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A nice period <I>Double Eagle</I> one pint patriotic whiskey flask. All in pleasing condition with no chips, flakes, cracks or condition issues, this beautiful hand blown aqua flask with its classic hinged mold marks and applied top will sit well in any earlier to mid 1800s antique grouping. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 This die struck, tinned sheet iron mess plate is approximately 9 1/8 inches in diameter and remains in excellent condition while displaying good evidence of age and period use even to a single period <I>cut-nail</I> piercing on the edge for suspension.  A classic Civil War era plate in style, construction and material, this attractive mess plate bears a clearly period scratch engraved identification on the back with an <B>1862</B> date (see photos).   With the knowledge that the plate came out of Pennsylvania, a close examination of the cursive name with a comparison to a state roster database such as that provided by <I>Historical Data Systems</I> may be fruitful.  A nice piece for the Civil War personal item collector.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Complete with finely inlayed bone teeth setting off detail of the figure and skill of the craftsman who created this fine old tobacco pipe, we will let our photos provide the description for this offering.  With a chip or two to the bill of the cap as remnant of period use and carrying, this exceptionally well carved figural pipe bowl remains in pleasing original condition and will set well in any Civil War personal grouping or tobacciana collection.      <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 A neat Civil War vintage personal item this <I>cloth stretcher</I> was designed to stretch and stabilize a section of cloth for identification with a common dipping pen.  Made of turned birch wood the round <I>plug</I> piece was placed under the cloth and the corresponding wood <I>hoop</I> was placed over the cloth covered <I>plug</I> and pressed down stretching and holding the material firmly for easy marking with a dipping pen. Only the second of such we have seen in our all too many years of paying attention to Civil War vintage personal item marking equipment, we have the other example in our own collection.  (That example retains the original label which is <B>patent dated 1856.</B>)  A scarce little personal item ! <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

original! patriotic DOUBLE EAGLE WHISKE $135.00

 

identified & 1862 dated Civil War MESS P

 

Civil War era - CARVED TOBACCO PIPE $525.00

 

Civil War era cloth stretcher – MARKING $95.00

This outstanding pair of original 17 1/2 inch high, fancy stitched <I>cowboy boots</I> are approximately size 10 ½ or 11 and remain in excellent condition with the eye appeal that comes only with age and period use.  Demonstrating all the characteristics of popularly frontier west footwear that collectors commonly refer to as the <I>Wellington boot</I>these boots sport 1 inch stacked leather heels with 16 inch straight tops of decoratively stitched high-grade leather, lined with soft <I>kid</I>leather and sporting 7 inch cotton web pulls.   With the vast majority eventually <I>used up</I> and cast aside in the period with the tops cut off to be repurposed as scrap, original period examples are seldom seen in any condition with well-preserved examples such as these with still pliable leather and solid stitching being extremely rare on todays collector market.  Unmarked as to maker as was common to such period examples most frequently made for the wearer by a local cobbler, our photos will do best to show off the appeal of these classic boots.  


<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 


Postal envelope addressed to James C. Mayer, 8th Company, 7th Regiment, N.Y.S.M., Washington, D.[C.]. Care Col. Lefferts. C.D.S. New York, May 27, with 3 cents rose (Scott #64) George Washington postage stamp. Rough edges where the envelope was opened. 


WBTS Trivia: The 7th New York State Militia was one of the country's most famous military units. Commanded by Colonel Marshall Lefferts, they were one of the first regiments to answer President Lincoln's call for troops after the bombardment of Fort Sumter and immediately left New York City (April 19, 1861) for Washington at the commencement of the Civil War. They also saw duty during the July 1863 New York City draft riots, and participated in the funeral cortege of President Lincoln through New York City.   <b>in the Civil War</b>


By Richard B. McCaslin. With a Foreword by the General Editors, Carl Moneyhon and Bobby Roberts. Published by The University of Arkansas Press, Fayetteville, Arkansas, 2007. 8 1/2 x 11 1/4, hard covers with illustrated dust jacket. 398 pages, index, illustrated. New condition. Extremely desirable book on Tennessee Civil War images.


It's one thing to understand that over twenty thousand Confederate and Union soldiers died at the Battle of Murfreesboro. It's quite another to study an ambrotype portrait of twenty year old private Frank B. Crosthwait, dressed in his Sunday best, looking somberly at the camera. In a tragically short time, he'll be found on the battlefield, mortally wounded, still clutching the knotted pieces of handkerchief he used in a hopeless attempt to stop the bleeding from his injuries.


Private Crosthwait's image is one of more than 250 portraits- many never before published- to be found in the highly anticipated <i>"Portraits of Conflict; A Photographic History of Tennessee in the Civil War."</i> The eighth in the distinguished Portraits of Conflict series, this volume joins the personal and the public to provide a uniquely rich portrayal of Tennesseans- in uniforms both blue and gray- who fought and lost their lives in the Civil War.


Here is the story of a widow working as a Union spy to support herself and her children. Of a father emerging from his house to find his Confederate soldier son dying at his feet. Of a nine year old boy who attached himself to a union regiment after his mother died. Their stories and faces, joined with personal remembrances from recovered letters and diaries and ample historical information on secession, famous battles, surrender, and Reconstruction, make this new Portraits of Conflict a Civil War treasure.   

 Remembered primarily for his April 12,1862 gallantly when, under fire, he replaced the American Flag that had been shot away from the Fort Sumter flag pole, the interesting  <I>back story</I> of how the New York City policeman turned <U>civilian</U> aid to the besieged garrison is to lengthy to recount here but well worth a google search.  In short Peter Hart, had served with Major Anderson as Sgt. Peter Hart and personal orderly in the Mexican War.  The two men had developed a special rapport in that time and while Hart had left the military to serve as a New York City Policeman, the Major’s wife Eliza was committed to reuniting the pair as a means of bolstering her husband’s spirits as the Major struggled with what surely must have seemed a <I>no win</I> circumstance in the days culminating in bombardment of his command and the beginning of Civil War.  No small feat as Eliza had to locate and convince Peter Hart to rejoin her husband, then tackle the political bureaucracy of a time and place headed for all-out war.  This required a trip to South Carolina where Mrs. Anderson would personally take on Governor Pickens of that state.  In the heat of the crises the Governor had restricted any access to the Fort that could be seen as upgrading the strength of the garrison.  Again <I>in short</I> Mjr. Anderson’s feisty wife was successful in her effort such that by the time of the attack on Fort Sumter, Peter Hart was present as aid to the beleaguered commander and well accounted for as the first shots of war rained on Sumter.  Peter Hart earned a place in history as when hot shot fired into the fort caused parts of Sumter to catch fire, he repeatedly led a detail of soldiers through suffocating smoke to extinguish flames threatening the fort’s powder supply.  In consideration of this and other action to include replacement of the fort’s fallen flag, Peter Hart’s bravery during the bombardment of Fort Sumter was acknowledged by all members of the garrison when Anderson and later presented him with a gold watch from Tiffany’s. Hart resumed working as a New York City policeman and died in1892.  A rarely seen remnant of Hart’s notoriety in the opening days of the Civil War, this E. Anthony / Brady blackmarked CDV remains in excellent condition with strong contrast.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

outstanding early mid-1800s - fancy stit $625.00

 

Cover Addressed to Soldier in the 7th N. $25.00

 

Portraits of Conflict, A Photographic Hi

 

scarce! Civil War vintage – Hero of Fort $235.00

This attractive earlier through mid-1800s leather wallet will best be described by our illustrations.  A standard size of the period (7 ¾ X 3 5/8 inches folded) this nice old wallet remains in pleasing condition, soft and pliable with solid stitching yet with good evidence of age and period use.  Attractively embossed inside and out with well-defined Federal Eagle panels, this desirable pattern is difficult to find today.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  A bit late for our usual fare but when this came out of a lot of 1930s & 40s Civil War veteran (G. A. R. & U. C. V.) we felt it worthy of a good home.  Measuring approximately 34 X 17 ¾ inches and printed on coarse linen.  Packed away out of the light for decades, the colors remain vivid and especially attractive as they reflect the period red and blue printing shades one expects of the 1930s & 40s.  Solid and in fine condition, upon the closest inspection one can detect a small pin or tack piercing at each corner indicating use as a banner.  A nice farmable size or displayed on the wall or on a table top as is, this colorful <I>Stars & Bars</I> Confederate banner will go well in any Civil War collection room. please note:   <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!


