and the "Memphis Mafia.")  You will see Scotty on all of the various television shows that Elvis appeared on in the 1950's culminating with the spectacular 1968 television show now famously known as "The Comeback Special." Elvis wore his now iconic black leather suit in the live performances in that show. Having gotten out of his movie obligations, Elvis wanted to return to the stage and "The Comeback Special" produced by Steve Binder was the start of his live performances. Elvis never looked or sounded better in that show! 


8 x 10, black and white photograph, of Elvis and Scotty performing on one of their television appearances in the 1950's with musical notes background. Seen at the right, but obscured somewhat are legendary drummer D.J. Fontana, and stand up bass player Bill Black, both part of the original "Blue Moon Boys." Signed at the lower right in silver pen, Scotty Moore. Obtained in person. Mint condition. Very desirable Elvis Presley related item.


<u>Music History Trivia</u>:  


Rolling Stones' guitarist, and one of its founding members, Keith Richards, said of Scotty Moore: When I heard "Heartbreak Hotel," for the first time, I knew what I wanted to do in life. It was as plain as day. All I wanted to do was to be able to play and sound like the way Scotty Moore did. Everyone wanted to be Elvis, I wanted to be Scotty!


     


Served as brigadier general in the New York State Militia in the 1850's and during the Civil War.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 1/4 card. Standing view wearing double breasted frock coat with epaulets and rank of brigadier general. He is also wearing what appears to be a two piece N.Y. belt plate, sash, and is holding his sword. His chapeau with plume sits on top of the studio table at his side. Back mark: J. Gurney & Son, 707 Broadway, N.Y. Very sharp. Excellent image.  


<b>Promoted to Brevet Brigadier General in 1865</b>


(1814-83) Born in Onondaga County, N.Y., he was an architect and builder by trade. Otis designed St. John's Church, in Savannah, Ga., in 1851, the Buffalo Broadway Auditorium, the Buffalo Medical College and Mariners Church of Detroit. During the Civil War he served as lieutenant colonel of the 100th New York Infantry, and led his regiment during the capture of Folly Island, South Carolina. He was promoted to rank of brevet brigadier general, on March 13, 1865, for "faithful and meritorious services during the war." He died on January 22, 1883, at Cuba, N.Y., and is buried there.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Full standing view in uniform wearing a double breasted frock coat with rank of lieutenant colonel, eagle sword belt plate, sash, and holding his sword at his front. No back mark. Period pencil ID on the reverse. This a known published image. Light age toning. Very fine view. Scarce.

CDV, General Joseph K. F. Mansfield $200.00

 

Autograph, Scotty Moore, Rock n' Roll HO $125.00

 

CDV, General Charles B. Spicer $100.00

 

CDV, Lietenant Colonel Calvin N. Otis, 1 $100.00




<b>The first Regular U.S. Army officer to be wounded in action during the Civil War, June 1861


Colonel 2nd New York Cavalry


He was wounded again in the 1864 Atlanta, Georgia campaign


United States Minister to Chile


From the personal collection of Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin. Irwin has the distinct honor of being the first recipient of the Medal of Honor in U.S. military history by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


(1836-81) Born near Deckertown, New Jersey, he graduated in the West Point class of May 1861, and only a month after graduating from the academy he had the distinction of being the first Regular U.S. Army officer to be wounded in action during the Civil War, this coming at the battle of Big Bethel, Va., which took place on June 10, 1861, on the Virginia Peninsula, near Newport News. In September 1861, he became the lieutenant colonel, and in December, colonel of the 2nd New York Cavalry. He successively commanded his regiment, a brigade, and later a division of cavalry in the Army of the Potomac, playing a creditable role in virtually every important cavalry action in the eastern theater of war, including Beverly Ford, Stoneman's raid, and Gettysburg. He was promoted to brigadier general, June 14, 1863. In February 1864, he commanded the celebrated Richmond raid which was to free the Union prisoners there, but instead resulted in a fiasco and the death of Colonel Ulric Dahlgren, the son of Admiral John A. Dahlgren. Sent south by General U.S. Grant, he was wounded in the early part of the Atlanta campaign, at Resaca, Ga. He returned to duty in late July 1864 to finish that campaign which included several raids and skirmishes against his old classmate, General Joseph Wheeler. He then took part in Sherman's March to the Sea, and the 1865 Carolina's campaign. General William T. Sherman was quoted as saying, "I want just that sort of man to command my cavalry in this expedition!" Kilpatrick was an early member of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, a military society composed of officers who had served in the Union armed forces. He was appointed United States Minister to Chile, by President Andrew Johnson, and served from 1866-70. He became active in politics as a Republican, and in 1880, was an unsuccessful candidate for the U.S. Congress from his home state of New Jersey. In March 1881, in recognition of Kilpatrick's service to the Republican Party, in New Jersey, as well as a consolation prize for his defeat for a House seat, President James A. Garfield appointed Kilpatrick once again to the post of Minister to Chile. Kilpatrick died, on December 4, 1881, shortly after his arrival in the Chilean capital of Santiago. He was only 45 years old. His remains were returned to the United States in 1887, and were interred at the West Point Cemetery, United States Military Academy.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view, seated pose, wearing a double breasted frock with rank of brigadier general. He is holding his slouch hat on his lap, and you can see the stripes on his trousers. Maj. Genl. J. Kilpatrick, U.S.A. is written in period ink on the front mount. Back mark: C.D. Fredricks & Co., 587 Broadway, New York. Written in period ink in Irwin's hand on the reverse is, Maj. Genl. Judson Kilpatrick, U.S.A. Cavalry. Died Oct. 1881. 45. Genl. B.J.D. Irwin album, No. 129. The card mount is very slightly trimmed. Very fine image. Rare. (because of the provenance).


<u>History of United States Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin</u>


<b>Surgeon & General Irwin was the first United States Medal of Honor Recipient by date of action, February 13, 1861.</b>


(1830-1917) Born in County Roscommon, Ireland, he immigrated with his parents to the United States in the 1840s. He attended New York University from 1848 to 1849, and then served as a private in the New York Militia. In 1850, he entered Castleton Medical College, and he later transferred to New York Medical College, where he graduated in 1852.


He served as a surgeon and physician at the State Emigrant Hospital on Ward's Island, NYC, until his appointment as assistant surgeon in the U.S. Army in 1856. He was an assistant army surgeon during the Apache Wars, and was the first Medal of Honor recipient chronologically by date of action. His actions on February 13, 1861, at Apache Pass, Arizona, are the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded! The citation on his medal of honor reads; "Voluntarily took command of troops and attacked and defeated hostile Indians he met on the way. Surgeon Irwin volunteered to go to the rescue of 2d Lt. George N. Bascom, 7th U.S. Infantry, who, with 60 men, was trapped by Chiricahua Apaches under Cochise. Irwin and 14 men, not having horses, began the 100-mile march riding mules. After fighting and capturing Indians, recovering stolen horses and cattle, he reached Bascom's column and helped break his siege."


Cochise, the Apache Indian chief, and a group of Apache warriors were accused of kidnapping a boy and a small group of U.S. soldiers in the Arizona Territory after the Army had captured Cochise's brother and nephews. When the Army refused to make a prisoner exchange, Cochise killed his prisoners. Soldiers then killed Cochise's brother and nephews. 2nd Lieutenant George Nicholas Bascom led a group of 60 men from the 7th U.S. Infantry after Cochise but was soon besieged, prompting a rescue mission by the army. In response to the siege of Bascom and his men, Irwin set out on a rescue mission with 14 men of the 1st U.S. Dragoons. He was able to catch up with the Apaches at Apache Pass in present day Arizona. He strategically placed his small unit around Cochise and his men, tricking the Apache leader into thinking that he had a much larger army with him. The Apaches fled and Bascom and his men were saved. Bascom and his men joined Irwin and together they were able to track Cochise into the mountains & rescued the young boy that Cochise had captured.


The Medal of Honor did not exist during the time of the "Bascom Incident," and would not be established until a year later in 1862. However, the actions of Irwin were well remembered, and he was awarded the Medal of Honor just prior to his retirement. Irwin's actions were the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded, predating the outbreak of the American Civil War.


Irwin subsequently served with the Union army during the Civil War, and was promoted to captain in August 1861, and the next year was appointed medical director under Major General William "Bull" Nelson. He improvised one of the first field hospitals used by the U.S. Army at the Battle of Shiloh, on April 7, 1862. He was captured during the Battle of Richmond, Ky., while attempting to save the wounded General Nelson. He was promoted to major in September 1862, and after his release from a Rebel prison he became medical director in the Army of the Southwest. From 1863 to 1865, he was superintendent of the military hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, and in March of 1865, he was brevetted to the rank of colonel. He was a companion of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and the Order of the Indian Wars of the United States. After the Civil War, Irwin served as a senior medical officer at several U.S. army posts, including West Point from 1873 to 1878. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1885, to colonel in August 1890, and to brigadier general in April 1904. He died in Ontario, Canada, on December 15, 1917, and is buried in the West Point Cemetery, at the U.S. Military Academy, New York.


His son George LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1889, and served in World War I, becoming a Major General in the U.S. Army.


His grandson Stafford LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1915, and served in World War II, and became a Lieutenant General in the U.S. Army.


His daughter, Amy Irwin Addams McCormick, was a nurse with the American Red Cross and served during World War I.


General Irwin was an admirer and collector of photographs, and he put together a very large, and superb collection of Union and Confederate images. Interestingly, he collected photographs of both Rebel and Yankee alike. I have owned several famous military photograph albums before and never came across one that collected images from both sides of the rebellion. He numbered each individual image, and wrote a brief historical notation on each one. The collection was split up by another dealer, and by the time I found out about it, I was still very fortunate to be able to acquire about one third of his superb Civil War image collection. Each image is rare because it is "one of a kind" having come from the Irwin collection!


The image of B.J.D. Irwin pictured here is a copy photograph from the "Find a Grave" website and is used here for illustration purposes only.  


<b>Union commander who defeated General Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Gettysburg</b>


(1815-1872) He was born in Cádiz, Spain, to a wealthy merchant and banking family from Philadelphia. He graduated in the West Point class of 1835, and fought with distinction in the Second Seminole War, and the Mexican War where he earned a brevet for gallantry in the battles at Monterey. He served in the United States Army Corps of Topographical Engineers, and led construction of lighthouses in Florida and New Jersey from 1851 to 1856, and the United States Lake Survey from 1857 to 1861. He fought in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign, and in the Seven Days battles in Virginia where he was very severely wounded leading his brigade at Glendale. He recovered in time to fight at 2nd Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. Elevated to the command of the Army of the Potomac on the eve of the Gettysburg campaign, he defeated Confederate General Robert E. Lee, Commander of the famed Army of Northern Virginia, in the epic 3 day battle at Gettysburg, and went on to fight in all of their battles culminating in the surrender of General Lee at Appomattox Court House, Va., on April 9, 1865. He was well known for his notoriously short temper and disdain for the press, and earned the nickname of the "snapping turtle." After the war, he commanded the Military Division of the Atlantic from 1865 to 1866, the Department of the East from 1866 to 1868 and the Military Division of the Atlantic again from 1869 to 1872. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view in uniform with rank of major general. His kepi is just visible at the lower left. Back mark: E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. The corners of the mount are very slightly trimmed. Minor age toning and wear. Sharp image. Very desirable pose of the victorious Union commander at the battle of Gettysburg!  


<b>From the personal collection of Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin. Irwin has the distinct honor of being the first recipient of the Medal of Honor in U.S. military history by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 7/8 card. Features portraits of 100 Union Generals and Naval Officers in a collage format. Each individual person is identified by a number, and the corresponding numbers with their names are printed on the verso. Published by C.D. Fredricks & Co., 587 Broadway, N.Y. Card mount is very slightly trimmed. Very fine and interesting composite card of Union Civil War commanders. Nice way to acquire 100 portraits of Union leaders! From the personal collection of Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin. Irwin has the distinct honor of being the first recipient of the Medal of Honor in U.S. military history by date of action, February 13, 1861. Written on the verso is, Gen. B.J.D. Irwin Album No. 3.


<u>History of United States Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin</u>


<b>Surgeon & General Irwin was the first United States Medal of Honor Recipient by date of action, February 13, 1861.</b>


(1830-1917) Born in County Roscommon, Ireland, he immigrated with his parents to the United States in the 1840s. He attended New York University from 1848 to 1849, and then served as a private in the New York Militia. In 1850, he entered Castleton Medical College, and he later transferred to New York Medical College, where he graduated in 1852.


He served as a surgeon and physician at the State Emigrant Hospital on Ward's Island, NYC, until his appointment as assistant surgeon in the U.S. Army in 1856. He was an assistant army surgeon during the Apache Wars, and was the first Medal of Honor recipient chronologically by date of action. His actions on February 13, 1861, at Apache Pass, Arizona, are the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded! The citation on his medal of honor reads; "Voluntarily took command of troops and attacked and defeated hostile Indians he met on the way. Surgeon Irwin volunteered to go to the rescue of 2d Lt. George N. Bascom, 7th U.S. Infantry, who, with 60 men, was trapped by Chiricahua Apaches under Cochise. Irwin and 14 men, not having horses, began the 100-mile march riding mules. After fighting and capturing Indians, recovering stolen horses and cattle, he reached Bascom's column and helped break his siege."


