View Orders Back to AntiqueArts Home Page Come and view all that's new! Come and view all that's new! More than 135 upscale Antiques shops Would you like to sell your antiques here? Have a question or suggestion? A comprehensive guide to antiques resources on the World Wide Web
Antique Arts Showcase
What's New in the Collector's Showcase?
The Most Recent Additions to This Category are First!


 Architectural Antiques
 Art
 Art Deco
 Autographs
 Bed Bath & Vanity
 Books
 China & Dinnerware
 Clocks & Watches
 Coins & Currency
 Cultures & Ethnicities
 Furniture & Accessories
 Glass
 Jewelry
 Lamps & Lighting
 Memorabilia
 Metalware
 Militaria
 Miscellaneous
 Paper & Ephemera
 Photographica
 Political
 Porcelain & Pottery
 Silver

Not a real big deal but this nice mid-19th century, all original, unsharpened and as new, cedar mounted <U>slate</U> pencil will be appreciated by collectors of Civil War era <I>everyday</I>and personal items as well as deep dish antique writing instrument enthusiasts.  <U>Not to be confused with the more commonly encountered <I>graphite</I> pencil</U>, this example has a slate center for use with the personal size writing slate used in the period.  Boldly marked <I>AMERICAN LEAD PENCIL CO. / SCHOOL SLATE 490</I> the piece was manufactured in the Jersey City Heigthts, New Jersey pencil factory set up in 1860 by Edward Weissenborn.  We have only a few of these and are offering them <U>priced individually</U> for the collector who would like one or two.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!  A good honest period used example of  Smith’s Pat. June 18, 1861 Captain of Infantry shoulder straps remaining in untouched condition just as they were set aside decades ago.   Best described here by our photo illustrations.  A classic for the Civil War collector.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 This soldiers letter is authored by  Dean W. Tainter while serving as a Pvt. of Co. A <B>13th Mass. Volunteer Infantry</B>.  His four page letter is legibly penned from <I>Camp Jackson </I> in Williamsport,  Maryland and is dated, Feb. 15, 1862.   Tainter had entered service on July 20, 1861 as a twenty-five year old bookkeeper / genealogy author (see: <I> A History and Genealogy of the Descendants of Joseph Taynter</I>  by ‎Dean W. Tainter* [1859] ) who according to his letter had passed up potential advancement in the 16th Mass. in favor of commitment to the 13th as it <I>was composed of American born Boston boys among whom was many of my friends</I> and, <I>was about to start without delay.</I>  Further expressing the recruits common sense of patriotism and eagerness to <I>help keep the old flag flying</I> Pvt. Tainter  advises, <I>I have not regretted my choice yet for the 16th did not leave until Sept. and have remained at Fortress Monroe inactive ever since while we have been in the Potomac from Washington to the Penn. line, had two or three brushes and won for ourselves a name.</I>  Tainter <U>writes of a book he had written</U> and  comments to the reader regarding his post Civil War plans advising that <I>your scheme about the Museum attracts my attention</I> but he has <I> talked of wool growing out west.</I>   Tainter states though, that <I>Antiquities touch a week point in my human nature</I> and advises that he <I>would like to see an inventory of the material which you have to form a Museum.</I>  Indeed, Pvt. Tainter seems to have more heart for <I>antiquities</I> than growing wool as he goes on to write more on the subject, eventually circling back to expressing once more a desire to see an inventory for the proposed museum.    No <I>deep dish</I> Civil War content but the letter is complete, an easy read and offers interesting insight.  Of interest is that according to the HDS database Tainter was <I>discharged for promotion</I> on May 28, 1862 and was commissioned into the U S Navy on that date.  We did find record of Navy service as <I>Acting Ensign</I> but will leave research of his Civil War Navy service to the new owner of his letter. 

            *  Dean W. Tainter’s letter offered here is addressed to <U>Charles M. Taintor</U> (yet another spelling variation) who authored an earlier published (1847) Taynter / Taintor / Tainter family genealogy titled <I> The Genealogy and History of the Taintor  Family, From the Period of Their Emigration From Wales, to the Present Time</I>.   Both works have made their mark and have been considered important enough to be republished through time.  Both are currently well represented in print and on the internet.  In addition to mentioning his own effort at authorship in this letter Dean Tainter recounts a request received for purchase of the work of both men.

      <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Entirely hand stitched and constructed in silk this earlier to mid-1800s ladies bonnet remains in excellent original condition and will best be described by our photo illustrations.   With good evidence of period construction and style while remaining in pleasing condition this black silk bonnet will go nicely in any Mexican War through Civil War era grouping and will be of special interest to the earlier to mid-19th century mourning collector.  A desirable ladies item simply laid out or displayed on your period form.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

mid 1800s – SLATE (‘SCHOOL’) PENCIL $18.00

 

Civil War vintage Smith’s Patent - Infa $255.00

 

c. 1862 - 13th Mass. Infantry - letter o $135.00

 

earlier to mid-19th century – Ladies Mou $145.00

 Not to be confused with more frequently surviving reconstructed Bannerman <I>Army surplus</I> examples, (Easily recognized by replacement of a large circular portion of the brim.) this example of the elusive early Civil War issue Hardee hat was recently acquired from an old collection dating back to when such treasures could be had.  While the sweat band is replaced and  there has been some old reinforcement of a crack visible on the underside of the brim, (see illustrations) this scarcely found <U>issue</U> Hardee represents a <I>find</I> that will display well in any Civil War or military headgear collection.  Recognizing that short of holding in hand, the eye is the best gauge, <U>a good look at our photo illustrations will speak best for condition and display appeal</U> of this rarely surviving <I>’Jeff Davis’</I>.  We have made every effort to illustrated this hat here toward that end.   Inside the crown the hat sports its original  U S ARMY EXTRA MANUFACTURE – 7 1/8 - No. 4 label and the Hardee retains its period blue worsted infantry cord, with brass infantry horn, regimental and company insignia, along with the eagle side device and regulation ostrich feather.   A scarce opportunity to acquire an original issue example of the type in nicely displayable condition.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  H 48in. x D 18in.  Our photos will offer the best description of this lot except to advise that each daguerreotype retains its original seal and while the postmortem has some specs behind the glass (on the glass &<U> not on the image</U>) the three 6th plate daguerreotypes remain in pleasing, all original and as found condition.  Emanating from a Maine estate where they had been maintained together the two of the gentleman are easily recognizable as one and the same.  The accompanying lady bears an identification as <I>Mary Hanson Verrill</I>.   Good fodder for some researcher, this group of three daguerreotypes is deserving of staying together.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  


7 3/4 x 10, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


INVOICE of Signal Equipment & Signal Stores, transferred by 2nd Lt. J.W. De Ford, 11th P.R.V. to 1st Lt. B.F. Fisher, 3rd P.R.V., Hd. Qrs. Signal Corps, Alexandria, Va., March 20, 1862. This invoice is for 3- 5 gal. copper cans, 1 tap borer, and 1 brass spigot, all noted to be in good condition. 


I certify that the above is a correct invoice of Signal Equipment & Signal Stores transferred by me this 20th day of March 1862, to 1st Lt. B.F. Fisher, 3rd P.R.V.


J.W. De Ford, 2nd Lt., 11th P.R.V.


Docket on the reverse.


Light age toning and wear.