 As with so many utilitarian items common to the period the lowly sheet iron <I>cow-bell</I> with its distinctive dull <I>’thunk- thunk’</I>, found its way to the front.  As with so much of this neat <I>stuff</I> we can thank the modern day <I>digger</I>/ historian for verification of field use of such.  (The excavated bell shown here [NOT FOR SALE] is from our own collection. It was found in a Falmouth, Virginia, Maine camp.)    Illustrated here with a quarter for size comparison, the sheet iron bell offered here remains in excellent plus condition with a deep natural age patina over a full complement of original finish.  Remnants of the original label remain on one side.  Not a big deal but the condition alone will make this piece a welcome addition to any quality Civil War grouping.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!


        A rarely surviving relic of the early post-Civil War <I>those were the days</I> when government military surplus <I>treasures</I> were offered for sale en-masse, this original 9 ¼ X 11 ¾ sales broadside offers <B> $100,000</B> in war surplus <B>Army Goods</B> from <B>United States Government Auctions</B> for sale.  A listing of available items includes everything from a large assortment of single and double harnesses and all manner of horse equipage such as bridles, halters, curry combs, horse blankets &c with <B>Cavalry, Artillery </B>and <B>Officers Saddles</B> to <B>India Rubber Tent Blankets, Ponchos </B> & <B>Overcoats</B> with <B>Canvas & India Rubber Horse Covers</B>.  Uniforms include <B> Infantry, Cavalry & Navy Over Coats, Blue Pants</B> and lined and unlined <B>Blouses</B>.   The list of military surplus includes <B>Army Tents</B> of three sizes with <B>Officers Mess Chests</B> and <B> Axes, Picks</B> and other camp gear.   <I>Heavy hand sewn</I> <B>Army Shoes</B> are <U>offered by the case</U> with <B>Dress & Musicians Coats, Forage & McClellan Caps, Haversacks, Knapsacks</B> and <B>Canteens</B> are offered for sale on the J. C. Collins broadside as well as <B>Iron Bedsteads, Linen Sheets</B> and hospital <B>Stretchers</B> along with <B>Camp Kettles</B> and a number of additional items.

      James C. Collins began his life as a Philadelphia merchant in the mid-1840s and is recorded as a <I>middle-man</I> in the rag and scrap iron business around 1849.   Collins got his big start in the military goods business during the Civil War and while remaining largely behind the scenes, he became a significant buyer at post-Civil war government surplus auctions and was a supplier of military surplus to the likes of <U>Francis Bannerman</U> and other well-known dealers of Civil War  military surplus.

     On news print type paper, printed on one, side this original just post-Civil War broadside is in a conveniently displayable size and remains in excellent condition save a small chip at the top center not impacting on text (see photo- We have laid a small section of like paper in the chip.) this original broadside will serve as a wonderful companion piece in any number of Civil War collectable categories.   Most frequently torn down and discarded after the sale, these broadsides were relatively fragile and not the kind of thing one would be inclined to preserve in the period such broadsides as this are seldom seen today and are very rarely offered. 

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Earlier 19th century through Civil War e

 

c. 1940s Confederate Stars & Bars - BAN $65.00

 

Civil War vintage SHEET IRON BELL $50.00

 

J. C. Collins - Civil War Surplus – earl $395.00




Criswell #124. Vignette of C.G. Memminger at top center and a cotton plant at the bottom. Authorized by the Act of Congress, C.S.A., February 20, 1863. Lithographed by Evans & Cogswell, Columbia, S.C. Eight coupons still attached. Very ornate Confederate bond that is in excellent condition.  <b>in the Civil War</b>


By William Garrett Piston and Thomas P. Sweeney. With a Foreword by the General Editors, Carl Moneyhon and Bobby Roberts. Published by The University of Arkansas Press, Fayetteville, Arkansas, 2009. 8 1/2 x 11 1/4, hard covers with illustrated dust jacket. 347 pages, index, illustrated. New condition. Extremely desirable book on Missouri Civil War images.


A deeply divided border state, heir to the "Bleeding Kansas" era, Missouri became the third most fought-over state in the war, following Virginia and Tennessee. Rich in resources and manpower, critical politically to both the Union and the Confederacy, it was the scene of conventional battles, river warfare, and cavalry raids. It saw the first combat by organized units of Native Americans and African Americans. It was also marked by guerrilla warfare of unparalleled viciousness. 


This volume, the ninth in the Portraits of Conflict series, includes hundreds of photographs, many of them never before published. The authors provide text and commentary, organizing the photographs into chapters covering the origins of the war, its conventional and guerrilla phases, the war on the rivers, medicine (Sweeney's medical knowledge adds greatly to this chapter and expands our knowledge of its practice in the west), the experiences of Missourians who served out of state, and the process of reunion in the postwar years.    


Multi-color lithograph, done by Kurz & Allison, 76-78 Wabash Ave., Chicago, Copyright 1891. Titled, "Assault on Fort Sanders." Imprint below the illustration gives the date of the battle, "November 29, 1863." States that the Union commander was General Burnside and the Confederate commander was General Longstreet. Also includes the numbers of losses suffered by both armies during the engagement. Overall size is approximately 23 3/4 x 18. This is a reprint of the original Kurz & Allison 1891 edition done on heavy paper stock with vivid colors. There are wide white borders on all sides. Circa 1960. It is my understanding that these were printed around the time of the Civil War Centennial celebrations using the original plates to print these. There were other reprints done much later (1979) of these Kurz & Allison Civil War battle scenes which are much smaller in size (about 12 x 15). Excellent battle of Fort Sanders, Tennessee lithograph prominently featuring the Confederate assault on the Union fort. Would look great framed. Scarce War Between the States battle to find any items on. Very desirable.


WBTS Trivia: The Confederate assault on Fort Sanders was the crucial engagement of the Knoxville, Tennessee campaign during the Civil War, and was fought in Knoxville, on November 29, 1863. Attacks by Confederate Lieutenant General James Longstreet troops failed to break through the well fortified defensive lines of Union Major General Ambrose E. Burnside, resulting in heavy Rebel casualties, and the Siege of Knoxville entered its final days.

 


<b>United States Colored Troops lead the charge</b>


Multi-color lithograph, done by Kurz & Allison, 76-78 Wabash Ave., Chicago, Copyright 1894. Titled, "Battle Of Olustee, Fla." Imprint below the illustration at lower left, "Feby. 26, 1864. Union: (Gen. Seymour). 8 U.S., 54 Mass., 1st N.C. Col. T. Loss: 193 K'd, 1175 W'd, 460 Miss. Conf. (Gen. Finnegan). Loss Abt. 660." Overall size approximately 23 3/4 x 18. This is a reprint of the original Kurz & Allison 1894 edition done on heavy paper stock with vivid colors. There are wide white borders on all sides. Circa 1960. It is my understanding that these were printed around the time of the Civil War Centennial celebrations using the original plates to print these. There were other reprints done much later (1979) of these Kurz & Allison Civil War battle scenes which are much smaller in size (about 12 x 15).  Excellent battle of Olustee, Florida lithograph prominently featuring gallant United States Colored Troops in the forefront of the action. Would look great framed. Very desirable Florida and black Civil War troops related item.


WBTS Trivia: The Battle of Olustee, Florida, which took place on February 20, 1864, was the only major battle of the Civil War that was fought in the state of Florida. Union General Truman Seymour landed troops at Jacksonville, Fla., whose main objective was to disrupt the food supply that was subsisting the Confederate army. Meeting little resistance, he proceeded towards the state capital of Tallahassee, against orders, assuming that he would only face the small Florida militia. Unknown to General Seymour, Confederate forces at Charleston, S.C. sent reinforcements to the support of General Joseph Finnegan in Florida led by General Alfred H. Colquitt. Instead of the light militia resistance Seymour expected, he ran into strong Confederate opposition near Ocean Pond in Olustee, where the Union and Confederate armies collided and the ensuing battle of Olustee was desperately fought. Distinguished among the Union soldiers that fought that day were numerous regiments of U.S. Colored Troops including the now famous 54th Massachusetts Infantry who had earned immortality at the battle of Fort Wagner, South Carolina in August of 1863. The Union forces were repulsed at Olustee and retreated back to Jacksonville where they stayed for the remainder of the war.