Cochise, the Apache Indian chief, and a group of Apache warriors were accused of kidnapping a boy and a small group of U.S. soldiers in the Arizona Territory after the Army had captured Cochise's brother and nephews. When the Army refused to make a prisoner exchange, Cochise killed his prisoners. Soldiers then killed Cochise's brother and nephews. 2nd Lieutenant George Nicholas Bascom led a group of 60 men from the 7th U.S. Infantry after Cochise but was soon besieged, prompting a rescue mission by the army. In response to the siege of Bascom and his men, Irwin set out on a rescue mission with 14 men of the 1st U.S. Dragoons. He was able to catch up with the Apaches at Apache Pass in present day Arizona. He strategically placed his small unit around Cochise and his men, tricking the Apache leader into thinking that he had a much larger army with him. The Apaches fled and Bascom and his men were saved. Bascom and his men joined Irwin and together they were able to track Cochise into the mountains & rescued the young boy that Cochise had captured.


The Medal of Honor did not exist during the time of the "Bascom Incident," and would not be established until a year later in 1862. However, the actions of Irwin were well remembered, and he was awarded the Medal of Honor just prior to his retirement. Irwin's actions were the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded, predating the outbreak of the American Civil War.


Irwin subsequently served with the Union army during the Civil War, and was promoted to captain in August 1861, and the next year was appointed medical director under Major General William "Bull" Nelson. He improvised one of the first field hospitals used by the U.S. Army at the Battle of Shiloh, on April 7, 1862. He was captured during the Battle of Richmond, Ky., while attempting to save the wounded General Nelson. He was promoted to major in September 1862, and after his release from a Rebel prison he became medical director in the Army of the Southwest. From 1863 to 1865, he was superintendent of the military hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, and in March of 1865, he was brevetted to the rank of colonel. He was a companion of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and the Order of the Indian Wars of the United States. After the Civil War, Irwin served as a senior medical officer at several U.S. army posts, including West Point from 1873 to 1878. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1885, to colonel in August 1890, and to brigadier general in April 1904. He died in Ontario, Canada, on December 15, 1917, and is buried in the West Point Cemetery, at the U.S. Military Academy, New York.


His son George LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1889, and served in World War I, becoming a Major General in the U.S. Army.


His grandson Stafford LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1915, and served in World War II, and became a Lieutenant General in the U.S. Army.


His daughter, Amy Irwin Addams McCormick, was a nurse with the American Red Cross and served during World War I.


General Irwin was an admirer and collector of photographs, and he put together a very large, and superb collection of Union and Confederate images. Interestingly, he collected photographs of both Rebel and Yankee alike. I have owned several famous military photograph albums before and never came across one that collected images from both sides of the rebellion. He numbered each individual image, and wrote a brief historical notation on each one. The collection was split up by another dealer, and by the time I found out about it, I was still very fortunate to be able to acquire about one third of his superb Civil War image collection. Each image is rare because it is "one of a kind" having come from the Irwin collection!


The image of B.J.D. Irwin pictured here is a copy photograph from the "Find a Grave" website and is used here for illustration purposes only.   


<b>Recovered at Pickett's Charge Field, Gettysburg


From the famous Rosensteel Gettysburg collection</b>


Excavated, large size, flat coin button. It Measures 1 1/4 inches in diameter, and is complete with shank on the verso. Shows typical aging and wear with a green patina. Found in the field where Pickett's Charge occurred. It was recovered by the late Gettysburg relic hunter John Cullison, who excavated Civil War artifacts at Gettysburg from 1935-1959. Mr. Cullison passed it on to the famous Rosensteel family of Gettysburg where it remained in their private collection until it was released in 1996. Very fine Gettysburg relic.

CDV, General Hugh Judson Kilpatrick $175.00

 

CDV, General George G. Meade $125.00

 

CDV, Army and Navy U. S. V. $95.00

 

Flat Coin Button Excavated at Gettysburg




<b>He died while on active service in 1863


From the personal collection of Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin. Irwin has the distinct honor of being the first recipient of the Medal of Honor in U.S. military history by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


(1806-63) He entered the navy in 1822, and sailed in the West Indies, off Africa, and along the China coast. He was appointed commander of the western flotilla at the beginning of the Civil War, and in Feb. 1862, with the cooperation of Gen. U.S. Grant, captured Fort Henry on the Tennessee River. In the ensuing capture of Fort Donelson, Foote was wounded. He aided General John Pope on the Mississippi River, but his wound was not healing and he was obliged to take leave of his command. Having proved himself a gallant fighter on the rivers, he was awarded the Thanks of Congress, and appointed Rear Admiral, June 16, 1862. While still recuperating from his wound, he was put in charge of the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting, and on June 4, 1863 was given command of the fleet off Charleston, South Carolina. Unfortunately, Foote's wound never healed properly and he died enroute to his assignment on June 26, 1863.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 3/4 card. Standing view portrait wearing naval uniform with epaulets and holding his sword and chapeau. Back mark: Charles D. Fredricks & Co., 587 Broadway, New York. Card mount has been trimmed. This image came from the Surgeon and General Bernard J.D. Irwin collection. There is a period ink inscription written on the front mount, Foot, Commodore, U.S. Navy. Written in period ink in Irwin's hand on the reverse is, Commodore Foot, U.S. Navy, Comdg. Mississippi Squadron, 1862-3. Light age toning and wear. Rare. (because of the provenance).


<u>History of United States Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin</u>


<b>Surgeon & General Irwin was the first United States Medal of Honor Recipient by date of action, February 13, 1861.</b>


(1830-1917) Born in County Roscommon, Ireland, he immigrated with his parents to the United States in the 1840s. He attended New York University from 1848 to 1849, and then served as a private in the New York Militia. In 1850, he entered Castleton Medical College, and he later transferred to New York Medical College, where he graduated in 1852.


He served as a surgeon and physician at the State Emigrant Hospital on Ward's Island, NYC, until his appointment as assistant surgeon in the U.S. Army in 1856. He was an assistant army surgeon during the Apache Wars, and was the first Medal of Honor recipient chronologically by date of action. His actions on February 13, 1861, at Apache Pass, Arizona, are the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded! The citation on his medal of honor reads; "Voluntarily took command of troops and attacked and defeated hostile Indians he met on the way. Surgeon Irwin volunteered to go to the rescue of 2d Lt. George N. Bascom, 7th U.S. Infantry, who, with 60 men, was trapped by Chiricahua Apaches under Cochise. Irwin and 14 men, not having horses, began the 100-mile march riding mules. After fighting and capturing Indians, recovering stolen horses and cattle, he reached Bascom's column and helped break his siege."


Cochise, the Apache Indian chief, and a group of Apache warriors were accused of kidnapping a boy and a small group of U.S. soldiers in the Arizona Territory after the Army had captured Cochise's brother and nephews. When the Army refused to make a prisoner exchange, Cochise killed his prisoners. Soldiers then killed Cochise's brother and nephews. 2nd Lieutenant George Nicholas Bascom led a group of 60 men from the 7th U.S. Infantry after Cochise but was soon besieged, prompting a rescue mission by the army. In response to the siege of Bascom and his men, Irwin set out on a rescue mission with 14 men of the 1st U.S. Dragoons. He was able to catch up with the Apaches at Apache Pass in present day Arizona. He strategically placed his small unit around Cochise and his men, tricking the Apache leader into thinking that he had a much larger army with him. The Apaches fled and Bascom and his men were saved. Bascom and his men joined Irwin and together they were able to track Cochise into the mountains & rescued the young boy that Cochise had captured.


The Medal of Honor did not exist during the time of the "Bascom Incident," and would not be established until a year later in 1862. However, the actions of Irwin were well remembered, and he was awarded the Medal of Honor just prior to his retirement. Irwin's actions were the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded, predating the outbreak of the American Civil War.


Irwin subsequently served with the Union army during the Civil War, and was promoted to captain in August 1861, and the next year was appointed medical director under Major General William "Bull" Nelson. He improvised one of the first field hospitals used by the U.S. Army at the Battle of Shiloh, on April 7, 1862. He was captured during the Battle of Richmond, Ky., while attempting to save the wounded General Nelson. He was promoted to major in September 1862, and after his release from a Rebel prison he became medical director in the Army of the Southwest. From 1863 to 1865, he was superintendent of the military hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, and in March of 1865, he was brevetted to the rank of colonel. He was a companion of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and the Order of the Indian Wars of the United States. After the Civil War, Irwin served as a senior medical officer at several U.S. army posts, including West Point from 1873 to 1878. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1885, to colonel in August 1890, and to brigadier general in April 1904. He died in Ontario, Canada, on December 15, 1917, and is buried in the West Point Cemetery, at the U.S. Military Academy, New York.


His son George LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1889, and served in World War I, becoming a Major General in the U.S. Army.


His grandson Stafford LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1915, and served in World War II, and became a Lieutenant General in the U.S. Army.


His daughter, Amy Irwin Addams McCormick, was a nurse with the American Red Cross and served during World War I.


General Irwin was an admirer and collector of photographs, and he put together a very large, and superb collection of Union and Confederate images. Interestingly, he collected photographs of both Rebel and Yankee alike. I have owned several famous military photograph albums before and never came across one that collected images from both sides of the rebellion. He numbered each individual image, and wrote a brief historical notation on each one. The collection was split up by another dealer, and by the time I found out about it, I was still very fortunate to be able to acquire about one third of his superb Civil War image collection. Each image is rare because it is "one of a kind" having come from the Irwin collection!


The image of B.J.D. Irwin pictured here is a copy photograph from the "Find a Grave" website and is used here for illustration purposes only.        Another offering from our fifty plus years of seeking out all manner of 18th and 19th century treasures  with a personal interest in Maine Civil War (see: Maine Legacy .com) and <I>Little Round Top</I> Gettysburg related material, we had set this early post-Civil War <I>Horstman Brothers & Co.</I> frock aside for its association with <B>44th Massachusetts Infantry</B> <U>Little Round Top</U> veteran <B>Major Charles E. Sprague</B> (see: findagrave.com)  With period identification marking in the right shoulder sleeve and <I>Horstmann Brothers & Company Philadelphia</I> label, (1859-1893) this frock offers late Civil War, early post-Civil War features to include a nine button, three button sleeve configuration, with padded chest and  tail pockets.  ( With Waterbury backmarked buttons on this Horstman Brothers & Co. frock, we suspect the coat to have been converted to G. A. R. use from general military stock.)  With no condition issues and good evidence of period originality our illustrations will do best to describe this desirable frock coat.

      <B><I>Chas. E. Sprague</B></I> mustered in on September 25, 1862 as a Corporal of Co. E 44th NY Infantry Promoted to Sergeant on January 14, 1863.  With the hard fought 44th New York at Gettysburg where their loss on Little Round Top  was 111 in killed wounded and missing Sgt. Sprague would be counted among the fallen and would be discharged for disability from U. S. General Hospital on March 10, 1864.  He was breveted Captain in 1865 for his part in the Gettysburg action and would ultimately reach the rank of Major.   Returning to New York where he was active in business and as a veteran, Sprague died in in Manhattan in 1912. ( The New York Archives has a lengthy article written by Sprague on his military service.)  



 


<b>Commanded the 1st Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia


Severely wounded in the Battle of the Wilderness, Virginia in May 1864</b>


(1821-1904) Born in Edgefield District, South Carolina, he was one of the foremost Confederate generals of the Civil War, and the principal subordinate to General Robert E. Lee, who called him his "Old War Horse." An 1842 graduate of West Point, Longstreet fought in the Mexican War, and was wounded in the Battle of Chapultepec.  Throughout the 1850s, he served on the western  frontier.  In June 1861, he resigned his U.S. Army commission, and joined the Confederacy. He commanded Confederate troops during an early victory at Blackburn's Ford in July, in action at the First Battle of Manassas. Longstreet made significant contributions to most major Confederate victories, primarily in the Eastern Theater with the Army of Northern Virginia. He played an important role in the Confederate success during the Seven Days Battles in the summer of 1862, where he helped supervise repeated attacks which drove the Union army away from the Confederate capital of Richmond. Longstreet led a devastating counterattack that routed the Union army at the Second Battle of Manassas in August. He also played vital roles at the battles at Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg. Longstreet's most controversial service was at the Battle of Gettysburg in July 1863, where he openly disagreed with General Lee on the tactics to be employed, and reluctantly supervised several unsuccessful attacks on the Union forces who held the high ground. Sent to the Western Theater to aide General Braxton Bragg, his troops launched a ferocious assault on the Union lines at Chickamauga that carried the day. Returning east, he ably commanded troops during the Battle of the Wilderness in May 1864, where he was seriously wounded by friendly fire. He later returned to the field, serving under General Lee in the Siege of Petersburg, and in the Appomattox campaign. Longstreet enjoyed a successful post-war career working for the U.S. government as a diplomat, civil servant, and administrator. His support for the Republican Party, and his cooperation with his old pre-war friend, President Ulysses S. Grant, as well as critical comments he wrote about General  Robert E. Lee's wartime performance, made him anathema to many of his former Confederate colleagues.  Consequently, his detractors focused on Longstreet's  actions at Gettysburg as a principal reason for why the South lost the Civil War turning him into their personal scapegoat, actions that would prove unjustified. Longstreet's reputation has undergone a reassessment, and many Civil War historians now consider him among the war's most gifted tactical commanders.  General James Longstreet died in Gainesville, Georgia, on January 2, 1904, six days before his 83rd birthday. Bishop Benjamin Joseph Keiley, who had served under Longstreet during the war, said his funeral Mass. Longstreet's remains are buried in Alta Vista Cemetery in Gainesville.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view pose wearing his double breasted Confederate general's frock coat. Imprint on the front mount, "Gen. Longsteet." Back mark: The Monumental Photograph Company, No. 178 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore, Md. Light age toning and wear. Desirable pose with Maryland back mark.  