John W. De Ford, was a resident of Fayette County, Pennsylvania, when he enlisted on June 20, 1861, as 2nd lieutenant, and was commissioned into the 11th Pennsylvania Reserve Volunteers, also known as the 40th Pennsylvania Infantry.

original! Civil War issue - U. S. Army

 

H 48in. x D 18in. $0.00

 

outstanding ‘before & after’ Postmortem $625.00

 

1862 Invoice for Signal Equipment & Stor $25.00




4 1/4 x 7, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, October 7, 1862


General Orders

No. 153


The Headquarters of Colonel William Hoffman, 3d Infantry, Commissary General of Prisoners, is transferred from Detroit, (Mich.) to Washington, D.C.


By Order Of The Secretary Of War:


L. THOMAS

Adjutant General


Light age toning and wear. The upper left corner of the paper is very slightly clipped. 



Colonel William Hoffman

Commissary General of Prisoners


(1807-84) Born in New York, he was the son of Lieutenant Colonel William Hoffman, who served in the War of 1812. He graduated from West Point in 1829, and was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant, 6th U.S. Infantry. He served in garrison at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1829; on frontier duty at Ft. Leavenworth, Ks., 1829-1831; was in the Black Hawk War, 1832; at Ft. Leavenworth, Ks., 1833; and in garrison at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1834-1836. He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant, 6th U.S. Infantry, November 16, 1836. Hoffman was next on frontier duty at Ft. Jesup, La., 1836; at Camp Sabine, La., 1836; and in the Florida War, 1837-1842. He was promoted to Captain, 6th U.S. Infantry, February 1, 1838. He served on recruiting service, 1842; on Frontier Duty at Ft. Smith, Ar., 1843-1846; and in mustering volunteers into service, 1846 before becoming involved in the Mexican War. In Mexico, he was engaged in the march through Chihuahua, 1846; Siege of Vera Cruz, March 9-29, 1847; Battle of Cerro Gordo, April 17- 18, 1847; Skirmish at Amazoque, May 14, 1847; Capture of San Antonio, August 20, 1847; Battle of Contreras, August 19-20, 1847; and Battle of Churubusco, August 20, 1847. He was brevetted to Major, August 20, 1847, for gallant and meritorious conduct in the Battles of Contreras and Churubusco. Hoffman was next engaged in the Battle of Molino del Rey, September 8, 1847; storming of Chapultepec, September 13, 1847; and the assault and capture of Mexico City, September 13-14, 1847. He received a brevet to Lieutenant Colonel, September 8, 1847, for gallant and meritorious conduct in the Battle of Molino del Rey. Following the Mexican War, he was on recruiting duty, 1848-1849; frontier duty at Ft. Leavenworth, Ks., 1849-1850; and at the crossing of the Arkansas, Ks., 1851. He was promoted to Major, 5th U.S. Infantry, April 15, 1851. Hoffman was in garrison at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1852. Transferred to the 6th U.S. Infantry, February 20, 1852, he was at Newport Barracks, Ky., 1852-1854; on frontier duty at Ft. Laramie, Dakota Territory, 1854- 1855; on the Sioux Expedition, 1855; at Ft. Laramie, Dakota Territory, 1855-1857; on the Utah Expedition, 1858; on the March to California, 1858; on frontier duty in Mojave Country, 1858-1859; at Benicia, Ca., 1859-1860. He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, 8th U.S. Infantry, October 17, 1860. He continued on frontier duty at San Antonio, Tx. where he was made a prisoner of war by the Texas Rebels, and not exchanged until August 27, 1862. He was promoted to Colonel, 3rd U.S. Infantry, April 25, 1862. Hoffman served as Commissary General of Prisoners, at Washington, D. C., to November 3, 1865. He was brevetted to Brigadier General, U. S. Army, October 7, 1864, for faithful and meritorious services during the Civil War, and brevetted to Major General, U. S. Army, March 13, 1865, for faithful, meritorious and distinguished services as Commissary General of Prisoners during the Civil War. Following the Civil War, Hoffman was in command of a Regiment at St. Louis, Mo., December 16, 1865-April 18, 1866; in command of a Regiment at Ft. Leavenworth, Ks., April 18, 1866-March 6, 1868; and Superintendent of the General Recruiting Service to May 1, 1870 when he retired. [Source: Aztec Club].  


<b>Colonel of the 9th Louisiana Infantry</b>


(1818-71) Born in Jefferson County, Tennessee, the 6 1/2 foot tall Peck moved to Louisiana in the early 1840’s and purchased a plantation in Madison Parrish, opposite Vicksburg. He enlisted as a private at Camp Moore, La., on July 7, 1861, and was mustered into the 9th Louisiana Infantry. The first colonel of this hard fighting regiment was Richard Taylor, son of General and President Zachary Taylor. The younger Taylor went on to prominence during the War Between the States and promotion to the rank of lieutenant general. Arriving on the First Manassas, Va. battlefield just after the Union army retreated, thereafter the 9th Louisiana Infantry fought in every engagement that the Army of Northern Virginia participated in. The regiment eventually surrendered at Appomattox with only 64 men and 4 officers left. Peck was promoted to colonel, October 8, 1863, and brigadier general, February 18, 1865. He was paroled at Vicksburg on June 6, 1865. 


Antique photograph, 3 3/4 x 5 1/2. Bust view in Confederate uniform. No imprint. Circa 1800's, post Civil War. Staining on the front and back. Peck is scarce to find any images of.


WBTS Trivia: The 9th Louisiana Infantry had 21 killed and 55 wounded at the battle of Sharpsburg, Md., and 25 killed and 57 wounded at the battle of Chancellorsville, Va.   


<b>To Surgeon of the 2nd Louisiana Cavalry</b>


5 1/2 x 8 1/2, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


Department Of The Gulf, United States Military Telegraph Office, Feby. 3, 1864. By Telegraph from New Orleans. Surgeon R.H. Alexander is sending a positive response to Surgeon John Cooper. Light age toning and wear. Scarce Civil War surgeon to surgeon military telegram.


John Cooper, the recipient of this telegram, served as Surgeon of the 2nd Louisiana Cavalry, 1863-64. 


The sender, Richard H. Alexander, was commissioned Assistant Surgeon, December 2, 1853; Major & Surgeon, June 11, 1862; Brevet Lieutenant Colonel & Surgeon, March 13, 1865; Lieutenant Colonel & Surgeon, December 7, 1884; died March 29, 1889.   


(1807-1870) Born at Stratford, in Westmoreland County, Va., he was the son of the legendary Revolutionary War hero, "Lighthorse Harry" Lee. Graduated #2 in the West Point class of 1829 without a single demerit to his name in 4 years! He emerged from the Mexican War with one wound, three brevets for gallantry, a brilliant reputation, and the ever lasting esteem of the commanding General of the United States Army, Winfield Scott, who said Robert E. Lee was "the very best soldier that I ever saw in the field." Served as Superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy, at West Point, 1852-55, and he commanded the detachment that captured John Brown at Harper's Ferry in 1859. Lee turned down President Lincoln's offer for him to command the Union Army in 1861, as he said he could never raise his sword against his native Virginia. Instead he was appointed commander of all military forces of Virginia, and soon after general in the Regular Army of the Confederate States of America. During the War Between The States, he commanded the Army of Northern Virginia at such battlefields as 2nd Manassas, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Petersburg, Richmond and Appomattox. His reputation became legendary and he might very well be the most famous soldier in American history! In the last years of his life, he served as president of Washington College at Lexington, Va. (now Washington & Lee University) where he is buried in the chapel.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 1/2 x 4 card. Bust view in uniform. No back mark. Excellent.