1863 Confederate $500 Bond- C. G. Memming $125.00

 

Portraits of Conflict; A Photographic Hi

 

Assault on Fort Sanders, Knoxville, Tenn

 

The Battle of Olustee, Florida




(1816-94) Graduated in the West Point class of 1837. After fighting against the Seminoles, he resigned to study law and afterwards began practice in Rocky Mount, Va. He became a member of the house of delagates, and the commonwealth's attorney, and when war broke out with Mexico he was a major of Virginia volunteers. At the start of the Civil War he was promptly appointed as colonel of the 24th Va. Inf., which he led at 1st Manassas. He was promoted to rank of brigadier general to rank from July 21, 1861, and took part in all the engagements of the Army of Northern Virginia from 1862-64. Promoted to major general to rank from Jan. 17, 1863, he was prominent at Salem Church during the Chancellorsville campaign, and at Gettysburg. At the Wilderness he commanded Gen. A.P. Hill's corps for a time, and was promoted to lieutenant general from May 31, 1864. He later saw action in the Shenandoah Valley at Winchester, Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform. No imprint. "Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early, C.S.A.," is written in a nice period ink script on the front mount. Excellent condition. Very desirable. Early is considered scarce to find in a cdv.  


<b>Includes Letters From General Andrew Jackson, President James Madison and Statesman James Mason</b>


16 pages, 6 x 9 1/2. 


New England Convention. Difference in favor of Southern States. The Olive Branch. Legislature of Massachusetts. Glorious News From New Orleans. 3 Letters From Major General Andrew Jackson to the Secretary of War Regarding Recent Action. Inspector General A.P. Hayne Reports the Killed, Wounded and Prisoners Taken at the Battle at Larond's Plantation. Proclamation From the President of the United States James Madison. Letter From James Mason. Military Report. Letter From Commodore J.H. Dent, U.S. Navy to the Secretary of the Navy Benjamin W. Crowninshield. Proceedings of Congress and more. Light age toning and wear. Very desirable New Orleans and General Andrew Jackson related issue.   


Trivia: The War of 1812 was fought between the United States and England from June 1812 to February 1815. One of the casualties of this war was the burning of the White House in Washington, D.C. by British forces on August 24, 1814.         <b>In The Civil War</b>


By Bobby Roberts and Carl Moneyhon.  Published by The University of Arkansas Press, Fayetteville, 1993. Hard cover, 8 1/2 x 11 1/4, with dust jacket, 396 pages, illustrated, index. New condition.


The Civil War presented the first major opportunity to photograph fighting men and the places where they fought and to create an extensive visual record of war. Most collections of such photographs, however, have focused on the eastern fronts and have treated the images only as illustrations for traditional narratives.


Centering on the common soldier, "Portraits of Conflict; A Photographic History of Mississippi in the Civil War," the third volume in the University of Arkansas Press's award winning series, tells the stories of the individuals- the heroism and the fear, the boredom and the misery. With over 280 photographs, six maps, and related documents, Roberts and Moneyhon depict the physical and spiritual suffering of the ordinary recruit in his fight for his country and its land.


Included in this photojournalistic album are the place and date of the birth and death for many of the soldiers mentioned, and each picture has a caption identifying the subject and the type of photograph represented. By carefully matching available written sources to photographs, Roberts and Moneyhon have provided a unique opportunity for the reader to see the war on a human scale that may always elude conventional narratives.   


 Complete and original with all the brass fixtures, no breaks or weak spots but with some crackling in the surface finish as evidence of age and originality, this leather accoutrement is offered from a Bannerman Island military goods salvage sail of many years past.  Per text offered in their 1903 Francis Bannerman Military Goods Catalogue, the Mod. 1873 carrying brace was worn over the shoulders with straps for attaching haversack, knapsack or other load to be carried.  The piece is Rock Island Arsenal marked and offered as found after decades of storage.  While the new owner may want to apply a light coat of Lexol or other <U>appropriate</U> preservative we’d leave this now rare accoutrement just as it is, untouched and <U>still tied with hemp twine just as it came from Bannerman Island.</U>  An exceptional Indian War vintage item!   As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !

CDV, General Jubal A. Early $250.00

 

Niles' Weekly Register, Baltimore, Febru $75.00

 

Portraits of Conflict, A Photographic Hi

 

U. S. Army Mod. 1873 KNAPSACK CARRYING B $145.00

An outstanding example of the 19th century design curry comb so well documented by Civil War site <I>diggers</I> who’s study and excavation efforts have served the collector community so well.  This same design was well utilized in the military through the Indian Wars era.  Acquired while poking through likely <I>antiquing</I> sites and collections in Montana and the Dakotas (we were supposed to be on vacation) we have left this <I>Wheeler Pat. 1861</I> curry comb  as found and as is simply to preserve its excellent natural age condition.   That <I>untouched</I> and <I>as found</I> quality is of particular value here not only as presentation of honest condition with traces of original lacquer finish on the metal but as presentation and preservation of the <B>U S 7</B> marked in the turned maple grip.  Picked out of an accumulation of antique harness, grooming and other period <I>horse barn</I> gear, the piece was offered with no price consideration or notation of the marking but only as a nice example of a Civil War era design.  Alignment of the characters are clearly indicative of a <U>single stamp</I> as opposed to individual character stamps.  This and other considerations offered here offer good evidence of the originality of an exceptional relic of the Indian Wars era. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  As with all of our items, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Somewhat crude in appearance yet clearly period this scarce Confederate marking stencil is that of <B>Daniel A. Atkinson</B> a Sargent of Co. C 1st Virginia State Reserves (a.k.a. <B>1st Battalion  2nd Class Virginia Militia of the City of Richmond</B> ).  A bit of an enigma as Daniel A. Atkinson is also recorded in period military records (see illustration) as <I>Daniel <B>H.</B> Atkinson</I>.  A check of a period Richmond Directory found Atkinson listed twice, once as Daniel A. and again as Daniel H.  Both listings are for a <I>cabinet maker</I> and <U> both are for the same address</U> in the historic old Church Hill district of Richmond.  (see illustration)   The National Park Service database lists <I>Daniel A. Atkinson</I>  as a primary name with <I>Daniel H. Atkinson</I> as an <I>Alternate Name</I>.  (A copy of our research notes will come with stencil.)  While little is written on the history of this outfit we did find that it was formed in Richmond 1862 and was composed primarily of young men between sixteen and eighteen with some forty-five to fifty-five aged members.  Clearly an effort to make non-draft age men available for local duty thus releasing <I>Regulars</I> for more argues duty in the field.   The Regt was largely employed as guards for <B>Castle Thunder</B>, and the Treasury Department as well as other posts within the city of Richmond.  A scarce item, we have had this stencil tucked away for years having acquired it when it walked into a Richmond Civil War show back in the day.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Easily dated to the earlier 19th century, this attractive old oil lamp offers that distinctive look and feel of the heavier <I>lead</I> glass common to better 18th century glass yet has the seam marks of a bit later two seam mold.  This and the early straight burner with the cylindrical wick, the absence of any mechanical wick adjustment and no provision for a chimney will make the old oil lamp appropriate to the earlier 1800s with use through the Civil War era.  All in nice original condition with the early burner and lots of telltale ware on the bottom from period use.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 This rarely found battlefield recovered <B>pair</B> of Union issue spurs emanated from the late pioneer Civil War relic collector and authoritative  author, Stanley Philips. ( <I>Excavated Artifacts from Battlefields & Campsites of the Civil War</I> Vol. 1 & 2 by Stanley Phillips)  Acquired years ago from the respected Phillips as a <I>Battle of the Wilderness</B> recovery, this rare pair of Union spurs is matching in all respects but most importantly with respect to being a legitimate pair, show a matching, <U>identical</U>, patina on each spur.  Experienced relic collectors will be appreciative of this as good evidence of a common recovery site.  As to condition, the spurs are in pleasing shape while the iron rowels show expected detrition from the elements.  An opportunity to acquire a rare matching pair of excavated spurs, knowledge of the conditions  and aftermath of the Wilderness battle, where so many casualties were never recovered, will only enhance the interest of the Civil War historian.  Upon request we will include our letter preserving origin as emanating from the Stanley Philips collection. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

Civil War / Indian Wars - Pat. 1861 CUR $195.00

 

Confederate marking stencil of – Daniel $425.00

 

earlier to mid-1800s – FINGER LAMP $75.00

 

Stanley Phillips collection - Battle of $225.00




7 3/4 x 2 3/4, imprinted form, filled out in ink. $3.33 Received of Mary Oliver, Three dollars and 33 cents, Tax for the year 1831, her taxable property consisting of 160 Acres of land. Also lists 1 Slave at lower right just above the signature of C. Steele, the tax collector of Warren County, [Mississippi]. Endorsed by Mary Oliver on the reverse. Light age toning and wear. Very fine early 1800's tax receipt listing a slave as taxable property.  