<b>Confederate Lieutenant General


Governor of Kentucky


From the personal collection of Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin. Irwin has the distinct honor of being the first recipient of the Medal of Honor in U.S. military history by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


(1823-1914) He was born at Glen Lily, his family's estate near Munfordville, Kentucky. His closest friend in Munfordville was Thomas J. Wood, who would become a Union Army general opposing Buckner at the Battles of Perryville, Ky., and at Chickamauga, Ga. during the Civil War. He graduated from West Point in the class of 1844, and later returned to the Military Academy to serve as an assistant professor of geography, history, and ethics. He was wounded and brevetted for gallantry in the Mexican War Battle of Churubusco, and was again cited for gallant conduct at the Battle of Molino del Rey, and was appointed a brevet captain. He fought in the Battle of Chapultepec, the Battle of Belen Gate, and the storming of Mexico City. At the conclusion of the war, American soldiers served as an army of occupation, and Buckner was accorded the honor of lowering the American flag over Mexico City for the last time during the occupation. Appointed adjutant general of Kentucky by Governor Beriah Magoffin in 1861, he tried to enforce Kentucky's neutrality policy in the early days of the Civil War, but when the state's neutrality was breached, Buckner accepted a commission in the Confederate Army. When his C.S.A. commission was approved, Union officials indicted him for treason, and seized his property. He was appointed a brigadier general on September 14, 1861, and saw action at Fort Donelson, Tenn. where he was forced to surrender the fort to his old friend and West Point classmate, General Ulysses S. Grant who demanded an  "unconditional surrender."  He was confined at Fort Warren prison in Boston for 5 months. After his release, he led a division in General Braxton Bragg's Kentucky campaign, and a corps at the battle of Chickamauga. He later received promotion to lieutenant general to rank from September 20, 1864. Near the end of the war he became chief of staff to General Edmund Kirby Smith in the Trans-Mississippi Department, and he later traveled to New Orleans, and arranged terms of surrender on May 26, 1865. The terms of Buckner's parole in Shreveport, Louisiana, on June 9, 1865, prevented his return to Kentucky for three years. He remained in New Orleans, worked on the staff of the Daily Crescent newspaper, engaged in a business venture, and served on the board of directors of a fire insurance company, of which he became president in 1867. Buckner returned to Kentucky when he was eligible in 1868, and became editor of the Louisville Courier newspaper. Like most former Confederate officers, he petitioned the United States Congress for the restoration of his civil rights as stipulated by the 14th Amendment. He recovered most of his property through lawsuits and regained much of his wealth through shrewd business deals. Buckner had a keen interest in politics and friends had been urging him to run for governor of Kentucky for years. Delegates to the 1887 state Democratic convention nominated Buckner unanimously for the office of governor, and he won the general election against his opponent William O. Bradley, and was appointed the 30th Governor of Kentucky, serving from 1887-1891. On a visit to the White House in 1904, Buckner asked President Theodore Roosevelt to appoint his only son as a cadet at West Point, and Roosevelt quickly agreed. His son Simon Bolivar Buckner Jr. would later serve in the U.S. Army as a Lieutenant General, and was killed at the Battle of Okinawa, making him the highest-ranking American to have been killed by enemy fire during World War II. Buckner became the last surviving Confederate soldier with the rank of lieutenant general. He died on January 8, 1914, and was buried in Frankfort Cemetery in Frankfort, Kentucky.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 7/8 card. The card mount has been trimmed. Early war, half view wearing his Kentucky State Guard uniform. Back mark: Charles D. Fredricks & Co., 587 Broadway, New York. This image came from the Surgeon and General Bernard J.D. Irwin collection. There is a period ink inscription written on the front mount, Maj. Genl. S.B. Buckner, C.S.A. Written in period ink in Irwin's hand on the reverse is, Maj. Genl. S.B. Buckner, C.S.A. This is image No. 182 in the Irwin collection as indicated on the reverse of the card. Rare. (because of the provenance).


<u>History of United States Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin</u>


<b>Surgeon & General Irwin was the first United States Medal of Honor Recipient by date of action, February 13, 1861.</b>


(1830-1917) Born in County Roscommon, Ireland, he immigrated with his parents to the United States in the 1840s. He attended New York University from 1848 to 1849, and then served as a private in the New York Militia. In 1850, he entered Castleton Medical College, and he later transferred to New York Medical College, where he graduated in 1852.


He served as a surgeon and physician at the State Emigrant Hospital on Ward's Island, NYC, until his appointment as assistant surgeon in the U.S. Army in 1856. He was an assistant army surgeon during the Apache Wars, and was the first Medal of Honor recipient chronologically by date of action. His actions on February 13, 1861, at Apache Pass, Arizona, are the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded! The citation on his medal of honor reads; "Voluntarily took command of troops and attacked and defeated hostile Indians he met on the way. Surgeon Irwin volunteered to go to the rescue of 2d Lt. George N. Bascom, 7th U.S. Infantry, who, with 60 men, was trapped by Chiricahua Apaches under Cochise. Irwin and 14 men, not having horses, began the 100-mile march riding mules. After fighting and capturing Indians, recovering stolen horses and cattle, he reached Bascom's column and helped break his siege."


Cochise, the Apache Indian chief, and a group of Apache warriors were accused of kidnapping a boy and a small group of U.S. soldiers in the Arizona Territory after the Army had captured Cochise's brother and nephews. When the Army refused to make a prisoner exchange, Cochise killed his prisoners. Soldiers then killed Cochise's brother and nephews. 2nd Lieutenant George Nicholas Bascom led a group of 60 men from the 7th U.S. Infantry after Cochise but was soon besieged, prompting a rescue mission by the army. In response to the siege of Bascom and his men, Irwin set out on a rescue mission with 14 men of the 1st U.S. Dragoons. He was able to catch up with the Apaches at Apache Pass in present day Arizona. He strategically placed his small unit around Cochise and his men, tricking the Apache leader into thinking that he had a much larger army with him. The Apaches fled and Bascom and his men were saved. Bascom and his men joined Irwin and together they were able to track Cochise into the mountains & rescued the young boy that Cochise had captured.


The Medal of Honor did not exist during the time of the "Bascom Incident," and would not be established until a year later in 1862. However, the actions of Irwin were well remembered, and he was awarded the Medal of Honor just prior to his retirement. Irwin's actions were the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded, predating the outbreak of the American Civil War.


Irwin subsequently served with the Union army during the Civil War, and was promoted to captain in August 1861, and the next year was appointed medical director under Major General William "Bull" Nelson. He improvised one of the first field hospitals used by the U.S. Army at the Battle of Shiloh, on April 7, 1862. He was captured during the Battle of Richmond, Ky., while attempting to save the wounded General Nelson. He was promoted to major in September 1862, and after his release from a Rebel prison he became medical director in the Army of the Southwest. From 1863 to 1865, he was superintendent of the military hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, and in March of 1865, he was brevetted to the rank of colonel. He was a companion of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and the Order of the Indian Wars of the United States. After the Civil War, Irwin served as a senior medical officer at several U.S. army posts, including West Point from 1873 to 1878. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1885, to colonel in August 1890, and to brigadier general in April 1904. He died in Ontario, Canada, on December 15, 1917, and is buried in the West Point Cemetery, at the U.S. Military Academy, New York.


His son George LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1889, and served in World War I, becoming a Major General in the U.S. Army.


His grandson Stafford LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1915, and served in World War II, and became a Lieutenant General in the U.S. Army.


His daughter, Amy Irwin Addams McCormick, was a nurse with the American Red Cross and served during World War I.


General Irwin was an admirer and collector of photographs, and he put together a very large, and superb collection of Union and Confederate images. Interestingly, he collected photographs of both Rebel and Yankee alike. I have owned several famous military photograph albums before and never came across one that collected images from both sides of the rebellion. He numbered each individual image, and wrote a brief historical notation on each one. The collection was split up by another dealer, and by the time I found out about it, I was still very fortunate to be able to acquire about one third of his superb Civil War image collection. Each image is rare because it is "one of a kind" having come from the Irwin collection!


The image of B.J.D. Irwin pictured here is a copy photograph from the "Find a Grave" website and is used here for illustration purposes only.

CDV, Admiral Andrew H. Foote $75.00

 

44th Mass Veteran - Horstmann Brothers & $525.00

 

CDV, General James Longstreet $395.00

 

CDV, General Simon B. Buckner $150.00




<b>Medal of Honor Recipient for gallantry in the battle of Franklin, Tennessee where he was wounded


From the personal collection of Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin. Irwin has the distinct honor of being the first recipient of the Medal of Honor in U.S. military history by date of action, February 13, 1861

</b>


(1828-1902) Born in Cedar Valley, Wayne County, Ohio, he graduated in the West Point class of 1852. His first assignment was on the western frontier where he was engaged in surveying railroads which ultimately led to him fighting Indians. Promoted to captain in 1861, he was on duty at Fort Washita, Indian Territory when the Civil War broke out, and he thus led his men to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Stanley fought in the battle of Wilson's Creek, Missouri, on August 10, 1861, after which President Lincoln appointed him brigadier general. He also saw action at New Madrid; Island No. 10; Iuka; Corinth; Stone's River; Murfreesboro; Tullahoma; Chattanooga; and in the Atlanta campaign. Stanley was appointed major general to rank from November 29, 1862. He was wounded in the battle of Franklin, Tennessee, November 30, 1864, earning himself distinction, and  the Medal of Honor for gallantry. While leading a counterattack against the Rebels, General Stanley was wounded in the neck at the same time that he had his horse shot out from under him.  Stanley remained in the United States Army after the Civil War, serving throughout the post-bellum years on the Indian frontier, commanding in the Dakota Territory, in the Yellowstone Expedition, in Texas where he crushed Indian raids, and in Santa Fe where he commanded the District of New Mexico. He later commanded the Department of Texas from 1884-92. From 1893-98 he was governor of the Soldiers' Home in Washington, D.C. General Stanley was interred at the United States Soldiers' and Airman's Home, National Cemetery in Washington, D.C. His only son, David Sheridan Stanley, named after his friend General Philip H. Sheridan, and five of his grandsons would all graduate from The United States Military Academy at West Point, N.Y.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Large bust view wearing double breasted frock coat with rank of major general. Back mark: Hoag & Quick's Art Palace, No. 100 4th St., opp. Post Office, Cincinnati, Ohio. Corners of the card mount are very slightly trimmed. This image came from the Surgeon and General Bernard J.D. Irwin collection. There is a period ink inscription written on the front mount, Maj. Genl. David Stanley, U.S.A. Written in period ink in Irwin's hand on the reverse is, Maj. Genl. David Stanley, Comdg. 4th Corps. There are a couple of more words but I am not sure what they say. This is image No. 65 in the Irwin collection as indicated on the reverse of the card. Excellent photograph. Rare.


<u>History of United States Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin</u>


<b>Surgeon & General Irwin was the first United States Medal of Honor Recipient by date of action, February 13, 1861.</b>


(1830-1917) Born in County Roscommon, Ireland, he immigrated with his parents to the United States in the 1840s. He attended New York University from 1848 to 1849, and then served as a private in the New York Militia. In 1850, he entered Castleton Medical College, and he later transferred to New York Medical College, where he graduated in 1852.


He served as a surgeon and physician at the State Emigrant Hospital on Ward's Island, NYC, until his appointment as assistant surgeon in the U.S. Army in 1856. He was an assistant army surgeon during the Apache Wars, and was the first Medal of Honor recipient chronologically by date of action. His actions on February 13, 1861, at Apache Pass, Arizona, are the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded! The citation on his medal of honor reads; "Voluntarily took command of troops and attacked and defeated hostile Indians he met on the way. Surgeon Irwin volunteered to go to the rescue of 2d Lt. George N. Bascom, 7th U.S. Infantry, who, with 60 men, was trapped by Chiricahua Apaches under Cochise. Irwin and 14 men, not having horses, began the 100-mile march riding mules. After fighting and capturing Indians, recovering stolen horses and cattle, he reached Bascom's column and helped break his siege."