The Hdqtrs. of Commissary General of Pri $10.00

 

Photograph, General William R. Peck $15.00

 

1864 U. S. Military Telegram From New Orl $45.00

 

CDV, General Robert E. Lee $45.00




Authentic, original woodcut engraving that has been hand tinted in color and was published in the June 13, 1863 issue of Harper's Weekly. Caption: Home From The War. Delightful scene of Union soldiers just home from the war being welcomed by their wives and sweethearts. 14 3/4 x 10 3/4. Harper's Weekly and date are printed in the margin. Very desirable.   


(1826-1901) Born at Tecumseh, Michigan, he attended the University of Michigan. When the Mexican War began, Pittman served as a member of the "Brady Guard," the "Grayson Guard," and the well known "Detroit Light Guard," and in 1847, he enlisted and served in the 1st Michigan Volunteers and was appointed adjutant of the regiment. In 1861, when President Lincoln sent out his call for volunteers, Pittman and others were summoned by Governor Austin Blair to organize State Troops for the Union war effort with General Alpheus S. Williams in charge, and Pittman serving as one of his staff officers with the rank of colonel. In the fall of 1861, a School of Instruction was established at Fort Wayne with Colonel Pittman in command and he organized, trained and equipped many of the Michigan troops who left Detroit to go off and fight in the Civil War. The following winter he was appointed Inspector General of Michigan Troops and was commissioned Brigadier General on the staff of Governor Blair and went with the governor to different parts of the field. In the summer of 1862, he was detailed to organize the 17th Michigan Infantry. After that he became a member of the Michigan State Military Board. In 1865, accompanying the governor, he went to Washington City to attend the "Grand Review" of the Union troops. With the war now ended, Pittman resigned his military commission and returned home to have an active business and civil service career which included being appointed as one of the trustees for the Michigan Asylum for the Insane, Inspector for the Detroit House of Correction, and the Superintendent of Police. 


<u>Signature With Title</u>: 4 x 1 1/2, in ink, "James E. Pittman" written above the title of Supt. of Police. Light age toning and wear.            


<b>Imprint of Bendann Brothers, Baltimore, Md.


Severely wounded and incapacitated during the Seven Days battles</b>


(1816-71) Graduated in the West Point class of 1837. He fought in the Seminole and Mexican Wars, winning a brevet for gallantry in the latter. At the outbreak of the Civil War he commanded the U. S. Arsenal at Augusta, Ga. which he surrendered to Rebel forces. Resigning his commission in the U. S. Army, he was commissioned Colonel 1st Maryland Infantry leading them at 1st Manassas. Promoted to brigadier general, he served with distinction under Stonewall Jackson in the 1862 Shenandoah Valley campaign, and in the beginning of the 7 Days Battles around Richmond in which he was severely wounded and incapacitated for many months. Commissioned a major general, he later commanded the Department of Richmond and later was General Hood's Chief of Artillery in the Tennessee campaign.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view in uniform with rank of brigadier general and wearing epaulettes. Blind stamp imprint on the front mount, Bendann Bros., Balto. Uncommon.  


<b>Bull Run Russell</b>


(1820-1907) Prominent English war correspondent who developed a reputation as Britain's finest military reporter. He came to America in 1861 to cover the American Civil War for the London Times. When General Irvin McDowell marched his inexperienced troops to the 1st battle of Bull Run, Va., Russell termed them a "rabble" army. Ironically, he was given the nickname "Bull Run" Russell for his panic stricken skedaddle from that battlefield. He published his Civil War experiences, which were titled, "My Diary, North and South." He was knighted in May 1895, and later appointed a Commander of the Royal Victorian Order by King Edward VII.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Standing view in full military splendor, with a medal pinned to his chest, and holding sword. Hat with plume sits on top of the studio table at his side. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Light age toning and wear. Very desirable pose in military attire.

Home From The War $95.00

 

Autograph, General James E. Pittman $20.00

 

CDV, General Arnold Elzey $95.00

 

CDV, William H. Russell $85.00




<b>Severely wounded at the battle of Seven Pines, Virginia</b>


(1824-86) Brother of Union General Henry J. Hunt, he graduated in the West Point class of 1847. He served in the Mexican War and in the Pacific Northwest. He saw action in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign under General George B. McClellan and was severely wounded at Seven Pines, Virginia. Following his recovery he was promoted to brigadier general and took part in General John G. Foster's movements against Kinston and Goldsboro, N.C. He later commanded the defenses of New York Harbor. He remained in the U.S. Army after the Civil War, and until his death, he served in various forts around the country.


<u>Partial Document Signed With Rank</u>: 7 3/4 x 6 1/2, in ink. Partial 1853 quartermaster related statement signed by Hunt with rank, "Yr. Obdt. Servt., L.C. Hunt, 1st Lieut. 4th Inf., A.A.Q.M." Addressed to Genl. Thos. S. Jessup, Quarter Master General, Washington City. Docket on the reverse, Lieut. L.C. Hunt, Fort Humboldt, May 4/53. Noted at the bottom is, Recd. July 12/53. Light age toning and wear. Very nice signature with rank and title.


Interesting facts about General Jesup and Fort Humboldt- Thomas S. Jesup, the recipient of this document, was a United States Army officer known as the "Father of the Modern Quartermaster Corps". His 52 year military career was one of the longest in the history of the U.S. Army.


Fort Humboldt, California, where this document originated, was established on a 35 foot high bluff overlooking Humboldt Bay, on January 30, 1853, during the California Gold Rush, by Captain Robert C. Buchanan, 4th U.S. Infantry. The fort was abandoned on September 14, 1867.


Captain Ulysses S. Grant, 4th U.S. Infantry, was posted to Fort Humboldt early in 1854.


In July 1854, Colonel Joseph K.F. Mansfield (later as a Union General he was killed at Antietam during the Civil War) inspected Fort Humboldt and was very complimentary about the garrison. He said, "These troops have done a great deal of work and put up all their quarters. Great credit is due this command for its industry, etc. A good bakery, hospital, store house and magazine have been built, and abundant quarters for officers."


At the beginning of the Civil War, the officers and enlisted men at Fort Humboldt declared their loyalties to the North and South respectively, and were recalled to the east coast to join their new commands. Like many posts in the west, Fort Humboldt was re-garrisoned by California Volunteer troops and became the headquarters of the Humboldt Military District. The district included Fort Bragg, Fort Wright, Fort Gaston, Fort Ter-Waw, Fort Seward and several camps. At the end of the war, the Federal troops returned and re-garrisoned Fort Humboldt.      


<b>Wounded four times during the Civil War!


United States Congressman from Ohio


Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives</b>


(1836-1932) Born near Springfield, Ohio, he was a lawyer by occupation. He was appointed major of the 3rd Ohio Infantry on April 27, 1861, and was promoted to lieutenant colonel, February 27, 1862. He was then appointed colonel of the 110th Ohio Infantry, September 30, 1862, brevet brigadier general, October 19, 1864, for gallantry in the battles of Opequan, Fisher's Hill and Middletown, Va., and brevet major general, April 9, 1865, for his role in the Appomattox campaign. He was wounded four times during the Civil War: June 13, 1863,  Winchester, Va.; June 14, 1863, Winchester, Va.; May 5, 1864, Wilderness, Va.; and September 19, 1864, Opequan, Va. He later became a major general of volunteers in the Spanish American War, was a U.S. Congressman, from 1877-85, and 1905-11, Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, 1881-83, and Junior Vice Commander-in-Chief of the G.A.R., 1871-72.