<b>Depredations are being committed against Southern citizens in North Georgia by Confederate raiders!</b>


2 pages, 6 1/2 x 8 1/2, in ink, written by Captain J.M. Carden, Commanding Scouts, to General Joseph Wheeler, Commanding Cavalry Corps.


<b><u>Grahamville, Jany. 8th, 1865</b></u>


General,


I have the honor to inform you that whilst upon duty collecting stragglers & deserters under orders from Brig. Genl. Reynolds, in North Georgia, I have found twelve men with authority from Gov. Joseph E. Brown to raise Regts., Battalions, or Companies, who are using this authority to enlist men from other regular commands, thus offering a premium for desertion. These parties followed Genl. Sherman’s line of march robbing citizens of horses, mules, knives, forks, spoons, ladies dresses, bed clothing, &c, &c, whilst doing so claiming to belong to Genl. Wheeler’s Cavalry. I captured a number of these parties with all the kinds of stolen property specified above & know them to belong to the parties raised by the men having authority from Gov. Brown as specified above. Their custom is to retreat to North Georgia with their stolen effects.


I am General Very Respy.,

Your obt. Svt.,

J.M. Carden

Capt. Comg. Scouts


To:

Maj. Genl. Jos. Wheeler

Comg. Cav. Corps


Docket:

Grahamville, Jany. 8th, 1865

J.M. Carden

Capt. Comg. Scout

Depredations in North Ga.


Very bold and neatly written. Superb Confederate scouting report that was sent to General "Fighting Joe" Wheeler informing him of depredations that were being committed against Georgia citizens by Confederate deserters who have followed the infamous march of Union General William T. Sherman and they are using General Wheeler's name to commit these crimes! Knowing of  Wheeler's volatile personality it's a pretty safe assumption to say that the general was not pleased to learn of this news! This report was published in the book, "Campaigns of Wheeler and His Cavalry, 1862-1865," by W.C. Dodson. This rare Confederate document has been in a private collection for the last 25 years! Extremely desirable! 

 


<b>Letcher Light Artillery of Virginia


Wounded in action at the battle of Fredericksburg, Va. in 1862


Major General and Commander of the Virginia Division of the U.C.V.


With imprint of Anderson & Co. Richmond, Va.</b>


A resident of Henrico County, Brander was commissioned into the Letcher Light Artillery of Virginia, on February 17, 1862. He was wounded in action at the battle of Fredericksburg, Va., on December 13, 1862. Served as Commander of the Virginia Division of the U.C.V., with rank of major general. Buried in Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 1/2 x 4 1/8 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform with rank of major. Imprint on the front mount, Anderson & Co., Richmond, Va. Backmark: Anderson & Co., 1311 Main St., Richmond, Va.


In the official account from U.C.V. Headquarters, New Orleans, La., January 29, 1900, General Moorman states of General Brander:


A noble old Virginian, Major General Thomas A. Brander, commanding the Virginia Division of the United Confederate Veterans, has been gathered into the harvest of death.  The great soul of this brave old soldier, patriotic citizen, and good man passed into the land of beauty, where he will again enjoy the companionship and enlist under the banner of glory which waves over Lee and Jackson, and Stuart and Heth, and Early and Pickett, and others of his immortal comrades who have preceded him into eternity. The General Commanding joins with the Confederate survivors of the Old Dominion who mourn for the loss of the noble old Confederate soldier whom they so often honored as their beloved Division Commander. Brave, modest, gentle, and chivalrous, his life work is ended, his name is inscribed upon the Roll of Honor, and his story is eloquently told in the annals of his State and of the Confederacy.


The following tribute is by his personal staff:


Richmond, Va., January 29, 1900.


Among those who today mourn the death of General Thomas A. Brander, late Commander of the Virginia Division of the United Confederate Veterans, perhaps none will do so more sincerely, or feel his loss more keenly, than we, the members of his personal staff. All of us were his old comrades, his lifelong friends and companions, and thus linked to him by ties which could be broken only by the rude hand of death. Deeply impressed with our sorrows, we cannot allow this occasion to pass without conveying to his family this imperfect testimonial of our appreciation of our chief, our comrade, and our friend, as well as of the loss sustained by us in his death. The old saying, "The bravest are the tenderest," was rarely more perfectly exemplified than in the life and character of our dead friend. 


At the outbreak of the late civil war he entered the ranks of the Confederate army, and on almost every field on which the Army of Northern Virginia was engaged he bore a noble part. He returned from the war a major of artillery in Peagram's Battalion, a body conspicuous for gallantry even in that splendid army, and among all that host of patriot "braves" there was none accounted braver or truer than he whose loss we mourn today. We cannot here recount either the stirring and stormy scenes of war which shaped his military life, or those through which he passed as a citizen, so often checkered by experiences both of sunshine and of sorrow; but suffice it to say thar throughout his eventful life he bore himself as only the brave, true man and Christian gentleman that he was could have done, and the epitaph of one of England's bravest and best soldiers might well be his; "He feared man less because he feared God more." As the ranking officer of the United Confederate Veterans in this department, he was at the head of all the movements and of all the processions formed and led to do honor to the Confederate cause, and to the memory of those who died for that cause, and we cheerfully bear testimony to the fidelity and ability with which he performed every duty imposed by these often recurring and sometimes mournful events in our city. 


In short, no man loved the Confederate cause or did more, as far as was able, to attest that love, both during and since the war, than he; therefore, be it 


Resolved: 1). That in the death of General Thomas A. Brander the survivors of the Confederate armies have lost a comrade as conspicuous for fidelity to duty and bravery in war as he was for fidelity to principle and manly bearing in times of peace; that our city has lost one of its best citizens, one who exemplified in all the walks of life that nobility of character which marks the true man and Christian gentleman; and that we, the members of his personal staff, feel with peculiar poignancy the grief now universal in our midst occasioned by his death. 


2). That we hereby tender to his family our deepest sympathies, together with the assurance that in the sorrow which death has brought to the household of our comrade, friend, and chief we, and each of us, share a common grief, akin to that only of those who were "nearest and dearest" to him in life.


Signed: George L. Christian, George J. Rogers, James H. Capers, Joseph V. Bidgood, J. Taylor Ellyson, William M. Evans, Joseph Bryan.   


Full color H.A. Ogden print titled, "McClellan at Antietam, September 17, 1862." Copyright 1912, by The War Memorial Association. Measures about 9 x 12. Very fine.

1831 Mississippi Tax Receipt For Land & $75.00

 

Confederate Scouting Report Sent to Gene $650.00

 

CDV, Major Thomas A. Brander $300.00

 

General George B. McClellan at Antietam $15.00




8 pages. THE SIEGE OF CHARLESTON. Arrival of the Arago, with Advices to the 10th. The Grand Assault Expected to be Made Yesterday. Reports of a Deserter from Fort Wagner. Guns Removed from Fort Sumter to James Island. The Fall of Sumter Regarded as a Certainty. Great Improvements in the Health of Our Troops. Progress of the Siege Operations. The Rebel Works. List of Deaths in Hospital from Port Royal Including Colored Troops From the 54th Massachusetts Regiment. Military News to be Suppressed; A Stringent Order From General Gillmore. The Big Gun; What the Three Hundred Pound Parrot is Expected to do. News From Fortress Monroe. Reports of an English Doctor Escaped from Richmond. A Mass Convention of Unionist Called in North Carolina. A Delegation to be Sent to Washington. The Draft. It Will Re-Commence on a Week from Next Monday. The Metropolitan Police; Their Services During The Riot Week, Their Honorable Record. The Hanging of the Negro in Clarkson Street. How the Rebels Carry on War. Gerritt Smith on the War. Affairs at Vicksburg. The Task of Cleaning the City of Confederate Nastiness. Usefulness of the Contrabands, and more news. Edge wear.  


<b>Colonel of the 26th North Carolina Infantry, 1861-62


Civil War Governor of North Carolina


U.S. Senator from North Carolina


With Raleigh, North Carolina backmark</b>


(1830-94) Born in Buncombe County, N.C., he was the younger brother of C.S.A. General Robert B. Vance. He studied law and began a practice in Asheville, N.C., in 1852. When North Carolina passed the ordnance of secession, in May 1861, Vance was a captain commanding a company known as the "Rough and Ready Guards," that was part of the 14th North Carolina Regiment. In August 1861, he was elected colonel of the 26th North Carolina Infantry which he led in the battle of New Bern, N.C., in March 1862, and in the battles around Richmond, Va. in the spring of 1862. In September 1862, Vance was elected Governor of North Carolina, and he was re-elected for a second term in 1864, earning the sobriquet, "War Governor of the South."  He was arrested by Federal forces on his birthday in May 1865, and confined in prison in Washington, D.C., until he was paroled in July 1865. He served once again as Governor of North Carolina, 1877-79, and was a United States Senator, from 1879-94.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 1/2 x 4 1/8 card. Chest up view. Backmark: J.W. Watson, Raleigh, N.C. Light age toning, with a couple of surface scratches and minor abrasions. Desirable to find with a North Carolina backmark.   