Cochise, the Apache Indian chief, and a group of Apache warriors were accused of kidnapping a boy and a small group of U.S. soldiers in the Arizona Territory after the Army had captured Cochise's brother and nephews. When the Army refused to make a prisoner exchange, Cochise killed his prisoners. Soldiers then killed Cochise's brother and nephews. 2nd Lieutenant George Nicholas Bascom led a group of 60 men from the 7th U.S. Infantry after Cochise but was soon besieged, prompting a rescue mission by the army. In response to the siege of Bascom and his men, Irwin set out on a rescue mission with 14 men of the 1st U.S. Dragoons. He was able to catch up with the Apaches at Apache Pass in present day Arizona. He strategically placed his small unit around Cochise and his men, tricking the Apache leader into thinking that he had a much larger army with him. The Apaches fled and Bascom and his men were saved. Bascom and his men joined Irwin and together they were able to track Cochise into the mountains & rescued the young boy that Cochise had captured.


The Medal of Honor did not exist during the time of the "Bascom Incident," and would not be established until a year later in 1862. However, the actions of Irwin were well remembered, and he was awarded the Medal of Honor just prior to his retirement. Irwin's actions were the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded, predating the outbreak of the American Civil War.


Irwin subsequently served with the Union army during the Civil War, and was promoted to captain in August 1861, and the next year was appointed medical director under Major General William "Bull" Nelson. He improvised one of the first field hospitals used by the U.S. Army at the Battle of Shiloh, on April 7, 1862. He was captured during the Battle of Richmond, Ky., while attempting to save the wounded General Nelson. He was promoted to major in September 1862, and after his release from a Rebel prison he became medical director in the Army of the Southwest. From 1863 to 1865, he was superintendent of the military hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, and in March of 1865, he was brevetted to the rank of colonel. He was a companion of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and the Order of the Indian Wars of the United States. After the Civil War, Irwin served as a senior medical officer at several U.S. army posts, including West Point from 1873 to 1878. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1885, to colonel in August 1890, and to brigadier general in April 1904. He died in Ontario, Canada, on December 15, 1917, and is buried in the West Point Cemetery, at the U.S. Military Academy, New York.


His son George LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1889, and served in World War I, becoming a Major General in the U.S. Army.


His grandson Stafford LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1915, and served in World War II, and became a Lieutenant General in the U.S. Army.


His daughter, Amy Irwin Addams McCormick, was a nurse with the American Red Cross and served during World War I.


General Irwin was an admirer and collector of photographs, and he put together a very large, and superb collection of Union and Confederate images. Interestingly, he collected photographs of both Rebel and Yankee alike. I have owned several famous military photograph albums before and never came across one that collected images from both sides of the rebellion. He numbered each individual image, and wrote a brief historical notation on each one. The collection was split up by another dealer, and by the time I found out about it, I was still very fortunate to be able to acquire about one third of his superb Civil War image collection. Each image is rare because it is "one of a kind" having come from the Irwin collection!


The image of B.J.D. Irwin pictured here is a copy photograph from the "Find a Grave" website and is used here for illustration purposes only.

  


<b>Led Pickett's Charge, at Gettysburg, on July 3, 1863


With back mark of Tanner & Vanness, Lynchburg, Va.</b>


(1825-1875) Born in Richmond, Va., he graduated last in the West Point class of 1846, and was brevetted twice for gallantry in the Mexican War. Appointed brigadier general, January 14, 1862, he led a Confederate brigade with skill during the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign, and was severely wounded at Gaines's Mill. Serving with General James Longstreet's 1st Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, he was present at Fredericksburg and Suffolk, Va., and was promoted to major general, October 10, 1862. Pickett gained immortality at Gettysburg, on July 3, 1863, when his division spearheaded the assault on the strongly defended Union position on Cemetery Ridge. Forever known as "Pickett's Charge," the casualties in the assault were terrible. Pickett later commanded the Department of Virginia and North Carolina. In 1864, he fought in the Petersburg campaign, and in 1865 at Five Forks, Va. Following the war, Pickett feared prosecution for his execution of deserters and temporarily fled to Canada. An old Army friend, General Ulysses S. Grant, interceded on his behalf, and he returned to Virginia in 1866. He could not rejoin the Army, so he tried his hand at farming, then selling insurance. He died at age 50 in July 1875 at Norfolk, Va., from an "abscess of the liver." He is buried in Hollywood Cemetery, in Richmond, Va.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform. This war time view is apparently him as a major general. Back mark: Tanner & Vanness, Photographers, 124 Main Street, Lynchburg, Va. Ex-Bill Turner collection, the author of "Even More Confederate Faces." Light wear and foxing. Very scarce and desirable Confederate image.

 


<b>Commanded the 2nd Corps, Army of the Potomac at Gettysburg where he was seriously wounded


United States Presidential candidate in 1880


Known as "Hancock the Superb"</b>



His Childhood, Youth, Education, Military Career, Social and Domestic Life. By Frederick E. Goodrich. Published by B.B. Russell, Boston, 1886. Illustrated front piece of Hancock with a printed signature below his portrait. Tissue paper opposite the front piece. Illustrated. Brown cloth hardcover book, with black and ornate gold leaf trim on the spine, and at the top of the front of the book which includes a bust vignette of General Hancock. There is a large, beautiful printed Hancock signature in black that is embossed into the front cover. The title, "Life Of General Hancock" is in gold. 352 pages. The book measures 5 1/4 x 7 3/4, and it is very tightly bound with colorful end pages. It shows some light wear, and there are a couple of small stains visible on the end pages. Very fine and desirable book about "Hancock the Superb," who was seriously wounded on July 3, 1863, during Pickett's Charge, at the battle of Gettysburg.      


<b>General "Stonewall" Jackson was mortally wounded at Chancellorsville, Virginia on May 2, 1863</b>


(1824-1863) Born in Clarksburg, Virginia (now West Virginia), he graduated in the West Point class of 1846, a class that furnished 24 general officers to the Union and Confederate armies during The War Between the States. He earned the brevets of captain and major during the Mexican War distinguishing himself at the Battle of Chapultepec. He was an instructor at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Va., from 1851-61. When Virginia seceded from the Union in May 1861, Jackson joined the Confederate Army, and distinguished himself as a brigade commander at the 1st Battle of Manassas, on July 21, 1861. He appeared on the field of battle just in the nick of time to furnish crucial reinforcements to the Confederate forces, and beat back a fierce Union assault. Confederate General Barnard E. Bee, shouted encouragement to his men by saying, look there stands Jackson like a stonewall, rally around the Virginians! From that July day forward, the sobriquet "Stonewall" stuck with General Jackson forever! He waged a magnificent campaign of surprise and maneuver in the spring of 1862, against the Federal Army in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, in such places as Kernstown, Front Royal, Winchester, and Port Republic, in what became known as "Jackson's Valley Campaign. Using a combination of great audacity, excellent knowledge of the terrain, and the great ability to inspire his troops to great feats of marching and fighting, his men earned the nickname of "Jackson's Foot Cavalry." General Jackson was regarded by many military historians to be one of the most gifted tactical commanders in U.S. military history. He would go on to fight in the Seven Days Battles in Virginia, the Battles of Cedar Mountain, 2nd Manassas, Chantilly, Harpers Ferry, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville. It was at the Battle of Chancellorsville, one of General Robert E. Lee's greatest victories that Stonewall Jackson would have his date with destiny, and be mortally wounded by friendly fire on the evening of May 2, 1863. While returning from a night reconnaissance, Jackson and his staff came upon sentries of the 18th North Carolina Infantry, who mistook the group for a Union cavalry unit. In the confusion shots were fired and General Jackson was struck by 3 bullets, two in the left arm, and one in the right hand. Jackson's personal surgeon, Doctor Hunter Mc Guire, amputated his arm, and he was placed in an army ambulance and brought to a farmhouse at Guinea Station, Va., where he died 8 days later, on May 10, 1863, of complications from pneumonia. When General Robert E. Lee first learned of Jackson's wounding and the amputation of his left arm, he famously said you have lost your left arm, but I have lost my right arm, illustrating the place that Jackson held in Lee's eyes, and in his gallant Army of Northern Virginia. Lee wrote to Jackson after learning of his injuries: "Could I have directed events, I would have chosen for the good of the country to be disabled in your stead." Lee had not only lost a good friend, but his best tactical general. The loss of Jackson was catastrophic to the Confederacy. Historians believe that if Stonewall Jackson had been with Lee at Gettysburg, less than 2 months after Jackson's death, the epic 3 day battle in Pennsylvania may very well have had a much different outcome. General Jackson's body was moved to the Governor's Mansion in Richmond for the public to mourn, and then was brought back to his beloved Lexington, to be buried in Oak Grove Cemetery. Lexington, Va., was the town where Jackson taught at V.M.I., and owned the only house he ever owned in his lifetime. In 1870, his commander General Robert E. Lee, would join his old comrade in eternal rest, as Lee was interred not far away in the chapel of Washington College, in Lexington.  


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Seated view wearing a double breasted frock coat with rank of major general. He poses with his legs crossed showing off the high leather boots he is wearing, and at the right side of the view a portion of a tent flap is visible. This is a variant of the February 1862 Winchester, Va. portrait. It shows retouching, but it is possible that it is from a genuine seated print that is now lost to the ages. The known portrait of Jackson taken at the Winchester session is said to be Mrs. Jackson's favorite image of her husband. There is a period ink inscription on the front mount which simply reads, "Jackson." Nothing more needed to be said to introduce this hero of the Confederacy. There is also a blind stamp imprint of Bendann, Baltimore on the front mount. Back mark: Bendann Bros., 207 Baltimore St., Baltimore, with their logo and a 2 cents blue/green George Washington U.S. Internal Revenue Proprietary tax stamp on the verso. Very nice portrait of "Old Blue Light." Scarce and very desirable.


<u>WBTS Trivia</u>: Confederate General Stonewall Jackson was called "Old Blue Light" because his men said his blue eyes glowed with a bright blue light when the battle commenced.

CDV, General David S. Stanley $195.00

 

CDV, General George E. Pickett $950.00

 

Book, Life Of General Hancock $45.00

 

CDV, General Thomas J. Stonewall Jackson $495.00




<b>1862 Barnard & Gibson image</b>


Wet plate, albumen photograph, mounted to 2 1/2 x 4 card. Imprint on the front mount, Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1862, by Barnard & Gibson, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Columbia. Partial imprint on the verso, Headquarters Lafayette-Headquarters General Porter. Farnhold's House and York River in the Distance. 


This view shows Union soldiers, and negro servants in the foreground in front of a wooden building with a portico at the entrance. A large Union camp is visible in the background with numerous tents. The top part of the photographic label on the reverse has been lifted off. The name "Adelbert" is written in old period ink at that part. [This is Brady view No. 370]. The bottom part reads, Headquarters Lafayette-Headquarters Gen'l Porter, Farnold's House and York River in the Distance. The reference to Lafayette in the imprint is that of the Marquis de Lafayette. He apparently used this building for his headquarters during the Virginia campaign in the American Revolution circa 1781. General Porter is Fitz John Porter. Light age toning, and wear to the corners of the card, and the verso. Nice content. 


  


<b>Served under General J.E.B. Stuart in the famous Black Horse Cavalry


Severely wounded and captured at Williamsburg, Va. in May 1862


Wounded and captured at Hanover, Pa. in the Gettysburg Campaign in July 1863


Badly wounded at the Battle of Five Forks, Va., and captured in April 1865 on the same night of the Lincoln Assassination</b>


(1830-1904) Born in Fauquier County, Virginia, he graduated from the Virginia Military Institute in 1849, and the following year from the University of Virginia where he studied law, and established a law practice in Warrenton, in 1851. He served as the Commonwealth's Attorney for Fauquier County. Payne enlisted in early 1861 as a private, and participated in the occupation of Harpers Ferry, Va., in April during the first days of the war. Later in the year, he became a captain in the famed Black Horse Cavalry, serving under General J.E.B. Stuart. He was promoted to major of the 4th Virginia Cavalry, and commanded the regiment at the Battle of Williamsburg, Va., where he was severely wounded and captured by Union forces. After being exchanged, he returned to duty as lieutenant colonel and fought in the Chancellorsville Campaign, and during the subsequent Gettysburg Campaign, he was captured at the Battle of Hanover, just outside of Gettysburg. He was thrown from his horse and awkwardly landed into a nearby open vat of tanning liquid. He was imprisoned at Johnson's Island, Ohio, and after his release he was promoted to brigadier general, in November 1864. Payne led a brigade in General Jubal A. Early's Shenandoah Valley Campaigns of 1864, where he fought in the battles of Opequon, Fisher's Hill, and Cedar Creek. During the final operations in early 1865 around Richmond, he commanded a cavalry brigade under General Fitzhugh Lee, and was badly wounded at Five Forks in April 1865. Unable to move to join his command, he fell into the hands of the Yankees on the same night that President Lincoln was assassinated in Washington. During his two incarcerations at Johnson's Island Prison, Payne spent more than 14 months there. On his final stay there he was released  on May 29, 1865. After the war, Payne returned to his Virginia law practice, and was the general counsel for the Southern Railway Company. He was elected to the Virginia State Legislature in the session of 1879–80. He died in Washington, D.C. on March 29, 1904, and is buried in Warrenton, Va.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. The corners of the card mount are very slightly trimmed. Bust view wearing a double breasted frock coat with rank of brigadier general. General Payne sat for this image in the winter months of 1864-65. Prior to 1991, this was an unpublished view of him. A copy of this photo is now in the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond, Va. Light foxing. Back mark: Selby & Dulany, Booksellers and Stationers, 332 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore. Rare and very desirable image of this gallant Confederate general who was wounded 3 times, and captured 3 times, in The War Between the States!      


