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H 17in. x W 12in. x D 17in.  H 15in. x W 22in. x D 7in.  H 12in. x W 17in. x D 5in.  H 35in. x W 59in.

H 17in. x W 12in. x D 17in. $0.00

 

H 15in. x W 22in. x D 7in. $0.00

 

H 12in. x W 17in. x D 5in. $0.00

 

H 35in. x W 59in. $0.00




<b>Son of President Lincoln's Secretary of War & U.S. Senator Simon Cameron


U.S. Secretary of War in the Cabinet of President Ulysses S. Grant


United States Senator from Pennsylvania</b>


(1833-1918) Born in Middletown, Dauphin County, Pa., he graduated from Princeton College in 1852, and received a graduate degree in 1855. President of the Northern Central Railroad Company, 1866-74. Secretary of War in the cabinet of President Ulysses S. Grant, 1876-77. Chairman of the Republican National Committee in 1880. Elected to the U.S. Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of his father, Simon Cameron, serving 1877-97. Was Chairman of the Committee on Naval Affairs, and served on the Committee on Revolutionary Claims.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 3/4 x 5/8, in ink, J.D. Cameron.  H 40 in. x D 22in.  


<b>Colonel of the 13th Kansas Infantry during the Civil War


Governor of Idaho Territory


United States Senator from Colorado</b>


(1835-1906) Born near the present day site of Burlington, Iowa, he studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1853. Served as a member of the Iowa State House of Representatives in 1856. On June 24, 1861, he enlisted as a captain, and was commissioned into Co. F, 1st Nebraska Cavalry. He resigned on February 4, 1862. He was commissioned captain of Co. K, 9th Kansas Cavalry, on July 30, 1862, and was discharged for promotion on September 20, 1862, and commissioned colonel of the 13th Kansas Infantry. Served as brigade commander in the District of the Frontier, 1863-64; and of the Department of Arkansas, 1864-65. Promoted to brevet brigadier general, February 13, 1865. He was mustered out of service on June 28, 1865. Residing in Arkansas after the war, he was president of the Arkansas constitutional convention in 1866, and justice of the Arkansas Supreme Court, 1867-71. He was appointed governor of the Idaho Territory by President Ulysses S. Grant, in 1871. Moving to Colorado in 1875, he resumed his law practice, and upon the organization of the State government, was elected judge of the fourth judicial district, 1876-80. Served as a member of the Colorado State House of Representatives, in 1882, and U.S. Senator, 1883-89. He was chairman of the Committee on Mining. 


<u>Signature</u>: 4 3/4 x 1 1/8, in ink, Thos. M. Bowen. There is a small hole below the signature which has been repaired on the reverse with archival document tape. This defect does not affect the autograph.        


<b>United States Senator from Oregon</b> 


(1835-1905) Born in Washington County, Pa., he attended Witherspoon Institute, taught school, studied law, admitted to the bar in 1857, and began a law practice. Moved to California and then to Portland, Oregon, in 1860, where he again practiced law. Was in the Oregon State Senate, 1862-66, serving as president the last 2 years. Served as U.S. Senator, 1873-79, 1885-97, and 1901-05. Was Chairman of the Committee on Railroads, and Chairman of the Committee on Transportation Routes to the Seaboard. He also served on the Committee on Privileges and Elections, and the Committee on Coast Defenses, and the Committee on Interoceanic Canals.


<u>Signature</u>: 4 3/4 x 1/2, John H. Mitchell.

Autograph, James D. Cameron $35.00

 

H 40 in. x D 22in. $0.00

 

Autograph, General Thomas M. Bowen $15.00

 

Autograph, John H. Mitchell $10.00

Standing approximately 1 ĺ inches with a 3 3/8 inch diameter this untouched and as found turned wood inkwell will be a classic in any American Colonial / Revolutionary War era surrounding and with a turkey quill, will make a nice addition to any antique writing instrument collection.  Best described by our photo illustrations good reference may be found in Neumannís  <I>EARLY AMERICAN ANTIQUE COUNTRY FURNISHINGS</I> and Newmann & Kravicís <I>COLLECTOR'S ILLUSTRATED ENCYCLOPEDIA of the AMERICAN REVOLUTION</I>  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Our photo illustrations will likely do best to describe this desirable Civil War vintage coat except to advise that while demonstrating qualities of age and originality with the most minimal of staining and mothing, the vest remains in excellent condition throughout and is guaranteed to please per our below stated no questions return policy.  With showy floral brocade, gold wash, <I>ball</I> buttons and classic polished cotton back with quilt padded chest and fine leather inner waist band, this rarely surviving period gentlemanís vest will be a pleasing addition to any period vintage clothing grouping.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Our photos will offer the best description of this pair of military US bridle rosettes.  All original with a deep unpolished age patina and good evidence of age, originality and period use.  please note:   <B>ALL ITEMS ARE CURRENT & AVAILABLE UNLESS MARKED SOLD!!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!  Our photo illustrations will speak best for this Civil War CDV except to advise that  the old pencil identification was bolstered by the period album identification <I>W. T. Rice Ė R. I. Cavalry</I> and bears a period revenue stamp with the back mark of war time New Orleans photographer <U>Caliste Marmu of 60 Royal St.</U> in that city.  Our research found <B>William T. Rice</B> was a resident of Providence, R. I. when he enlisted on July 7, 1863. He was mustered in as a Pvt. of Co A <B>3rd Rhode Island Cavalry</B>.  Detached as a teamster March 15, 1864, Rice is recorded as being hospitalized in New Orleans on September 15, 1864 returning to his regiment June 15, 1865.   He was mustered out on August 4, 1865.  A bit rough with good age but a desirable southern photographer and a good <I>Red River Campaign</I> cavalry regiment.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!

18th early 19th Century Treen INKWELL $75.00

 

original mid 1800s Gentlemanís Vest $235.00

 

antique U. S. Bridle Rosettes $55.00

 

identified 3rd Rhode Island Cavalry - Ne $95.00

Offered here is a rarely surviving Model 1816 .69 caliber smooth bore flintlock musket that, while the hammer and frizzen are clearly replacements, remains in its original flintlock state.  A most desirable feature when the vast majority of the then outmoded Mod. 1816 were converted for State militia and later Civil War service. The workhorse of the U. S. Infantry in the  Mexican-American War the Model 1816  was pressed into service during the Civil War in both the updated percussion and, especially in the South, the old flintlock format. The source of some considerable political controversy in the early days of the Civil War as many loyal Unionists came to believe that that the 1850s Secretary of War Jefferson Davis had something special in mind when he caused large shipments of the old model muskets to be removed from Northern arsenals for delivery to those located in the soon to be Confederate South.  The tail of the lock is marked <B>HARPERS/FERRY/1817</B> with the old style <B>Federal Eagle</B> and <B>US</B> forward of the hammer. The top of the barrel bears the view and proof marks "P" and an Eagleís Head.  All measurements are correct for this model.  While our photos will offer the best description of condition suffice it to say this nearly 200 year old Harpers Ferry, Virginia arm remains in pleasing condition with a deep chocolate brown age patina over all, is complete with good evidence of age and period use and handling yet with no splits or breaks in the walnut stock.  The action is still strong and functions crisply. In short this nice old Harpers Ferry will sit nicely in among nice condition period issued equipage.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