Relic card with 2 brass pins recovered from the wreck of the Georgiana. 5 x 3, gray card with illustration of a sailing ship at the top left, and imprint that reads: Brass sewing pins manufactured in England that were taken from the wreck of the CSA blockade runner "Georgiana" which sank off the South Carolina coast in 1863 while trying to run the Federal blockade into Charleston from Bermuda. Brass pins were unavailable in the Confederacy and imported pins were a prized commodity in the South. 


The "Georgiana" was built in 1862-63, in England for the Confederate States. She escaped from British jurisdiction for Nassau on January 22, 1863. She was detected trying to run the blockade into Charleston on March 22nd, 1863. Her Captain ran her ashore on Long Island Beach off the South Carolina coast. Her valuable cargo being arms and supplies was mostly lost due to shelling. Aside from the cargo loss, the destruction of the "Georgiana" was a blow to the Confederacy as she was the fastest cruiser and would have made a superb man-of-war. 


Confederate marine relics are considered rare and quite desirable.  


<b>Lieutenant Colonel, 15th New Hampshire Infantry


Twice wounded during the battles at Port Hudson, Louisiana


United States Congressman & Senator from New Hampshire


Dwight M. Sabin, United States Senator from Minnesota</b>


<u>Henry W. Blair</u>: (1834-1920) Born in Crampton, Grafton County, N.H., he attended the common schools and private academies, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1859 and commenced practice in Plymouth, N.H. He was appointed prosecuting attorney for Grafton County in 1860. He enlisted in the Union army at Plymouth, N.H., on October 2, 1862, and was commissioned major of the 15th New Hampshire Infantry. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel on April 8, 1863, and was severely wounded on May 27, 1863, and again on June 14, 1863, during the battles of Port Hudson, Louisiana. He was mustered out of the service on August 13, 1863, at Concord. In 1866, he served as a member of the New Hampshire State House of Representatives; and was a member of the state senate, 1867-1868. He served as a U.S. Congressman from 1875-1879; and was a member of the U.S. Senate, from 1879-1891. He was the chairman of the Committee on Education and Labor. He was appointed Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to China by President Benjamin Harrison, on March 6, 1891, but he was objected to by the Chinese Government as being persona non grata, and subsequently tendered his resignation which was accepted on October 6, 1891. He served once again as a U.S. Congressman, 1893-1895. 


<u>Dwight M. Sabin</u>: (1843-1902) Born near Marseilles, La Salle County, Illinois, he moved to Connecticut with his parents in 1857; attended the country schools and Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass. He served in the Union Army during the Civil War; employed as a clerk in Washington, D.C. He returned to Connecticut in 1864 and engaged in agricultural pursuits and also in the lumber business. He moved to Stillwater, Minnesota in 1868, engaged in lumbering and the general manufacture of railroad cars and agricultural machinery. Served as a member of the Minnesota State Senate, 1872-1875; and in the Minnesota State House of Representatives, 1878 and 1881. He was chairman of the Republican National Committee, 1883-1884. Served as a U.S. Senator from Minnesota, from 1883-1889, serving as the chairman on the Committee to Examine Branches of the Civil Service, and was also on the Committee on Railroads.


<u>Signatures</u>: Both senators have signed a 3 3/4 x 1 1/8 slip of paper in ink, H.W. Blair and below D.M. Sabin.

The New York Times, August 14, 1863 $35.00

 

CDV, Zebulon B. Vance $75.00

 

Brass Pins From The Confederate Blockade $7.00

 

Autographs, Henry W. Blair $25.00




<b>Famous Union Cavalry Commander during the Civil War</b>




(1824-1897) Graduated from West Point in the class of 1844. In 1846, he was awarded the brevet of first lieutenant for gallantry in the Mexican War. He later served on the Indian frontier and in Florida against the Seminoles as an officer of the United States  dragoons. Distinguished service in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign gained him notoriety and a promotion to brigadier general. He commanded a division of the Cavalry Corps in the Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville campaigns. Promoted to major general in June 1863, he took over command of the Cavalry Corps and directed 10,000 Federal horsemen in the battle of Brandy Station, Va., the biggest cavalry fight of the Civil War. The battle was said to have made the Union Cavalry. He served in the Gettysburg campaign, and also led the cavalry corps at Beverly Ford, Aldie, Middleburg, Upperville, Culpeper Court House and went west in 1864 to the Department of Missouri. Pleasanton resigned from the U.S. Army in 1868 and served as Commissioner of the Internal Revenue under President Ulysses S. Grant.


<u>Signature With Title</u>: 4 3/4 x 1 5/8, in ink, Very respectfully, A. Pleasanton, Commissioner. Very neatly written autograph.  

 


Full color H.A. Ogden print titled, "Sherman At Kenesaw Mountain, October 4, 1864." Imprint below the illustration, "Copyright 1912, by The War Memorial Association." Signature of H.A. Ogden is in the print at lower right. 9 x 12 1/2. Very fine.  


<b>United States Senator from Nevada</b>


(1829-1912) Born in Herefordshire, England, he immigrated to the United States with his parents who settled in the northern part of Ohio. He attended the public schools in Cleveland and later moved to California and engaged in mining and farming in Trinity County where he was elected sheriff of the county. He served as a California State Senator from 1863-1867, then moved to Gold Hill, Nevada in 1868 where he again pursued mining. He was a Republican United States Senator from Nevada serving 1873-1903; was the chairman of the Committee to Audit and Control the Contingent Expenses; and he also served on the Committee on Epidemic Diseases. 


<u>Signature</u>: 4 x 3/4, in ink, Jno. P. Jones.   <b>In The Civil War</b>


By Richard B. McCaslin, With a Foreword by the General Editors, Carl Moneyhon and Bobby Roberts. Published by The University of Arkansas Press, Fayetteville, 1994. Hard cover, 8 1/2 x 11 1/4, with dust jacket, 345 pages, illustrated, index. The dust jacket has some light wear on the bottom edge of the reverse. The book itself is in brand new condition.


The Civil War presented the first major opportunity to photograph fighting men and the places they fought and to create an extensive visual record of war. Most collections of such photographs, however, have focused on the leaders of the conflict and have treated the images only as illustrations for traditional narratives.


Centering on the common soldier, "Portraits of Conflict; A Photographic History of South Carolina in the Civil War" by Richard McCaslin details the physical and spiritual suffering of the ordinary recruit in his fight for his country, his land, and his family's way of life.


By carefully matching available written sources to photographs, the author has provided a unique opportunity for the reader to see the war on a human scale that often eludes conventional narratives. Included in this photojournalistic album are the place and date of birth of many of the soldiers pictured. A complete caption identifies the subject and the type of every photograph presented.

Autograph, General Alfred Plesanton $75.00

 

General William T. Sherman at Kenesaw Mo $15.00

 

Autograph, John Percival Jones $10.00

 

Portraits of Conflict, A Photographic Hi

One of the most desirable examples Civil War soldier hand crafting is the hand carved laurel root tobacco pipe and this offering will be of no exception.  Remaining in fine untouched and as found condition, this skillfully hand carved, highly figured burl laurel root pipe is best described by our photographs.

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

 Quincy Adams Gillmore graduated first in his class at West Point in 1849.  Commissioned into the Engineer Corps.  Well respected as an advocate for the use of the newly developed rifled naval guns at the Siege of Fort Pulaski.  Gillmore was widely credited with changing the landscape of siege warfare.   Given Command of the Department of the South and the X Corps, Gillmore was in command of the troops in the recapture of Fort Sumter, the capture of Battery Wagner where he ordered  integration clearing the way for African-American soldiers such as those of the 54th Mass. to set their part in history.  Gilmore played a role in the Bermuda Hundred operations and was credited in the crucial raising of units around Washington when CS Gen. Jubal Early threatened the Capitol City.    Promoted to Maj. General in March of 1863 this earlier Anthony view depicts Gilmore as a Brigadier General and bears a hurried but clearly period penned signature <B><I>Q. A. Gillmore</I></B>.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 Not a big deal but with its convenient  <I>hip</I> size, original paper label and nicely <I>bubbled</I> aqua glass, this little pocket brandy flask will (if not pressed into use) make a nice addition to any period personal grouping.  The flask stands 6 ¼ inches and remains in excellent condition with no chips, cracks or stains. A nice period piece without spending a pile of money.  please note:   <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!