<u>Signature With Closing From Letter</u>: 3 3/8 x 1 3/4, in ink, "Very Truly Yours, J. Warren Keifer," mounted to piece of an album page. There is a small hole in the paper that has the autograph on it. It causes the loss of the bottom of the "y" in "Very," the bottom of the "T" in "Truly" and it touches the long extension of the "W" in "Warren." There is a very small area of wear with slight paper loss at the upper right edge which does not touch any of the writing. Boldly written.  


<b>U.S. Secretary of State under President Abraham Lincoln


Savagely attacked in his bed on the night of the Lincoln assassination by fellow conspirator Lewis Payne who was later hung! 


Governor of New York


U.S. Senator from New York</b>


(1801-72) Lawyer and Whig politician. Governor of New York 1839-42. He later served in the U.S. Senate, vigorously opposed slavery and joined the Republican party in 1856. Twice passed over for president (1856 and 1860) he became Abraham Lincoln's very able Secretary of State. He was savagely attacked in his bed on the night of the President Lincoln assassination by fellow conspirator Lewis Payne. He recovered from his wounds and served in the same post under President Andrew Johnson. Perhaps his most important act was the purchase of Alaksa, then called "Seward's Folly," in 1867 from Russia.


<u>Free Frank Signature From Envelope</u>: 3 5/8 x 2 3/4, in ink, "William H. Seward." This is the front panel cut off an original period envelope with partial, indistinct postmark at upper left, and addressed in ink (not by Seward) "James Rees, Esq., Utica, N. York."   


<b>United States Congressman from Virginia</b>


(1807-1891) Graduated from West Point in the class of 1825. One of his classmates was Robert E. Lee. He served with great distinction in the Seminole and Mexican Wars, in which he was wounded and brevetted repeatedly. He was commissioned a brigadier general in the Confederate Army in May 1861. The forces he commanded at Harpers Ferry, Va. linked up in time to fight with General P.G.T. Beauregard at 1st Manassas, turning the tide of battle in favor of the Confederacy. This performance earned him a promotion to rank of full general and the command of the Army of Northern Virginia. He fought against General George B. McClellan in the Virginia Peninsular campaign and was severely wounded at the battle of Seven Pines, Va., in May 1862. He was later given the command of the Army of Tennessee which he led in the early stages of the Atlanta campaign. He later opposed General William T. Sherman in the 1865 Carolina's campaign and eventually surrendered his army at Greensboro, N.C., on April 26, 1865. From 1879-81, Johnston served as a U.S. Congressman from his native state of Virginia, and was U.S. Commissioner of Railroads from 1885-91. He died in Washington, on March 21, 1891, supposedly as a result of a cold contracted while marching bareheaded in the rain in the funeral procession of his old Civil War adversary, General William T. Sherman.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view in uniform with double breasted coat with rank of brigadier general and epaulettes. Period pencil inscription on the reverse, "Genl. Joe Johnston, Commanding Army Potomac." Backmark: E.A. (early 1860's E. Anthony, N.Y. imprint). Excellent.


WBTS Trivia: Not to be confused with the Union Army of the Potomac, the Confederate Army of the Potomac, whose name was short-lived, was the command under Generals' P.G.T. Beauregard and Joseph E. Johnston in the early days of the War Between The States. It fought under this name at the First Battle of Bull Run, Va. which took place on July 21, 1861.

Autograph, General Lewis C. Hunt $75.00

 

Autograph, General Joseph Warren Keifer $15.00

 

Autograph, William H. Seward $75.00

 

CDV, General Joseph E. Johnston $75.00

      This rare early service CDV offers the signed portrait of Ohio’s <U>John Grant Mitchell</U> as Captain, <B>3rd Ohio Infantry</B>. (See our illustration for a signature comparison example.)  Twenty-two years old and minus the heavy full beard sported later as a full General, Columbus, Ohio resident John Grant Michell entered the military on August 1, 1861 as 1st Lt. 3rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  Promoted Captain on December 31, 1861, Mitchell was sent into Ohio on recruiting service in the summer of 1862.  It would have been in this period, prior to promotion and commission as Lt. Col. of the <B>113th Ohio infantry</B> that the young Captain would have had this image captured by photographer Michael Witt.  ( Coinciding with the photo back mark, Witt is listed in Civil War years Columbus, Ohio Directories as doing business at 81 S. High Street in Mitchell’s <I>home city</I> of Columbus. )

         John G. Mitchell would serve under Generals. John Beatty, W. S. Rosecrans, and Ormsby M. Mitchel. A Colonel at Chickamauga, he was a prominent part of General George H. Thomas' heroic defense, would take part in the Atlanta Campaign and was present at the surrender of CSA Gen. Joseph E. Johnston in North Carolina.  On January 12, 1865.  Mitchell became one of the youngest full generals of the Volunteer Services when appointed Brigadier General, US Volunteers. (One may well surmise that the more popularly known heavy full beard was a choice intended to offer maturity.)  On March 13, 1865 and was brevetted Major General before resigning on July 3, 1865.   He practiced law in Columbus, where he died in 1894 at the age of 56.

      Some age foxing with a period ink signature that, while somewhat fragmented, compares well with known period examples. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 At first glance not a big deal but if you appreciate Civil War personal items or period gaming and gambling primitives, this old hand crafted dice cup with period hand cut bone dice will be especially appreciated.    This well-worn old cup was fashioned from a single piece of hardwood drilled out leaving the telltale marking of a hand brace and auger.  The sides were them shaved to finish of the thin walled game cup.  The uneven lip with a rich natural gloss to the outside surface offer good evidence of age with lots of period use and handling.  The old bone dice housed in the cup (illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison) are clearly the product of a <I>make-do</I> effort, hand cut and crudely formed from bone.  Like the cup they offer unquestionable evidence of age and period handling. A worthy addition to any early American gaming or personal item grouping, this cup and dice set will fit especially well set in with American gold rush items or relics of the American West as well as the Civil War.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


       This scarce import Austrian <I>horse pistol</I> has a 10 3/8 inch .665 smooth bore barrel with a period arsenal conversion from the European <I>tubelock</I> system to standard American percussion.  The Model1851 pistol was not equipped with a ramrod channel or ramrod as, in use by Austrian Dragoons, the rammer was carried separately.  In line with intended mounted use and carrying, the pistol’s design offers the unusual feature of attached <U>sling swivels</U>.   The barrel and lock face do not show arsenal markings with the exception of reversed initials on the back side of the lock (see photo).  Requiring some additional research and of potential significance to the Confederate collector will be the small <B>SC</B> (South Carolina ?) one piece stamp on the opposite side of the lock.  This offering remains in pleasing condition with good evidence of contemporary use and carrying to include a clearly period crack repair to the wood adjacent to the barrel just forward of the lock.  Despite good evidence of at least a small number of these Austrian conversion having found their way into the American Civil War, existing examples of such have been extremely elusive and are seldom found even in the older, advanced collections.  A complete example has been preserved in the Smithsonian Institution collection as a specimen from Civil War purchases. (see:<I>Civil War Guns</I> by Wm. Bennett Edwards)  Additionally a relic lock is known to exist having been recovered in 1924 at the Pea Ridge battlefield in Arkansas.  Acquired some time ago and set aside per our personal fascination with the myriad of Civil War imports, this is the only example of such we have owned, in our fifty plus years of active search for such treasures. 