<U>A note about firearms:</U>   WE EMPHASIZE HERE THAT THIS PIECE IS CONSIDERED AN ANTIQUE / COLLECTABLE AND IS THEREFORE OUTSIDE  FEDERAL RESTRICTIONS APPLICABLE TO COVERED (MODERN) FIREARMS. THE PIECE IS OFFERED AS A HISTORICAL COLLECTABLE ONLY AND THOUGH MECHANICALLY OPERABLE, IS NOT TO BE CONSIDERED  FIREABLE UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES. THE PURCHASER ASSUMES ALL LIABILITY FOR PURCHAS, CONTROL AND OWNERSHIP.  <U>PURCHASE OF THIS ITEM WILL CONSTITUTE A FULL UNDERSTANDING OF AND AGREEMENT WITH  THE ABOVE. </U>


 


<b>United States Senator from Nebraska</b>


(1830-97) Born at Glen Falls, Warren County, N.Y., he attended Glen Falls Academy, and Union College, in Schenectady, N.Y., taught school, studied law, moved to Omaha, Nebraska, in 1857, was admitted to the bar, and commenced a law practice in Omaha. Was a delegate to the first Territorial Convention in 1859. Served as Secretary of the Territory of Nebraska, 1861-67, performing the duties of Acting Governor part of the time. Served as U.S. Senator, 1875-81, and 1887-93. Was Chairman of the Committee on Agriculture, and Chairman of the Committee on the Improvement of the Mississippi River and Its Tributaries. 


<u>Signature</u>: 4 x 1/2, in ink, A.S. Paddock.   


<b>United States Senator from New Jersey</b>


(1800-1862) Born in Morris County, N.J., he studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1823, and commenced a law practice in Morristown, N.J. Served in the New Jersey State Assembly in 1832, and in the New Jersey State Council, 1838-40. Was U.S. Senator, 1841-53; serving as the Chairman on the Committee on the District of Columbia. 


<u>Signature With State</u>: 7 x 1 1/2, in ink, New Jersey, J.W. Miller. The signature only is in the hand of Senator Jacob W. Miller.  


<b>United States Congressman and Senator from Massachusetts</b>


(1816-1903) Born in Cummington, Mass., he graduated from Yale in 1839, became a teacher, and edited the Greenfield Gazette and the North Adams Transcript. He studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1842, and commenced practice in North Adams, Mass. Served as a member of the Massachusetts State House of Representatives, 1848-49, and 1852; and in the State Senate in 1850. He was a member of the State constitutional convention in 1853, and District Attorney for the western district of Massachusetts, 1853-57. He helped create a national weather service and was behind finishing the Washington Monument. A Republican, he served 18 years as a U.S. Congressman, 1857-75, and 17 years as a U.S. Senator, 1875-93. He served as chairman of the Committee on Elections, and chairman of the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds. His most famous accomplishment was as author of the "Dawes Act" which conferred citizenship on American Indians. He served as the chairman of the commission that was created to administer the tribal affairs of the Five Civilized Tribes of Indians in the Indian Territory, 1893-1903.


<u>Signature</u>: 3 1/2 x 5/8, in ink, H.L. Dawes.

1817 dated Ė Harpers Ferry Arsenal - U. $1295.00

 

Autograph, Algernon S. Paddock $10.00

 

Autograph, Jacob W. Miller $10.00

 

Autograph, Henry L. Dawes $15.00




<b>Colonel of the 19th Ohio Infantry during the Civil War


Wounded at Lovejoy Station, Ga. during the Atlanta campaign


United States Senator from Nebraska</b>


(1837-1911) Born in Philadelphia, Pa., he moved to Canton, Ohio, in 1856, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1859, and commenced practice in Canton. Manderson was elected captain of the 19th Ohio Infantry, on May 30, 1861. He was promoted to major, April 7, 1862; lieutenant colonel, February 28, 1863; colonel, April 14, 1863; he was wounded in action during the Atlanta campaign on September 2, 1864, at Lovejoy Station, Georgia; and was promoted to brevet brigadier general, March 13, 1865, for gallantry, and faithful and meritorious service during the Civil War. After the war he continued with his law practice in Canton, and then moved to Omaha, Nebraska in 1869, where he continued to practice law in that city. Served as a member of the State Constitutional Conventions in 1871 and 1875. Elected to the U.S. Senate in 1883 serving until 1895. He was President pro tempore of the Senate during the 51st, 52nd and 53rd Congresses. Was Chairman of the Committee on Printing. Appointed general solicitor of the Burlington system of railroads west of the Missouri River. Served as Vice President of the American Bar Association in 1899, and President in 1900.


<u>Signature</u>: 5 1/4 x 5/8, in ink, Chas. F. Manderson. Light staining spot at right. Cut slightly irregular at the top edge which does not affect any of the handwriting.       This exceptionally well wrought black iron <I>sticking tommy</I> candle holder measure approximately 11 Ĺ inches in length and remains in excellent original condition while offering good evidence of age and originality.  Popular among collectors of antique mining memorabilia, with a frequent emphasis on gold and silver mining in the American West these easy to carry and convenient to use lighting implements saw wide application in 18th through mid 19th century.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!  Constructed from soldered, lap seam, sheet iron, this period tinder box fire starter is of classic period design measuring approximately 4 1/2 inches in diameter and stands about 1 13/16 from rim to rim with an applied candlestick holder and finger loop.  Solid with good evidence of age and period use this <I>box</I> contains its period carbon residue under the original sheet iron <I>damper</I> with finger loop, period beeswax fragment, two flints (one of which is clearly is a discharged musket flint), and a period maker marked <I>striker</I> or steel.  All is set off by the retention of a period candle stub.  A <I>must have</I> 18th early 19th century utility, the tinder box fire starter required some skill, experience and effort to create a usable fire in a time when the open flame was essential to the giving of light, heat from the cold and fire for cooking.  Quickly falling out of favor upon the advent of the common match, the tinder box all but disappeared with few examples to survive into todayís antique market.  Those few original tinder boxes existing today seldom contain, as does this offering, the period content essential to creating fire.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 A product of the early post-Civil War years these walnut mounted bronze busts of General Ulysses S. Grant graced many a Union veteranís home and local G. A. R. post wall.  Mounted on a stout 11 ĺ X 9 inch walnut shield, these early post Civil War heavy cast bronze figures of the popular hero were, unlike lesser quality and much more abundant later examples, extremely well done with fine detail. This one is set off particularly well by an eye appealing natural age patina.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Autograph, General Charles F. Manderson $20.00

 

19th century hand wrought ĎSticking Tom $95.00

 

1700s early 1800s Tinder Box with conten $295.00

 

early post-Civil War Gen. U. S. Grant BR $75.00

Another piece carved out of our own accumulation of Civil War vintage <I>stuff</I>, this neat old hand crafted mess plate measures a full 10 inches in diameter and remains in  pleasing condition yet with good evidence of age and originality.   Hand formed of sheet-iron then geometrically hand decorated using hand punches or dies* the plate is finished with rolled over and flattened rim.  A classic process of the period <I>tin-smith</I> as he plied his trade without benefit of more efficient sheet metalwork equipment found in commercial shops. (* The punches used were handmade resembling stencil cutting or wood working chisels but rather than a cutting tool, were dulled at the edge so as to create a shaped indentation in sheet iron.) A lot to say about a mess plate I suppose but we sell what we like and as an old Maine Mill, Master Journeyman I do get caught up in the intricacies of the old trades.   