<b>Wounded at the Battle of Shiloh, Tennessee in April 1862


From the personal collection of Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin. Irwin has the distinct honor of being the first recipient of the Medal of Honor in U.S. military history by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


(1815-73) Born at the Rural Felicity Plantation in Camden County, Georgia, he would become known as "Old Reliable" during his Civil War career. He graduated in the West Point class of 1838, and was commissioned 2nd lieutenant in the 2nd U.S. Dragoons upon his graduation. He fought in the Mexican War and was brevetted for gallantry at Medelin, Vera Cruz and St. Augustin. He was second in command to Captain Seth B. Thornton, when they were ambushed and surrounded by Mexican troops and subsequently captured on April 25, 1846, at Carricitos Ranch, Texas, during what would become known as the "Thornton Affair." He was exchanged on May 11th. Now serving under General Winfield Scott, Captain Hardee was wounded in a skirmish at La Rosia, Mexico, in 1847, which was about 30 miles above Matamoros. After the war, he led units of Texas Rangers and soldiers in Texas.  Afterwards, he served as the commandant of cadets at West Point, from 1856-60. He wrote the standard textbook, "Rifle and Light Infantry Tactics," at the behest of the U.S. Secretary of War at the time, Jefferson Davis. It was later used by both the Union and Confederate armies and it became the best known drill manual in the Civil War. He is also said to have designed the "Hardee" hat about this time. When his native state of Georgia seceded from the Union, he resigned his lieutenant colonelcy in the U.S. Army, and was appointed brigadier general in the Confederacy on June 17, 1861, and major general on October 7th. His initial assignment was to organize a brigade of Arkansas regiments and he impressed his men and fellow officers by solving difficult supply problems and for the thorough training he gave his brigade. He received his nickname of "Old Reliable" while with this command. General Hardee operated in Arkansas until he was called to join General Albert Sidney Johnston's Army of Central Kentucky as a corps commander. Johnston would withdraw from Kentucky and Tennessee, into Mississippi, before launching a surprise attack at the Battle of Shiloh in the spring of 1862. Hardee was wounded in the arm on April 6, 1862, during the first day of the battle. General Albert Sidney Johnston was killed at Shiloh, and Hardee's corps joined General Braxton Bragg's Army of Tennessee prior to the Siege of Corinth, Mississippi, until Department Commander P.G.T. Beauregard evacuated the town and withdrew to Tupelo. General Beauregard was replaced by General Braxton Bragg, who subsequently moved his army to Chattanooga before embarking on his Heartland Offensive into Kentucky. That campaign concluded with the Battle of Perryville on October 8, 1862, where Hardee commanded the Left Wing of Bragg's army. He was promoted to lieutenant general to rank from October 10, 1862, becoming one of the first Confederate officers to achieve that rank. In arguably his most successful battle, at Murfreesboro, Tenn., which was fought from December 31, 1862, to January 2, 1863, his 2nd Corps launched a massive surprise assault upon the right flank of General William S. Rosecrans's army, driving it almost to defeat, but again, as had happened at Perryville, General Bragg failed to follow up his tactical success, opting instead to withdraw before the arrival of Union reinforcements. After the Tullahoma Campaign, Hardee lost patience with the irascible Bragg and briefly commanded the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana under General Joseph E. Johnston. General Hardee returned to Bragg's army after the Battle of Chickamauga, taking over the corps of General Leonidas Polk at Chattanooga, Tenn., besieging the Union army there. During the Chattanooga Campaign in November 1863, Hardee's Corps of the Army of Tennessee was defeated when Union troops under General George H. Thomas assaulted their seemingly impregnable defensive lines at the Battle of Missionary Ridge. Hardee renewed his opposition to serving under Bragg and joined a group of officers who finally convinced Confederate President Jefferson Davis to relieve Bragg. General Hardee was then given temporary command of the Army of Tennessee before General Joseph E. Johnston took over command at Dalton, Ga. In February 1864, Johnston was ordered to dispatch Hardee to Alabama, to reinforce General Polk against General Sherman's Meridian Campaign. Following Sherman's withdrawal to Vicksburg, Hardee was once again sent back to Georgia, where he joined Johnston's army for the Atlanta Campaign. As Johnston fought a war of maneuver and retreat against General William T. Sherman, President Davis eventually lost patience with him and replaced him with the much more aggressive General John Bell Hood. Hardee could not abide Hood's reckless assaults and heavy casualties. After the Battle of Jonesboro, Ga., that August and September, he requested a transfer and was sent to command the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. He opposed General Sherman's March to the Sea as best he could with inadequate forces, eventually being forced to evacuate Savannah, Ga. on December 20, 1864. Subsequently Sherman presented the city to President Lincoln as a Christmas gift. As Sherman turned north in the Carolina's Campaign, Hardee took part in the Battle of Bentonville, North Carolina, in March 1865, where his only son, 16 year old Willie, was mortally wounded in a cavalry charge. General Johnston's plan for Bentonville was for Hardee to engage one of Sherman's wings at Averasborough so that Johnston could deal with one wing piecemeal. The plan was unsuccessful, and he surrendered with Johnston's army to Sherman on April 26, 1865, at Durham Station, N.C. After the war, Hardee settled at his wife's Alabama plantation. After returning it to working condition, the family moved to Selma, Alabama, where he worked in the warehousing and insurance businesses. He eventually became president of the Selma and Meridian Railroad. Hardee was the co-author of "The Irish in America," published in 1868. He fell ill at his family's summer retreat at White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia, and died in Wytheville, Va. on November 6, 1873. He is buried in Live Oak Cemetery, Selma, Alabama.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Vignetted bust view wearing a double breasted frock coat with part of an epaulet visible on his shoulder. This view is thought to be of Hardee in his U.S. Army uniform taken just before the start of the war. Since so many Confederate officers wore their old army uniforms into the Civil War, Stonewall Jackson among them, it is impossible to state whether or not this was the uniform he wore during the early days of the Confederacy. This image came from the personal collection of Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin. Irwin has the distinct honor of being the first recipient of the Medal of Honor in U.S. military history by date of action, February 13, 1861. Ink inscription written by Irwin on the front mount, Lt. Genl. W.J. Hardee, C.S.A., and on the verso he has written Lt. Genl. W.J. Hardee, C.S.A., Died Nov. 6/63. At 58. (He apparently absentmindedly wrote '63 instead of '73). This is image No. 126 in the Irwin collection as indicated on the reverse of the card. Light surface brushing in the background area. Very fine. Rare.


<u>History of United States Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin</u>


<b>Surgeon & General Irwin was the first United States Medal of Honor Recipient by date of action, February 13, 1861.</b>


(1830-1917) Born in County Roscommon, Ireland, he immigrated with his parents to the United States in the 1840s. He attended New York University from 1848 to 1849, and then served as a private in the New York Militia. In 1850, he entered Castleton Medical College, and he later transferred to New York Medical College, where he graduated in 1852.


He served as a surgeon and physician at the State Emigrant Hospital on Ward's Island, NYC, until his appointment as assistant surgeon in the U.S. Army in 1856. He was an assistant army surgeon during the Apache Wars, and was the first Medal of Honor recipient chronologically by date of action. His actions on February 13, 1861, at Apache Pass, Arizona, are the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded! The citation on his medal of honor reads; "Voluntarily took command of troops and attacked and defeated hostile Indians he met on the way. Surgeon Irwin volunteered to go to the rescue of 2d Lt. George N. Bascom, 7th U.S. Infantry, who, with 60 men, was trapped by Chiricahua Apaches under Cochise. Irwin and 14 men, not having horses, began the 100-mile march riding mules. After fighting and capturing Indians, recovering stolen horses and cattle, he reached Bascom's column and helped break his siege."


Cochise, the Apache Indian chief, and a group of Apache warriors were accused of kidnapping a boy and a small group of U.S. soldiers in the Arizona Territory after the Army had captured Cochise's brother and nephews. When the Army refused to make a prisoner exchange, Cochise killed his prisoners. Soldiers then killed Cochise's brother and nephews. 2nd Lieutenant George Nicholas Bascom led a group of 60 men from the 7th U.S. Infantry after Cochise but was soon besieged, prompting a rescue mission by the army. In response to the siege of Bascom and his men, Irwin set out on a rescue mission with 14 men of the 1st U.S. Dragoons. He was able to catch up with the Apaches at Apache Pass in present day Arizona. He strategically placed his small unit around Cochise and his men, tricking the Apache leader into thinking that he had a much larger army with him. The Apaches fled and Bascom and his men were saved. Bascom and his men joined Irwin and together they were able to track Cochise into the mountains & rescued the young boy that Cochise had captured.


The Medal of Honor did not exist during the time of the "Bascom Incident," and would not be established until a year later in 1862. However, the actions of Irwin were well remembered, and he was awarded the Medal of Honor just prior to his retirement. Irwin's actions were the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded, predating the outbreak of the American Civil War.


Irwin subsequently served with the Union army during the Civil War, and was promoted to captain in August 1861, and the next year was appointed medical director under Major General William "Bull" Nelson. He improvised one of the first field hospitals used by the U.S. Army at the Battle of Shiloh, on April 7, 1862. He was captured during the Battle of Richmond, Ky., while attempting to save the wounded General Nelson. He was promoted to major in September 1862, and after his release from a Rebel prison he became medical director in the Army of the Southwest. From 1863 to 1865, he was superintendent of the military hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, and in March of 1865, he was brevetted to the rank of colonel. He was a companion of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and the Order of the Indian Wars of the United States. After the Civil War, Irwin served as a senior medical officer at several U.S. army posts, including West Point from 1873 to 1878. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1885, to colonel in August 1890, and to brigadier general in April 1904. He died in Ontario, Canada, on December 15, 1917, and is buried in the West Point Cemetery, at the U.S. Military Academy, New York.


His son George LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1889, and served in World War I, becoming a Major General in the U.S. Army.


His grandson Stafford LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1915, and served in World War II, and became a Lieutenant General in the U.S. Army.


His daughter, Amy Irwin Addams McCormick, was a nurse with the American Red Cross and served during World War I.


General Irwin was an admirer and collector of photographs, and he put together a very large, and superb collection of Union and Confederate images. Interestingly, he collected photographs of both Rebel and Yankee alike. I have owned several famous military photograph albums before and never came across one that collected images from both sides of the rebellion. He numbered each individual image, and wrote a brief historical notation on each one. The collection was split up by another dealer, and by the time I found out about it, I was still very fortunate to be able to acquire about one third of his superb Civil War image collection. Each image is rare because it is "one of a kind" having come from the Irwin collection!


The image of B.J.D. Irwin pictured here is a copy photograph from the "Find a Grave" website and is used here for illustration purposes only.

    

 


<b>General-in-Chief of the U.S. Army during the Civil War, 1862-64</b>


(1815-1872) Born on a farm in Westernville, Oneida County, New York, his father fought as an officer in the War of 1812. He graduated 3rd in the West Point class of 1839, and became a noted expert in military studies earning the nickname, "Old Brains," which was later turned around to mock him by fellow officers. An assistant professor while still an undergraduate at the United States Military Academy, he first worked upon the fortifications of New York Harbor, and in 1844 inspected those of France. Upon his return to the U.S., he wrote a "Report on the Means of National Defence," which was published by Congress and won him an invitation from the Lowell Institute of Boston to deliver a series of lectures. These were published as "Elements of Military Art and Science," a work which enjoyed wide circulation among soldiers for many years. He received a brevet as captain in the Mexican War. At the beginning of the Civil War, General Winfield Scott recommended to President Abraham Lincoln that Halleck be appointed major general in the regular army. In November 1861, Halleck relieved General John Fremont at St. Louis, and in a demonstration of his talents as an administrator quickly brought order out of the chaos in which his predecessor had plunged the Department of the Missouri. He had a series of successes  at Forts Henry & Donelson, Pea Ridge, Island No. 10 and Shiloh. President Lincoln later called him to Washington to serve as general-in-chief of the U.S. Armies a position he held from 1862-64. After General Ulysses S. Grant Grant forced General Lee's surrender at Appomattox Court House, Halleck was assigned to the command of the Military Division of the James, headquartered at Richmond. Halleck was a cautious general who believed strongly in thorough preparations for battle, and in the value of defensive fortifications over quick, aggressive action. He was a master of administration, logistics, and the politics that were necessary at the top of the military hierarchy. He was an important participant in the admission of California as a state in the Union, and was a principal author of the California State Constitution. General Halleck was present at the death bed of President Abraham Lincoln, and was a pall bearer at his funeral. He died at his post in Louisville, Kentucky, on January 9, 1872, just 7 days short of his 57th birthday. He was buried in the family plot in Greenwood Cemetery, in Brooklyn, New York, on January 25th. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Standing view wearing a double breasted frock coat with rank of major general as he holds his kepi at his waist while posing in front of a large studio column. Back mark: E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York, with a 2 cents orange George Washington Internal Revenue tax stamp. Very fine.