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


<U>A note about firearms:</U>   WE EMPHASIZE HERE THAT THIS PIECE IS CONSIDERED AN ANTIQUE / COLLECTABLE.  IT IS OFFERED AS A HISTORICAL COLLECTABLE ONLY AND IS NOT TO BE CONSIDERED  FIREABLE UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES.  <U>PURCHASE OF THIS ITEM WILL CONSTITUTE A FULL UNDERSTANDING OF AND AGREEMENT WITH  THE ABOVE. </U>


 H 8in. x W 7in. x D 9in.

Rare! early Civil War service CDV – Gen. $225.00

 

handcrafted antique - DICE CUP & BONE DI $95.00

 

S C marked - Civil War import Austrian $650.00

 

CHECK WRITER $0.00

H 7in. x W 9in. x D 8in.  H 18in. x W 21in. x L 44in.  H 30in. x W 24 1/2in. x D 18in.  H 38in. x D 26in.

H 7in. x W 9in. x D 8in. $0.00

 

GO CART $0.00

 

H 30in. x W 24 1 / 2in. x D 18in. $0.00

 

H 38in. x D 26in. $0.00




<b>United States Congressman from Massachusetts


President Abraham Lincoln's & President Andrew Johnson's Minister to China</b>


(1820-70) Born in New Berlin, New York, he attended the University of Michigan, graduated from the law department of Harvard University in 1846, was admitted to the bar and practiced in Boston. He served in the Massachusetts State Senate in 1852; was a member of the Massachusetts constitutional convention in 1853; and served as a U.S. Congressman, 1855-61. In May 1856, Senator Charles Sumner of Massachusetts delivered an abusive denunciation of President Franklin Pierce and Southerners who sympathized with the pro-slavery violence in Bleeding Kansas. In particular, Sumner lambasted Senator Andrew Butler, a cousin of Congressman Preston Brooks of South Carolina. Three days later, Congressman Brooks advanced upon Sumner while he worked at his desk in the Senate chamber. Using his cane, Brooks beat Sumner into unconsciousness. Brooks received no official censure from the House of Representatives, and was instead hailed as a hero in much of the pro-slavery South. Shortly afterwards, Congressman Burlingame delivered what The New York Times referred to as "the most celebrated speech" of his career; a scathing denunciation of Preston Brooks' assault on Sumner, branding him as "the vilest sort of coward" on the House floor. In response, Brooks challenged Burlingame to a duel, stating he would gladly face him "in any Yankee mudsill of his choosing." Burlingame eagerly accepted; as the challenged party, he had his choice of weapons and location. A well-known marksman, he selected rifles as the weapons, and the Navy Yard on the Canadian side of the U.S. border in Niagara Falls as the location (in order to circumvent the U.S. ban on dueling). Brooks, reportedly dismayed by both Burlingame's unexpectedly enthusiastic acceptance and his reputation as a crack shot, neglected to show up, instead citing unspecified risks to his safety if he were to cross "hostile country" (the northern United States) in order to reach Canada. Burlingame's solid defense of a fellow Bostonian greatly raised his stature throughout the North. He was appointed Minister to China by President Lincoln on June 14, 1861, and served throughout the Lincoln administration, and into the Johnson presidency retiring from this post on November 21, 1867. He then served as China's envoy to the U.S. which resulted in the 1868 landmark "Burlingame Treaty."


Authentic, original vintage engraving of Burlingame, 4 x 5 1/2, tipped to an album page with black ink lined borders around his likeness. Overall size is 6 x 9 1/4. Excellent.    H 33in. x D 12in.  H 45in. x D 12in.  H 19in. x W 20in. x D 16in.

Anson Burlingame $15.00

 

H 33in. x D 12in. $0.00

 

H 45in. x D 12in. $0.00

 

H 19in. x W 20in. x D 16in. $0.00

H 6in. x W 27in. x D 4in

NEON  H 40in. x D 14in.  


<b>Third President of the United States</b>


(1743-1826) Among the many highlights of "Founding Father" Thomas Jefferson's political career were; principal author of the Declaration of Independence, a representative of Virginia in the Continental Congress, 2nd Governor of Virginia, United States Minister to France, 2nd Vice President of the United States, and 3rd President of the United States.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view portrait. No imprint. Light age toning and minor wear. Very fine.  


By David Nevin and The Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1986. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with full color illustration of General William T. Sherman riding with his staff. Also has a U.S. and C.S. belt plate, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title of the book printed in blue. The title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 175 pages, index, maps, profusely illustrated. Excellent content. New condition.


The Cover: Major General William Tecumseh Sherman, on a black horse, rides with his staff past a group of freed slaves in this painting of Sherman's march to the sea by artist A.J. Carlin. The wholesale destruction of the land's resources by Sherman's troops spread a sense of helplessness through the Confederacy, portending the end of the War.

H 6in. x W 27in. x D 4in
NEON $0.00

 

H 40in. x D 14in. $0.00

 

CDV, President Thomas Jefferson $15.00

 

Sherman's March; Atlanta to the Sea $20.00




By Peter M. Chaitin and The Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1984. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with full color illustration of the Federal fleet engaging Confederate warships on the Mississippi River. Also has a U.S. and C.S. belt plate, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title of the book printed in blue. The title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 176 pages, index, maps, profusely illustrated. Excellent content. New condition.


The Cover: Fires and bursting shells light the surface of the Mississippi River as a Federal invasion fleet engages Confederate warships south of New Orleans early on April 24, 1862. At left, the Federal flagship Hartford trades shots with the turtle shaped ram Manassas and the foundering tugboat Mosher.  


<b>Killed at the Battle of Stones River, Tennessee, in 1862


Had his head blown off by a Confederate artillery shell


Appointment for a captain to report to Colonel William Tecumseh Sherman in Missouri


This document was sent to President Lincoln's first Secretary of War, Simon Cameron


Civil War Date Document Signed</b>


(1821-62) Born at Havana, Cuba, his birth name was "Julio Pedro Garesche de Rocher." He attended Georgetown College in Washington, D.C., 1833-37, and was then appointed as a cadet to the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, graduating in the class of 1841. He received his commission as 2nd lieutenant, on July 1, 1841, and was assigned to the 4th U.S. Artillery. Garesche then served on frontier and garrison duty for the next 5 years, and was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 14, 1846. During the Mexican War he served with distinction at Camargo, Mexico, and was later appointed to the post of Acting Assistant General of the Rio Grande District, serving in this capacity from 1847-48. He served on the Texas frontier from 1849-51; was on staff duty in the Adjutant General’s office at Washington, D.C., 1852-53; returning to Texas in 1853, he served on recruiting and engineer duty in the Department of Texas; and was back on frontier duty at Fort Brown, Texas, from 1853-55. He was promoted to the rank of brevet captain and A.A.G. on November 9, 1855, and was serving at Washington in 1861 when the Civil War commenced. Declining a commission as brigadier general, instead he accepted a position as staff major, on May 14, 1861. Promoted to lieutenant colonel and A.A.G., on July 17, 1862, he was appointed as "chief of staff" to Major General William S. Rosecrans. Garesche participated in the operations of the Army of the Cumberland, and at the Battle of Stones River, Tenn., on December 31, 1862, while riding alongside of General Rosecrans, he was decapitated by a Confederate cannon ball. General William B. Hazen discovered his lifeless body and removed Garesche’s West Point class ring, and personal bible.


<u>Civil War Date Document Signed</u>: 8 x 10, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


WAR DEPARTMENT

Washington, June 18, 1861


Sir:


You are hereby informed that the President of the United States has appointed you Captain in the Thirteenth Regiment of Infantry, in the service of the United States, to rank as such from the fourteenth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and Sixty one. Should the Senate, at their next session, advise and consent thereto, you will be commissioned accordingly.