 Measuring just under 10 inches in total length with a double edged 5 5/16 inch blade, this attractive old knife offers good evidence of age by virtue of  construction with its nicely shaped, repurposed file blade, set into a stag grip and secured with a pewter casting and copper rivet.  These typically 19th century  construction features in combination with a pleasing natural age patina over period wear offer good evidence of age and originality.  Attractive scrimshawed fouled anchor and sea-horse figures demonstrate good age but may have been added some time in the past postdating the earliest days of this classic old belt knife.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Civil War carved PATRIOTIC TOBACCO PIPE

 

Civil War vintage SIGNED Gen. Q. A. Gill $335.00

 

Civil War era aqua glass BRANDY FLASK

 

nautical theme – hand crafted Antique Be $295.00

Not a big deal but worthy of continued preservation is this delicate aqua glass cologne bottle.  A nice example of the make do culture of the 1700s, this little bottle offers a period sealing wax repair of a fractured corner as the original owner thought enough of what was likely a gift, to repair the piece for continued use.  Of significance lost in time is the fact the repaired bottle never was cast aside but found its way through the years to now serve as an attractive addition to someone’s 18th century collection.  A neat little piece without spending a lot of money. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  This all original brown ink penned and docketed Confederate document was executed on December 31, 1861 by the hard fighting Confederate Captain <B>William K. Bachman</B> in command of <B> BACHMAN'S Company of GERMAN LIGHT ARTILLERY, HAMPTON'S LEGIONS</B> and bears his signature.  

<CENTER> Our transcription of the document is as follows: </CENTER>


<I>I hereby certify that a quart of oil recd. Of Capt. Baldwin act. Ord.  officer in Richmond in Sept. /61 was used for cleaning and keeping in order the small arms in my possession  up to  Nov. q, 1861, also that the packing box received Sept. 7, 1861 from Capt. Child’s ord. officer at Charleston was used in a ___?____-superfluous accoutrements and was left behind by me for want of transportation.  December 31, 1861    Wm. K. Bachman    Capt. Co. B. Art. Bat. H. Legion    S. C. V. </I>


Before the close of the Civil War this battery commander would lead his South Carolina company as Hampton’s Legions left their mark on such battlegrounds as the Seven Days Battles, Second Manassas, South Mountain, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg and at <FONT COLOR=#FF0000 ><I><B> GETTYSBURG</B></I></FONT> where as part of Hood’s Division 1st Corps, Capt. Bachman’s battery fought gallantly firing toward <U>Meade's Union center in support of Pickett and Pettigrew.</U>     In the fall of 1863 Bachman’s Co. of ‘German Light Artillery’ returned to South Carolina.  Here Capt. Bachman and his brave mounted artillerists would fight out the war  participating in the Carolina Campaigns with Wright’s Div. Dept. of S.C., Ga. & Fla.   A desirable Confederate document in pleasing condition with no tears, stains or repairs and with a hard to find signature.  (see: Confederate Military History, The Official Records, The Confederate Veteran, Time / Life’s – The Civil War, Sifakis’ Compendium of the Confederate Armies and more.)  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


  A most essential accoutrement for the Civil War Cavalryman, Mounted Artillery or in the pocket or saddlebag of any mounted troop, the hoof hook was designed to aid in the removal of a stone lodged between hoof and iron horseshoe.   Difficult to find on today’s market we acquired this example some years ago here in Maine and set the piece aside until now.  All original and in unusually nice condition with a near full complement of its period nickel finish, our photos will do best to speak for condition.   


<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 How often have those of us who enjoy such things read a Civil War soldier’s letter, a page from a winter camp journal or other first-hand life account, where the writer  phrases the arrival of a carefully got up package of home preserves, or has lamented the fact that he received such but alas the glass preserve jar had been broken in transit spilling the content?  This offering of a quart size preserve jar, boldly marked <B> MILLVILLE ATMOSPHERIC FRUIT JAR</B> on one side and  <B>WHITALL’S PATENT JUNE 18th 1861</B> on the other will make a wonderful companion piece in any Civil War collection and will go especially well in any winter camp, medical and sanitary fair grouping.  Much more difficult to find than the more common MASON preserve jar of the period, this nicely marked and dated Whitall jar retains its equally well marked and dated glass lid and its cast iron lid clamp.  All in nice condition with that pretty light aqua bubbled glass the jar remains in fine condition with no chips.  A scarce collectable complete with original components each as collectable as the jar its self.   An exceptional example of period everyday life seldom seen today.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

18th century COLOGNE BOTTLE $35.00

 

Capt. Wm. K. Bachman – SIGNED - S. C. V. $155.00

 

Civil War era POCKET - FOLDING HOOF HO $125.00

 

Pat. 1861 - MILLVILLE ATMOSPHERIC FRUIT $135.00

This little handmade pocket note book measures approximately 4 X 4 ¾ inches and is made up of a 12 page, brown ink penned personal record of the 1853 muskrat hunting and trapping record of three hunting buddies identified only as William, Edward and John.  A wonderful relic of country Americana, the pages record such statistics as <I>DAY OF THE MONTH – NUMBER OF SHOTS</I> and</I><I> NUMBER KILLED</I> by each of the three.   A record of the number shot and the number trapped by each is augmented by a record of <I>NUMBER OF SHOTS – NUMBER KILLED – EACH WEEK</I> and <I>NUMBER SHOOT – NUMBER KILLED</I> December through May of 1853.  Finally a list of total <I>SHOTS & NUMBER KILLED</I> by each in the season.  Not a bug deal but a really nice piece of hunting and trapping Americana worthy of an appreciative home. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Illustrated here adjacent to a US quarter for size comparison, this period script engraved identification badge is inscribed <I><B>Co. B - I. Mills – 5th Vt. Vet. Vol.</I></B>    While at first glance the knowledgeable Civil War historian will question the use of the distinctive 2nd Corps pattern worn by a  5th Vermonter (a 6th Corps Regiment) a look at our man’s service not only explains the 2nd Corps device but establishes when the device would have been appropriately worn by <B>Ira Mills</B>   A look at the <I>Roster of Vermont Volunteers During the War of the Rebellion 1861-66</I> published by the Vermont Adjutant and Inspector General's Office  (1892), tells us that Ira Mills was a resident of New Haven, Vt. when he enlisted and was mustered in on September 10, 1861 as a musician (fifer) Co. B <B>5th Vermont Infantry</B>; re-enlisted December 15, 1863 in the <B>Veteran Reserve Corps</B> then mustered out on June 29, 1865.  All good information but retrieval of some key Muster and Detachment Roll document images (to be provided) offered more even to pinpointing the 2nd Corps association.  Per period  5th Vermont field documentation, <I>Fifer</I>  Ira Mills was assigned duty as a <B>nurse</B> in the Regimental Hospital, October 1, 1862.   After continued detached service in the hospital, a notation on the July & August 1863, Co. B report states, <I>Returned to duty August 4th by order of Lt. Col. Lewis</I>   Our man has returned to duty with his 5 Vt. Regiment just in time to participate  in the Regiment’s detached service in the New York City <B>Draft Riots</B>.  He remained with the Regiment  as they rejoined the Army at Culpeper Court House, Va. and participated in the <I>Bristoe Campaign, Advance to line of the Rappahannock, Rappahannock Station</I> then the <I>Mine Run Campaign</I>    On December 16, 1863 Mills is mustered out of the 5th Vt to re-enlist in the Veteran Reserve Corps. Where he is again assigned duty as <I>Hospital Nurse</I> first in the 6th Corps Hospital then per notation he was <I> On duty Hd. Qts. <U>City Point</U> Hospital Attendant since Jan. 8, 1865.  By order of Genl. Getty.</I>  <U>This is where Mills would have picked up an association with the </U><B>2nd Corps</B><U> as reflected by his use of that device as his identification pin. </U> ( The City Point Depot Field Hospital was actually a group of hospitals to include the 2nd Corps  Hospital.)     February 1865 to May 1865 Mills is recorded as a <I>Hospital Attendant</I> back at Head Quarters  6th Corps Medical Dept. Hospital.   He was Mustered Out on May 29,1865 at Munson's Hill.   The young veteran returned to the family farm in New Haven, Vermont where he died in 1867 at age 28.    The cause of his death was recorded as <I>heart disease</I>.   A remnant of the <I>good old days</I> when one may expect to find such in a New England country estate sale this nice honest ID pin / Corps Badge offers a well-documented history thanks to images of period records shown here that are found the modern day internet. ( At 74 we see blessings in modern technology while enjoying the memories of the hunt in the <I>good old days</I>)  Our photos will  likely do best to describe the physical aspects of this desirable piece.