CDV, Headquarters of General Lafayette &

 

CDV, General William Henry Fitzhugh Payn

 

CDV, General William J. Hardee $185.00

 

CDV, General Henry W. Halleck $100.00




<b>In the Battle of Gettysburg, Tyler's 130 guns pounded General George E. Pickett's advancing Confederate columns as they attempted to storm Cemetery Ridge, on July 3, 1863


Colonel of the 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery


Wounded in action at the Battle of Cold Harbor, Va. in June 1864</b>


(1831-74) A nephew of Union General Daniel Tyler, he was born in Hunter, New York, graduated from West Point in 1853, and entered the artillery branch of the U.S. service. At the military academy he was classmates of future Union generals James B. McPherson (KIA in 1864), and General John M. Schofield. In April 1861, he was an unexpected witness of the bombardment of Fort Sumter at the time being a member of the expedition that President Lincoln sent to relieve the fort. Tyler was commissioned Colonel of the 4th Connecticut Infantry in September 1861. They had previously performed badly in the Shenandoah Valley campaign, so when he took over command of the regiment he whipped them into shape and in January 1862 they were reconstituted as the 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He later saw yeoman service in General George B. McClellan's 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign. Although moving heavy guns is a very difficult undertaking, Tyler lost only one gun in the entire campaign. At the battle of Fredericksburg, he commanded the artillery of General Joseph Hooker's "Center Grand Division," and he was in charge of the Artillery Reserve at the Battle of Chancellorsville, Va. At Gettysburg his 130 guns pounded General George E. Pickett's advancing Confederate columns as they attempted to cross the Emmitsburg Pike, and storm Cemetery Ridge, on that hot fateful day of July 3, 1863. Tyler commanded a brigade of General John Gibbon's division, of the 2nd corps at Spotsylvania, and at Cold Harbor, he was cited for his great gallantry. Struck by a bullet in his ankle during the fighting, it would not only lame him permanently, but it would bring about his death at a young age. By the end of the war, Tyler was a major general in the Regular United States Army. He died in Boston, Mass., at the age of 42, and is buried in Cedar Hill Cemetery in Hartford, Conn. Before he died, he did manage to complete his autobiography, titled the "Memoir of Brevet Major General Robert Ogden Tyler," J.B. Lippincott, Philadelphia, 1878. The Robert O. Tyler Post #50, of the Grand Army of the Republic, in Hartford, was named in his honor.   


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of colonel. Bold period ink ID on the front mount, R.O. Tyler, Col. 1st C.V.A. [Connecticut Volunteer Artillery]. Back mark: R.W. Addis, Photographer, 308 Penna. Ave., Washington, D.C. Corners of the mount are slightly trimmed. Light scattered foxing. Scarce early war view.  


<b>1865 Autograph Endorsement Signed


Recommendation for captain of the 20th N.Y.S.M.</b>


(1833-99) Born in New York, he was appointed to West Point, and graduated in 1855, and assigned to the 1st U.S. Artillery who he fought with in the Third Seminole Indian War. When the Civil War began, Turner was quickly promoted to captain, and he served on the staff of General David Hunter, first in Kansas, then in the Department of the South where he rendered valuable services at the battle of Fort Pulaski, Ga. On June 13, 1863, Turner was appointed chief of staff in the Department of the South under General Quincy A. Gillmore, and participated in the operations against Charleston, South Carolina. On September 6, 1863, he was awarded a brevet promotion to Major, U.S. Army for his service at Battery Wagner, where the gallant 54th Massachuseets Colored Regiment commanded by Colonel Robert Gould Shaw led the assault. The following day he was appointed brigadier general of U.S. Volunteers. In May 1864, General Gillmore's 10th Corps was transferred to the Petersburg, Va., front and Turner continued as chief of staff through the Bermuda Hundred Campaign. On June 22, 1864, he received his first infantry command of the war at the head of the 2nd Division, 10th Corps. Turner and his division participated in the Siege of Petersburg, and during the winter of 1864-65, he served as chief of staff of the Army of the James. The defeat of the  Confederate forces in the Shenandoah Valley freed up available units in General Philip H. Sheridan's Army of the Shenandoah to be sent to the Petersburg front and in March, General Turner assumed command of the Independent Division of reinforcements from the recently victorious Army of the Shenandoah. Despite its name, Turner's Independent Division was attached to the newly created 24th Corps under General John Gibbon. At the end of the Petersburg Campaign, Gibbon's corps was assigned the task of assaulting Forts Gregg and Whitworth. Turner's division was split between the two forts, sending one brigade against the lesser Fort Whitworth, while the other two joined General Robert S. Foster in the main attack against Fort Gregg. Turner received praise from his commanding officers for gallant services at Petersburg, and after the fall of the city, he participated in the forced march to Appomattox Courthouse, where he and other troops of the Army of the James directly intercepted General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Turner remained in command of the 24th Corps, and was responsible for overseeing occupied Virginia. He then commanded the District of Henrico, Virginia, including Richmond, the former Confederate capital, from June 9, 1865 until April 6, 1866, and the entire Department of Virginia, from April 7th until May 17th. Part of his responsibility in Virginia was re-establishing the local government and persuading it to take the responsibility for law enforcement as well as support of the unemployed persons both former Rebel soldiers and former slaves! This proved especially problematic, as Richmond's long-time mayor, Joseph C. Mayo used vagrancy laws against black persons, and the vast majority of those fed by soup kitchens were African Americans. Thus, General Turner ordered his men not to follow Mayo's orders until Governor Francis Pierpont replaced him with city council president David J. Saunders, who was also appointed head of the city run gasworks and waterworks. John W.Turner continued as major general in the U.S. Army until 1871, and commanded the purchasing depot and commissary in St. Louis, Missouri from October 31, 1866 to February 1871, and he resigned from the regular army on September 4, 1871. Upon retiring from the army, he settled in St. Louis, where he became a prominent citizen. He worked as a banker, civil engineer and served more than a decade as commissioner of streets and public works until his death. General Turner died in St. Louis, on April 8, 1899, and was buried in Calvary Cemetery in St. Louis.


<u>1865 Autograph Endorsement Signed</u>: 7 1/2 x 9 1/2, in ink, with the endorsement by General Turner on the verso. The front page is a letter written by Brevet Major W.W. Beckwith, U.S.V. & Assistant Provost Marshal.


Office of the Provost Marshal

Head Quarters Dist. of Henrico

Richmond, Va., Dec. 16th, 1865


This is to certify that I am personally acquainted with Capt. Charles S. Parker, 20th N.Y.S.M. During my acquaintances with him his conduct as an officer in the army has been such as to merit the approval and praise of his superior officers. While the Regiment served under the orders of Brig. Genl. M.R. Patrick, Captain Parker's gentlemanly qualities were so well recognized as to induce his selection for the discharge of delicate and important duties.


W.W. Beckwith

Capt. 20th N.Y.S.M.

& Brevet Major U.S.V.

Asst. Pro. Marshal


The autograph endorsement signed by General Turner on the verso is as follows: 


Hd. Qrs. Dist. Henrico

Richmond, Va.

Dec. 18, 1865


The endorsement of Maj. Beckwith is cordially recommended.


Jno. W. Turner

Bvt. Maj. Genl.

Comdg.


Very fine. Excellent content and endorsement.  


<b>Famous for his American flag dispatch, "If anyone attempts to haul down the American flag, shoot him on the spot!" This became a clarion call in the North during the Civil War!


New York Secretary of State


United States Senator from New York


Governor of New York</b> 


(1798-1879) Born in Boscawen, New Hampshire, he joined the U.S. Army in 1813, and served until 1828.  In 1830, he was appointed by Governor Enos T. Throop as Adjutant General of the New York State Militia. Was New York Secretary of State, 1833-39, and served as a member of the New York State Assembly in 1842, and was elected to the United States Senate, serving 1845-49. In 1853, Dix was president of the Mississippi and Missouri Railroad. He was Postmaster of New York City 1860-61. In 1861, President Buchanan appointed him U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, and on January 29, 1861, he made his famous American flag dispatch to a treasury official in New Orleans, "If anyone attempts to haul down the American flag, shoot him on the spot!" Commissioned Major General by President Abraham Lincoln, on May 16, 1861, he was first on this list, thus outranking all other volunteer officers during the Civil War. At the beginning of the war he arrested six members of the Maryland General Assembly and prevented Maryland from seceding from the Union, which earned him President Lincoln's gratitude and praise. That winter, he commanded an organization known as "Dix's Command" within General George B. McClellan's Department of the Potomac. Dix commanded the Department of Virginia from June 1862 until July 1863, and the Department of the East from July 1863 until April 1865. On July 22, 1862, General Dix and Confederate General Daniel H. Hill made an agreement for the general exchange of prisoners between the Union and Confederate armies. This agreement became known as the "Dix-Hill Cartel." It established a scale of equivalents, where an officer would be exchanged for a fixed number of enlisted men, and also allowed for the parole of prisoners, who would undertake not to serve in a military capacity until officially exchanged. The cartel worked well for a while, but it ended up breaking down when Confederate officials insisted on treating black prisoners as fugitive slaves and returning them to their previous owners. He made an important and distinguished contribution to the Union cause when he suppressed the 1863 New York City draft riots. General Dix was active in the defense of Suffolk, Virginia, which was part of his department. He served as the chairman of the 1866 National Union Convention. He was U.S. Minister to France, 1866-69, and Governor of New York, 1873-74.


<u>War Date Autograph Letter Signed</u>:  1 page, 5 x 8, in ink, on imprinted letter sheet.


Head Quarters, Department of the East, New York City, 20 Feby 1864


Let us have no compromise with the authors of rebellion, who have cost the country half a million lives. When they are expelled, let us make peace on just terms with those, whom they have deceived, deprived, and oppressed. 


John A. Dix

Maj. Genl. 


Other than a tiny paper chip at the extreme upper right edge of the letter sheet, that does not affect any of the content, this letter is in very fine condition, and is bold and neatly written. Excellent patriotic content by General Dix.   Offered here in eye appealing as found and as used condition is this pair of early Augustus Buermann hand forged sheet iron spurs.  A staple of the old west, appreciated for their affordability and prized for their comfort and  durability, the Buermann <I>tin-belly</I> Eureka Style Spur was once the most popular among 1870s working cowboys.  The first commercial offering by German immigrant and American Civil War veteran Augustus Buermann (Co. B 9th New Jersey Infantry) these early hand forged so-called <I>tin belly</I> spurs saw heavy use in the period tending to be used up and eventually cast aside leaving a precious few matched pairs surviving.  This all original pair remain in sound unmolested condition demonstrate that desirable natural age patina and evidence of period wear that collector / historians covet.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

CDV, General Robert O. Tyler $100.00

 

Autograph, General John W. Turner $125.00

 

Autograph, General John A. Dix $250.00

 

Early production August Buermann - Ha $95.00

Set here with a period quarter for size comparison, this attractive <B> No3 MABIE TODD & CO PAT AUG 14 77 </B>marked dipping pen measures 5 7/8 inches in length to include its original tapered shank gold nib.  All original and in fine condition this eye catching ink pen will make a nice addition laid out with a period document, letter, journal or simply displayed with a period ink stand or desk. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 This Civil War import combination screwdriver features a 3 5/8 inch long walnut grip with iron ferrule and was designed to accept a double ended driver blade especially designed to properly fit the thin slotted hammer and utility screws used in many of the earlier to mid-1800 muskets.  Originally issued with the Austrian Mod.1854 Lorenz, these handy accoutrements found their way to this continent in limited numbers as they accompanied what was considered one of the better Civil War import arms used by both Union and Confederate. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


       Best described here as to condition by our photo illustrations, this Grant family CDV remains in pleasing condition as it depicts  Civil War Gen. Ulysses S. Grant gathered with his family.  Rendered in 1863, this photo captures (left to right)  Ellen <I>‘Nellie’</I> Wrenshall Grant, Gen. Grant, Jesse Root Grant, Frederick Dent Grant, Mrs. Julia Dent Grant and middle son  Ulysses "Buck" Simpson Grant Jr.  