Immediately on receipt hereof, please to communicate to this Department, through the Adjutant General's Office, your acceptance or non-acceptance of said appointment; and, with your letter of acceptance, return the Oath herewith enclosed, properly filled up, Subscribed and Attested, reporting at the same time your Age, Residence, when appointed, the State in which Born, and your full Name, legibly written out.


Should you accept, you will at once report in person for orders, to the Colonel of your Regiment, (Col. W.T. Sherman) at Jefferson Bks., Mo.


(To) Simon Cameron

Secretary of War


Capt. Charles C. Smith

13th Regt. Infantry


A true copy


Julius P. Garesche

Asst. Adjt. Genl.


U.S. Office

June 28/61


Light age toning and wear. Very fine. Extremely desirable and rare autograph.


Captain Charles Campbell Smith, the subject of this appointment, was a resident of Indianapolis, Indiana, when he enlisted on April 19, 1861, and was commissioned captain, 10th Indiana Infantry. He was discharged on May 26, 1861, and commissioned captain in the 13th U.S. Infantry. He resigned from the army on November 5, 1864. Smith died on August 20, 1891, and he is buried at Arlington National Cemetery, Washington, D.C., in Site 139-C.


The 13th United States Infantry was reconstituted in May of 1861, with William Tecumseh Sherman appointed as their colonel, and Philip H. Sheridan serving as one of their other captains. Sherman and Sheridan would both go on to become very prominent and influential Union generals' during the American Civil War. The 13th U.S. Infantry earned its motto, "First at Vicksburg," and fought in the battles of Haynes Bluff, Champion's Hill, Black River, and the assault on Vicksburg. The 13th Regiment was the only Union regiment to plant their colors on the Confederate positions at Vicksburg. The 13th U.S. Infantry would later go on to fight in the Spanish American War, and World War II.


<u>WBTS Trivia</u>: Julius P. Garesche was a Catholic in Newark, New Jersey, and he organized the first local conference of the St. Vincent de Paul Society, and was their president. He contributed frequently on Catholic, social and political questions to the New York "Freeman's Journal" and "Brownson's Quarterly Review," and in September 1851, in recognition of his services to the Church, he received the honor and decoration as "Knight of St. Sylvester," which was bestowed upon him by Pope Pius IX.   




         


By The Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1985. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with full color illustration of Confederate guerrillas in action. Also has a U.S. and C.S. belt plate, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title of the book printed in blue. The title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 176 pages, index, maps, profusely illustrated. Excellent content. New condition.


The Cover: Peering through a screen of cattails, Confederate guerrillas draw a bead on their foe in a painting by Tennessee artist Gilbert Gaul. Such furtive assaults by irregular troops plagued the Federal Army as it moved through the South, forcing the diversion of thousands of men from the battle fronts to protect the vulnerable Union rear.  


<b>President Lincoln directs that the sentence be carried out</b>


4 x 6 1/2, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, July 31, 1863


General Orders

No. 253


The proceedings of the Military Commission which convened at Fort Yorktown, Virginia, May 4, 1863, pursuant to Special Orders, No. 105, dated Headquarters, 4th Army Corps, Fort Yorktown, Virginia, April 29, 1863, and before which Private George W. Johnson, Company "D," 4th Regiment Delaware Volunteers, was tried, convicted, and sentenced "to be hanged by the neck until he is dead," for the murder of James Holland, a black man, have been submitted to the President of the United States, who directs that the sentence, as promulgated in General Orders, No. 37, Headquarters, Department of Virginia, Seventh Army Corps, May 26, 1863, be carried into execution.


BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:


E.D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning. Very fine.

The Coastal War; Chesapeake Bay to Rio G $15.00

 

Autograph, Lieutenant Colonel Julius P. $495.00

 

Spies, Scouts and Raiders; Irregular Ope $20.00

 

Delaware Private is to be Hanged for the $35.00




<b>Civil War Congressman


Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives 


Vice President of the United States</b>


(1823-1885) Was a newspaper editor and owner in Indiana. He ran unsuccessfully for a number of political offices as a Whig and then joined the new Republican party. Elected to the U.S. Congress in 1854, he served as Speaker of the House from 1863-69, and was elected Vice President of the United States serving under President Ulysses S. Grant.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view pose. Period ink inscription on the front mount, Schuyler Colfax, Vice President. Backmark: H.H. Parkhill, Evansville, Ind. Sharp image. Very fine.  


By The Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1985. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with full color illustration of a ceremony of a flag presentation at Union Square, N.Y.C. Also has a U.S. and C.S. belt plate, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title of the book printed in blue. The title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 176 pages, index, maps, profusely illustrated. Excellent content. New condition.


The Cover: New York City women on the small reviewing stand present the colors to a newly formed regiment, the 20th U.S. Colored Troops, in a ceremony at Union Square in March 1864.  


4 x 6 5/8, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, August 18, 1863


General Orders

No. 287


In the cases of Bugler John O'Brien, of Light Company A, 3d U.S. Artillery, and Musician Samuel Madden, of Company B, 5th U.S. Infantry, and of Private Thomas Lynch, of Company K, 5th U.S. Infantry, tried by Garrison Courts Martial, convened by Special Orders, Nos. 61 and 66, Headquarters, Albuquerque, N.M., June 15 and June 26, 1863, on the charge of "conduct prejudicial to good order and military discipline," the charge should have been laid under the 45th Article of War, the specifications charging them with drunkenness while on duty. The suspension of the sentences by the Department Commander is approved, and they are inoperative, not having been awarded under or in accordance with the proper Article of War, which specifies the kind of punishment for the offence of which they were convicted.


Bugler O'Brien, Musician Madden, and Private Lynch, will be released from confinement and returned to duty.


BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:


E.D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant General


Light age toning and wear.


 


<u>John J. Ingalls</u>: (1833-1900) Born in Middleton, Essex County, Mass., he graduated from Williams College, Williamstown, Mass., in 1855, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1857, and moved to Kansas in 1858. Member of the State constitutional convention in 1859. Was Secretary of the Territorial Council in 1860. Served as Secretary of the Kansas State Senate in 1861. During the Civil War he was judge advocate of the Kansas Volunteers. Served as a Kansas State Senator in 1862. He was the editor of the Atchison Champion, 1863-65, and helped to found the Kansas Magazine. Served as U.S. Senator from Kansas, 1873-91, being President pro tempore of the Senate during the 49th, 50th and 51st U.S. Congresses. He was the Chairman of the Committee on Pensions, and served on the Committee on the District of Columbia.


<u>Jonathan Chace</u>: (1829-1917) Born at Falls River, Mass., he was engaged in the cotton manufacturing business. Served as Rhode Island State Senator, 1876-77. Was U.S. Congressman from Rhode Island, 1881-85, and U.S. Senator, 1885-89. Chairman of the Committee on Civil Service and Retrenchment. 


<u>Signatures</u>: 4 1/2 x 2, in ink, John J. Ingalls, Jonathan Chace. The paper has been irregularly cut.

CDV, Schuyler Colfax $65.00

 

Twenty Million Yankees; The Northern Hom $15.00

 

3 Union Soldiers Are Released From Confi $8.00

 

Autographs, U. S. Senators John J. Ingall $15.00




<b>Signed by Medal of Honor Recipient, Lieutenant James S. Casey</b>


7 3/4 x 10, printed form, filled out in ink.