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 With lots of character and good evidence of age, an unbound, turned up brim and that classic <I>beehive</I> crown that Confederate collectors especially appreciate, this classic old <I>butternut</I> colored wool felt slouch hat will be best described by our illustrations.  With lots of attractive, honest age, save a missing sweat band, an all too common malady as perspiration from period use took its toll on stitching, this beauty remains in exceptional and will set well in any quality Civil War collection.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 H 42in. x D 16in.  


<b>A Pictorial Review Of The Individuals In The Confederate Armed Forces</b>


By William A. Albaugh, III. Broadfoot Publishing Company, Wilmington, North Carolina, 1993. 229 pages. 8 1/2 x 11 1/4, hardcover with illustrated dust jacket. Light wear to the dust jacket. Brand new condition. Very valuable reference work on Confederate images. A must have for all Confederate photograph collectors and Civil War libraries!

unusual decorated Civil War era sheet-ir $75.00

 

desirable! 19th century ĎBee Hiveí Ė SLO

 

H 42in. x D 16in. $0.00

 

Confederate Faces $50.00

A rare find for the late 1700s early 1800s pewter or Americana collector is this scarce small <I>sugar</I> spoon mold.  A classic period bronze mold used in the casting of small (4 13/16 long) pewter spoons with 15/16 inch wide by 1 5/8 inch long bowl, this rarely encountered sugar spoon mold measures 5 9/16 in total length.  Emanating from an old collection dating from the days when such treasures could be found, this all mold offers a deep natural patina with complete period originality to include an unusual <I>half funnel</I> design as opposed to the usual full funnel as provided by a half funnel at the mouth of each of the two pieces.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 After decades of storage this all original and clearly period 17 inch square cotton bandana remains in fine condition throughout with bright unfaded figured colors.  A classic, seldom surviving example of a simple everyday utility, this rarely seen period textile offers good evidence of creation on a narrow earlier to mid-1800s loom as it is stitch bound on three sides with a loom finished edge on the fourth.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


<CENTER><FONT COLOR=#800000>If you have an interest in neat Civil War period things with a personal history you may enjoy our museum site at:</FONT COLOR=#800000></CENTER>

<CENTER><B><I>MaineLegacy.com</I></B></CENTER>


 A remnant of one of our many <I>Civil War Show</I> trips South in years past is this neat little pairing of a period wallet ink inscribed <I><B> Capt. R. Collier 7th Kentucky Cavy.</I></B> and a period Joseph Rogers Ink scraper inscribed <B><I>R. Collier</I></B> with a scrimshaw style entwined <I>R.C.</I> monogram.   Robert Collier was a forty-one year old  resident of Buckeye, Garrard County, Kentucky when on August 4, 1862 he enlisted and was commissioned  on August 16, 1862 as  Captain of Co. H 7th Kentucky Cavalry.  Capt. Collier was promoted to Major on May 29,1863 and transferred from command of Co. H Field & Staff of the Regiment.  He remained with the 7th Kentucky Cavalry until February 21, 1865.   Collierís wallet is interesting beyond the inscription in that its usual long form was cut in half with the raw end stitched so as to shorten its length to one half.  Clearly a period alteration the short wallet would fit nicely in the inner breast pocket of a cavalry jacket.  The leather wallet remains soft and pliable with solid stitching.  The bone handled ink scraper or <I>eraser</I> is maker marked <I>JOSEPH ROGERS & SONS Ė S. NORFOLK St., SHEFFIELD</I>.   (Rogers opened his shop at this location in 1825.)   With good evidence of period use and honing of its blade the bone grip shows evidence of consistent use over a clearly period scratch engraved script inscription in the same hand as the wallet identification.  Set aside for years in our accumulation of <I>neat stuff</I> mostly due to our fascination with the interesting period alteration of the wallet, it is time to move it along to an appreciative new home.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>



 A nice item for the Civil War sewing table or sewing basket, this pair of adjustable buttonhole scissors remain in excellent original condition while offering good evidence of age and originality.  Of particular interest to Civil War enthusiast are the <B>PAT.  DEC.  1864</B> markings.  <B>Don't forget to give our search feature a try</B> for special wants. A simple <B>key word</B> in lower case works best. Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques !!

rare! late 18th century early 19th centu $225.00

 

rarely seen original Civil War vintage Ė $225.00

 

7th Kentucky Cavalry Ė WALLET & INK SCRA

 

original! Pat. 1864 marked BUTTONHOLE S

A desirable 19th century pharmacistís <I>tool of the trade</I>, this brass bound walnut pill machine is best known by collectors as a <I>pill roller</I> and will fit nicely in any collection of Civil War medical items.   (see: <I>Pictorial Encyclopedia of Civil War Medical Instruments & Equipment</I> by Damman ) In the period the making of pills entailed the creation of a dough like material containing the necessary <I>medication</I>, rolling out that dough to form an appropriately sized quarter inch thick sheet. The pharmacist placed the dough sheet on the machine base and pressed the top or <I>paddle</I>over the sheet drawing the paddle back and forth cutting and forming the material into cylindrical strips which were cut to appropriate length to afford the proper dosage and rolled into pills.  The base of this this all original and period pill machine measures approximately 13 7/8 X 7 ĺ  inches with a 16 inch paddle.  All complete and functional this device offers good evidence of age and period use yet remains in excellent condition with a pleasing untouched age patina. We have left the brass <I>as found</I>, uncleaned and unpolished just as it came out of decades of storage. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! :</FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 This nice out of the attic toothbrush of Civil War vintage material, style and construction remains in excellent condition after decades of storage. A full complement of natural hog bristles remain as secured as the day they were set in the 6 Ĺ inch long bone grip.  Unlike fancier <I>specialty</I> items, such common remnants of everyday life were generally used up and ultimately cast aside in the period, seldom to be preserved.  Accordingly such simple things rarely survived  to be made available for appreciation by the modern collector. A neat every day item necessary to complete any fully equipped personal grouping.  (see: Philipís  Excavated Artifacts from Battlefields & Campsites of the Civil War & Dammanís Pictorial Encyclopedia of Civil War Medical Instruments & Equipment )  

.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

 Untouched and as found after decades of attic storage, our photos will offer the best description of this offering except to advise that this set of blacksmith wrought ice creepers is completely original even to  retaining their <U>period leather fasteners.</U>  Classic period repurposing seems evident here as the tops of <I>used up</I> boots saw additional usefulness on these creepers.   <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  This nice original inscribed Civil War photograph in CDV format is back marked <I>E. & H. T. Anthony from Photographic Negative of Bradyís National Portrait Gallery</I>.  The photograph is of <B> Mjr. Gen. Erasmus D. Keyes </B>.  Keyes graduated from West Point in 1832 and served for a time in the pre Civil War years as aide-de-camp to Gen. Winfield Scott.  He commanded a number of expeditions against Indians in the northwest where he took part in a number of engagements. <U>A brigade commander at <B>1st Bull Runn</B>, Keyes was in command of the 4th Army corps, at Lee's Mills and in the <B>Siege of Yorktown</B>.</U>  He was brevetted to Brig. General for his conduct in the battle of Fair Oaks.   Resigning from the army in 1864 Keyes settled in San Francisco and became involved in gold mining.  