<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

 


Multi-color lithograph, done by Kurz & Allison, 76-78 Wabash Ave., Chicago, Copyright 1889. Titled, "Battle Of Resaca." Imprint below the illustration at lower left lists the dates of the battle as well as the various corps and armies that fought. Overall size is  approximately 23 3/4 x 18. This is a reprint of the original Kurz & Allison 1889 edition done on heavy paper stock with vivid colors. There are wide white borders on all sides. Circa 1960. It is my understanding that these were printed around the time of the Civil War Centennial celebrations using the original plates to print these. There were other reprints done much later (1979) of these Kurz & Allison Civil War battle scenes which are much smaller in size (about 12 x 15). Very fine Atlanta campaign lithograph that would look great framed.


WBTS Trivia: The Battle of Resaca, Georgia was part of the important Atlanta Campaign and was waged between May 13 to 15, 1864. It ended inconclusively with the Confederate Army retreating. The Union army was led by General William T. Sherman and the Confederates by General Joseph E. Johnston.

 


Criswell #120. February 20, 1863. Vignette of a Confederate officer leaning against a tree and gazing into a valley. Steamboat at the bottom. Lithographed by Archer & Daly, Richmond, Va. Black ink printed on pink paper. Seven coupons still attached below. Very fine.

hand crafted - season of 1853 MUSKRAT HU $55.00

 

Inscribed Corps Badge - 5th Vermont Fif

 

The 1864 Battle of Resaca, Georgia

 

1863 Confederate $100 Bond $125.00




Multi-color lithograph, done by Kurz & Allison, 76-78 Wabash Ave., Chicago, Copyright 1893. Titled, "Battle Of Wilson's Creek." Imprint below the illustration at lower left, "Aug. 10, 1861. Union (Gen. Lyon) Loss: 223 Kd., 721 Wd., 291 Missg., Gen. Lyon Kd. [General Lyon can be seen at the center of the battle scene shot from his white horse]. Confd. (Gen. McCulloch) Loss: 265 Kd., 800 Wd., 30 Missg." Overall size approximately 23 3/4 x 18. This is a reprint of the original Kurz & Allison 1893 edition done on heavy paper stock with vivid colors. There are wide white borders on all sides. Circa 1960. It is my understanding that these were printed around the time of the Civil War Centennial celebrations using the original plates to print these. There were other reprints done much later (1979) of these Kurz & Allison Civil War battle scenes which are much smaller in size (about 12 x 15). Light crease at the bottom left hand white margin. Very fine battle of Wilson's Creek, Missouri lithograph that would look great framed.


WBTS Trivia: General Nathaniel Lyon (1818-61). Graduated from West Point in 1841 ranking #11 in his class. During the years before the Civil War he fought against the Florida Seminoles and was brevetted captain for gallantry in the Mexican War. More than any other man he saved Missouri for the Union in 1861. He was killed in action at the battle of Wilson's Creek, Mo., on August 10, 1861.   


<b>Military Governor of Louisiana</b>


Delivered in Portland, Maine on Aug. 10, 1863


Loyal Union League, Portland


Speech of Brig. Gen. George F. Shepley, In The City Hall, Portland, Monday Evening, August 10th, 1863.


4 page imprint, 11 x 16. The speech of General Shepley takes up more than 2 full pages of content. Also includes other news: Withdrawal of the Troops- Who Favors it? Letter From Gen. Anderson. Jefferson on Arbitrary Arrests. Consistent Advocates of Free Speech. Resistance to Law Demanded by Democrats. Jackson and Douglas on Arbitrary Arrests. A Democrat on Reconstruction. The Legacy of Stephen A. Douglas. The Voice of a Southern Patriot. Utterance of a Noble Democrat. The Voice of an Old Democrat. Light staining, edge wear, and scattered fold breakage. I believe this General Shepley imprint is rare as I have never seen one before.       


<u>General George F. Shepley</u>: (1819-78) Commissioned colonel of the 12th Maine Infantry in November 1861, he accompanied General Benjamin F. Butler's forces in the expedition against New Orleans, Louisiana. After the capture of the city on May 1, 1862, General Butler appointed Shepley as post commander at New Orleans, and military governor of Louisiana in June, with Shepley being promoted to the rank of brigadier general. General Shepley continued in this capacity until the spring of 1864, when he was assigned to the District of Eastern Virginia under Butler again. At the close of the war he operated as chief of staff to General Godfrey Weitzel, and became military governor of Richmond, Va. in April 1865.  


<b>Ran for president against Abraham Lincoln in 1864</b>


(1826-85) Graduated in the West Point class of 1846 and fought in the Mexican War. Hailed at the beginning of the Civil War as the "Young Napoleon," he proved to be a brilliant military organizer, administrator, and trainer of men, but an officer totally lacking in the essential qualities of successful command of large forces in battle. He saw action at Rich Mountain, W.V., in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign and at the battle of Antietam, the bloodiest single day in American history. He was defeated for the presidency in 1864 by Abraham Lincoln.


Wet plate, albumen cabinet card photograph, mounted to 4 1/4 x 6 1/2 card. Bust view in civilian attire. Warren's imprint on the front mount. Period ink inscription below the portrait, "Genl. George B. McClellan, U.S." Backmark: Warren's Portraits, 465 Washington St., Boston. Excellent.  


<b>United States Senator from New Hampshire


U.S. Secretary of the Navy</b>


(1835-1917) Born in Concord, New Hampshire, he graduated from Harvard Law School in 1854, was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Concord. Was a member of the New Hampshire State House of Representatives, 1862-1864, serving as speaker of the house. He was appointed by President Abraham Lincoln solicitor and judge advocate general of the Navy Department. Appointed First Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, serving 1865-1867. Was a member of the New Hampshire State constitutional convention in 1876. Served again as a member of the New Hampshire State House of Representatives in 1881. Appointed by President Chester Arthur as Secretary of the Navy serving 1882-1885. Served as a U.S. Senator, 1887-1889, and 1889-1901. He was the chairman of the Committee on Immigration, and also served on the Committee on Census, and the Committee on Privileges and Elections. President William McKinley appointed him as president of the Spanish Claims Treaty Commission, 1901-1908.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 x 1/2, in ink, W.E. Chandler.

1861 Battle of Wilson's Creek, Missouri

 

Speech of Brig. Gen. George F. Shepley

 

Photograph, General George B. McClellan $45.00

 

Autograph, William E. Chandler $15.00




<b>Civil War Senator from Nevada


Member of the President Andrew Johnson Impeachment Congress</b>


(1827-1909) Born in Wayne County, N.Y., he attended Yale College in 1849-50, moved to San Francisco in 1850 and was engaged in gold mining in Nevada County, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1852, and commenced practice in Nevada City. He served as district attorney in 1852; attorney general of California, 1854; moved to Virginia City, Nevada, in 1860; involved in early mining litigation and in the development of the Comstock lode; was a member of the Territorial council in 1861; member of the state constitutional convention in 1863; upon the admission of Nevada as a State into the Union was elected as a Republican to the U.S. Senate in 1864, serving until 1875; was re-elected in 1887 and served until 1905. Served as chairman of the Committee on Pacific Railroads; and chairman of the Committee on Mines and Mining.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 x 1/2, in ink, Wm. M. Stewart.

 <b>and the fall of Vicksburg, Mississippi</b>


4 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by J.N. McBee, to his children.