Fort Columbus, N.Y.,

New York, Jany. 8, 1863


Received, from SIMEON DRAPER, Provost Marshal General, the following described person, a deserter, viz.:


Rank, Private

Name, James M. Newbury

Company, H

Regiment, 156th

State, N.Y.


James S. Casey

1 Lt. 5 Inf.


Light age toning and wear. Uncommon and very desirable deserter related document signed by a U.S. Medal of Honor recipient.


<u>James S. Casey</u>: (1833-99) Born in Philadelphia, he joined the 7th New York State Militia at the outbreak of the war, in April 1861. He was commissioned 2nd lieutenant, in the 5th U.S. Infantry, on August 5, 1861. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant, September 25, 1861; captain, December 1, 1863; and brevet major, March 25, 1865, for his gallantry in action at the battle of Fort Stedman, Virginia. After the war he became a Companion of the New York Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. Casey served under former Civil War General Nelson A. Miles, in the Black Hills War, earning the Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry in leading his command in an assault against a superior number of Indians in the battle of Wolf Mountain, Montana, on January 8, 1877. He was promoted to major of the 17th U.S. Infantry, on June 27, 1884; lieutenant colonel, of the 1st U.S. Infantry, on April 23, 1890; colonel, of the 22nd U.S. Infantry, on January 21, 1895; and he retired from the army on January 28, 1897. Colonel Casey was buried at Vale Cemetery, in Schenectady, New York.


<u>James M. Newbury</u>: He was 18 years old when he enlisted as a private, on August 21, 1862, at Marbletown, N.Y., and was mustered into the 156th New York Infantry. Apparently released as a deserter, he rejoined his regiment, and died of disease, on February 11, 1863, at New Orleans, Louisiana.


<u>WBTS Trivia</u>: Fort Columbus, N.Y., played an important role in the military life of New York City as the largest army post defending the city. As the closest major army post to the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, Fort Columbus for many years served as a first posting or a major departure point for newly graduated cadets shipping to army posts along the Atlantic or Pacific coasts. Many future generals in the Civil War were posted to or passed through Fort Columbus as young junior officers. Among them were Robert E. Lee, Ulysses S. Grant, Thomas J. Jackson, Joseph E. Johnston, John Bell Hood, Theophilus H. Holmes, Abner Doubleday, Henry W. Halleck, James B. McPherson, John G. Barnard, Horace Brooks, and others. 


In December 1860, and April 1861, the Federal Army secretly dispatched troops and provisions from Fort Columbus to relieve the besieged garrison at Fort Sumter, in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina. In the early years of the Civil War, the north barracks were used to hold Confederate officers taken as prisoners of war pending transfer to other Union prisons such as Johnson's Island, near Sandusky, Ohio, Fort Delaware, Delaware, or Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor. Major General William H. C. Whiting died of dysentery in February 1865 in the post hospital shortly after his surrender at the Battle of Fort Fisher, North Carolina. He was the highest ranking Confederate officer to die as a prisoner of war at Fort Columbus.         



 


<b>Medal of Honor Recipient for gallantry at Port Hudson, Louisiana


Earned the Gold Lifesaving Medal of Honor for saving drowning sailors


He is the only person in American history to have received both the Medal of Honor and the Gold Lifesaving Medal</b>


(1842-1921) Born in Bristol, Maine, Marcus A. Hanna, was living in Rockport, Massachusetts, when the Civil War broke out. He enlisted as a landsman, at Boston, on May 9, 1861, and was mustered into the U.S. Navy. He was discharged on June 20, 1862 having served on the U.S.S. Ohio, the U.S.S. Mississippi and the U.S.S. Niagara respectively. He then decided to join the Union army and enlisted on September 15, 1862, and was mustered into Co. B, 50th Massachusetts Infantry. During the regiment's service at Port Hudson, Louisiana, Sergeant Hanna, was awarded the Medal of Honor for gallantry when he exposed himself to a heavy Rebel fire in order to get water for his comrades who were pinned down in their rifle pits. He was mustered out of the 50th Massachusetts Infantry on August 24, 1863, and was then mustered into Co. K, 2nd Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. He served in this unit until his discharge at Wilmington, N.C., on September 3, 1865. In 1869, Hanna was appointed keeper of Pemaquid Point Light in his hometown of Bristol, Maine. In 1873, he was transferred to Two Lights in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he served as head light keeper. He was awarded the Congressional Gold Life Saving Medal in 1885 for single handedly rescuing sailors of a wrecked schooner while serving at Two Lights, Cape Elizabeth, Maine. According to the Official Coast Guard records Hanna braved a blizzard and freezing temperatures and risked his own life to save the doomed men.  He successfully got the sailors off the ship and brought them to the nearby signal house where they were able to be warmed to save them from exposure and frostbite.   



Marcus A. Hanna

Port Hudson, Louisiana

July 4, 1863


<u>BRAVE AND RESOURCEFUL</u>


"VOLUNTARILY exposed himself to a heavy fire to get water for comrades in rifle pits."  This is the inscription on the Medal of Honor, the proud bearer of which is Marcus A. Hanna, sergeant of Company B, Fiftieth Massachusetts Infantry.


The incident occurred at Port Hudson, on July 4, 1863, and serves not only to illustrate the hero's feeling for his suffering comrades, but his courage and resourcefulness as well.  Sergeant Hanna gives a detailed description of the occurrence, as follows:


"While our forces were closely investing Port Hudson, four days before its surrender, the Fiftieth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry was ordered into the rifle-pits to support a New York battery.  It was early in the morning, and we had just been relieved from similar duty, performed during the night.  The men went back to the pits without having time to replenish their haversacks or canteens.  The day was intensely hot and by noon the men were suffering from thirst.  How to get water was a  problem, with the enemy on the alert and posted on works but a short distance from and considerably higher than our position.


"At about 2 or 3 o'clock P.M. the thirst of our men had become almost unbearable and Lieutenant William H. Hurd, in command of our company, gave some of us permission to go to the rear for water.  Orderly Sergeant Blatchford and myself were the only sergeants present that day.  I at once volunteered to go, and asked for a file of men to assist me.  No one responded.  I decided to try it alone.  I took twelve or fifteen canteens-all I could conveniently carry-hung them about my neck, and placed them about my body to afford protection from rebel bullets.  A dummy, made by rigging up a musket with a blouse and cap, was prepared, the idea being to raise it above our pit and, if possible, draw the fire of the enemy, and then, before they had time to reload, I was to take my chances.  Carefully we raised the dummy until the cap only could be seen, then we ducked it out of sight, to 

hoist it again at once, this time showing the head and body.


"The deception was a success, for at once there came a heavy volley, and before the smoke had cleared away, I was up and off as rapidly as my light but bulky load would permit. I steered across the level plains for the nearest cover some 600 yards away, but I had not gone far, before I could hear the patter of bullets all around me, and knew that I was within sight and range. Yet, I kept on my course, until about half the distance was covered when I realized that I could not escape being hit, and bethought myself of the ruse of throwing myself prostrate, as if killed or badly wounded.  The trick was successful. The firing ceased, and, after lying prone until I was well rested, I sprang to my feet and ran like a deer for the blackberry hedge. In this second race, no further shots were sent after me by the enemy."