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

antique pharmaceutical PILL ROLLER $225.00

 

Civil War era BONE TOOTHBRUSH $65.00

 

1700s early through mid 1800s HANDWROUGH $135.00

 

Inscribed ! - Civil War CDV photograph Ė $125.00

Acquired directly from the Vermont estate and offered at auction some years ago with a number of inscribed books from his personal library (2 included here as additional provenance) this historic Civil War folk art bone ring of <U>Congressional Medal of Honor</U> winner <B>Major Charles G. Gould</B> remains in pleasing original condition with eye appealing natural age patina, good evidence of period wearing and, most importantly, convincing provenance.  Initially acquired by us to be retained in our personal collection of Civil War vintage folk art carved bone, (see: www.MaineLegacy.com) we have decided to offer the piece to another  appreciative home as our own Civil War collection is focused on Maine related artifacts.  With a myriad of resource material in print and on the internet (see: <I> Roster of Vermont Volunteers During the War of the Rebellion 1861-66 - Deeds of Valor /  How our Soldier-heroes won the Medal of Honor - The Medical and Surgical History of the Civil War </I>)  suffice it to say here that Charles Gould, a resident of Windham, Vermont, was a mere three months into his seventeenth year on August 13,1862 when he enlisted as a Private of Co. G <B>5th Vermont Volunteer Infantry</B>.  Promoted to Corporal, December 27, 1863, Gould was commissioned as Lieutenant of Co. F of the 5th Vermont Infantry before transferring on December 22,1864 to be commissioned into  Co. E  <B>11th Vermont Vol. Infantry</B>.   Wounded April 2,1865 at Petersburg, Virginia, Gould was awarded the Medal of Honor for Gallantry in assault and capture of Petersburg on that date.  Per his Medal of Honor citation Gould was <I><B>Among the first to mount the enemy's works in the assault, he received a serious bayonet wound in the face, was struck several times with clubbed muskets, but bravely stood his ground, and with his sword killed the man who bayoneted him. </I></B>  Promoted Major by Brevet  for his gallantry at Petersburg, Virginia, Gould mustered out on June 19, 1865.  After the Civil War he lived and worked in Washington D. C. returning to the family home in Vermont in retirement.  He died at age seventy-one and is buried in the Windham Central Cemetery, Windham, Vermont.  

     While the circumstances of the carving of the bone ring and exactly when he started wearing it have been lost in time, considerable period wear, (significantly heavier on the right side indicating that it was likely worn on the left little finger), and the usual history of these period popular pieces among the lower enlisted ranks, would indicate the ring was likely acquired early in Gouldís service and worn throughout the War.   As such, this wonderful personal artifact of the hard fought New England Congressional Medal of Honor recipient would have been worn through action at the Battle of Crampton's Gap, <U>Antietam</U> and <U> Fredericksburg</U>, Salem Church, <B>Gettysburg</B>, <U>Battle of the Wilderness</U>, Spotsylvania Court House, <U>Cold Harbor</U>, Cedar Creek and finally Petersburg on April 2, 1865 where despite being  cut on the head by a sword and bayoneted in both the spine and mouth Gould managed to kill the man who had bayonetted him in the face he was credited with being the first man of the Sixth Corps over the Confederate works.  (see: Don Troianiís limited edition print of Gould in action <I>Medal Of Honor Petersburg, April 2, 1865</I>.

     Provenance will include our own letter attesting to our knowledge of the estate auction, a copy of the advertisement published by the auctioneer holding the Gould estate sale and a signed statement of provenance by the auction worker / collector who acquired the Gould ring from the estate.  Additionally the ring will come with Gouldís signed volume of the  <I>Gettysburg National Military Park Commission - Annual Reports to the Secretary of War, 1893-1901</I>.  While included here simply as  remnant of the estate sale, this signed by Gould, hardbound government edition is a nice Gettysburg item in and of itself .   Also included as a memento from Charles Gouldís Vermont estate will be a copy of Kennonís <I>MANUAL OF GUARD DUTY</I> published by the War Department and inscribed to him in 1891.

<B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>



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 Offered here <U>priced individually</U>  are original die cut and paper backed, 1 ľ  inch,  wool, sew-on 6th corps badges 1st, 2nd, & 3rd division your choice while they are still available (1st Div.-14th Corps  sold).  [We only have the two 14th Corps devices but have similar examples available in 5th and 6th Corps  <U>search:</U> Stokes] Acquired several years ago now when we were fortunate enough to purchase a number of items brought home as keepsakes by a late <B>W. Stokes Kirk</B> clerk when the Philadelphia based military surplus dealer closed up shop in 1976. Founded in 1874, W. Stokes Kirk like Bannerman in New York purchased large quantities of still available Civil War surplus at government auction. Seems like an impossibility now but we can remember the two offering original Civil War material as late as the 1950s. This piece offers a now rare opportunity to acquire such an item from what for years now has become an ever dwindling and now a nearly nonexistent supply. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Offered here <U>priced individually</U>  are original die cut and paper backed, 1 ľ  inch,  wool, sew-on 6th corps badges 1st, 2nd, & 3rd division your choice while they are still available (1st Div.-6th Corps  sold).  [We only have the two 6th Corps devices but have similar examples available in 5th and 14th Corps  <U>search:</U> Stokes] Acquired several years ago now when we were fortunate enough to purchase a number of items brought home as keepsakes by a late <B>W. Stokes Kirk</B> clerk when the Philadelphia based military surplus dealer closed up shop in 1976. Founded in 1874, W. Stokes Kirk like Bannerman in New York purchased large quantities of still available Civil War surplus at government auction. Seems like an impossibility now but we can remember the two offering original Civil War material as late as the 1950s. This piece offers a now rare opportunity to acquire such an item from what for years now has become an ever dwindling and now a nearly nonexistent supply. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


 Offered here <U>priced individually</U>  are original die cut and paper backed, 1 1/4 inch, wool, sew-on 5th corps badges 1st , 2nd, & 3rd division your choice while they are still available  (1st Div.-5th Corps  sold).  [ We only have the two 5th Corps devices left but have similar examples available in 6th and 14th Corps  <U>search:</U> Stokes ] Acquired several years ago now when we were fortunate enough to purchase a number of items brought home as keepsakes by a late <B>W. Stokes Kirk</B> clerk when the Philadelphia based military surplus dealer closed up shop in 1976. Founded in 1874, W. Stokes Kirk like Bannerman in New York purchased large quantities of still available Civil War surplus at government auction. Seems like an impossibility now but we can remember the two offering original Civil War material as late as the 1950s. This piece offers a now rare opportunity to acquire such an item from what for years now has become an ever dwindling and now a nearly nonexistent supply. <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

Civil War personalized bone ring of MEDA $895.00

 

Civil War surplus - W. Stokes Kirk Phila $85.00

 

Civil War surplus - W. Stokes Kirk Phila $95.00

 

Civil War surplus - W. Stokes Kirk Phila $95.00

H 10in. x D 24in.  


8 pages, 5 x 8, in ink, written by Lieutenant Benjamin Wright, to his wife Abbie. Excellent 1863 Charleston, South Carolina campaign content. 


<b><u>Camp 10th C.[onnecticut] V.[olunteers], Seabrook Island, S.C., June 15th, 1863</b></u>


My Dear Abbie,


Here it is the middle of June. One summer month will quickly be gone. Well, I can say "fly quickly round ye wheels of time and bring the welcome day" that is when our time shall have been served or when our country no longer needs our services. This morning I intended to have written several letters today, but I have done nothing at it. I canít plan want of time necessarily for I have done but little of importance all day, been fooling around. Tomorrow I shall probably have to go on fatigue. I came off guard yesterday morning. We come on duty about every three days.