      By all accounts a doting, devoted father, Ulysses and Julia Grant had four children, three boys and a girl, with elder sons Frederick and Ulysses Jr., attending West Point and Harvard.   Later the youngest, Jesse, ran about the White House giving President Grant much-needed cheer.  Daughter Ellen,<I>Nellie</I>, was married at the White House in 1874.    [ see: <I>Nellie</I>Grant bronze cannon / www.MaineLegacy.com page 5 ]<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 Best described here by our illustrations as to condition and eye appeal suffice it to say this<B>6th Me Bat </B> branded  hames horse collar fixture is fashioned from white ash wood with black iron strapping and harness fixtures (note distinctively period square nuts), measures 26 inches from tip  to tip and remains in pleasing original condition.  Acquired some years ago accompanied by the 6th Battery field desk, this remnant of the hard fought Maine Light Artillery Battery has been set aside with our personal <I>stuff</I>since.(see: MaineLegacy.com pages 31 through 35 for a small sampling)  A bit traumatic as we seldom offer things from the <I>collection</I> but alas time marches on.  A note for the uninitiated: The Hames horse collar fixture surrounded the heavily padded leather collar and was affixed with iron fixtures to accommodate harness reins and traces.

      <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Fine condition! MABIE TODD & CO - Paten $85.00

 

Civil War import Lorenz Rifle – combinat $85.00

 

c. 1863 Gen. U. S. Grant Family CDV $55.00

 

Civil War vintage- 6th Maine Battery Mou $345.00




<b>Colonel 5th South Carolina Infantry


He also commanded the elite Palmetto Sharpshooters


Wounded at the Battle of Seven Pines, Virginia in 1862


Wounded in the Second Battle of Manassas, Virginia in 1862


Mortally wounded at the Wilderness, Virginia in May 1864</b>


(1835-64) Born on Edisto Island, South Carolina, he graduated at the head of his class in 1854, at the South Carolina Military Academy, now The Citadel in Charleston, S.C. He founded King's Mountain Military School at York, S.C., in 1855, and served as a teacher and administrator until the winter of 1860-61. He married Caroline Jameson in 1856, and his father-in-law was David F. Jameson, who was the president of the South Carolina Secession Convention in December of 1860.  On December 20, 1860, South Carolina became the first state to secede from the Union, and on April 12, 1861, Confederate forces bombarded Fort Sumter and the War Between the States commenced. Jameson also served as Secretary of War for the state of South Carolina during the conflict. An enthusiastic supporter of states rights, he helped raise and organize the 5th South Carolina Infantry, and on June 4, 1861, he was elected their colonel. Ordered north, the regiment departed from Orangeburg, S.C., and arrived at Manassas Junction, Virginia on June 21st. Assigned to the brigade of General David R. Jones, Jenkins led his South Carolinian's into their first battle, crossing McLean's Ford, and attacking the Federal left near Little Rocky Run, in what became the First Battle of Manassas, Va. earning the praise of their commanding general. During the 1862 reorganization of the Confederate army, Jenkins recruited and organized the elite Palmetto Sharpshooters which included a good portion of the officers and men who had served under him in the 5th South Carolina Infantry. Assigned to General Richard H. Anderson's South Carolina Brigade, Jenkins and his sharpshooters reinforced the Confederate line at Yorktown and Williamsburg, Va. When General Anderson rose to division command, Jenkins was placed in command of the South Carolina Brigade which he led with distinction in the Battle of Seven Pines where he was wounded. It became a bitter slugging match against Union General Darius N. Couch's 4th Corps. Colonel Jenkins broke the Union lines and reached Seven Pines where he captured the colors of the 16th Michigan infantry. His gallant actions and heroism brought with them the high praise of General James Longstreet himself calling attention to the bravery and skill of Jenkins. He was promoted to brigadier general, on July 22, 1862, at the age of 26, becoming one of the great "boy generals of the Civil War." He was wounded in the shoulder and chest at the Second Battle of Manassas, Va. in August 1862.  He was next assigned to serve in the division of General George E. Pickett, and was with him at Fredericksburg, but they saw little action there. General Pickett's division then participated in the 1863 Suffolk, Va. campaign under General Longstreet. Jenkins' Brigade was detached from Pickett's division in the summer of 1863, and assigned to protect Richmond where they were stationed during the Gettysburg campaign. In September 1863, General Jenkins was ordered to join the division of General John Bell Hood, and accompany General Longstreet's troops to northwest Georgia to reinforce General Braxton Bragg's Army of Tennessee. General Hood was so severely wounded at the Battle of Chickamauga that it resulted in the amputation of his right leg, and Jenkins was elevated to division command to replace Hood. Bragg's army occupied Missionary Ridge and Lookout Mountain, forcing the defeated Union army back into Chattanooga. Jenkins served with Longstreet in East Tennessee in November and through the winter of 1863-64. He was highly commended by General Longstreet for his vigorous pursuit of the Yankees from Lenoir Station to Knoxville, Tenn. where Jenkins troops participated in the siege of Knoxville, Tennessee, in November and December 1864, and in the engagement at Bean's Station, on December 14th. As the Federals pursued Longstreet's troops he hit them hard and stopped them in their tracks ending their pursuit and the winter campaign. With the arrival of cold weather, General Jenkins brought his brigade into winter quarters at Russellville, Tennessee. During this period he led them to a very decisive victory at Kimbrough's Crossroads, Tennessee, on January 16, 1864, when they clashed with Federal cavalry in a very sharp battle. In the spring of 1864, Jenkins joined his commanding officer, General James Longstreet who was ordered to return east to rejoin General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, reaching Gordonsville, Va., on May 2nd. Within 48 hours of their arrival, the Army of the Potomac, crossed the Rapidan River, and entered into the tangled devilish woodlands known as the Wilderness. In the late afternoon on the fateful day of May 4th, General Micah Jenkins turned his brigade out for the very last time! At noon on May 6th, General Longstreet called on Jenkins South Carolina boys to exploit the success gained by the Confederates devastating flank attack on General Winfield S. Hancock's 2nd Corps. As the two Confederate generals rode eastward down the Orange Plank Road, Jenkins remarked to Longstreet, "I am happy. I have felt despair of the cause for some months, but am relieved and feel assured that we will put the enemy back across the Rapidan before night."  In only a few minutes, the crash of musketry sounded in the dense woods, and both Generals' Jenkins and Longstreet were thrown from their horses, and sprawled out upon the sacred soil of "Old Virginia." Longstreet was critically wounded, but Jenkins took a minie' ball to the head, the bullet lodging in his brain. As he lay there mortally wounded. delirium set in as he ordered his men forward. Jenkins was dead before nightfall that day. What made matters even worse was that the horror of Chancellorsville, almost a year earlier to the day, when General Stonewall Jackson was mortally wounded by friendly fire, was repeated. This tragic event took place only 4 miles from where Stonewall Jackson was mortally wounded! The musketry that felled Generals' Jenkins and Longstreet, was fired by some of General William Mahone's Virginians who were in the woods just south of the road and mistook the mounted Confederate officers for Yankee cavalry. Jenkins was buried in Magnolia Cemetery, in Charleston, South Carolina.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 1/2 x 4, thick pink blockade run card stock, with no back mark which is typical of these cards which were oftentimes smuggled into the Confederacy, usually through Cuba, from England on blockade runner ships. This is an incredibly rare 3/4 seated view of Jenkins wearing his double breasted frock coat with shoulder straps, as he sat for this circa 1861 portrait while Colonel of the 5th South Carolina Infantry Regiment. He poses holding his kepi on his lap which clearly shows his hat wreath insignia and regimental numeral 5 which is reversed indicating that this was printed as a reverse negative. There is a tiny area of black at the upper right corner of the albumen which was printed into the image when it was originally produced. There is some light staining in the background area which does not affect the beauty of the image, and of course its remarkable rarity! Light wear. General Jenkins is lightly inscribed on the card mount below his portrait. In my 46 years in business, and 62 years as a Civil War collector, I have never owned this image, nor have I ever seen one for sale. Until I purchased this carte de visite, the only other one I know of is in the collection of the Library of Congress. Exceedingly rare, and extremely desirable!         


<u>WBTS Trivia</u>: General Micah Jenkins's son, Micah John Jenkins was born on July 3, 1857, and he graduated from West Point in 1879. He served in the Spanish American War, as Captain of Troop K, 1st United States Volunteer Cavalry Regiment, the "Rough Riders," then commanded by Colonel Teddy Roosevelt. He fought with the regiment in Cuba and participated in the attack on San Juan Hill.  He was promoted to major of the regiment on August 11, 1898; and was mustered out of the service at Montauk Point, Long Island, New York, in September 1898.  He died in Charleston, South Carolina on Oct. 17, 1912.  


<b>Colonel 7th Massachusetts Infantry


From the personal collection of Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin. Irwin has the distinct honor of being the first recipient of the Medal of Honor in U.S. military history by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


(1822-97) Born on a farm in Putnam County, New York, he graduated in the West Point class of 1846, along with George B. McClellan, Stonewall Jackson, and 46 other graduates who fought in the Civil War including 19 who became full generals for either the Union or Confederate armies. Couch fought in the Mexican War and was brevetted to 1st lieutenant for gallantry at the Battle of Buena Vista. He next participated in the Seminole Indian Wars of 1849-50. On June 15, 1861, shortly after the outbreak of the Civil War, Couch was appointed Colonel of the 7th Massachusetts Infantry, and he was promoted to brigadier general on August 9, 1861. He compiled a distinguished record in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign as a division commander in the 4th Corps, serving at Yorktown and Williamsburg, and during the Battle of Seven Pines, Oak Grove, and Malvern Hill during the Seven Days battles. He was promoted to major general on July 4, 1862. He then commanded his division at Antietam, and the 2nd Corps at Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville. Couch commanded the Department of the Susquehanna during the Gettysburg Campaign in 1863, and later was transferred to the western army commanding a division of the 22nd Army Corps with distinction in the Franklin & Nashville, Tennessee campaign, and in the 1865 Carolina's campaign. Couch returned to civilian life in Taunton, Mass., after the war, where he ran unsuccessfully as a Democratic candidate for Governor of Massachusetts in 1865.  Couch moved to Connecticut in 1871, where he served as the Quartermaster General, and then Adjutant General, for the state militia. He joined the Aztec Club of 1847 by the right given him for his Mexican War service, and he also joined the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. He died in Norwalk, Connecticut, on February 12, 1897, at the age of 74, and was buried in Mount Pleasant Cemetery in Taunton, Mass.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Superb quality half view pose wearing double breasted frock coat with rank of major general. Back mark: Published by E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York, From Photographic Negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery, with 2 cents orange George Washington, U.S. Internal Revenue Proprietary tax stamp. This image came from the Surgeon and General Bernard J.D. Irwin collection. There is a period ink inscription written on the front mount, Maj. Genl. Couch, U.S.A. Written in period ink in Irwin's hand on the reverse is, Maj. Genl. D.N. Couch, U.S.A. Com'd Copr. d'arm, Army Potomac. This is image No. 44 in the Irwin collection as indicated on the reverse of the card. Excellent photograph. Rare.


<u>History of United States Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin</u>


<i><b>Surgeon & General Irwin was the first United States Medal of Honor Recipient by date of action, February 13, 1861.</i></b>


(1830-1917) Born in County Roscommon, Ireland, he immigrated with his parents to the United States in the 1840s.  He attended New York University from 1848 to 1849, and then served as a private in the New York Militia.  In 1850, he entered Castleton Medical College, and he later transferred to New York Medical College, where he graduated in 1852.

  

He served as a surgeon and physician at the State Emigrant Hospital on Ward's Island, NYC, until his appointment as assistant surgeon in the U.S. Army in 1856.  He was an assistant army surgeon during the Apache Wars, and was the first Medal of Honor recipient chronologically by date of action. His actions on February 13, 1861, at Apache Pass, Arizona, are the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded! The citation on his medal of honor reads; "Voluntarily took command of troops and attacked and defeated hostile Indians he met on the way. Surgeon Irwin volunteered to go to the rescue of 2d Lt. George N. Bascom, 7th U.S. Infantry, who, with 60 men, was trapped by Chiricahua Apaches under Cochise. Irwin and 14 men, not having horses, began the 100-mile march riding mules. After fighting and capturing Indians, recovering stolen horses and cattle, he reached Bascom's column and helped break his siege."


Cochise, the Apache Indian chief, and a group of Apache warriors were accused of kidnapping a boy and a small group of U.S. soldiers in the Arizona Territory after the Army had captured Cochise's brother and nephews. When the Army refused to make a prisoner exchange, Cochise killed his prisoners. Soldiers then killed Cochise's brother and nephews.  2nd Lieutenant George Nicholas Bascom led a group of 60 men from the 7th U.S. Infantry after Cochise but was soon besieged, prompting a rescue mission by the army. In response to the siege of Bascom and his men, Irwin set out on a rescue mission with 14 men of the 1st U.S. Dragoons. He was able to catch up with the Apaches at Apache Pass in present day Arizona. He strategically placed his small unit around Cochise and his men, tricking the Apache leader into thinking that he had a much larger army with him. The Apaches fled and Bascom and his men were saved. Bascom and his men joined Irwin and together they were able to track Cochise into the mountains & rescued the young boy that Cochise had captured.