<b><u>Putnam, O.[hio], July 8, 1863</b></u>


Dear Children,


Yours of week before last was received on Wednesday and the letter to Harry mailed the same day. We had one from Newton about the date of yours- none from John since I wrote you last. We are well though Mother has just recovered from an attack of neuralgia. Mother & I were at Dillson Monday last from noon till night. I guess it was that cured her though she was better when she went. They have fruit in abundance. The wholesale merchant Scott is said to be a Copperhead. I didn’t go to Columbus on the 17 cause I was sick in the forenoon. I finished enrolling two Townships yesterday week ago. I had no serious trouble with anyone, but was somewhat annoyed by a few Butternuts with lies & evasion, but I believe I got them all. I was 22 days employed. That colt Etta wrote about is about 2 months old, very beautiful. I have a halter for it & lead it when I ride or drive. Tell Harry to come & see it. I am at a great loss for pasture for them. <b><I>We have had stirring times here for a week past especially since last Saturday. Gen. Meade who superseded Gen. Hooker fought Lee’s whole force, 100,000 strong, on the 1, 2, 3 & on the 4 [July] utterly routing him or at least driving his whole force capturing 30,000 prisoners & 118 guns. On Sunday night at Church it was our Quar. Meeting when I was reading the closing hymn, and a dispatch was handed me saying Gen. Meade had taken 15,000 prisoners & 108 guns. The J. Elder stopped us to sing the Doxology.  After prayer we closed amid general rejoicing and joyful greetings. Yesterday about 2 P.M. a Herald drove furiously through town [he is referring to a Herald newspaper wagon] saying Vicksburg is fallen- surrendered on the glorious fourth- so the 4th is now rendered thrice glorious. Some were afraid we might be deceived, but I got our flags out & the bells ringing & the steam whistle we kept up for over half an hour. Last night we had some sky rockets. Tonight we are to have more. I wish Harry was here to see the sights. About noon today we had a dispatch saying another great fight is going between Lee & our forces. Meade is driving them again with great slaughter. The Potomac is up & there are hopes that Meade will capture or disperse Lee’s whole army. That would naturally end the rebellion. There is intense interest to hear the result of these terrible battles. Over 12,000 wounded Rebels are in our possession. This news drives the Copperheads to their dens, not one of them can rise again.</b></I> We had heavy rain on Friday-Saturday last. The first thorough rain since you left. Don’t be so slow about writing. Our love to you all. Here is a paper for Harry by Etta & the magazine.


As Ever,

J.N. McBee


J.N. McBee, is an Ohio enrolling officer who is enlisting soldiers to fight for the Union cause. Great account of the news from Gettysburg and Vicksburg as battle reports are coming into Ohio with the glorious news of the catastrophic Rebel defeats at Gettysburg and Vicksburg which was the turning point of the war! Also has some very interesting content regarding Copperheads in Ohio. Great event letters like this one regarding General Lee's defeat at the battle of Gettysburg are getting rarer and rarer to find. Once these letters get into private collections or institutional archives they seldom come back on the market again.  

 


<b>United States Congressman and Senator from Illinois</b>


(1823-1903) Born in Steuben County, New York, he attended Elmira Academy, moved to Illinois in 1838, and settled in Mount Morris. He was employed in government surveying and farming until 1844, when he engaged in the real estate business and banking in Chicago. Served as clerk of Cook County, 1853-61. Was chairman of the Board of Supervisors of Cook County in 1868. Served as a U.S. Congressman, 1871-75, and was chairman of the Committee on Manufacturers. Served again in the U.S. Congress, 1875-76, and 1881-83. Served as U.S. Senator 1887-91, serving on the Committee on Enrolled Bills.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 x 1/2, in ink, C.B. Farwell.  


<b>"damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!"</b>


(1801-1870) He entered the navy as Midshipman in 1810 after having been virtually adopted by Commodore David Porter. The friendship between the two families began when Porter's father was buried on the same day as Farragut's mother in New Orleans. He fought in the Mexican War and was awaiting orders at his Norfolk, Va. home when the Civil War broke out. Told that a person with Union sentiments could not live in Virginia, he packed up his family and Virginian wife and moved north. He was given command of the New Orleans expedition in December 1861, and helped capture the city in the spring of 1862. Promoted Rear Admiral in July 1862 for his success in opening up the Mississippi River to Vicksburg, he spent the next year in operations against Port Hudson, La., and returned to NYC in August 1863 to a hero's welcome. He returned to the Gulf in January 1864 to prepare for the assault on Mobile Bay, taking the port on August 5th. It was during this attack that Farragut was to have coined the famous expression, "damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead." He again returned to NYC, this time in failing health. The city gave him a public reception and $50,000 to purchase a home there, and on Dec. 23, 1864, he was promoted to Vice Admiral, the rank just having been established. He was one of the first to enter Richmond after it's capture. On July 25, 1866, he was promoted to full Admiral, the first in the U. S. Navy to ever hold that rank!


Wet plate, albumen cabinet card photograph, mounted to 4 1/4 x 6 1/2 card. Standing view wearing his United States naval uniform, naval cap, 2 piece belt plate, with sword attached to belt. Backmark: Sarony & Co., Photographers, 680 Broadway, N.Y.  Napoleon Sarony. Alfred S. Campbell. Light age toning and edge wear with a tiny thumbtack hole in the extreme upper border edge. Very desirable Union naval hero.

Autograph, William M. Stewart $15.00

 

Letter, Great News of Rebel Defeat at th $495.00

 

Autograph, Charles B. Farwell $10.00

 

Photograph, Admiral David G. Farragut $50.00




<b>The second son of General Robert E. Lee, he was severely wounded at the battle of Brandy Station, Va., and captured</b>


(1837-1922) The second son of General Robert E. Lee, nicknamed "Rooney." A Harvard educated gentleman, he promptly entered the Confederate service upon the secession of his native Virginia, and became colonel of the 9th Virginia Cavalry. He served with the famous Confederate cavalry General J.E.B. Stuart through virtually all of the cavalry campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia. He was promoted to brigadier general to rank from September 15, 1862. He was severely wounded during the battle of Brandy Station, Va., and was captured while he was recuperating. He was not exchanged until March 1864. Promoted to major general on April 23, 1864, the youngest in the Confederate service, he continued to play an important role in the Army of Northern Virginia until the army's surrender at Appomattox Court House, Va., on April 9, 1865.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform. Brig. Gen. W.H.F. Lee, C.S.A., is written in period ink on the front mount. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York. Excellent. Very desirable.  


(1814-1879) Graduated in the West Point class of 1837. He displayed a gallant record in the Mexican War. A solid combat officer, Hooker fought in the Peninsular campaign, the Seven Days battles, 2nd Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, where he commanded the Army of the Potomac, and the Atlanta campaign. His sobriquet was, "Fighting Joe" Hooker.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Half view in uniform with rank of major general. Backmark: E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery, with 2 cents orange revenue tax stamp. Age toning and light edge wear to bottom of the mount.  


8 pages. European News. Three Days Later by the Persia at this Port. A Suspicious Sale of Three of Her Majesty's War Steamers. Another Privateer---Perhaps. Aspect of the Mexican Question. The Archduke Maximilian Accepts the Crown of Mexico. The Polish Revolution. The Draft. List of Names Drawn Yesterday in the Fifth, Eighth and Ninth Districts. The Rebel Privateers. Destruction of the Brig W.E. Nash by The Florida. The Lawrence Massacre. Account of the Terrible Tragedy. Another Guerrilla Trapped. North Carolina and the Union. A Rebel General Captured; Jeff Thompson and His Staff Captured at Pocahontas, Arkansas. The Siege of Charleston. Detailed Reports From Our Own Sources and From Rebel Papers. Shells Passing Through Fort Sumter. Interesting Statements by Deserters. The Rebels Preparing to Evacuate the Place. Beauregard Given 48 Hours to Remove the Women and Children From Charleston. Interesting From the South. Operations on the North Carolina Coast. A Rumored Raid of Our Forces Towards Staunton, Va. Important From the Southwest. Large Capture of Confederate States Cotton Near Natchez. General Herron on an Expedition up the Red River. Reported Death of General Pemberton, and more. Edge wear.   


Multi-color lithograph, Kurz & Allison, 76-78 Wabash Ave., Chicago, Copyright 1888. Titled, "Battle Of Chattanooga." Imprint below the illustration at lower left, "Nov. 23-25, 1863. Union Gen. Grant Loss 757 K'd, 4,529 W'd, 330 Miss. Conf. Gen. Bragg, Loss 8,684, K'd, W'd & Miss." Overall size is approximately 23 3/4 x 18. This is a reprint of the original Kurz & Allison 1888 edition done on heavy paper stock with vivid colors. There are wide 1 plus inch white borders on all sides. Circa 1960. It is my understanding that these were printed around the time of the Civil War Centennial celebrations using the original plates to print these. There were other reprints done much later (1979) of these Kurz & Allison Civil War battle scenes which are much smaller in size (about 12 x 15). Very fine Chattanooga lithograph that would look great framed.

CDV, General William Henry Fitzhugh Lee $200.00

 

CDV, General Joseph Hooker $50.00

 

The New York Times, August 27, 1863 $35.00

 

The Battle of Chattanooga, Tennessee




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