 

16th: Quite unexpectedly I did not have to go on fatigue today. Would probably have had to have gone but instead of sending two officers on fatigue there was only one sent. I hardly think I shall go tomorrow unless the officers are all sick. I think about half of them are on the sick list now. We are having pretty large sick lists at present. Nothing very serious however. Mostly chills and fevers, but that pulls the men right down. This hot weather makes the duties also come heavier on the men that are for duty. I am afraid our list will be growing longer all summer if we stay in this department. I have great cause to be thankful. Somehow or other this southern climate seems to agree with me pretty well. I donít think I have had the Dr. prescribe for me in a year. Hardly another man in the Regt. I think can say that. I feel very thankful that I have been preserved. I pray that my health may be continued, but health is very uncertain in this climate. Lieut. Tomlinson was quite sick for several days but he has recovered. Sergt. Peck is quite sick. He occupies my tent. We were reviewed last week by Gen. Stevenson for the benefit and entertainment of the gun boat officers as we suppose. A number of them road with the Gen. After the review we were drilled in Brigade drill so as to show the gun boat officers what we can do, show them some of the evolutions of the Brigade. We would like now for them to show us something, some of their evolutions in taking some battery. I think we are entitled to some entertainment. If they had wanted to have seen some double quick we should probably had to have done it. We received a small mail this afternoon, not very late date however. I received none at all. I think it came on the boat that brought Gen. Gillmore. This afternoon heavy firing is going on in the direction of Folly Island. They say there has been more or less of it going on for two or three days between our batteries on Folly Island and the Rebs on Morris Island, and that some of our gun boats had taken part in the affair. There is some pretty heavy and fast firing. Gen. Hunter left the department on Sunday for the North. His staff clerks, etc. only numbered sixty three. It is a wonder that he never did anything. It could not have cost anything to run his machine, but he has gone. May peace go with him. May he never have command of another department. Gen. Gillmore that has taken [his] place was in command at Tybee Island when Fort Pulaski was taken. I think he belonged somewhere in this part of the country before the war broke out. One thing he comes here in a department with but few troops, so few that he will not be able to do much at present. He may worry the Rebs some, however I think probably he will be here in a few days to look after us. We hear that he has gone up to Stono. I think Admiral Foote will trouble them some after he gets here. I donít think quite as many will run the blockade as have heretofore. It was high time a change was made. I donít believe these gun boat officers will have quite as easy times laying off as they have had. Foote will bring them right up to the scratch. If he had command of the monitors when the attack was made on Charleston they would never backed out as they did. He would have taken Charleston or lost every one of them. He has faith in them. Nathan received a letter from Jared Finch today. Jared talks right up to him like a father. He is faithful to his old friend, tells him what the Lord has done for him. He urges Nathan to come out on the Lordís side also. I am in hopes Nathan will. I believe Nathan was converted a year ago last winter, but he never had confidence to take up his cross. All he needs I think is confidence. He is a very good boy, very conscientious. His brother William has written him a very plain letter. I hope we may yet see of the Lordís doings in our midst, but the army is a poor place for a man to make a stand to serve the Lord surrounded by companions of all sorts, no place where a man can go in secret. It requires a good deal of determination to make a stand. Tonight is our regular night for prayer meeting. I anticipate a good time. Our chaplain preaches Sabbath afternoon. There was a large turn out. He also attended the Sabbath school. He was not out to the meeting in the evening. I have just succeeded today in getting Dr. Newton to make out the certificate for Mr. Edward Meade that I called for a week ago. I am about disgusted with the way things are done in our Regt. I am greatly disappointed about some things, had hoped they would be different. The field and staff must have a mess tent. If they have to take the hospital tent there must be a barn built for their horses while the old hospital tent is like a pig pen not fit for a hog to stay in. Of course horses are of more account than men. I donít complain on my own account as I can get along here. So few have trouble in the hospital, but I want to see the men treated like men. I have a feeling for them. If I was capable I would write a letter to some of the Conn. papers that would raise a breeze. I would not be surprised if there was some letters come out soon. It ought to be done. It might have a good effect. It could not hurt to say the least.


17th: I am on guard again today this morning about 5 oíclock. The Sergt. Major came around with an order for a review by Gen. Gillmore at 9 oíclock, Regt. to form at 8. We got all ready, the Co. fell in waiting for the band to strike up for us to march out, to our gratification the recall was sounded for some reason the Gen. had decided not to [have] any review. It was sensible in him for the morning has been very hot. There begins to be a little breeze starting up now. Some how or other I seem to have the luck of getting on duty these hottest days. Tomorrow morning I shall have to come off and go up on picket and then be on duty part of tomorrow night. We shall be on the out post. I think we shall be very short of non-commissioned officers which is going to make it come hard on us. I think also we shall be short of men. Our Regt. has to do just the same amount of picket duty with the men we have got as the 24th Mass. with nearly as many men. We have to finish just as many men for the trenches and if any men are needed for fatigue such as on loading Qtr. Master goods or anything of the kind. The 10th [Conn.] is called on for them and our Col. submits to it. The thing of it is Gen. Stevenson was Col. of the 24th [Mass.] and they have just what they want. Any men on his staff came from the 24th [Mass.]. I think him about competent to command the 24th [Mass.]. The chaplain attended the prayer meeting last night. We had a good meeting but not as many present as we have had sometimes heretofore. I think some of Co. I men are feeling quite deeply. I wish there could be a meeting held in the Co. I think it would do good, but as it is, there is no place, the tents being those little A tents. Paul Ferris promised me last night that he would give up playing cards. I think there is hope of Paul yet. He was very intimate with William Husted and Silas Finch, and it makes him think some on his ways there being converted. I think there is others that are halting between two opinions going through the Co. In the evenings you will see a number reading their testaments. It looks good. I hope we shall see something come of it yet.


Very fine condition, with some light staining, excellent content, very newsy, 8 page, 1863 South Carolina letter. The <u>letter is unsigned</u>, however, I guarantee that it was written by Lieutenant Benjamin Wright in his very distinctive handwriting style. It came out of a large group of his war date personal correspondence that I bought many years ago. I will supply you with Xerox copies of a group of other interesting items related to Benjamin Wright some of which have been signed by him with his full name and regiment to corroborate the ID.


Lieutenant Benjamin Wright, was a resident of Greenwich, Conn., when he enlisted on September 13, 1861, as a sergeant, and was mustered into Co. I, 10th Connecticut Infantry. He was promoted to 2nd lieutenant, January 8, 1863; 1st lieutenant, June 6, 1864; and mustered out of the service on October 17, 1864.


<u>PRINCIPAL ENGAGEMENTS OF THE 10TH CONNECTICUT INFANTRY</u>:


Roanoke Island, N. C., Feb. 8, 1862.

Newbern, N. C., Mar. 14, 1862.

Kinston, N. C., Dec. 14, 1862.

Whitehall, N. C., Dec. 16, 1862.

Goldsboro, N. C., Dec. 18, 1862.

Seabrook Island, S. C., Mar. 28, 1863.

Siege of Charleston, S. C., from July 28 to Oct. 25, 1863.

St. Augustine, Fla., Dec. 30, 1863.