  

The Medal of Honor did not exist during the time of the "Bascom Incident," and would not be established until a year later in 1862.  However, the actions of Irwin were well remembered, and he was awarded the Medal of Honor just prior to his retirement. Irwin's actions were the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded, predating the outbreak of the American Civil War.  


Irwin subsequently served with the Union army during the Civil War, and was promoted to captain in August 1861, and the next year was appointed medical director under Major General William "Bull" Nelson. He improvised one of the first field hospitals used by the U.S. Army at the Battle of Shiloh, on April 7, 1862. He was captured during the Battle of Richmond,  Ky., while attempting to save the wounded General Nelson. He was promoted to major in September 1862, and after his release from a Rebel prison he became medical director in the Army of the Southwest.  From 1863 to 1865, he was superintendent of the military hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, and in March of 1865, he was brevetted to the rank of colonel.  He was a companion of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and the Order of the Indian Wars of the United States. After the Civil War, Irwin served as a senior medical officer at several U.S. army posts, including West Point from 1873 to 1878. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1885, to colonel in August 1890, and to brigadier general in April 1904.  He died in Ontario, Canada, on December 15, 1917, and is buried in the West Point Cemetery, at the U.S. Military Academy, New York.

  

His son George LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1889, and served in World War I, becoming a Major General in the U.S. Army.

 

His grandson Stafford LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1915, and served in World War II, and became a Lieutenant General in the U.S. Army.

 

His daughter, Amy Irwin Addams McCormick, was a nurse with the American Red Cross and served during World War I.


General Irwin was an admirer and collector of photographs, and he put together a very large, and superb collection of Union and Confederate images. Interestingly, he collected photographs of both Rebel and Yankee alike. I have owned several famous military photograph albums before and never came across one that collected images from both sides of the rebellion. He numbered each individual image, and wrote a brief historical notation on each one. The collection was split up by another dealer, and by the time I found out about it, I was still very fortunate to be able to acquire about one third of his superb Civil War image collection. Each image is rare because it is "one of a kind" having come from the Irwin collection!


The image of B.J.D. Irwin pictured here is a copy photograph from the "Find a Grave" website and is used here for illustration purposes only.


     


<b>Colonel of the 2nd Kentucky Infantry


Captured at Fort Donelson, Tennessee in February 1862


Mortally wounded on January 2, 1863 at the Battle of Murfreesboro while leading a charge which cost his brigade 400 casualties


General Hanson's dying words: "I die in a just cause, having done my duty." 


From the personal collection of Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin. Irwin has the distinct honor of being the first recipient of the Medal of Honor in U.S. military history by date of action, February 13, 1861</b>


(1827-63) Born in Clark County, Kentucky, he served as 1st lieutenant of the 4th Kentucky Volunteers in the Mexican War, and was cited for bravery at the Battle of Cerro Gordo. After the war he returned home to Kentucky and studied law in Lexington, where he engaged in a duel with a classmate. He was shot in the leg just above the knee, making him lame for the rest of his life. In 1853 and 1855 he was a member of the Kentucky State legislature, and in 1860 he stumped the state for the Presidential election ticket of Bell and Everett. Hanson was a colonel in the Kentucky State Guard in 1861, and on September 3rd of that year was commissioned colonel of the 2nd Kentucky Infantry, C.S.A. Captured at the Battle of Fort Donelson, Tennessee, in February 1862, by Union General Ulysses S. Grant, he was exchanged 7 months later for General Michael Corcoran. Hanson was presented with a new horse by admiring friends, and his regiment reenlisted for the war, and Hanson was promoted to brigadier general on December 13, 1862. He commanded his old regiment, the 2nd Kentucky Infantry, as well as the 3rd, 4th, 6th and 9th Kentucky Infantry Regiments, serving in General John C. Breckenridge's division, and Lieutenant General William J. Hardee's corps. He led the Kentucky Brigade, known as "The Orphan Brigade," in his first battle as a general, at Murfreesboro, Tennessee, on January 2, 1863. General Braxton Bragg, commanding the Confederate army, ordered General Breckenridge's division to take a hill occupied by Union forces several hundred yards in his front, that was well protected by massed Union artillery. General Breckenridge and his brigade commanders, including Hanson, agreed that this mission was impossible, and Hanson was so furious that he had to be physically restrained from attempting to kill General Bragg. The attack began at 4 p.m., and moving in good order the Confederates seized the hill, but then the Union guns opened up with a devastating fire on the Rebs. While leading a charge which cost his brigade 400 casualties, General Hanson was mortally wounded when he was struck above the left knee by a fuse from an artillery case shot that severed his artery. General Breckenridge, the original commander of "The Orphan Brigade," rode among the survivors, crying out repeatedly, "My poor Orphans! My poor Orphans," They vainly tried to stop the bleeding in General Hanson's leg, and nursed by his wife, he died two days later in a house near the battlefield. His last words were "I die in a just cause, having done my duty." Hanson was considered to be a dependable subordinate who could be counted on to have his troops ready for battle, and to carry out his orders in a timely manner. General Breckenridge remarked in his official report, "Endeared to his friends by his private virtues and to his command by the vigilance with which he guarded its interest and honor, he was, by the universal testimony of his military associates, one of the finest officers that adorned the service of the Confederate States." Temporarily buried in Nashville, he was reinterred in Lexington, Kentucky, on November 11, 1866. In 1895, the survivors of the "Orphan Brigade," dedicated a monument to General Hanson's memory.  


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Standing view wearing a double breasted Confederate frock coat with braiding on his sleeves and the rank of colonel while wearing his sash around his waist. He strikes a Napoleonic pose and stands next to a table at his side with a vase of flowers on it. Back mark: Published by E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York. Very minor corner wear. This is the best known war time image of Hanson and was probably taken just before he was captured at Fort Donelson, Tennessee in 1862. This image came from the Surgeon and General Bernard J.D. Irwin collection. Written in period ink in Irwin's hand on the front mount is, Major Genl. Roger Hanson, C.S.A. This is image No. 155 in the Irwin collection as indicated on the verso of the card. Excellent photograph. Very desirable. Rare.


<u>History of United States Surgeon & General Bernard John Dowling Irwin</u>


<i><b>Surgeon & General Irwin was the first United States Medal of Honor Recipient by date of action, February 13, 1861.</i></b>


(1830-1917) Born in County Roscommon, Ireland, he immigrated with his parents to the United States in the 1840s.  He attended New York University from 1848 to 1849, and then served as a private in the New York Militia.  In 1850, he entered Castleton Medical College, and he later transferred to New York Medical College, where he graduated in 1852.

  

He served as a surgeon and physician at the State Emigrant Hospital on Ward's Island, NYC, until his appointment as assistant surgeon in the U.S. Army in 1856.  He was an assistant army surgeon during the Apache Wars, and was the first Medal of Honor recipient chronologically by date of action. His actions on February 13, 1861, at Apache Pass, Arizona, are the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded! The citation on his medal of honor reads; "Voluntarily took command of troops and attacked and defeated hostile Indians he met on the way. Surgeon Irwin volunteered to go to the rescue of 2d Lt. George N. Bascom, 7th U.S. Infantry, who, with 60 men, was trapped by Chiricahua Apaches under Cochise. Irwin and 14 men, not having horses, began the 100-mile march riding mules. After fighting and capturing Indians, recovering stolen horses and cattle, he reached Bascom's column and helped break his siege."


Cochise, the Apache Indian chief, and a group of Apache warriors were accused of kidnapping a boy and a small group of U.S. soldiers in the Arizona Territory after the Army had captured Cochise's brother and nephews. When the Army refused to make a prisoner exchange, Cochise killed his prisoners. Soldiers then killed Cochise's brother and nephews.  2nd Lieutenant George Nicholas Bascom led a group of 60 men from the 7th U.S. Infantry after Cochise but was soon besieged, prompting a rescue mission by the army. In response to the siege of Bascom and his men, Irwin set out on a rescue mission with 14 men of the 1st U.S. Dragoons. He was able to catch up with the Apaches at Apache Pass in present day Arizona. He strategically placed his small unit around Cochise and his men, tricking the Apache leader into thinking that he had a much larger army with him. The Apaches fled and Bascom and his men were saved. Bascom and his men joined Irwin and together they were able to track Cochise into the mountains & rescued the young boy that Cochise had captured.

  

The Medal of Honor did not exist during the time of the "Bascom Incident," and would not be established until a year later in 1862.  However, the actions of Irwin were well remembered, and he was awarded the Medal of Honor just prior to his retirement. Irwin's actions were the earliest for which the Medal of Honor was awarded, predating the outbreak of the American Civil War.  


Irwin subsequently served with the Union army during the Civil War, and was promoted to captain in August 1861, and the next year was appointed medical director under Major General William "Bull" Nelson. He improvised one of the first field hospitals used by the U.S. Army at the Battle of Shiloh, on April 7, 1862. He was captured during the Battle of Richmond,  Ky., while attempting to save the wounded General Nelson. He was promoted to major in September 1862, and after his release from a Rebel prison he became medical director in the Army of the Southwest.  From 1863 to 1865, he was superintendent of the military hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, and in March of 1865, he was brevetted to the rank of colonel.  He was a companion of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and the Order of the Indian Wars of the United States. After the Civil War, Irwin served as a senior medical officer at several U.S. army posts, including West Point from 1873 to 1878. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1885, to colonel in August 1890, and to brigadier general in April 1904.  He died in Ontario, Canada, on December 15, 1917, and is buried in the West Point Cemetery, at the U.S. Military Academy, New York.

  

His son George LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1889, and served in World War I, becoming a Major General in the U.S. Army.

 

His grandson Stafford LeRoy Irwin, graduated from West Point in 1915, and served in World War II, and became a Lieutenant General in the U.S. Army.

 

His daughter, Amy Irwin Addams McCormick, was a nurse with the American Red Cross and served during World War I.


General Irwin was an admirer and collector of photographs, and he put together a very large, and superb collection of Union and Confederate images. Interestingly, he collected photographs of both Rebel and Yankee alike. I have owned several famous military photograph albums before and never came across one that collected images from both sides of the rebellion. He numbered each individual image, and wrote a brief historical notation on each one. The collection was split up by another dealer, and by the time I found out about it, I was still very fortunate to be able to acquire about one third of his superb Civil War image collection. Each image is rare because it is "one of a kind" having come from the Irwin collection!


The image of B.J.D. Irwin pictured here is a copy photograph from the "Find a Grave" website and is used here for illustration purposes only.


    


<b>Medal of Honor Recipient for gallantry at the Battle of Fair Oaks, Virginia


At Fair Oaks he received two very serious wounds which resulted in the amputation of his right arm


11th Corps Commander at the Battle of Gettysburg


1864 dated image</b>


(1830-1909) Howard was born in Leeds, Maine, and graduated #4 in the West Point class of 1846. Was appointed Colonel of the 3rd Maine Infantry, in June 1861, and saw action as a Brigade Commander at the 1st Battle of Bull Run. He was promoted to brigadier general on September 3, 1861, and fought at Yorktown, and Fair Oaks where he received two serious wounds and lost his right arm. Howard recovered quickly enough to rejoin the army for the Battle of Antietam, in which he rose to division command in the 2nd Corps. He was promoted to major general in November 1862, seeing action at Fredericksburg, and he was appointed as the commander of the 11th Corps in April 1863. He later fought in the battles of  Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg. Howard and the 11th Corps were transferred to the Western Theater becoming part of the Army of the Cumberland in Tennessee. In the Battles for Chattanooga, the corps joined the assault that captured Missionary Ridge, and they also participated in the Atlanta campaign. General Howard subsequently led the right wing of General William Tecumseh Sherman's infamous "March to the Sea," through Georgia and then the Carolina's.  He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions at Fair Oaks, and the Thanks of Congress for Gettysburg. Continuing in the Regular Army, he was peace commissioner to the Apaches, and he participated in Indian fighting. He founded Howard University for Negroes in Washington, D.C., and served as it's president from 1869-74. He served as superintendent of the United States Military Academy, 1881-1882. Oliver O. Howard died in Burlington, Vermont, on October 26, 1909, and is buried at Lakeview Cemetery, in Burlington. At his death, Howard was the last surviving Union Army general to have held the permanent rank of a general in the regular U.S. Army.  


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Back mark: Wenderoth & Taylor, Philadelphia, with 2 cents blue revenue tax stamp on the verso, stamped in black W & T (Wenderoth & Taylor) 1864. Bottom right corner of the mount is bent, not affecting the image. Tiny abrasion at upper portion of the background area, not near the subject, and a very thin vertical surface scratch that is only visible upon close inspection when you turn the card on an angle. Very sharp image. Displays well. Desirable Gettysburg general and MOH recipient.

CDV, General Micah Jenkins $2200.00

 

CDV, General Darius N. Couch $250.00

 

CDV, General Roger W. Hanson $350.00

 

CDV, General Oliver O. Howard $75.00




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