"I went about half a mile further to a spring, filled my load of canteens, not one of which, in spite of the firing, had been punctured, and began cautiously to work my way back to my company in the rifle-pits.  Instead of making a bee-line for the pit, I made a detour to the left, in order to bring one of our batteries between myself and the enemy.  After I had reached the battery I had still some sixty or seventy yards to go to the right, wholly exposed to the enemy's fire.  However, I covered this distance 

unmolested.  Lieutenant Hurd and the men warmly congratulated me, and expressed gratitude for the partial relief I had brought them."


Source:  "Deeds of Valor"


<u>Autograph Document Signed</u>: 6 x 8 3/4, in ink. 


"Served in U.S. Navy from May 5th 1861 to June 20, 1862 [on] Frigates, Ohio, Mississippi and Niagara, rate landsman. 


Served in Army, 50th Mass. Vols. from Aug. 15, 1862 to Aug. 24, 1863. Rank private, corporal, sergeant. Reenlisted as veteran Sept. 1st, 1863 as 1st Sergeant, Co. K, 2d Mass. H.[eavy] Arty. Mustered out as 2d Lieut. October 1st, 1865.


After the war he served for a period of 20 years in Light House service. 


Awarded Congressional gold Medal of Honor for rescuing single handed crew of wrecked schooner Australia, Jan. 5th, 1885, Cape Elizabeth Lt. Station.


Awarded Army Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry before Port Hudson, July 4th, 1863.


For details of Life Saving Medal see Life Saving Report 1885, page 42.


For Army Medal, see (Circular) by War Dept. Medals of Honor published by direction of Secretary of War. 

    

Marcus A. Hanna


I never saw President Lincoln." 


Light age toning and wear. Very fine. Extremely desirable A.D.S. from this Civil War Medal of Honor recipient, who was also awarded the Gold Life Saving Medal, the only person in American history to receive both of these heroic awards!! Rare to find in this particular format detailing his military career and awards.      All original and in excellent condition yet with good evidence of age to include a pleasing natural patina with the expected short single age crack along the grain of each natural bovine horn grip; this rarely surviving matching eating knife and fork pair offers the strong cutler marking <B>J. ASHMORE PHILADELPHIA</B> with an <B>American Eagle</B> and <B>U. S.</B> on the knife blade.  Listed in Houston’s knife collectors guide as being in operation 1832 – 1858, John Ashmore crafted cutting implements to include razors, utility items such as axes and hatchets and all manner of cutlery to include bowie knives. (They give Ashmore’s work their highest <I>collectability</I> rating.)  Of most interest to American military historians will be that per Bazelon & McGuinn’s <I><B>Directory of American Military Goods Dealers & Makers </I></B> , delivery receipts for the <B>Schuylkill Arsenal</B> record numerous receipt of Ashmore’s goods to the well-known Army Quarter Master Depot.   Best known today as suppliers to the Lewis & Clark Expedition the Schuylkill Arsenal was built in 1800 to function as a quartermaster facility in support of the U.S. military.  The depot at Schuylkill Arsenal became a primary provider of military goods for the Civil War.   Seldom surviving as a pair in any condition, this cutlery pair is worthy of special notice and with the maker and US marking will be of special interest to enthusiasts of the Mexican War through Civil War use eras. 

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 This outstanding heavy cast and turned bronze mortar and pestle set dates to the earlier through mid-1800s and remains in eye appealing condition with good evidence of age and period use while remaining in excellent condition with a nice untouched natural age patina.  This small <I>doctor’s bag</I> size bronze mortar stands approximately 2 1/8 inches high , is 2 1/8 inches in diameter at the mouth and 1 7/16 inches across the base.  The bronze pestle measures about 3 1/8 inches in length.  Not to be confused with more frequently encountered later examples or the common Chinese castings, this rarely found 19th century bronze apothecary mortar & pestle set will make a nice addition to any quality medical grouping or will go well simply as a period decorative piece. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

1863 Receipt For Deserter of the 156th N $75.00

 

Autograph, Marcus A. Hanna $150.00

 

pre Civil War knife & fork CUTLERY PAIR $85.00

 

vintage – personal travel size - bronze $95.00

Most popularly seen from the earlier1800s through the 1870s, the wearing of these hand woven shirt cuff protectors was, in their time, nearly synonymous with clerking and bookkeeping with service pressed into all manner of continual activity where a reasonably well dressed gentleman was charged with repetitive writing or the handling of material before a desk or table.  In their prime many a pair of these cuffs saw use at the gambling table as a <I>well got up</I> dandy protected the cuffs of his best shirt from wear.  Seldom seen today as most were used up and cast aside in the period, this pair remain in excellent original condition and are sure to please the most discriminating antique collector.  Measuring just under 7 inches in length and 2 ¾ at the wrist flaring to approximately 4 ¾ inches in diameter, these period cuff guards will set in well in any writing instrument, country store of gambling grouping.  A scarce piece of Americana seldom surviving, this is the only pair of such cuffs we have seen outside of museum collections in over fifty years of paying attention to such treasures.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Well documented by modern relic hunters and Civil War site <I>diggers</I>,museum collections and Civil War reference publications, these little brass cased pewter religious figures fit well in any Civil War personal item  grouping. This example remains untouched and original in all respects with that rich age patina that comes to brass with considerable period handling and decades of storage.  Shown here with a quarter for size comparison, this all original and period example is sure to please.  (see: <I>Excavated Artifacts from Battlefields & Campsites of the Civil War and the <I> Gettysburg Visitor’s Center</I> Civil War Museum collection)  please note:   <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!  Mounted on its musket shaped oak parade staff and remaining in outstanding original condition, this wonderful old parade lantern retains its original camphene burner with patriotic red, white and blue glass panels. (With its frost etched glass panel, this offering mirrors the design and color configuration of a Lincoln / Hamlin red, white and blue parade lantern documented in the Smithsonian National Museum collection.)  Retaining its original burner still fitted with the telltale extra length small diameter, tapered brass burner tubes specifically designed to handle the clean burning and especially bright but volatile camphene fuel.  Popular in the 1850s with the use of camphene (a mixture of turpentine and alcohol) as a lighting fuel waning in the early 1860s, this lantern easily dated in the Civil War period.  Measuring approximately 4 feet, 9 inches in overall length mounted on its oak <I>musket</I> staff, the 5 inch square sheet iron lantern body measures about 11 ¼  inches in height from base to the top of its brass chimney cap.  An outstanding piece of Civil War vintage patriotic / political Americana, this rare parade lantern will be of special interest to the Lincoln and Wide Awake enthusiasts as well as Civil War historians. 

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 H 108in. x D 32in.

antique - PALMETTO CUFF GUARDS $125.00

 

Civil War era TRAVELING RELIGIOUS DEVICE $65.00

 

c. late 1830s / early 1860s Red – White $1250.00

 

H 108in. x D 32in. $0.00

H 20in. x D 42in.  H 106in. x D 12in.


ONE PAIR  H 60in. x D 72in.  H 106in. x W 80in.

H 20in. x D 42in. $0.00

 

LAMP POSTS $0.00

 

H 60in. x D 72in. $0.00

 

H 106in. x W 80in. $0.00

H 104in. x W 196in.  H 17in. x W 12in. x D 17in.  H 15in. x W 22in. x D 7in.  H 12in. x W 17in. x D 5in.

H 104in. x W 196in. $0.00

 

H 17in. x W 12in. x D 17in. $0.00

 

H 15in. x W 22in. x D 7in. $0.00

 

H 12in. x W 17in. x D 5in. $0.00




< prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 next >

AntiqueArts.com home page! How to use this page! How to advertise here How we manage your personal information Terms of use TIAS home page