Walthall Junction, Va., May 7, 1864.

Drewry's Bluff, Va., May 13 to 17, 1864.

Bermuda Hundred, Va., June 16, 1864.

Deep Bottom, Va., June 20, 1864.

Strawberry Plains, Va., July 26 and 27, 1864.

Deep Bottom, Va., Aug. 1, 1864.

Deep Bottom, Va., Aug. 14, 1864.

Deep Run, Va., Aug. 16, 1864.

Deep Gully and Fuzzells Mills, Va., Aug. 28, 1864.

Siege of Petersburg, Va., Aug. 28 to Sep. 29, 1864.

Fort Harrison, Va., Sep. 27, 1864.

Laurel Hill Church, Va., 0ct. 1, 1864.

Newmarket Road, Va., Oct. 7, 1864.

Darbytown Road, Va., Oct. 13, 1864.

Darbytown Road, Va., Oct. 27, 1864.

Johnson's Plantation, Va., Oct. 29, 1864.

Hatcher's Run, Va., Mar. 29 and 30, and April 1, 1865.

Fort Gregg, Va., April 2, 1865.

Appomattox Court House, Va., April 9, 1865.


Source: Connecticut: Record of Service of Men During War of Rebellion            

 Too small for anything but single serving <I>camp</I> use, these little 3 Ĺ high by 3 ľ inch mouth diameter, pottery bean pots must have lost favor for all else as period examples have disappeared from the scene even here in Maine where the little native red-ware pot was a natural to the baked kidney bean eating <I>Yankee</I>.  Easy to carry and high in protein, dried beans were plumped by soaking in water prior to being place in the pot with, if one were so fortunate, a healthy portion of molasses, touch of brown sugar, pinch of dried mustard then topped with a cube of salt pork.  Buried to the rim in the coals of a campfire with a flat stone to cover the mouth and hold in heat, the little pot would soon offer a tasty, trail hardy meal.  Emanating from a Maine farm attic, this little gem remains in excellent, unused condition and offers good period characteristics to include the telltale raw outer surface with interior glaze.   Consistent with the field practice of using a stone, there is no inner lip for a cover as was common to larger <I>home</I>bean pots.  Surviving in as new and unused condition with no chips, cracks, or other issues this little period Maine baked bean pot will be a nice find for the Civil War era personal item enthusiast!  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>


<CENTER><FONT COLOR=#800000>If you have an interest in neat Civil War period things or Maine in the time, you may enjoy our museum site at:</FONT COLOR=#800000></CENTER>

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 Measuring approximately 19 inches  around the curve from tip to mouth this beautiful old steer horn vase offers an unusually appealing grain figure set off by an attractive natural age color that comes to <I>old breed</I> white steer horn with the passing of decades.  Still retaining the original protective brass finial at the tip, the mouth is fitted with applied, scalloped sheet brass with a brass eye such that the vase may be hung in use or simply utilized as a shelf or table setting centerpiece with a floral or greenery spray.  A popular 1800s ranch or country home decoration frequently serving as a remembrance of a favorite steer.  Solid and in pleasing condition with no cracks or holes, this all original country steer horn vase offers exceptional color and grain.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

H 10in. x D 24in. $0.00

 

10th Connecticut Infantry Letter $100.00

 

scarce ! period Maine redware - single $75.00

 

19th century Steer Horn - VASE $95.00

Our photo illustrations will likely do best to describe this desirable Civil War vintage coat except to advise that while demonstrating qualities of age and originality with the most minimal of staining and mothing, the coat remains in excellent condition throughout and is guaranteed to please per our below stated no questions return policy.  The frock sports a full complement of its original cloth covered breast buttons with one piece gold wash <I>disk</I> buttons at the tails, is quilted at the chest and has pockets in the tails.  With no tears, repairs or alterations the coat will display nicely on an adult medium form.  As scarce as mid 1800s uniform coats are, they tended to be put away and preserved with much more frequency than their civilian counterparts as the later were used up and eventually cast away, most frequently to be cut up as scrap for small sewing projects, mending and even cut into narrow strips for rug making.  As a consequence the surviving original <I>Abe Lincoln</I> type gentlemanís frock coat so popularly seen in period photography is seldom encountered on todayís collector market.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>  Remaining in especially nice condition save a small bend or <I>ding</I> at the rim of the base (see photo), this pewter lamp would have been used from about 1837 when camphene was first introduced as lighting fuel until the early 1860s when use of camphene fell away in favor of kerosene. Sporting the telltale elongated, tapered brass burner tubes especially designed to handle the volatile camphene fuel (made from distilled turpentine) this lamp stands approximately 3 3/8 inches from base to mouth, not counting the 1 1/4 inch burner tubes and is 4 5/16 inches in diameter at its base.  With no dents or scars save the afore mentioned bend at the rim, this is a nice second quarter of the 19th century camphene lamp.  <B>Buy with confidence! </B><I>  We are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with return as purchased on direct sales!</B> <I>Just send us a courtesy  e-mail to let us know your item will be returned per these provisions and your purchase price will be refunded accordingly.</I>  <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>



  This 6th Corps, Army of the Potomac device is approximately 1 5/8 inches  square and is constructed in the style referred to in the period as <I>extra rich</I> with heavy bullion surmounted over itsí crimson velvet center of the 1st Division.  The piece came to us years ago from the personal collection of Dr. Francis Lord  who authored the old standard <I>Lordís Civil War Collectorís Encyclopedia</I>. The badge has a classic cotton gauze backing and as you can see remains in fine condition.   As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B><U>no questions asked</U> three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B>  Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques!


 


<b>Medal of Honor Recipient</b>


(1830-1909) Graduated #4 in the West Point class of 1846. Was Colonel 3rd Maine Infantry, June 1861. He saw action at 1st Bull Run, Yorktown and Fair Oaks where he received two serious wounds resulting in the amputation of his right arm, and was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. He also fought at Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, where he was voted the Thanks of Congress, and in the Atlanta campaign. He founded Howard University for negroes in Washington and served as it's president from 1869-74. Continuing in the Regular Army after the Civil War, he was peace commissioner to the Apaches, participated in Indian fighting and served as superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.


Authentic, antique portrait engraving, in uniform with rank of major general, with printed facsimile autograph with rank beneath his likeness. Published by C.B. Richardson, J.J. & W. Wilson, Printers. 5 1/4 x 9 1/4.

Civil War vintage Gentlemanís FROCK COAT $595.00

 

second quarter of the 19th century Pewte $145.00

 

Civil War vintage 6th ARMY CORPS DEVICE $245.00

 

General Oliver O. Howard $15.00




History in 3-D. By Bob Zeller. Chronicle Books, San Francisco, 2000. Hard cover, 10 x 9 3/4, 120 pages, index, profusely illustrated. Brand new condition.


Incidents of The Rebellion. Civil War Photographs Seen As They Were Meant To Be Seen. In 3-D. View The Tangle Of The Wilderness; The Lost Cyclorama; The Rarest Gettysburg Photo; A Slave Church; The Civil War In Color; The CSS Florida; The Western Theater. Complete with Viewer. 


Superb, scholarly reference work that is a must have for all Civil War photograph collectors. Many of the images in this book were never published before which includes a rare portfolio of color Civil War images! Comes with an easy to use stereoscopic viewer, which unveils each image in glorious 3-D as it was originally taken and meant to be seen. Never has the Civil War been seen with such extraordinary clarity.   


Unused, 3 1/2 x 5 1/2, linen postcard, with full color illustration of the President Lincoln Statue At the Entrance To Grandview Park, Sioux City, Iowa. Descriptive text on the reverse. Very minor edge wear. Excellent color and subject matter. Circa 1930-1945. Very desirable President Abraham Lincoln philatelic related collectible.  


(1798-1879) Joined the U.S. Army in 1813. Was New York Secretary of State, 1833-39, and was elected to the Senate in 1845. In January 1861, President Buchanan appointed him Secretary of the Treasury, and on Jan. 29, 1861, he made his famous American flag dispatch to a treasury official in New Orleans, "If anyone attempts to haul down the American flag, shoot him on the spot," which became a clarion call to the North! Commissioned a Major General by Abraham Lincoln, on May 16, 1861, he was first on this list, thus outranking all other volunteer officers during the Civil War. He commanded the following military departments: Dept. of Pa.; Middle Dept.; Dept. of Va.; Dept. of the East. He made an important and distinguished contribution to the Union cause when he suppressed the 1863 New York City draft riots. Was elected Governor of New York in 1872. 


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Standing view in uniform with epaulettes and rank of major general, holding his sword. 1861 M.B. Brady imprint on the front mount. Backmark: E. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Light age toning and wear. Top corners of the mount are slightly rounded.  


Raleigh, Sept. 1st, 1862. Vignette of Ceres at left. There are a couple of small stain spots and light wrinkles to the note. Fine war date Confederate North Carolina currency.

The Civil War In Depth, Volume II $25.00

 

President Abraham Lincoln Statue, Sioux $2.50

 

CDV, General John A. Dix $75.00

 

1862 State of North Carolina 25 Cents No $15.00




<b>Imprint of Brady's National Photographic Portrait Galleries</b>


(1823-1874) Graduated 4th in the West Point class of 1846. He won two brevets and was severely wounded in the Mexican War. As chief engineer of the fortifications of Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, he was a leading participant in the bombardment of Fort Sumter which were the opening shots of the Civil War. He later took part in General Ambrose E. Burnside's North Carolina expedition, and commanded the Department of North Carolina, the Department of Ohio, the Department of the South, and the Department of Florida respectively.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 3 7/8 card. Mount is trimmed. Half view pose in uniform with rank of major general. He is wearing a kepi with a U.S. hat wreath insignia and two stars clearly visible at the center representing his rank of major general. Backmark: Brady's National Photographic Portrait Galleries, Broadway & Tenth Street, New York & No. 352 Pennsylvania Ave, Washington, D.C., with 2 cents orange George Washington U.S. Internal Revenue tax stamp on the reverse. Light age toning, discoloration and minor wear. Very fine Mathew B. Brady image.  


<b>Signed by a North Carolina private who was wounded and captured at the battle of Gettysburg!</b>


8 1/2 x 11, imprinted form, filled out in ink.


March 30th, 1901


To the United Daughters of the Confederacy:


The undersigned, residing at Washington, N.C., who is an Ex-Confederate Soldier, but not a member of any Camp, hereby makes application for a Confederate Cross of Honor. Applicant entered the service of the Confederate States on the 10th day of M[ar]ch. 1864, as a private in Company A of the 67th Regiment of North Carolina Volunteers, C.S.A., and was at that time a resident of Beaufort County, N.C. Your applicant was honorably discharged from said service by Col. Jno. N. Whitford, Col. 67th Regt. N.C. Vol. on the 10th day of May 1865, at which time he held the rank of private.


Respectfully,

T.J. Harding

Applicant


We endorse the above application,


W.C.[?]

Member Co. K, Regt. 10 Vols., C.S.A.


W.L. Dudley

Member Co. E, Regt. 55 Vols., C.S.A.


Light age toning and wear. There are two punch holes at the top of the document which do not affect any of the content. Any document signed by a Confederate soldier who was wounded and captured at the battle of Gettysburg is always popular and in demand.


William L. Dudley, who signed this document at the bottom, was a 30 year old farmer from Pitt County, North Carolina, when he enlisted as a private on April 22, 1862, and was mustered into Co. E, 55th North Carolina Infantry. He was wounded in action at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863, and captured on July 3, 1863. After being confined as a prisoner of war, he was exchanged at City Point, Va., on August 20, 1863. The date of his discharge is unknown.


The 55th North Carolina Infantry fought in the Army of Northern Virginia from Gettysburg to Cold Harbor, in the Petersburg trenches, and in the Appomattox campaign. They were in the brigades of Generals' Joseph R. Davis and John Rogers Cooke. From July 1-3, 1863, at Gettysburg, they suffered 41 men killed, 210 wounded, and 259 captured. During the Wilderness campaign the regiment lost 59% of the 640 men engaged, and when they surrendered at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865, there were only 4 officers and 77 men left of the gallant 55th N.C. Infantry.  


5 x 7 3/8, imprint.


War Department

Adjutant General's Office

Washington, June 6, 1861


General Orders,

No. 30


I--The State of Missouri is added to the Military Department of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and portions of Western Pennsylvania and Virginia. Major General McClellan will extend his command accordingly.


II--The Headquarters of the Department of the West are removed from St. Louis to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.


III--The three months' militia and the three years' volunteers will be paid at once to include the 31st of May, 1861. With this view, Commanding officers of these troops will cause duplicate muster rolls to be made out immediately, which they will forward to the Paymaster General in this city; and upon these rolls the officers of the Pay Department will pay in full, leaving any stoppage to be deducted at a future payment.


IV--The names of the following officers will be stricken from the Rolls of the Army:


Captain Charles H. Tyler, 2d Dragoons, for abandoning the command of, and deserting his Post, Fort Kearny.


1st Lieutenant Charles H. Rundell, 4th Infantry, for continued disobedience of orders, absence without leave, and failing to render his accounts as required by the Act of January 31, 1823.


1st Lieutenant Andrew Jackson, 3d Infantry, for absenting himself from his company without permission, and failing to make any report.


And 2nd Lieutenants Charles E. Patterson, 4th Infantry; Olin F. Rice, 6th Infantry, and Charles C. Campbell, 1st Cavalry, for tendering their resignations in the face of the enemy.


BY ORDER:

L. THOMAS

Adjutant General


There is a light vertical fold crease in the paper which does not really detract from the overall appearance of the document. Very fine 1861 U.S. War Department imprint.  


<b>Morse's Gallery of the Cumberland, Nashville, Tennessee imprint</b>


(1808-75) Congressman, Senator and Governor of Tennessee. He was nominated and elected vice president on the Union Republican ticket in 1864. Upon Abraham Lincoln's assassination in April 1865, he became our 17th president and resolved to follow Lincoln's plans for reconstruction without bitterness or malice. His reconstruction plan clashed drastically with that of the Radical Republicans in congress, and Johnson's term was one humiliation after another, culminating on Feb. 24, 1868 with a resolution of impeachment against him. This failed by one vote to pass, and he served out his term.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Bust view pose. Backmark: Morse's Gallery of the Cumberland, Nashville, Tenn. Light horizontal crease below the subject that is hardly noticeable. Scarce imprint for an Andrew Johnson image.

CDV, General John G. Foster $65.00

 

Application for Confederate Cross of Hon $75.00

 

War Department Orders Issued by Adjutant $10.00

 

CDV, President Andrew Johnson $95.00




<b>United States Congressman from Massachusetts</b>


(1758-1808) Born in Dedham, Mass., he graduated from Harvard College in 1774, studied law, was admitted to the bar,  and practiced in Dedham. He served in the Massachusetts State House of Representatives in 1788, and was a member of the Massachusetts convention that was called for the ratification of the Federal Constitution. Elected as a Pro-Administration candidate for the First through the Third U.S. Congresses and as a Federalist to the Fourth Congress, he served from 1789-1797. He was the chairman of the Committee on Elections. He served as a member of the Governor's Council, 1798-1800. Chosen as the president of Harvard University in 1804, he was forced to decline the prestigious position because of failing health. Ames was an important leader in the U.S. House of Representatives, and was highly noted for his oratorical skills, and was a very influential figure of his era.


Original mid 1800's period engraving, 4 x 6 3/4, tipped to a 6 x 9 1/4 album page with black border around his portrait. Imprint of Stuart Pinx. Light age toning. Very fine. Desirable early U.S. Congressional leader.  


8 1/4 x 11 1/4, manuscript in ink, with the original 1863 imprinted transmittal cover.


Invoice of Subsistence Stores turned over at Boston, on board bark "P.R. Hazeltine" to Capt. W.W. McKim, A.Q.M., U.S.A., by Capt. E.D. Brigham, C.S., U.S.A., for transportation and delivery to Capt. A.J. McCoy, C.S. Vols.,, Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, Louisiana. Itemized account of the stores shipped via boat include prime mess pork, mess beef, flour, hard bread, beans, rice, hominy, coffee, tea, vinegar, candles, soap, salt, pepper, potatoes, onions and whiskey. Office of Commissary of Subsistence, U.S.A., Boston, December 16th, 1863, E.D. Brigham, Capt. & C.S. Light age toning and wear. Very fine.


Also comes with the original 9 1/2 x 4 1/8, imprinted envelope from the Treasury Department, with ink notations on it as follows: No. 44. Invoice and Receipt. Barque "P.R. Hazeltine." From Boston, Mass., to New Orleans, La. Cargo- C. Stores. Dec. 17, 1863. Very fine. 


The officer who signed this invoice, Captain Elijah D. Brigham, was from Massachusetts. He was commissioned captain C.S. Vols., Sept. 30, 1861; 2nd lieutenant, 10th U.S. Infantry, Nov. 28, 1862; 1st lieutenant, Nov. 4, 1863; captain, C.S. Vols., Feb. 9, 1863; brevet major and lieutenant colonel, March 13, 1865.  


<b>From Seven Days to Second Bull Run</b>




By The Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1984. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with full color illustration of Confederate General Robert E. Lee on horseback surrounded by some of his top generals including Jackson, Longstreet and A.P. Hill. Also has a U.S. and C.S. belt plate, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title of the book printed in blue. The title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 176 pages, index, maps, profusely illustrated. Brand new condition.


The Cover: Astride his gray mount Traveller, General Robert E. Lee pauses beneath an oak tree with his senior officers to reconnoiter an enemy position. The aggressive strategy Lee embraced after taking command of the Army of Northern Virginia reversed for a time the tide of war in the East.  


<b>The "Little Giant" opposed Abraham Lincoln in the 1860 presidential election


1861 Chicago imprint on the front mount</b>


(1813-1861) An outstanding legislator, and orator, he was one of the founders of the Democratic Party in Illinois. Served as U.S. Senator, 1843-61. He is best known for his debates in 1858 against Abraham Lincoln. He was narrowly defeated for the Democratic nomination for president by Franklin Buchanan in 1856. He did gain the Democratic nomination in 1860, but was defeated for the presidency by his old friend and rival Abraham Lincoln. Upon secession, and the outbreak of the Civil War, he supported Lincoln and his policies. He died of typhoid fever in 1861.


Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 x 4 card. Imprint on the front of the card mount, Douglas' Grave, Born April 23, 1813. Died June 3, 1861. From Carbutt's Gallery, 131 Lake Street, Chicago. Written in pencil on the reverse of the card is "Grave of Senator Stephen A. Douglas taken shortly after his death in 1861." Light age toning and wear. Slightly rounded corners.  Very fine.

Fisher Ames $10.00

 

1863 Invoice of Subsistence Stores Shipp $25.00

 

Lee Takes Command $20.00

 

The Gravesite of Senator Stephen A. Doug $75.00




Authentic, original woodcut engraving that has been hand tinted in color and published in Harper's Weekly. General Grant is the central figure of this battle scene as he rallies his troops with his sword upraised over his head. Several other Union soldiers are prominent in the scene. This is a double page centerfold that measures 14 1/4 x 22 1/4. Caption: Major-General Ulysses S. Grant Before Vicksburg. Circa 1863. Light age toning and fold  wear. Very desirable subject matter.  


1861 Civil War patriotic imprint with full color vignette of Columbia holding a sword and an American flag, etc. Motto at left edge, "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" and above, "Conquer we must, for our cause it is just. Let this be our motto. In God is our trust." "Copyright 1861" imprinted below the illustration. Light staining at the corners. 


***See our Patriotic Imprints section to read more information about this item.  


By Jerry Korn and the Editors of Time Life Books. Published by Time Life Books, Alexandria, Va., 1985. Hardcover with embossed gray leatherette cover with full color illustration of Union gunboats on the Mississippi River. Also has a U.S. and C.S. belt plate, stars, crossed cannons, swords and cannon balls with the title of the book printed in blue. The title is also printed in blue on the spine. Large 9 x 11 size, 175 pages, index, maps, profusely illustrated. Brand new condition.


The Cover: A Federal flotilla under Rear Admiral David Porter braves a storm of fire from Confederate batteries along the shore and atop the high bluffs at Vicksburg on the night of April 16, 1863. The transports and barges, lashed to the sides of Porter's gunboats for protection, carry troops and supplies downriver for Major General Ulysses S. Grant's campaign to assault Vicksburg from the south.   A bit late for our usual fare but representative of our affinity for surviving utilitarian items of gone bye everyday life, this neat old workerís dinner bucket remains untouched, as found and apparently unused.  Not a big deal unless you appreciate such things, this old time dinner pail is complete and original even to its tin cup on the lid.  It stands just under 10 inches base to the top of its cup and is about 7 inches  in diameter.   Retaining an original bright shiny tinned finish on internal surfaces, the outer portions offer that desirable natural age patina that comes to tin with decades of natural exposure.  Now an attractive Americana collectable these sturdy dinner pails were used by , miners, factory workers, dock hands, and other laborers from the mid-19th century to hold hard-boiled eggs, vegetables, meat, pie, and other hardy fare until 1904 when the advent of the <I>thermos</I> vacuumed bottle brought about a change in design of the common <I>lunch-box</I> still popular today. A nice old piece of Americana on the fringe of our usual time period but scarce in this condition and worthy of appreciation.  .  As with <U>all direct sales</U>, we are pleased to offer a <B>no questions asked three day inspection with refund of the purchase price upon return as purchased!</B> <FONT COLOR=#0000FF>Thanks for visiting Gunsight Antiques! </FONT COLOR=#0000FF>

General Ulysses S. Grant on Horseback $100.00

 

Conquer We Must For Our Cause it is Just $6.00

 

War on the Mississippi, Grant's Vicksbur $20.00

 

classic tin Ė DINNER PAIL $95.00




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